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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  September 26, 2019 11:00am-2:01pm BST

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you're watching bbc newsroom live — it's11am and these are the main stories this morning: come on, come on, then! borisjohnson is accused of using dangerous language following heated scenes in the house of commons last night. the husband of the murdered mp, jo cox speaks out. this stuff is not only wrong, because actually, on both sides of the debate, people are just trying to do what they think is right for the country, but it's also dangerous. it creates an environment where the sort of thing that happened tojo becomes more likely. there was an atmosphere in the chamber worse than any i've known in my 22
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years in the house. new figures reveal uptake of all 13 routine vaccinations for the under fives has fallen in the last 12 months. strong words from the duke of sussex on a tour of botswana prince harry takes aim at climate change deniers. it is a race against time and one in which we are losing. everyone knows it, there is no excuse for not knowing that, and i think the most troubling part of it is i don't believe there is anybody in this world that can deny science, undeniable science and facts. and coming up, the uk's new polar research ship, originally due to be called boaty mcboatface, is launched, now named after sir david attenborough.
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good morning and welcome to westminster where borisjohnson is facing calls to moderate his language after the commons witnessed some of the most furious exchanges it's seen in recent years last night. a number of conservative mps, including a cabinet minister, have urged him to pick his words carefully, after he accused his opponents of surrendering to the european union, and sabotaging his brexit negotiations. the prime minister also claimed the best way to honour the murdered pro—remain mp, jo cox, was to "get brexit done". jo cox's husband brendan cox has this morning told the bbc it wasn't legitimate to co—opt his late wife's memory "for things that she didn't believe in or didn't say". a key exchange in the commons last night was between the labour mp and the prime minister, let's listen back to that.
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ido i do not seek to stifle robust debate but this evening, the prime minister has contently used derogatory language to talk about an act passed by this house. we should not resort to using offensive, dangerous or inflammatory language for legislation that we do not like. we stand here under the shield of oui’ we stand here under the shield of our departed front with many of us in this place subject to death threats and abuse every single day. let me tell the prime minister that that they often quite his words, surrender act, betrayal traitor and ifor one answer give surrender act, betrayal traitor and i for one answer give it. surrender act, betrayal traitor and ifor one answer give it. we must moderate our language and it has to come from the prime minister first. i would be interested in hearing his opinion, he should be absolutely shaved himself —— ashamed of himself!
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i think, himself! ithink, mr himself! i think, mr speaker, i... himself! ithink, mrspeaker, i... i himself! ithink, mr speaker, i... i have to say, i'd never had such humbug in all my life. the reality is... and this is a bill... this is a bill. order. as we've been hearing there was a particular backlash over the prime minister's claim that the best way to honour the murdered mpjo cox was to deliver brexit. her husband brendan spoke to bbc breakfast earlier, who warned of the risks faced by mps in the current poltical climate there is a real threat to members of parliament and that threat continues. i speak to lots ofjo's friends on both sides of the house and there are credible death threats. there has been a particular case where another attempted assassination of a female mp was thwarted only by the police's intervention.
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this is real and it is really important that everybody on all sides of politics tries to make politics a safe place for people to argue and to debate, but to do that in a safe way. and the second thing, which i think is probably even more important, although hard to distinguish, is that there is something much more profound about the tone and the nature of our politics, and what happened last night was a reflection of a much wider willingness to demean each other, to impugn each other‘s motives, to assume that the reason that people want to leave is because they are racist or want to remain is because they are traitors to the country. this sense of politics now, whereby we are notjust disagreeing with each other but we are calling each other the worst names that we can, where we are saying what happened in the last few weeks was a coup, that it is a dictatorship, that borisjohnson is a fascist, or that people that want to remain in the european union
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are in league with other nations. this stuff is not only wrong, because actually on both sides of the debate people are just trying to do what they think is right for the country, but it is also dangerous. it creates an environment where the sort of thing that happened tojo becomes more likely. brendan cox. the conservative mp glyn davies told the bbc that the atmosphere in the commons yesterday as in part due to opposition mps barracking borisjohnson as he spoke. but when the prime minister walked in, i mean, he was facing 300 people on the other side that really were shouting all kinds of abuse and i think it creates an environment where you can't have sensible debate. and generally speaking, i'm in the camp of people who want to tone this down. i think there is quite a big debate about that issue today and i might try and speak in that if i can. i would like us to go back to the sort of politics we used to have. there is a tendency, at the moment,
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i think, while the debate about being a member of the european union continues, i fear we are not going to be able to calm things down. this morning the speaker of the commons, john bercow, warned mps that yesterday's scenes were unacceptable. i think there is a widespread sense across the house and beyond, that yesterday the house did itself no credit. there was an atmosphere in the chamber worse than any i've known in my 22 years in the house. on both sides, passions were inflamed, angry words were uttered, the culture was toxic. our assistant political editor norman smith is in central lobby for us.
