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tv   BBC News at Nine  BBC News  September 26, 2019 9:00am-10:01am BST

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you're watching bbc news at nine with me, annita mcveigh. the headlines: borisjohnson is accused of using dangerous language following extraordinary scenes in the house of commons last night — the husband of the murdered mp, jo cox speaks out. this stuff is not only wrong, because actually, on both sides of the debate, people are just trying to do what they think is right for the country, but it's also dangerous. it creates an environment where the sort of thing that happened to jo becomes where the sort of thing that happened tojo becomes more likely. the best thing we can do to calm things down his get it delivered, get it resolved, so we can focus on the priorities that the british people keep telling me when i travel around the country that they want to focus on.
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as part of the bbc‘s "we are stoke" week, we'll be hearing from people there about their reaction to last night's brexit debate in the commons. that's at 9.15. the introduction of minimum pricing for alcohol in scotland appears to have cut drinking, according to a new study. strong words from the duke of sussex on a tour of botswana. prince harry takes aim at climate change deniers. it's a race against time, and one we are losing. everybody knows it. there is no excuse for not knowing that in the most troubling parties that in the most troubling parties that i don't believe that there is anybody in this world that can deny science —— the most troubling part is. a bbc investigation finds children as young as seven are being groomed to work in one of the world's largest licenced brothels in bangladesh. and in sport — england take on the usa in their world cup group game later this morning — a match they're expected to win .
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good morning and welcome to the bbc news at 9. borisjohnson is facing calls to moderate his language — after the commons witnessed some of the most furious exchanges it's seen in recent years. a number of conservative mps — including a cabinet minister — have urged him to pick his words carefully, after he accused his opponents of surrendering to the european union, and sabotaging his brexit negotiations. the prime minister also claimed the best way to honour the murdered pro—remain mp, jo cox, was to "get brexit done". jo cox's husband brendan cox has this morning told the bbc it wasn't legitimate to co—opt his late wife's memory "for things that she didn't believe in or didn't say". our political correspondent helen catt reports. as the prime minister prepared to face mps, some were hoping for an apology, others his resignation, others a milder tone.
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instead... the supreme court was asked to intervene in this process for the first time ever. and it is absolutely no disrespect to the judiciary to say i think the court was wrong. boris johnson issued a challenge to the opposition — you vote to sack me. they have until the house rises today to table a motion of no confidence in the government. the snp seemed like they might be tempted to take up the offer. the opposition must unite to trigger a vote of no confidence to bring this chaotic government down. but in the end, no party tabled a no confidence vote. they won't throw boris johnson out, they say, until they are sure a no—deal brexit can't happen, but that doesn't mean they think he is the man for the job. this, mr speaker, was ten minutes of bluster from a dangerous prime minister who thinks
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he is above the law. but in truth, mr speaker — in truth, mr speaker, is not fit for the office which he holds. after the debate, mp after mp expressed concern over the language being used. words like "capitulation", "surrender", or "betrayal". many of us in this place subject to death threats and abuse every single day and, let me tell the prime minister, that they often quote his words, "surrenderer", "betrayal", "traitor". cheering and applause i think, mr speaker, i have to tell you, mr speaker, i have to say, mr speaker, i have never heard such humbug in all my life. today i have reported to the police a threat against my child, that has been dismissed as humbug. tension are only likely to rise
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further over the next few weeks, with little sign of how parliament divisions might be resolved. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. we can cross to our westminster studio and speak to our assistant political editor norman smith. i want to pick up on something i heard you say in an interview earlier today that the language used by the prime minister and the manner in which he spoke, you make the point, was very much a political strategy. i think it is. i think point, was very much a political strategy. ithink it is. ithink mr johnson finds himself in a very, very difficult situation where he really can't trigger the election that he thinks would be his way out of the current predicament because the opposition parties won't vote for it, and so my that he's trying to provoke them, to rile them, to goad them to put down a motion of no confidence almost in exasperation, infury, in confidence almost in exasperation, in fury, in response to the very inflammatory language that he used, particularly of course in response
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to some of those female mps we saw there, urging him to moderate the sort of terms he was using, and then mrjohnson seems to me to fairly briskly dismissed that and i think his hope is that, yes, they might with a rush of blood to the head think that that is enough and we're going to have to stop this man and we will put down a motion of no confidence, but so far they have held that —— held back from that. but the pressure on them to do something is immense. the other aspect, and why i say he is using it deliberately, is because it says to me that he's basically given up on parliament. he's not trying to broker a consensus or reach an agreement in parliament, he's talking to predominantly leave voters outside of parliament, and to those voters who he believes, probably correctly, are fed up, angry at parliament for the deadlock and that is why he is pursuing this
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very, very confrontational style and pitching, if you like the people against parliament, albeit, when you listen to james cleverly, the chairman of the party this morning, he was rather suggesting that this wasn't something mrjohnson was doing, it wasjust wasn't something mrjohnson was doing, it was just part and parcel ofan doing, it was just part and parcel of an increasingly divisive brexit debate. we can see how divisive this has been. it was divisive through the referendum campaign and has proved divisive over the last couple of years and the exchanges in the house have showed it still generates a huge amount of temper on both sides of the commons, and i think the best thing we can do to calm things down is to get it delivered, get it resolved, so we can focus on the priorities that the british people keep telling me when i travel around the country that they want to focus on, which is things like the police, the nhs, public services. the immediate political consequence of last night, i think, is the prospect of a brexit deal has
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receded markedly, and i say that, because to get a deal through the commons mrjohnson is going to need the support of some opposition mps. the chance of securing more than two oi’ the chance of securing more than two or three labour mps supporting him i would think is now negligible because of the ferocity and contempt, really, he has shown towards the opposition last night. secondly, the chance of the eu agreeing to a deal i think similarly has become negligible because they will only agree to a deal if they are convinced that borisjohnson can get it through parliament. they're not going to make any concessions to a prime minister who they think simply cannot get an agreement through. so for both of those reasons, i think the hard political consequence of last night is that the likelihood of a brexit deal has receded markedly. norman, thank you very much. as we've been hearing there was a particular backlash over
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the prime minister's claim that the best way to honour the murdered mpjo cox was to deliver brexit. her husband brendan spoke to bbc breakfast earlier, who warned of the risks faced by mps in the current poltical climate. there is a real threat to members of parliament and that threat continues. i speak to lots of her friends on both sides of the house and there are credible death threats and there's been a particular case where another attempted assassination of a female mp was thwarted only by the police's intervention. this is real and it's really important that everybody on all sides of politics tries to make politics a safe place for people to argue and debate, but to do that in a safe way. and the second thing which i think is even more important, although hard to distinguish, is there is something more profound about the tone
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and nature of our politics and what happened last night was a reflection of a much wider willingness to demean each other, to impugn each other‘s motives, to assume that the reason people want to leave is because they are racist or want to remain because they are traitors to the country. this sense of politics now whereby we are notjust disagreeing with each other, but we are calling each other the worst names that we can, where we are saying what happened in the last few weeks that it was a coup and it's dictatorship and boris johnson is a fascist or that people who want to remain in the european union are in league with other nations. this stuff is not only wrong, because on both sides of the debate people are just trying to do what they think is right for the country but it's also dangerous and creates
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an environment where the sort of things that happens tojo becomes more likely. we are joined by the conservative mp glyn davies. thanks for coming to talk to us this morning. what is your reaction to what mrjohnson had to say last night and how he said it?|j what mrjohnson had to say last night and how he said it? i didn't hear the particular part that you might be speaking about, and i heard the not —— 90 minutes of his speech and it was a rather brutal session of parliament and i don't approve of it, not the specifics, but ijust don't approve of the general tenor when borisjohnson was speaking he was facing a ferocious baying mob and it's very difficult to have a sense of a rational debate in a climate like that. so you're saying that was his reaction to what you call a ferocious baying mob? 0bviously call a ferocious baying mob? obviously there is jeering across the chamber, that is a feature of the chamber, that is a feature of the house of commons, but when paula sherriff was talking about her concerns and he used the words humbug, ithink concerns and he used the words humbug, i think people would say his manner was quite dismissive of her and then we've just heard the
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language he used around jo cox, so clearly people are very concerned about that. some will be concerned. that was the tenor of the debate itself. there was a good three hours more. but when the prime minister walked in, he was facing 300 people on the other side that really were shouting all kinds of abuse and it creates an environment where you cannot have sensible debate, and i'm in the camp of people who want to talk this down and there is a big debate about this and i'd like to speak about it in i can —— if i can but i'd like us to go back to the politics we used to have. there's a tendency at the moment, i think, with all the debate about being a member of the european union continues, i feel we won't be able to calm things down. irrespective of what seems there were in the house as mrjohnson walked in, he is the
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prime minister and he sets the tone. nicholas soames said this morning that the job of the prime minister is to bring the country together, but he drove it further apart, he said. johnson needs to start behaving like a prime minister. so will you be asking the prime minister to moderate his language? well, i'm not sure i'll be doing that, but what i do think generally everybody should moderate their language. we are focusing very much on borisjohnson language. we are focusing very much on boris johnson because language. we are focusing very much on borisjohnson because he is the prime minister, but i must say there we re prime minister, but i must say there were a number of other contributions, i thought, were a number of other contributions, ithought, that were a number of other contributions, i thought, that were not out of order in terms of the speakers interpretation, but i think out of order in terms of what a civilised debate should be. one person doing that then leads to others doing it and i think you end up others doing it and i think you end up with a not very constructive debate. but in the climate of threats to mps, would you say the prime minister's words and manner we re prime minister's words and manner were unhelpful quest but no, i thought the whole session in general