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is anything going to change because of all of this? i'm not talking about the political culture that john bercow was alluding to, that in terms of the course, the direction of brexit? i suspect not, to be honest. it seemed to me watching last night that it was a very deliberate political strategy by the prime minister to try and go to real opposition mps in the hope that they will feel sufficiently incensed to trigger a vote of no confidence, thereby giving mrjohnson the election he wants. i think he has pretty much given up on getting any sort of deal in parliament and is now talking to the electorate and is trying to galvanise the vote leave constituencies and those members of the public, who feel fed up, angry at the deadlock they see in parliament. i would at the deadlock they see in parliament. iwould not at the deadlock they see in parliament. i would not be at all
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surprised if mrjohnson, maybe not in quite the terms he used last night, but i think the guts of the strategy will remain the same. he would like to think we would find out because we do actually have an urgent question done byjess phillips addressed to the prime minister about last night's language. jess phillips joins me now. two things. do you expect the prime minister to respond, and what you hope to achieve by this?” prime minister to respond, and what you hope to achieve by this? i don't expect the prime minister to respond, even though i put the question directly to him. i know he is not going to respond. what i expect to achieve, i suppose i want to put sunlight on the fact that this is a strategy. borisjohnson has always tried to present himself as if he is off the cuff, a lovable rogue. but the reality is, he has lines that have been tested and drawn up specifically to inflame
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aggression and an us versus them. it is the single, simplest way to lead a country but just is the single, simplest way to lead a country butjust by no means leadership that i recognise. he should be trying to bring the country together. it borisjohnson was to get his deal three, which he is still claiming is his strategy, although i have to say i do not trust these claims any more, why on earth is not try to reach out to people like me? instead he is using language that is literally being created back at me with his name associated with it in death threats to me. let's park borisjohnson. what about the brexit debate generally? is not time that mps on all sides just dial down some of the animosity? absolutely it is time. i represent a live constituency and i sit in my office, which is open to the public all day, every single day of the week where i can be there and have been there for the past three weeks,
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there is no animosity. there is no aggression. people talk completely reasonably and we generally love and laugh together in my constituency. but needs to be represented here. we all need to dial it down and i can be guilty of being emotional and using my language and if said things that have been used to harm other people, then i am sorry. i invite the prime ministerjacked the same. what is the impact of this —— i invite the prime minister to act the same. “— invite the prime minister to act the same. —— what is the impact of this, there has to be some sort of deal, how far now is it possible or difficult for them to reach across and agree with any deal mrjohnson brings back this month it is incredibly difficult if boris johnson decides to double down today. instead of apologising for what has happened over the shutting down of parliament and now what has happened with the inflame language that he's been using, it will be incredibly difficult and that is
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entirely on boris johnson's shoulders. i am entirely on boris johnson's shoulders. lam more entirely on boris johnson's shoulders. i am more than happy to sit down with him and his advisers andl sit down with him and his advisers and i will be asking for that today, to talk to him about this, but he is not interested in talking to me. he is only interested in making people hate me because i guess that is what will pay his bills in the end. our way in danger —— my we in danger of thinking is what happens in this place feeds into public attitudes? we have angry exchanges, very bitter i’ows we have angry exchanges, very bitter rows here, but does it actually translate into attitudes, behaviour outside or are we assuming too much? i think we should not assume too much, but, as i said, i've had a death threat this week, not online, literally posted to my place of work when my staff work, that says, to create borisjohnson, literally says those words, "people like you who do not support brexit will be found deadin not support brexit will be found dead ina not support brexit will be found
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dead in a ditch". i do not think that borisjohnson dead in a ditch". i do not think that boris johnson actually has the i’ui'i that boris johnson actually has the run of the people. i do not think it speaks for the people i knew when there is much as he thinks he does. he is speaking to some of the assay, and he is ok with that. what has happened to me, that is collateral damage to him because all he is wrong to do is win votes. the argument within government, really the only way to resolve the tensions is to get brexit done. brexit is the issue. therefore win a be more honest for the opposition parties to engage seriously with the prime minister or to allow a general election to let the public have their say? of course we should be reacting reasonably to the prime minister, of course we should be talking to him. i have to say, that has never been offered, it was not offered under theresa may either. the idea that we are going to call a general election, which is exactly what boris wants, he was to go around the country inflaming said language and trying to get people to
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attack, people like me, as if it is people versus parliament. as if i wasn't elected by people to come here and speak for people. i have no fear of having a general election. what with that election be like in the current climate, do you think is mark i would be horrendous and feral. it would only return similar numbers to what we have here. i am more than happy to see what boris johnson to what we have here. i am more than happy to see what borisjohnson is proposing with his deal and to look at it with fresh eyes and openness. i say this with total sincerity. unlike some of the people i been talking to, i mean what i say and i tell the truth. the reality is, he is not giving me anything to do. he is not giving me anything to do. he is going to have to compromise. yes, so am is going to have to compromise. yes, so am i. is going to have to compromise. yes, soami.iam is going to have to compromise. yes, so am i. i am willing to do that. that's phillips, thank you very much for your time. the other observer is the eu he will be calibrating, given the eu he will be calibrating, given the divisions at westminster how far mrjohnson could get any deal
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through parliament. the language feeds into the public discourse but also to the nitty—gritty of trying to get a brexit deal. norman, thank you very much. i'm joined by the conservative mp tobias ellwood. for your benefit, jess phillips was saying she had a letter, a death threat delivered to her office and that letter, she created a line from it, which says," to create boris johnson —— quote". do you think the prime minister should address this?” quote". do you think the prime minister should address this? i came away disappointed about how things are done last night. the world looks at us and has done for decades, centuries to watch out informed and passionate debates but once that lead to solutions. we did not come
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anywhere near solution yesterday. more division, positions were further entrenched. i think we need to learn from that, recognising the supreme court has called us back here for one simple task and that is to resolve exit. jess phillips, she is also an urgent question which will be just later, is also an urgent question which will bejust later, she believes there is a strategy, deliberate strategy by the prime minister to use keywords and phrases to drive a wedge, i drive a narrative at them and us. do you believe that it is what he is doing? she is not the only person accusing him of doing that. the strategy is reflected that there is a minority government. we do not have the numbers. if we want to get a brexit deal, we need to reach across the aisle. we need language that increases the opportunity of dozing let's get this done, let's get this result. that is the strategy want to see, my question is to believe the accusations that the prime minister has a strategy in using the inflammatory language to goad the
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position and vote of no confidence oi’ position and vote of no confidence or general election, all to all to appeal to a certain set of eight is? we came back yesterday on extraordinary circumstances. the tensions about this frustrating across the nation as well. it has been three years since we are at odds with his mission to resolve brexit. that was reflective in their frank exchanges yesterday. i think we need to draw out on this, to resolve this matter. but he is more temperate language. do you think the language yesterday has the very opposite effect to the one that you are trying to achieve, that it makes are trying to achieve, that it makes a deal less likely? borisjohnson, as you say, is going to have to reach up to mps to other parties if he gets a deal. do you think this demonstrates that he really wants to get a deal? i believe this coming and he wants a deal. we now realise that no deal is not an option because it has been legislated against, that was debated today or not has been confirmed. the way we get out of this impasse is recognising we must all move forward from our transposition. why dated