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was. it's so easy to specifically ta ke was. it's so easy to specifically take on one person, but what i do know is... he is the prime minister. i've been the leader of councils and organisations, and if you walk into a chamberand organisations, and if you walk into a chamber and there are 250,300 people and they really were very, very aggressive when he walked in. so you are defending his reaction?” wasn't there. i wasn't in for that particular session. i can only speak about the session in general and i must say, it was not particularly edifying, the whole session, and i think everybody contributed to that. does it suggest that he does not really wa nt does it suggest that he does not really want to deal, because if he did, why would he speak like this? if, as you say, the atmosphere was already pretty free braille, and it was yesterday, why would he add to that —— febrile. if he really wants to get the deal and wants opposition support? i think he wants that deal,
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andi support? i think he wants that deal, and i am desperate for the deal and we would have had that deal if the opposition voted for it. three times it has been before parliament. i think the opposition think that the previous one was a good deal, and if that was amended it might be more a cce pta ble that was amended it might be more acceptable for the conservative party and i think there is a majority to support the deal and i think it's time to put the country first, back the deal and move on from where we are and then moderate the debate. thank you very much. the headlines on bbc news... borisjohnson is accused of using dangerous language following extraordinary scenes in the house of commons last night. the introduction of minimum pricing for alcohol in scotland appears to have cut drinking, according to a new study. prince harry speaks out on a tour of botswana as he takes aim at climate change deniers. in sport, england head coach eddie jones calls for a fast start against
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the us in their second group match at the rugby world cup. after beating tonga on sunday, they have had a four day turnaround. and there we re had a four day turnaround. and there were more upsets in the third round of the league cup. 0xford were more upsets in the third round of the league cup. oxford united beating west ham, one of three premier league sides knocked out. manchester united scraped through on penalties against rochdale. but business as usual for liverpool, who have been drawn to play arsenal in the fourth round after they beat mk dons. more to come on all the stories later on. all this week the bbc is in stoke on trent, discovering stories about what makes the city tick, and the issues facing its people. after a dramatic few days in westminister, this morning we've been getting reaction from students in stoke—on—trent. it's the city with the highest number of "leave" votes in the uk. let's speak to our correspondent ben thompson who is live in
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stoke—0n—trent for us. interesting to get away from westminster and get reaction from outside the westminster bubble. yes, you are absolutely right. let me explain about where we are. a beautiful morning in stoke—on—trent, started out a little wet, but let me show you around because this is the scene this morning in stoke—on—trent and you will see one of the 4000 or so that were here, just 47 remain, but stoke made its name from potteries. but business and industries have changed here and it's about start—ups and education and logistics. all the events of the last 24 hours have been in the westminster bubble, so we've been asking what it means for people who are living here and what they make of events there. let me introduce you to sam and valentino. you are both students in the city, so talk me through what we've heard in the last 24 hours, because quite simply it's been a bit fraught on both
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sides. sam, what did you make of what you heard? i disagreed with the judicial decision, but i agree with boris, you have to respect because they are the highest court in the land, but i disagree with the ruling. do you think the debate and all the conversation has moved far away from what people were initially voting for? that in somewhere like stoke—on—trent, it's not about what you guys want, its about what westminster wa nt. you guys want, its about what westminster want. definitely. yesterday we saw parliament was reopened and they were saying about how they should have been debating, but what were they doing yesterday? they weren't debating, just having childish arguments. so what is the solution to something like this? three years on from the vote we are no further forward, really.” three years on from the vote we are no further forward, really. i think the answer is to bring it back to the answer is to bring it back to the people and vote on what kind of deal because we're getting nowhere with parliament, it's all political games on right now we are in an era of uncertainty and it needs to be stopped by bringing it back to the
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people who voted in the first place in 2016. is it that simple? the danger is if there is another vote and they might be a different result and they might be a different result and we end up in the same territory where the first referendum says one thing and another vote sends something else and no further forward in unity and it's the division that is causing the problems. i think in a democracy the people need to have the power to change their mind and if that's the case, so be it, and if that's not the case, then parliament definitely knows what they need to get on with because right now the parties are trying to please their voters but it's not getting anywhere because the two major parties are divided. sam, when we talk about what will happen next, you're very keen to highlight the opportunities that brexit would bring and you see there are great opportunities that won't be unlocked until the political impasse is solved. it's notjust that. the system right now is broken. the majority of mps in
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westminster art remainers and if you look at the breakdown of the vote, the 2016 referendum, if that was an election, the brexit argument would have 401 seats, so you can see why borisjohnson wants have 401 seats, so you can see why boris johnson wants another election and the reason jeremy corbyn won't allow it to happen is he knows he has lost the confidence of his own people in his party. you are both on different sides of the leave and remain argument and i wonder if there is a feeling, amongst the younger generation that your future is being decided by squabbling adults in westminster. is that what it boils down to? definitely. we are entering the job market and the education market at such a pivotal time in politics and that's why something needs to be done, no matter what it is, but all this squabbling is going on while we are essentially starting our lives and this degree of uncertainty, it needs to be stopped at some point, whether it's leave or remain. some clarity either way. really nice to see you both and thanks for your time this
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morning. there you have it. some of the thoughts in stoke—on—trent and we will continue that conversation over the course of the next week, much more from here as part of a special series we're running across the bbc, but i want to leave you with a beautiful view of where we are and you'll be able to see the kiln which dates back to the mid—1800s and only taken out of service in 1980, but as i said, business looking very different. the local economy is very different, and as you mention in the introduction, 89.4% of people voting to leave the european union here, so quite clearly a significant vote to leave. more from us a little later. as we've been reporting, a number of senior conservative mps have urged boris johnson to moderate his language, after he was criticised for accusing his opponents of "sabotage" during a heated debate in the commons. there was particular anger at the prime minister's reply to a question about
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the murdered mpjo cox. the labour mp, peter kyle, joins us now from westminster. thanks for taking the time to talk to us this morning and i was looking at your twitter feed a few moments ago and you said, referring to the comments that paula sheriff address to the prime minister and his response, the humbug response, you called up one of the most saddest and distressing sites i've witnessed in politics. the conservative mp glyn davies said when borisjohnson entered the chamber he was greeted bya entered the chamber he was greeted by a baying mob stop do you accept that there is a wider problem, or are you focusing on the prime minister? what you have to realise about yesterday and why i found it so distressing, and distressing is the right word, people say it squabbling and i've seen squabbling in the house of commons and i've been there for four years and seen the stuff that is called childish in
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the stuff that is called childish in the past, but we were there for a very important reason yesterday because the government have been found to step outside of the law and thatis found to step outside of the law and that is why parliament was sitting yesterday. so it was going to be a difficult day, no doubt about that. but there is a really important thing here. we've got to focus on why it was so distressing. the prime minister was using language causing real genuine distress to people in the commons. when that was pointed out to him, rather than doing what normal people do, what everyday people do in real life where it is only steps over the line people say, you can't say that because upsetting me, and you change. rather than changing, he realised it was causing distress and he zeroed in on it. he did it again and again and again. by invoking the memory ofjo cox, suggesting the way to honour her memory is to deliver brexit, for example. in reply to my question which pointed out that it's ok for him to be using this language because he lives behind a wall of security and doesn't feel the threat
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that many candidates and mps and women in particular candidates and what they are suffering. in response, he said vote the brexit if you want to take the danger away. this is incendiary language. he is invoking the length that the murder ofjo cox invoking the length that the murder of jo cox used invoking the length that the murder ofjo cox used in the trial. —— the language that the murderer ofjo cox used in his trial. it is very upsetting for us. is this a political strategy from boris johnson? is what is driving this the desire to trigger a vote of no confidence or a general election because his options are becoming narrower and narrower? there was no doubt to be sitting in there that it was one of two things. either it was a political strategy to see where the upset and hurt was caused and to zero in on it in order, as you say, to provoke us into voting no confidence or giving him a general election, or it was the actions of a sociopath who has zero emotional intelligence and is incapable of
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understanding and seeing distress when he sees it. neither of those two things is acceptable in modern british political debate. sorry to interrupt but were almost out of time. ina interrupt but were almost out of time. in a line, as a result of last night, any chance of getting a deal or garnering any support to get the backing for the deal has gone? the vast majority of mps i am in touch with want to do what is in the national interest. so when he asked to support the deal, where is the deal? we can only see if we're putting the national interest first once we see it. if we see the deal he has promised, no backstop, better than the theresa may deal, then i think we might see some interest in it. i will support it if it goes back to the people for a confirmatory vote then it never has to return to parliament because we can find to return to parliament because we canfind a to return to parliament because we can find a legislative vehicle that puts it back to the people, and once they have decided, it is definitive and atan they have decided, it is definitive and at an end and never has to
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return to parliament again. i think thatis return to parliament again. i think that is the way of ending the debate by getting brexit out of westminster and back in the community and changing the tone of debate in our country. we must leave it there, but thank you for your time. prince harry has travelled to botswana to visit conservation and health projects as part of his family's tour of southern africa, their first overseas trip as a family. speaking this morning, prince harry has stressed the importance of conservation and said the world is losing the race against climate change. i don't think there's anyone not involved in conservation somehow that shouldn't be. this last week, led by greta thunberg, the world's children are striking, there is an emergency and it's a race against time and one we are losing. everybody knows it. there is no excuse for not knowing that and i think the most troubling part of it is that i don't believe there is anybody in this world that can deny