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remain but i'm happy and content with signing a deal which helps us have a relationship with the eu. i would encourage the 650 colleagues to recognise they will not get their peer version of brexit. the liberal democrats wanting to ignore referendum and revoke article 50, thatis referendum and revoke article 50, that is not going to happen. each of us that is not going to happen. each of us must compromise. we need to show some reason to measure leadership from number ten to actually that space for that debate to continue. recent unmeasured and leadership from number ten. that you do not think the tone of what is coming from number ten at the moment it is reasoned and measured.” from number ten at the moment it is reasoned and measured. i am saying what happened yesterday is far from that. there were heated exchanges on both sides of the house, i make that very clear. let's learn from the sun before it. time is up against us and this nation and the eu and others are watching the sun saying let's get on with this, we have until the 14th of october to present our ideas at the european summit. that is what we should be focusing on. all the
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media questions you have asked me so far nothing to do with the substantial issue, the one piece of the jigsaw that is missing from her, is how to resolve the northern ireland backstop. get that sorted, we have a deal. do you think people need to draw a line under what has happened yesterday before they can go on to talk about the things that you want to talk about?” go on to talk about the things that you want to talk about? i am attempting to do that now but you keep referring back to what happen yesterday. we cannot ignore that, we must learn from it, we do not want to repeat it again. i'm going to go back to what happened yesterday, we speak about exchanges on all sides of the house, it is part of the nature of the house of commons on democracy, do you think it went beyond the line of what is acceptable because like i am talking about the prime minister's response to paula sharon, the —— mark paula sharon, dismissing her response as humbug. the use ofjo cox's memory, saying that the best
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way to pay tribute to her memory was to get brexit done, which is something she did not support. she was a remain mp, it is difficult for us was a remain mp, it is difficult for us to make judgments was a remain mp, it is difficult for us to makejudgments on was a remain mp, it is difficult for us to make judgments on that. she was a close friend of mine. we did a lot of work on syria. it is not helpful to look back on theseissues it is not helpful to look back on these issues and trying to dissect them. i absolutely say yesterday was not a good day. i apologise to my constituents to say that was not a good use of our time, bearing in mind we were encouraged to come back here. let's learn and be followed, let's get the brexit deal done because it is polarising the nation. there are at moderate language from you and apollo cheese —— apologies from you. let's reflect on what the speaker john back i was talking bout this morning when he talked about in direct response to the scenes yesterday, —— john direct response to the scenes yesterday, ——john bercow. he said it was the worst he had seen,
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toxicity of the culture, he had been approached by senior politicians from across the house to look at, in the future, formal consideration of the future, formal consideration of the political culture and a striking phrase, he urged mps to treat each other as opponents, not as enemies. i'm joined by the daily telegraph's brexit commissioning editor asa bennet. good morning. what you make of the scenes yesterday? is a return to what goes, that was quite bitter from both sides. the prime minister that seem to have labour mps heckling him, saying he should be in prison. the prime minister was standing his ground and seem to be trying to agitate mps, to start them to incite them to vote him down in the motion of no confidence and that was not coming. you may well understand the frustration from the prime minister's part because he is right now boxed in by the so—called ban. that is a vaguely threatening to oblige him to delay brexit, something that is a fundamental part
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of his mission. that is why he came out with these dramatic terms. he is extremely frustrated, he said, he wasn't prime ministerial in his opinion, does he not need to rise against all of that? these frustrations, are they a and excuse for dismissing paula sherriff‘s comments about talking aboutjo cox in the way he did. the matter of when he said humbug, i think that was currently in language and response because it... he is someone who can be deft with his language, very agile, good at finding the right terms. he was far too blunt in his response, i would say. yet, actually, the best way to get brexit done is to unite the country, this is not so controversial. whenjeremy corbyn was under threat, he told the mps the best way, jo cox would want
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to go get behind the labour leadership and bring the party back together. she is the spirit of unity and cohesion. this has inflamed passions across the political faction. this has inflamed passions across the politicalfaction. looking at what it means practically, do you think a deal is less likely because my do you think it indicates that the prime minister is really trying to get a deal? this is the real problem if you are trying to play to cross party spirit, is coming together for the greater good, the national interest, you are not going to get that with the language we have seen this week. and i think that may be deliberate because when we saw the attorney general railing at mps, monty python, a dead parliament, it ceased to be, no more right. calling them cowards. clearly. they want a different parliament. they want to inspire voters to rise up they want to inspire voters to rise up and demand an election, to tell that mps to not be lily levitt and backing up an election. they can see that they have the prime minister
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trapped. it is good to get your thoughts. we will be back in very soon. let's head back to the studio. we are receiving news that the former president of france has died at the age of 86. mr chirac was president to 1997. he opposed the us led assault... he has passed away at the age of 86. the duke and duchess of york have announced that princess beatrice has got engaged. she is engaged to mr edoardo mapelli mozzi. it's said to have happened earlier this month while the pair were away in italy. the wedding will take place in 2020. it was her sister he made the
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announcement. it was via instagram. 0ur royal correspondentjonny dymond joins me in the studio. good news for the royalfamily, and fa ns good news for the royalfamily, and fans of royal weddings. princess beatrice, 99 to the elder sister of the two children. ninth air to the throne. this relationship has been in the papers a little bit for the last couple of years that things have moved quickly, with cinnamon public a couple of times, once in a gala evening. then we saw them at the wedding of lady biela winsor this yearin wedding of lady biela winsor this year in may. a spike in rumours recently about a possible engagement are now the confirmation from the duke and duchess of york that they are getting engaged and that the wedding will happen sometime next
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year. asa year. as a couple, how long have they been together? princess beatrice is not hugely in the public eye. she has a relatively private role. she does have a former royal title, her royal highness, but she does not have a public role really. we have not tracked this relationship in the same way that we tracked harry and meghan's. we reckon a couple of yea rs, meghan's. we reckon a couple of years, something like that. it has got relatively seriously in the last year also, and that is a mention we things things have moved pretty quickly. at the number of people will be asking who he is. he is a pretty wealthy businessman, he runs a top end property firm, finds property for rather wealthy people in london. he has a son from a previous relationship, a two—year—old son. there is a new thing for the royal family. two—year—old son. there is a new thing for the royalfamily. as i say, wedding expected in 2020.
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fantastic news. next year is all we know. all we know is next year. shall we make a guess at spring or summer? her younger sister was married in october, fairly blustery day in fact, 0ctober. that would have been scheduled so that it did not clash with the wedding earlier in the year as harry and meghan. there is now a clear run for weddings in 2020. let's make a stab at spring or summer next year. i will hold you to that. thank you very much. now it's time for a look at the weather. spring and early summer is not bad for a wedding. blustery showers across the uk, we have lost a band of rain, it's across the uk, we have lost a band of rain, its left us with some decent cloud scapes. some rainbow spotted by our weather watchers and we will continue with there is some showers, mainly because western parts of the uk this afternoon. some of those could be on the heavy side
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and a few of them will drift away further eastwards into the midlands and eastern parts later on. i maximum temperatures today, 16—20dc. through tonight, we will continue with the showery frame. we will see a lot more of them coming into wales, the north west of england in particular during the early hours of friday morning. a pretty wet start to the day here. elsewhere there will be some clear skies, temperatures getting down to nine and 13 celsius. throughout friday, keep your umbrella handy, more showers passing their way from east to west throughout the uk. they could merge together to get longer spells of rain, a tad cooler tomorrow as well. perhaps the chance with some brighter skies are seeing more rainbows. goodbye.