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science, undeniable science and fa cts . science, undeniable science and facts. science and facts that have been around for the last 30 or maybe 40 yea rs been around for the last 30 or maybe 40 years and it's only getting stronger and stronger. genuinely, 40 years and it's only getting strongerand stronger. genuinely, i don't understand how anyone in this world, whoever it is, you, us, children, leaders, whoever it is, no one can deny science otherwise we live in a very, very troubling world. 15 years i've been coming here. there's a sense of escapism and real sense of purpose. i've been learning from this man for the last 15 years, him and a bunch of other individuals that he has introduced me to, and they are friends. some of my closest friends are here. i came here in 97 and 1998 straight up my mum died and it was a nice place to get away from people, and ifeel deeply connected to this place and africa and i think what we are seeing here in africa, we are seeing more around the world. people are being brought up in concrete
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jungles, in cities which inevitably mean they are more disconnected from nature and there is this symbiotic relationship that some people have. we should be taking over, but it doesn't work like that. while prince harry continues his solo part of the tour, the duchess of sussex and four—month—old son archie are staying in cape town, where yesterday they all met the renowned anti—apartheid campaigner, archbishop desmond tutu. 0ur correspondent, pumza fihlani joins us now from cape town. hello to you. assess for us if you will how this pretty tough message from prince harry, saying that climate change deniers need to listen to the science is going down, and also that very personal comment about the deep connection to africa. it really gives us a sense of where the prince is in terms of the charities he has chosen and why he has chosen them. a lot of the work
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that he is doing across southern africa is focused on building closer relationships with young people, finding out how they can get involved in issues that would ordinarily be considered too big for them, issues around climate change. as he said, these are the people who are going to inherit whatever is left behind by the impact of climate change, so he wants to get them at the fore front to correct things, and it's also the same reason that he has partnered organisations focused on hiv aids prevention but also helping young people be involved in those conversations on how to protect themselves and how to treat the disease or manage the disease. in botswana, for example, it has the third largest population of people living with hiv and aids and it is a charity that the prince is passionate about and he set up himself in 2006, and part of what he's doing today will be to revisit the charity and see what efforts have been made and what more needs
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to be done and how much has changed since he set it up more than a decade ago. and what else is in store for the royal family as they continue their tour? the duke will proceed to malawi, where he will be involved with more charity work around education and preservation work. also, one of the moments local media are keen on is the visit to angola, where he will retrace the steps of princess diana took in 1997, when we saw the iconic pictures of her walking through a minefield. he wants to see efforts made an activity happening now around removing mines in the area. he wants to also keep the legacy of princess diana alive while infusing some of the things he is passionate about and at the core of it for him
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is getting young people involved in every effort to better their lives. thank you. in a moment, the weather. first, what has victoria got coming up first, what has victoria got coming up at10am? first, what has victoria got coming up at 10am? we will hear from the labourmp up at 10am? we will hear from the labour mp paul sherriff after the fierce exchanges in the commons with borisjohnson fierce exchanges in the commons with boris johnson last night. we stand here under the shield of our departed friend, with many of us in this place subject to death threats and abuse every single day. let me tell the prime minister they often quote his words. surrender, betrayal, traitor. ifor one i'm sick of it. i have to say, mr speaker... i have to say, i have never heard such humbug in all my life. and we will talk to the music producer naughty boy to talk publicly for the first time about
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his mum's recent dementia diagnosis and how music is helping her. join us and how music is helping her. join us at10am. and how music is helping her. join us at 10am. and coming up in sport, england take on the usa in their world cup group game. the england head coach said he did not know quite what to expect from opponents. now the time for a look at the weather forecast. it has been a wet start for many. a band of rain moving from west to east across the uk. it will eventually clear, leaving a mixture of sunny spells in blustery showers. in the northern isles in far north—east of scotland, it could persist into the afternoon. the shower is moving in could be quite heavy but there will be sunny spells between. gusty winds and temperatures up to 20 degrees.
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tonight, showers cleared but another batch of showery rain spreading through ireland, north—west england wales. clear spells the further east you are. still double figures for many. 0n you are. still double figures for many. on friday, more showers. longer spells of rain at times. up to 18 degrees. hello this is bbc news. the headlines: borisjohnson is accused of using dangerous language following extraordinary scenes in the house of commons last night — the husband of the murdered mp, jo cox says the language needs to be tempered. this stuff is not only wrong, because, actually, on both sides of the debate, people are just trying to do what they think is right for the country, but it's also dangerous. it creates an environment
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where the sort of thing that happened tojo becomes more likely. the introduction of minimum pricing for alcohol in scotland appears to have cut drinking, according to a new study. prince harry speaks out on a tour of botswana as he takes aim at climate change deniers. also coming up — as part of the bbc‘s we are stoke week — how this all—women's choir is having a positive impact on people's lives. time now for the morning briefing, where we bring you up to speed on the stories people are watching, reading and sharing. it's our top story that's trending online and got a lot of you talking. as we've been reporting, mps asked boris johnson to moderate his language during a heated debate in the commons yesterday. the prime minister refused to change his words despite a barrage of criticism from opposition benches. labour's paula sherriff referred tojo cox, the mp murdered in 2016, as she pleaded with him to refrain