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hello this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: borisjohnson is accused of using dangerous language following extraordinary scenes in the house of commons last night. the husband of the murdered mp jo cox says the language needs to be tempered. this stuff is not only wrong, because actually on both sides of the debate people are just trying to do what they think is right for the country, but it is also dangerous. it creates an environment where the sort of thing that happened tojo becomes more likely. new figures reveal uptake of all 13 routine vaccinations
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for the under fives has fallen in the last twelve months. the introduction of minimum pricing for alcohol in scotland appears to have cut drinking, according to a new study. pricess beatrice has announced her engagement to millionaire and property tycoon edoardo mapelli mozzi. prince harry speaks out on a tour of botswana as he takes aim at climate change deniers. also coming up: the uk's new polar research ship, originally due to be called boaty mcboatface, is launched today, named after sir david attenborough. sport now, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good morning. england will be looking to make it two wins out of two
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at the rugby world cup. four days after beating tonga, they kick off aginst the usa in kobe in the next 15 minutes. our sports correspondent andy swiss is there for us. welcome. we have had a very hot, humid day. temperatures around 30 celsius although it will be a little cooler by the time the teams kick off under the roof here. england have had only four days since their opening match against tonga, and with that in mind they have rested a lot of the players who played in that game, brought in some fresh legs. they made ten changes to the line—up. captain 0wen farrell is getting a breather. and some perhaps unfamiliar names in the line—up. they will be making their welcome davies. england have real strength in depth. —— world cup debuts. the usa are an improving force in world
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by. usa are an improving force in world rugby. the england head coach eddie jones who is known for his colourful turn of phrase said playing the usa would be like playing 15 donald trumps. it got a slightly mystified response from the usa coach who said quite simply" i don't know what that means." we do know that the usa are improving, they have had some good results over the last couple of yea rs, results over the last couple of years, most notably when they beat scotla nd years, most notably when they beat scotland last year, and they have beenin scotland last year, and they have been ina scotland last year, and they have been in a training camp with the marines here in japan. been in a training camp with the marines here injapan. they clearly mean business. but england will be the favourites to make itjust wins out of two. and de suisse there. if you go to the bbc sport website, you will be able to find commentary on there. —— that is andy swiss.
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we've already had one match today. italy sit top of pool 5 with two bonus point wins. they scored seven tries against canada in fukuoka. 48—7 the final score. they beat namibia in their opener but they have matches against new zealand and south africa to come. there were more league cup upsets last night. three premier league sides were knocked out by teams from league one. the west ham manger manuel pellegrini says he took full resonsibilty as the were thrashed 4—0 by oxford united at the kassam stadium. shandon baptiste with 0xford's fourth. last season's surprise semi—finalists in the competition burton albion beat bournemouth 2—0. 0liver sarkic and then nathan broadhead with the goals. and sunderland were the last of the league one sides to take a premier league scalp. max power scored the only goal of the game at sheffield united. liverpool beat mk dons 2—0, defender ki—jana hoever with his first for the club. the draws been made for the last 16. liverpool will face arsenal next. manchaster united will face chelsea
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after beating rochdale on penalties but 16—year—old luke matheson, the youngest player in rochdales history grabbed plenty of headlines with the equlsier that sent the tie to a shoot out. he is 16. he has just started his a levels after passing ten gcse‘s last month. i love learning, it is what i want to do because football is not a guarantee. you never know what could happen. you could be the best player in the world and you never know what could happen. anything is possible soi could happen. anything is possible so i want to make sure i have got that back—up plan just in case. so i want to make sure i have got that back—up planjust in case. very wise head. it was also the quarterfinals and the scottish league cup last night. rangers will play the semis.
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glen kamara's deflected fifth—minute strike was enough to send steven gerrard's side through. there were also wins for celtic, hearts, and hibs. that's all the sport for now. let's head back to westminster. thank you very much. we are going to return to the ongoing row. borisjohnson has refused to moderate we are his language during a heated debate in the commons, despite a barrage of criticism from opposition benches. labour's paula sherriff referred tojo cox, the mp murdered in 2016, as she pleaded with him to refrain from using dangerous words like "surrender". we can speak tojo cox's sister kim leadbeater. thank you very much for taking the time to talk to us today. you have obviously had a little time now to reflect on what was said in the house of commons yesterday evening, to listen to the reaction to all of that, and i wonder what your thoughts are this lunchtime. good morning. i watched thoughts are this lunchtime. good morning. iwatched parliament thoughts are this lunchtime. good morning. i watched parliament tv for four hours last night, mesmerised, asi four hours last night, mesmerised, as i think lots of people were, and
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upset, obviously, on a very personal level. my reflections really are that we all need to take a step back andi that we all need to take a step back and i hope last night is actually a turning point where we can do this, to think about the way that we speak to think about the way that we speak to each other, to think about the language we use, and the tone of that language as well. we have to make a way forward through a challenging situation in modern times. the way to do that i think, is with respect and civility. passions are running high and feelings were tense last night, a lot of raw emotion, but i think people in public positions of responsibility need to behave responsibly and this is across the political spectrum. i'm not a member ofa political spectrum. i'm not a member of a political party, i actually don't care how you voted on brexit, but what i think is we need to step back and think about how we are speaking to each other on a human level. and therefore you will have undoubtably welcomed the speaker's
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comments when he called on mps to treat each other as opponents but not enemies. exactly. ithink treat each other as opponents but not enemies. exactly. i think what john said this morning was excellent andi john said this morning was excellent and i am hoping to speak to him, we are working with him in terms of providing a conduct in public life that hopefully all political parties can sign up to. i think that is right. it would be unrealistic to think that we are going to agree on everything. 0f think that we are going to agree on everything. of course we are not. we are living in very difficult times and people feel very passionate about the subject and lots of other subjects. but we have to find a way, andi subjects. but we have to find a way, and i thinkjohn's was i right there, be opponents but we do not have to be so horrible to each other. i think that is the bottom line. the other thing to be really clear about is that we do not want jo's name be used to silence this discussion and debate. it is a very ha rd discussion and debate. it is a very hard balance and it is hard for me to be objective but we must never forget what happened to jo to be objective but we must never forget what happened tojo because the reality is a serving politician
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was shot and stabbed to death in the street. we must never forget that. equally, that is not a reason to not conduct passionate, robust debate. it is the manner in which we do that which is important. or did you think about that part of the evening where borisjohnson said that the best about that part of the evening where boris johnson said that the best way to honour your sister, jo, memory was to get brexit done?” to honour your sister, jo, memory was to get brexit done? i always try to be fairand was to get brexit done? i always try to be fair and what i hope he meant was the best way to move on from the situation and for things to come down is to find a way forward and i think we can probably all agree on that. i felt quite uncomfortable with him using jo's name in that context with him using jo's name in that co ntext sto p with him using jo's name in that context stop i hope that he had the opportunity to reflect on those comments and a couple of other things that he said and may be think that wasn't quite the right thing to say and quite the right context. as i say, things are very tense last night, things were very heated, and we all do say things that are probably not the most helpful or useful thing to say at that moment in time. so you think his comments
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we re in time. so you think his comments were delivered in the heat of the moment rather than being deliberately inflammatory, deliberately inflammatory, deliberately trying to drive a wedge to create a then and two narrative? iam to create a then and two narrative? i am trying to be fair and i am trying to be reasonable and objective and i think what needs to happen today as people need to calm the situation down and not pour more fuel on the fire. if i come up today in angerandi fuel on the fire. if i come up today in anger and i am picking sides, i don't think that is a helpful solution. i think what i suggest is last night happen, we all now need to find a way to move on from that ina to find a way to move on from that in a useful manner, including the prime minister, and that is what my call is today to people. him, do you need an apology? people are calling on borisjohnson to apologise for last night? do you, asjo's sister, feel you need an apology from the prime minister? not necessarily