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from using "dangerous" words like "surrender". he described her intervention as "humbug" and repeated the word again. many of us in this place, subject to death threats and abuse every single day. and let me tell the prime minister that they often quote his words, surrender, betrayal, traitor. and i for one am sick of it. i think, mr speaker, i have to tell you, mr speaker, i... i have to say, mr speaker, i've never heard such humbug in all my life. well, in that fiery session last night, another mp, tracy brabin, who replaced jo cox as the mp for batley and spen after the mp was murdered, also urged the prime minister to moderate his language so — in her words — mps feel secure when going about theirjobs. in response, boris johnson said "the best way to honour the memory ofjo cox"
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would be "to get brexit done". well, that's prompted strong reaction online and following those exchanges last night, jo cox has been trending. the writer and journalist maya goodfellow wrote — i'm going live to the house of commons where an urgent question is being asked. genuine, heartfelt, sincerely subscribe to differences of opinion about that matter. members must be free to express themselves about it and to display as they unfailingly do the courage of their convictions. it ought however to be possible to disagree
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agreeably. i can see members on both sides of the house, who are fine exponents of that principle and tradition. yesterday, that was not the majority, i am sorry to say. i have, over night, received an approach from two very senior members on either side of the house. pressing the case for a formal consideration of our political culture going forward. manifestly any such formal structure, any such conference, deliberation, would not ta ke conference, deliberation, would not take place under my aegis. like everybody else here, i want what is best for the house. pending
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consideration of that approach and the argument for having a sober consideration of the issue of political culture and conduct over an ongoing period, i can advise the house that there will be an urgent question later today on the matter to which i havejust question later today on the matter to which i have just referred and that will be an opportunity for collea g u es that will be an opportunity for colleagues to say what they think. this is something of concern across the house. it is not a party political matter. and as far as i'm concerned, it should not be in any way, at any time, to any degree, concerned, it should not be in any way, atany time, to any degree, a matter for partisan point scoring. it is about something bigger than an individual or an individual party, oran individual or an individual party, or an individual political or ideological viewpoint. let's treat of it on that basis. in the meantime, may i just
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of it on that basis. in the meantime, may ijust ask, and that is all i'm doing and all i can do as your representative in the chair, ask colleagues, please, to lower the decibel level and to try to treat each other as opponents, not as enemies. 0rder. urgent question. ian murray. 0rder. enemies. 0rder. urgent question. ian murray. order. i genuinely am not convinced. i will take one if the right honourable gentleman insists. iam not right honourable gentleman insists. i am not sure how helpful it will be. would it be helpful to the house to know the subjects of the other urgent questions and statements, please? i am gratefulto urgent questions and statements, please? i am grateful to the right honourable gentleman. yes, we have... we have the... the first urgent question is on the subject
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from the honourable gentleman on the subject of the european union withdrawal number to act 2019 and theissues withdrawal number to act 2019 and the issues will play out but compliance with the act and it's a perfectly reasonable question from him. the second is on the situation in hong kong. the third is from mr chris law on the subject of arms export licences to saudi arabia. the fourth urgent question, to which i perhaps slightly elliptically referred is on the matter of the toxicity of our political culture and the need to take appropriate steps to minimise that toxicity and to conduce to a better atmosphere. and the statement, yes there is a statement from the secretary of state for business, energy and industrial strategy on the subject of the international climate action
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at the un summit. and a business statement, which we notice had noticed last night, from the leader of the house. i hope that has satisfied the legitimate inquisitorial appetite of the honourable gentleman. 0rder, urgent question, mr ian murray. thank you, mr speaker. my urgent question is to ask the prime minister to make a statement on compliance with the european withdrawal number two act 2019. the minister. thank you, mr speaker. in the tone that you are setting, perhaps i can incorrectly refer and thank my honourable friend because there are many friends across the chamber and if one reads the newspapers this morning, i think there is a feeling that we are adversarial permanently but that is not the case. many of us work
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together bilaterally in groups in this house and committees and most of the time on the floor of this house in consensual nature. turning to the subject of this very important, urgent question. the government will obey the law. this has always been the case. the house has always been the case. the house has heard this from the prime minister, it has heard it from the first secretary of state. it has heard it from the lord chancellor, who has constitutional responsibility for upholding the rule of law. and yesterday, honourable and right honourable members had opportunity to put similar questions to the attorney general. the government opposed to the act passed earlier this month. notwithstanding our fervent attempts to resist the passage of the bill,
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even the architects must accept the act makes provision... we will be backin act makes provision... we will be back in the commons later for some of those urgent questions to be asked today but the speaker talking about the toxicity of political culture and he has had overnight an approach from two senior politicians from either side of the house asking forformal from either side of the house asking for formal consideration of our political culture. he urged mps to treat each other as opponents are not enemies. sport now. talking rugby. england face usa in their second group game. a match which gets underway at 1145 in kobe — which is hot and humid. ten changes to the side that beat tonga in their opener wiuth head coach eddiejone urging his side to produce a fast start against a sie 13th in the rankings. andy swiss is in kobe.
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welcome and this is where we've had a hot and humid day. temperatures around 30 degrees, although it will bea around 30 degrees, although it will be a little cooler by the time the teams kick off under the roof here. england have had early four days since their opening match against tonga. with that in mind they have rested players who played in that game and brought in fresh legs. they have made ten changes. captain 0wen farrell is getting a breather and george ford will captain instead of him. and some perhaps on familiar names in the england line—up, rory mcconnachie, piers francis, they are making their world cup debut. but they have strength in depth. they should still be too good for the usa but the usa are an improving force in world rugby. the england head coach eddiejones, in world rugby. the england head coach eddie jones, known in world rugby. the england head coach eddiejones, known for his colourful turn of phrase, said
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playing the usa would be like playing the usa would be like playing 15 donald trump s. a comment which got a mystified response from the usa coach gary gold who said, i don't know what that means. what we don't know what that means. what we do know about the usa is they are improving, they have had good results over the past couple of yea rs, results over the past couple of years, notably when they beat scotla nd years, notably when they beat scotland last year. they have been ina training scotland last year. they have been in a training camp with the marines here in japan. they in a training camp with the marines here injapan. they clearly mean business, but england will be the favourites to make it two wins out of two. the united states not to be underestimated. 0ne of two. the united states not to be underestimated. one of two matches being played today. italy are already under way against canada in pool b. you can listen to full commentary of england against usa on 5live sport. build—up starts at 11,
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with the match getting under way at 11:45. there were more league cup upsets last night. three premier league sides were sent packing by league one opposition in the 3rd round. west ham thrashed 4—nil by oxford at the kassam stadium. shandon baptiste with 0xford's fourth. last season's surprise semi—finalists burton claimed another big win as they beat bournemouth 2—nil. 0liver sarkic and then nathan broadhead with the goals. and max power scored the only goal of the game as league one sunderland won 1—nil at sheffield united. liverpool set up a tie in the fourth round with arsenal. it's after a young side beat mk dons 2—0, james milner with their first before turning provider for their second.
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and there was a lucky escape for manchester united who needed penalties to edge out league one rochdale. and it is that result that gets plenty of coverage on the back pages. daily mail leads on 0le so lucky, as united needed penalties get past rochdale. the sun — pathetic — their take on manchester united's fortunes they are still in it, unlike west ham, hammer horror in the daily telegraph. jack wilshere pictured. the were also four scottish league cup games last night. rangers will play in the semi—finals for a fourth consecutive season after a hard—fought 1—0 win over livingston. glen kamara's deflected fifth—minute strike was enough to send steven gerrard's side through. elsewhere, there wins for celtic, hearts, and hibs. dont forget there will be plenmty of reaction to england's match in sportsday tonight,
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6.30 on bbc news — where we'll also be looking ahead to the start of the world athletics championships in doha, which begins tomorrow. that's all the sport for now. let's return to politics. the furious exchanges last night and the backdrop how brexit should proceed. the prime minister has pledged to leave on the 31st of october with or without a deal in parliament passed a law requiring him to ask for an extension if the deal has not been agreed. we can speak to professor tony travers. what is your take on the exchanges last night? the commons can be a brutal place at the best of times. it is deliberately adversarial. the challenge last night, because of brexit, is whether
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the words used by politicians spill out into the way mps are treated. they get death threats. it is extraordinary to have to say but they do and they receive threats of violence, and the link between them is the onejohn bercow this morning is the onejohn bercow this morning is starting a process of reconciliation. will this spill—over into the capacity of borisjohnson to get a deal, or to get mps to vote for a deal if he got one with the eu?i for a deal if he got one with the eu? i suspect at the margin it will have made it less likely. that some labour mps have made it less likely. that some labourmps might have made it less likely. that some labour mps might support a version ofa labour mps might support a version of a withdrawal deal if boris johnson can negotiate one with the eu. what does it say about his willingness to get the deal?” eu. what does it say about his willingness to get the deal? i think you can read it as a slight sense of if we do not get it, so what? in that sense. his very precise way of deliberately rattling the opposition
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last night in the house of commons could be read as his saying i might not get a deal and if i don't, so what? it makes no deal that much more likely i suspect. one could argue that some of the language used yesterday would not have been tolerated several years ago. do you think what we have heard from the speaker this morning suggest to you that parliament will very quickly try to step in to remove that toxicity and potentially undergo this formal consideration of the political culture i think the phrase john bercow used. the speaker has clearly had an approach from senior mps, getting away of having a meeting, discussion on how to tone down the use of language. to avoid this problem of stirring up h speech against mps. beyond that, we are in unusual times in parliament and in
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the way that affects the way people outside react to government and politics. thank you. sales of alcohol in scotland's shops fell by almost 8% after it introduced minimum unit pricing — that's according to a new study. since may 2018, the price of alcohol has had to be at least 50p per unit. the study for the british medical journal found the impact was around twice that predicted ahead of the move. we can speak now to dr eric carlin, director of scottish health action on alcohol problems. why do you think the effect was greater than predicted ? why do you think the effect was greater than predicted? it is fair to say the policy was always predicated on a conservative estimate. the bmj study, which is welcome, is basically confirming that. all of us who have argued for this policy, based on modelling studies and experience from other countries, that we are correct, and