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directed you personally but a public apology parliament?” directed you personally but a public apology parliament? i do not need a personal apology. my life is what it is now since jo personal apology. my life is what it is now sincejo got killed, it doesn't bring jo back. in terms of apologising on a wider scale, in terms of the way the behaviour was conducted, i think that could be quite helpful to people. what you must do, what he mustn't do, is disrespect the genuine fear and threats that have been placed on politicians on a daily basis. including himself, iwould imagine. the raw emotion that was there last night from politicians who are facing daily threats, abuse, people coming up and being horrible to them in the street, that is a reality for them and we cannot dismiss that and he should not dismiss that. that may be something he ought to think carefully about. it is across the political spectrum, it is not about right or wrong, left or right, leave or remain, it is the whole tone of
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discourse and he has to take responsibility on that. thank you very much. and now it's time for ask this with our reality check correspondent, chris morris. chris is in stoke—on—trent today. 0ur reality check correspondent is in stoke—on—trent. we've been speaking to people out and about, and the first question for chris comes from student gemma adkins. lets hear that now. how will brexit affect first time workers coming out of university? 0k, chris, idon't 0k, chris, i don't know if that cou nts 0k, chris, i don't know if that counts as one of the more complicated or less complicated question that you have received on brexit over the last three years. question that you have received on brexit over the last three yearsm isa brexit over the last three yearsm is a big question. everyone wants to know how it will affect them. it
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partly co m es know how it will affect them. it partly comes down to this huge sense of uncertainty for business. they do not know the terms on which they will be trading with europe in a few months‘ time. brexit or no brexit, the economy is not going to ground toa the economy is not going to ground to a halt and i think the best you can say is that some areas of the economy may struggle as a result of brexit, other areas of the economy may find they have got new opportunities. i think if you have got a decent university degree and you have got skills that employers need, then brexit or no brexit, they are going to want to employ you. ok, chris. our next question comes from an italian student, federika brandimarte. she‘s studying at staffordshire university. here is what she asked. i will ask them if we will be able to get a job because i am italian and i am studying a forensic course, forensic investigation, so i would like to know if i will get a job in the future. what are your thoughts on that?”
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think we know that the british economy needs workers from overseas, thatis economy needs workers from overseas, that is not going to change as a result of brexit. she is an eu citizen who is already here which means she will be able to apply for what is called a settled status which should give her the right to live and work here in the future, so, again, if she can find employers who want to employ her, that shouldn‘t change. as for international students in the future, we know that the government recently said that international stu d e nts recently said that international students whether from in the eu recently said that international students whetherfrom in the eu or outside the eu, will be given up to two years to find work before they have to leave. but for eu students in the future, they will no longer be able to necessarily come here and a study on the same terms as british stu d e nts a study on the same terms as british students after brexit, just as british students will no longer be able to go to other european countries and take advantage of
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local rules and local fees in those countries as well. they will be changes but if you are already here, then you should have the right to stay. let's take another question for you, chris. this is from another student, jake walked in. ——jake walkden. my question would be how will brexit impact people that are studying here that are from a different country? how will it impact the cost of flights and, just in general, how it will impact. a broader question on the impact of studying here during this brexit process , studying here during this brexit process, after brexit, but bringing in lots of other angles as well like what travel costs might be. yes, the cost of flights is something we get asked a lot and it is really difficult to predict, to be honest. we know, for example, petrol is priced in dollars so if the value of the pound fell quite dramatically
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against the dollar, you could argue that could push the cost of flights. the problem is there is so much we don‘t know. we do not know, for example, what the terms of the airlines are going to be flying to and from the eu are going to be. we are part of the single sky at the moment which means any airline can fly a ny moment which means any airline can fly any route they want. if there was a nodal brexit, that would be restricted dramatically. the eu will put a temporary measure in place to allow basic rights to continue but in the long term what is going to happen, not sure, could that have an effect on price? possibly for. a lot of things will be supply and demand. if people still want to fly, then they should be able to do so. possibly i think the big thing to look for might be the value of the pound against the dollar, but there are so many other things apart from brexit that will impact the cost of flying, not least, of course, the pressures from those who say climate
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change means we need to alter our habits when it comes to flying. thank you very much. thank you to those three students for sending those three students for sending those questions in and to chris, our reality check correspondence there in stoke—on—trent. before i hand back to the studio. vickyjung is saying that in a briefing to journalists, downing street has issued a statement saying whatever the views, politicians and those in public life should not face threats or intimidation, it is completely unacceptable. asked about why boris johnson referred to the ban act as a surrender act, the reply was, there are serious concerns about that act, it works against the country‘s best interests in negotiations. more from here throughout lunch time but right now, back to the studio. anita, thank you very much. figures published this morning show that there‘s been a fall
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in the take up of all 13 routine vaccinations for children under the age of five. the data from nhs digital shows uptake of the first dose of the mmr vaccine fell for the fifth year in a row. jonathan balljoins me now. he‘s a professor of molecular virology at the university of nottingham. thank you for speaking to us at bbc news. this is yourfield, how worried should we be? we should be worried. this is, as you say, the fifth year that numbers have fallen and whilst we often think as these virus infections as being fairly trivial childhood infections, they can cause very serious trivial childhood infections, they can cause very serious complications and even result in death. because we have got such an effective vaccine as mmr, we have forgottenjust have got such an effective vaccine as mmr, we have forgotten just how dangerous these things can be. something like measles which is incredibly contagious, one of the most infectious viruses that we know, for every person infected,
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they can infect 18 of the people. we know that we have to have an uptake of around 95% to get what we call herd immunity stop in other words, 95% of people are immunised and that stops the from spreading within the community and we need to get nearer to those figures to stop the outbreaks that we are seeing not only in the uk but we are seeing in europe and across the world. looking at projections, if that isn‘t done, how do you see the spread of these diseases evolving over time if they are not checked, what is going to happen, how fast can it happen? we will continue to see outbreaks. i am not saying that we will end up with a worldwide pandemic at any particular time but what we will a lwa ys particular time but what we will always see whenever the community doesn‘t reach those vaccination targets is we will see outbreaks, epidemics, and occasionally associated with that will be people who will be admitted to hospital with serious complications and very
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occasionally deaths. unfortunately, it isa occasionally deaths. unfortunately, it is a complex picture as to why people aren‘t getting vaccinated. we certainly can lay the blame at the anti—vaccine movement, there is still a lot of misinformation going around on social media for example. we know the mmr vaccine is incredibly safe, the link with autism was totally discredited, but u nfortu nately autism was totally discredited, but unfortunately there‘s room still circulate. 0f unfortunately there‘s room still circulate. of course, i think the other problem is apathy. because we don‘t see these as serious diseases, it is easy to ignore the invitation to go and get your child vaccinated. 0k, professor jonathan to go and get your child vaccinated. 0k, professorjonathan ball from the university of nottingham, thank you very much indeed. ina in a moment, we will have all the business headlines. first, a reminder of our headlines here. borisjohnson is accused of using dangerous language following extraordinary scenes in the house of commons last night — the speaker describes the atmosphere there as "toxic."
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new figures reveal uptake of all thirteen routine vaccinations for the under fives has fallen in the last twelve months. prince harry speaks out on a tour of botswana as he takes aim at climate change deniers. i‘m victoria fritz in the business news this morning. £121 million. ba counts the cost of the pilot strike at the start of the month. the airline says further walk—outs will only exacerbate a weaker outlook for profits. a us regulator sues the online dating company match, which also owns tinder and 0kcupid, alleging that hundreds of thousands of people were duped into subscribing after receiving fake expressions of love interest. a thomas cook boss has apologised after a video emerged of staff cheering him and other executives at the firm‘s german subsidiary after it secured a bailout.
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the german government stepped in to save the business while thomas cook workers all lost theirjobs. hello there. the bbc is reporting from stoke—on—trent this week. it‘s the city that recorded the highest number of leave votes in the uk. today it‘s the turn of local businesses to discuss what they believe brexit might mean for the area. if you‘re an antiques roadshow fan, you‘ll know how important the ceramics industry has long been to the area. but did you know that ceramics are found in everything from your car engine to your smartphone? in fact, they‘re likely to be critical to the roll out of 5g infrastructure around the world. the industry in stoke has been in decline, but could that be about to change? let‘s speak now tour... dr laura cohen is chief executive of the british ceramic confederation. thank you forjoining us. when it comes to brexit, what are the concerns for your industry? our
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industry had been growing 9% per year after the recession, it is a 2 billion industry with 20,000 jobs, 630 million exports. the main concerns are around customs at the border, cash being tied up in stocks of raw materials and finished goods rather than investment of developed new product lines, increase capacity. we are also seeing a loss of confidence are ready which will be even worse in a nodal brexit, a loss of confidence amongst customers at home and abroad particularly in europe. we are very concerned about ta riffs europe. we are very concerned about tariffs as well in a new deal brexit. 0ur tariffs as well in a new deal brexit. our customers in europe will be paying extra costs through export ta riffs be paying extra costs through export tariffs and at the same time the manufacturers in the uk will have the double whammy of zero import ta riffs the double whammy of zero import tariffs on very many but not necessarily all product lines. we are worried about dumping the
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legislation is not in place fully so that when we have import surges and so on we need to be able to see the data properly and react to it. we need to understand what the new guidances, the new legislation in place is in the uk. we were growing, thriving, and we want to continue to be successful. you say you are growing and thriving but along with other aspects of manufacturing, investment has been stalling. it is very difficult and you do require partnerships with the likes of universities and start—ups to foster and keep growing and keep driving that growth. is that possible under any kind of brexit scenario at the moment? we have a really good academic expertise in ceramics and materials in the uk and the sector has built a very strong links with them and we need to continue to develop and grow that. but in a no—deal brexit, there is going to be
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the immediate threat to cash in businesses, to customer confidence. we are already seeing a fewjobs lost at smaller companies which are below the media radar because of lost customer confidence. we need parliamentarians to work together to avoid no deal and try to find a way forward , avoid no deal and try to find a way forward, ideally a deal and it is really important when the eyes of the world are upon us that we are seen as a good place to continue to invest. we a re seen as a good place to continue to invest. we are seen as somewhere politically and economically stable. chief executive of the british ceramics federation, thank you very much. and i think that might be it from me today. plenty more throughout the rest of the afternoon from my colleagues from stoke. we will see you soon. thank you very much.
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the duke and duchess of cambridge will join sir david attenborough for the naming ceremony later of the polar research ship the public wanted to call boaty mcboatface. they‘ll attend a ceremony at the cammell laird shipyard in birkenhead, and will be joined by the famous broadcaster himself. 0ur science correspondent rebecca morelle reports. heading for the most remote parts of our planet, this 130—metre long polar ship is almost complete. the rrs sir david attenborough ready for its royal ceremony today. the ships that we have at the moment are 25, 30 years old. it is an extremely advanced ship. probably the — certainly, one of the most advanced ships in the world, if not the most advanced ship. it has taken just three years to build this vessel. a million pieces of steel slotted into place. on board, the team is putting together the finishing touches. for a ship this size, everything is on a huge scale.
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my primary role on board has been to get the ship painted. so internally and externally. ship total — it has taken 60,000 litres of paint to paint this ship which is just mind—boggling the amount we have actually used. and what of boaty mcboatface, the name the public chose for this ship? well, boaty lives on in the form of a robotic yellow submarine. it will be deployed from the ship to the icy deep. and this is how the sir david attenborough will look when the exploration begins. breaking through ice, up to a metre thick, the hope is it will transform our understanding of the rapidly changing poles. after the vessel‘s naming ceremony today, the next step will be sea trials before it leaves for antarctica next year. rebecca morelle, bbc news. now it‘s time for a look at the weather.