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in fact the health and social impact will be more significant than we had hoped for. that is a good news story for public health. are you sure this is leading to less alcohol consumption because we are talking about sales just in shops, not about people going to bars. minimum unit pricing only affect sales of alcohol in shops, not the on trade such as pubs and restaurants. we do not know exactly what the impact is going to be on health. it is reasonable to assume that if consumption goes down, particularly as this study has found, that sales have gone down particularly in the groups who are purchasing the most alcohol and particularly in the lowest social economic demographics. people who are drinking the most and the people
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who are poorest, the people combined most likely to suffer health and social harms, and the people who seem to be from this study changing their behaviour than most, so it is looking pretty positive. tell us how much less people are actually drinking and how you expect to go from here in terms of developing what you've discovered. what we found was it was the top 20% of the population who have reduced their drinking most. the reduction was 15 grams of alcohol per week. that is a significant reduction. what is that, 15 grams? what is it equivalent to? is ata 15 grams? what is it equivalent to? is at a glass of wine? it isjust over two units of alcohol. eight
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grams is one unit of alcohol. 0ne over two units of alcohol. eight grams is one unit of alcohol. one of the most important things with minimum unit pricing, we have said the purpose of the policy is not to punish the whole population for what is going wrong in certain sections of the population. that is what we have been accused of by people who have been accused of by people who have opposed this policy. what this study has found is that the people who are drinking the most and the people drinking the cheapest, most harmful products, are the people who are reducing the drinking the most. it is an explicitly targeted policy. that will have the greatest impact on reducing harms to the poorest people in society. thank you. figures just out in the last half—an—hour show a fall in coverage of all 13 routine childhood
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vaccinations, for children aged under 5 in england, over the past year. the data from nhs digital for 2018—19 showed uptake of the first dose of the mmr vaccine fell from 91.2% to 90.3% — the fifth year in a row it has dropped. let's get more on this with dr caroline dollery, who's the chair of the mid essex clinical commissioning group — she joins me via webcam from her chelmsford practice. a dropping coverage across all 13 routine childhood vaccinations for the under fives. what is your reaction? it is very concerning. this is a significant continuing drop in immunisation uptake. it is certainly a major focus of national policy to try to address it. it is causing an outbreak really in preve nta ble causing an outbreak really in preventable infectious disease and
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obviously the consequences of that are significant numbers of young people, children and old people suffering significant ill—health and even death. are you seeing cases of measles in your practice, or lots of people coming to you expressing concerns about vaccinations? we are seeing more cases. anecdotally in our practice. we have had four confirmed measles cases in the past month. two of which were in young babies who were not old enough to have the mmr vaccine. 0bviously babies who were not old enough to have the mmr vaccine. obviously you cannot give the mmr vaccine before the age of one and these were pa rents the age of one and these were parents who wanted to vaccinate so it made it even more heartbreaking, i guess. that affects immunity if people are not taking up the vaccination, the chances of the disease spreading through the wider
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population increases. exactly right. the herd immunity concept is important to understand. there are certain people who are unable to be vaccinated, either because they are too young or because they have a poorfunctioning too young or because they have a poor functioning immune system. measles is extremely contagious and often measles is extremely contagious and ofte n ca n measles is extremely contagious and often can spread well before people are aware they have the condition. you can have 90 new cases for every one case of measles. it spreads incredibly rapidly. it is imperative people understand and are able to talk to health professionals. we do know, there have been studies on this, there is a lot of support for the vaccine programme. it is also very... doctor, we are almost out of time stock in a word, you urge
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people to get vaccinations? without a doubt. i am sorry to interrupt you. time now for a look at the weather forecast. we have heavy rain across north—east scotland and the far south—east of england. it is clear in. many saw it first thing. we will be left with a mixture of sunny spells and blustery showers. the rain could linger into the northern isles but elsewhere we will see sunshine coming through. the shower is predominantly towards western areas where they could be on the heavy side. they will drift further east from time to time. maximum temperature is 16—20. this evening, still some showers around but further spells of rain moving to wales, north—west england and that is the early part of friday. throughout friday, more showers merging to give longer spells of
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rain. moving from west to east across many parts. a pretty wet day, worth keeping the umbrella handy on friday. temperatures down a little bit. goodbye.
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hello, it's thursday, it's 10 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. in herfirst interview since those angry scenes in the commons last night, the labour mp paula sheriff describes the prime minister as a "bully" and accuses him of inciting hatred towards mps. do you believe the prime minister is making you and other mps less safe? with any shadow of a doubt, and i know the feeling is shared across the house. because that is a very strong claim to make.” the house. because that is a very strong claim to make. i stand by it 100%. i can stand here today, victoria, and tell you that i believe the prime minister is inciting hatred towards

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