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we have got some pretty unsettled weather over the next two days. we started with heavy rain. if we look at the satellite, we can see this massive cloud of the coast of newfoundland. that is that we can‘s wet weather. ahead of that, an area of low pressure out to the west. that is a weather front this morning bringing outbreaks of rain. that has cleared away now. the north—east of scotland, we still have rain. elsewhere, shai was moving in from the west. with their showers, we have got fairly decent cloud scopes. that is from a weather watcher in bedfordshire. clouds could bring showers mainly across western areas of england, wales and into northern ireland and scotland. some could be on the heavy side but there will be some sunny spells and temperature is about 16 to 20 celsius. this evening, we are going to sea the shower is continuing to move their way in. in fact, across wales and
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north—west england, showers merging together to give longer spells of rain as we go into the early hours of friday. elsewhere, there will be some clear skies and those are your overnight temperatures, many of us staying in double figures. friday, more of the same. showers coming from west to east. they were clumped together to give some lengthy spells of rain as it moves its way gradually from west to east. they will be some sunny spells again as they develop and move eastwards. temperatures down a bit on today, 13 to 18 celsius. for the weekend, i showed you that lump of cloud at the start. as we go through into saturday, it is not quite with us. low pressure is driving the weather through saturday bringing showery outbreaks of rain. it is later on saturday and into the night time period that we will see this next batch of rain that slowly move its way into wales and the south—west of england. temperatures on saturday about 15 to 18 celsius. this area of
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rain towards the south—west, there are uncertainties on the timing of its progression. as it clears the way to the east, there will be some fairly strong winds behind that so a blustery day on sunday. rain generally moves away towards the east but they could be a lot of rainfall as we go through the weekend so it is well worth staying tuned to the forecast. goodbye.
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i‘m annita mcveigh, live at westminster where the fall—out from yesterday‘s heated exchanges in the commons continue to reverberate. come on! come on, then! borisjohnson is accused of using dangerous language in the house of commons last night. the husband of the murdered mpjo cox speaks out. this stuff is not only wrong, because actually, on both sides of the debate, people are just trying to do what they think is right for the country, but it‘s also dangerous. it creates an environment where the sort of thing that happened tojo becomes more likely. there was an atmosphere in the chamber worse than any i've known in my 22 years in the house.
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i‘m lukwesa burak. in other news: new figures reveal uptake of all 13 routine vaccinations for the under 5s has fallen in the last 12 months. president trump‘s top intelligence official faces congress over a whistleblower complaint that sparked an impeachment inquiry. princess beatrice announces her engagement to boyfriend edoardo mapelli mozzi. also coming up, as part of the bbc‘s we are stoke week, how this all—women‘s choir is having a profound impact on people‘s lives.
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hello and welcome to westminster where borisjohnson is facing calls to moderate his language after the commons witnessed some of the most furious exchanges it‘s seen in recent years last night. a number of conservative mps, including a cabinet minister, have urged him to pick his words carefully, after he accused his opponents of surrendering to the european union, and sabotaging his brexit negotiations. the prime minister also claimed the best way to honour the murdered pro—remain mp, jo cox, was to "get brexit done". jo cox‘s husband brendan cox has this morning told the bbc it wasn‘t legitimate to co—opt his late wife‘s memory "for things that she didn‘t believe in or didn‘t say". a downing street spokesman told journalists at a briefing a short while ago that it was not acceptable for mps to face or indeed those in
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public life to face any threats or intimidation. another breaking line coming from us, the prime minister has been meeting the 1922 committee of backbenchers, a line coming out is that borisjohnson is saying that he could get a brexit deal, but if not, the uk will have to leave the eu on the 31st of october. you will know of course that mps have voted to say that if the prime minister does not have a deal by mid—0ctober, then he must request an extension. let‘s consider all of this. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith is in the central lobby of the houses of parliament for us. the prime minister trying to, i guess, bring the attention back to the prospects of a brexit deal, and what happens if there is not a deal, he still has questions to answer about yesterday in the commons. he is facing a growing backlash over his very competitive, provocative approach in the commons last night, not just from
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approach in the commons last night, notjust from opposition approach in the commons last night, not just from opposition mps approach in the commons last night, notjust from opposition mps but indeed from some of his own supporters, nervous about the impact that has already divided country and for sellers that feels tensions and divisions. the response from those around mrjohnson has been to point the finger back at opposition mps and say, mrjohnson has been accused of being a dictator, a tyrant. i think we can go to the commons now because the labour mpjess phillips has got an urgent question about the prime minister‘s language. no matter their background, camp or dissipate in our democracy, for you from hatred and intimidation. that is why we are taking action to confront it. the government is committed to campaign... we have already made secondary legislation that removes the requirement for candidates standing and local and mayoral elections to have the home address is published on the ballot paperand address is published on the ballot paper and will do the same for the greater london assembly elections. members across this house have faced
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threats and violence, tax on their constituency offices and staff and abuse aimed at family members. this is abhorrent. i know honourable and right honourable member is from crossley has raised this concern yesterday. we want ensure people from across this political is action can stand fathers, free from the theory of intimidation and abuse. we wa nt theory of intimidation and abuse. we want to tackle this issue and protect voters. there security arrangements for members of parliament have been kept under consta nt parliament have been kept under constant review and the metropolitan police. local forces engage with mp5 and other political figures to make their security needs. each force has a single point of contact in place, contact with the plate through regular updates and meetings as required. the government are also considering what further steps are necessary to ensure the safety of parliamentarians and their staff. crucially this applies to not only the vicinities of parliament but also in constituencies online. we
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are working with social media companies to address threats online to create a safe environment for debate. just phillips. thank you, mr speaker. —— jess phillips. just phillips. thank you, mr speaker. ——jess phillips. the prime minister to be asked to reflect. iam nota minister to be asked to reflect. i am not a nobody in here is a traitor. they are not ignoring their constituencies, they are all in good faith. i was raised that we were the good ones and over there was the bad ones, and what i found was everyone was to get to the same conclusion. i will wager that more so than the prime minister, i spent time in my constituency office, loving and laughing with my constituents, no matter what they voted. i do not wa nt to matter what they voted. i do not want to probe into the idea that we all get to and no doubt we are going to hear a lot of that today because we all get abuse and i‘ve had a death threat this week that
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literally quoted the prime minister that and use the prime minister does not words in a death threat that was delivered to my staff. we know that it gets out. what i want to look up to date on what i want answers to today is the one that is a clear strategy to divide, the use of language yesterday and over the past few weeks, such as the surrender bell, invoking a wall, talking about the trail and strategy —— betrayal and treachery. it is entirely designed to inflame hatred and division. i get it. it works. it is working. we are all ambitious, i‘m get it. it works. it is working. we are allambitious, i‘m not get it. it works. it is working. we are all ambitious, i‘m not going to pretend i am not. i also have a soul. it is not sincere, it is totally planned, it is completely and utterly a part of the strategy
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designed by somebody to harm and cause hatred in our country. when i hear of my friend‘s murder and the way it has made me and my colleagues you‘ll and feel scared described as humbug, i actually do not feel anger towards the prime minister. i feel pity for those of you who still have to toe his line. the people opposite me know how appalling it was to describe the murder of my friend as mayor humbug. —— humbug. can i ask eve ryo ne mayor humbug. —— humbug. can i ask everyone to act with calm and dignity in this moment. i want to ask the prime minister to apologise
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and to tell him that the bravest, strongest thing to say is sorry. it will make him look good. it will not upset the people he won brexit in this country if the axe were once like a statesman —— like who want brexit in this country. calling me names, putting words in my mouth and in the mouth of my dead friend makes me cross and angry. it makes me scared, even. buti me cross and angry. it makes me scared, even. but i will not react. the prime minister wants me to react so that ijoin in the chaos that keeps this hatred and fear on our streets. i simply asked the minister today to request to the prime minister his notable by his bravery today, i ask him...
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i asked him to ask the prime minister to meet with me, in private, with his advisers and some of my colleagues and my friends from joe‘s family —— jo‘s family so we can explain our grieve and try to make him understand why it is so abhorrent that he has chosen a strategy to divide, rather than to lead. minister foster. thank you, mr speaker. i will show calm and dignity with my responses today as well. i would be very clear that the government is looking at how we create a safe environment. we are not just create a safe environment. we are notjust in terms of members of parliament, but for a journalist and four others in public life you can face abuse for wanting to be involved in what they do. of course,
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members of the judiciary. i involved in what they do. of course, members of thejudiciary. i am a lwa ys members of thejudiciary. i am always glad no one is a traitor for saying what they believe all for arguing a different political point, thatis arguing a different political point, that is part of public debate. the last actual traitor was in 1916, someone who tried to support those looking to overturn this democracy by violent means. i think it is right to say that the government is moving to take action. we have the online ham white paper, working with collea g u es online ham white paper, working with colleagues in the department of culture, media and sport to tackle the corrosive nature of the debate online. we see some of the work being done across government to try and tackle why things aren‘t being done and make sure people are clear to express their views. the lower peers as much as line as it does in the physical world. i think —— the law applies online as much as it doesin law applies online as much as it does in the physical world. it is
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about how we do not get into a game about how we do not get into a game about what about, it is how we focus on what we can to protect her, she made this morning, mr speaker, about the suggestions and i‘m sure you like me would like to hear about the thoughts coming out that i did that has been floated. the minister who is responsibility it is for a defending democracy programme, i will be happy to meet with the honourable member to discuss in a different format to where it comes stop and ultimately to see where we can go with, we are committed to legislate, one of the things that many picked up last time following the election and see this as an ongoing debate, plus yesterday, if this has had not been meeting, i was due to be having a meeting with the police to discuss what we could do to ensure all candidates receive support in any future general election. it is not just election. it is notjust about election. it is not just about when election. it is notjust about when people are members of this place that they would face intimidation and abuse.
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the government is taking a range of actions and ultimately, it is for eve ryo ne actions and ultimately, it is for everyone to think about what they say and also how they have contributed uncertainly today, what they will get from the government is a calm dignity in response and make it clear that what we are doing to tackle this issue and create a safe environment for golfer debate, not just for members of parliament. when it comes to creating safe environment and displays, we have a very clear of conduct. it is enforced by you in this chamber, mr speaker. yesterday you were right knee, i think, speaker. yesterday you were right knee, ithink, vigorous speaker. yesterday you were right knee, i think, vigorous with the prime minister as either in the enforcement of his behaviour in accordance to that code. i have the very greatest respect for my honourable friend, we serve on the select committee together and i know how passionately she feels on many issues. i‘m afraid it was yesterday
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she was the person i could hear screaming the loudest from her badge. noticeable it was, she was actually having a conversation with one of the whips who were standing by the side of your chair, mr speaker. it was that... we are going to say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. continuing watching the commentary on the bbc news channel. debate of the hostility that the media reported. is it one of the issues here the equal implementation of the code of conduct so that all members of this house feel as affected by the code and its requirement for all of us to treat each of us with respect. regardless of party. thank you, mr speaker. the right honourable member makes a valid point, that it‘s for all of us to look at how we contribute to
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respectful debate in this chamber. of course, in terms of what happens in this chamber it would be yourself and your deputies that make sure members stick to the code of conduct and you have taken action when you believe that is not occurring. but ultimately, certainly for government it‘s not just about this ultimately, certainly for government it‘s notjust about this place but the whole of democratic debate. there are people looking at doing their democratic duty as i see it, standing in this place, giving people a chance to vote for policies who want to know that in doing so they will have their arguments put to the test, they will have their thoughts put to the test, their proposals put to the test. what is not put to the test is how thick a skin they have. it is absolutely right what the minister has said. that kind of conduct has to be enforced and, indeed, as far as the chamber is concerned adjudicated by the chair. the record is there for all to see, people can observe week after week
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after week after week that there can be abuses on both sides, for example during prime ministers questions and every time, without fail, the chair intervenes to seek to restore order. it has been the case, it is the case, it will always be the case. it isn't a matter of party politics, it isn't a matter of party politics, it isa isn't a matter of party politics, it is a matter of procedural propriety and that is the way it has to continue to be. jeremy corbyn. thank you, mr speaker. i start by congratulating my friend the member of birmingham yardley for securing this question. it‘s extremely disappointing that the prime minister has not respected this house by attending here today. the prime minister‘s language and demeanour yesterday was frankly nothing short of disgraceful. three yea rs nothing short of disgraceful. three years ago, our colleague, our member
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jo cox was murdered by a far right activist shouting "britain first, this is for britain". the language politicians use matters and have real consequences. to dismiss concerns from members about the death threats they receive and to dismiss concerns that the language used by the prime minister is being repeated in those death threats is reprehensible. to dismiss those concerns in an abusive way, as he did, is completely unacceptable. i pay tribute to my honourable friend is for dewsbury and for batley and spen and other members, including the memberfor spen and other members, including the member for broxtowe for what they said yesterday. today, i‘ve written to all members of the parliamentary labour party expressing my solidarity to my friends and set out the conduct expected of all colleagues. no side
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of this house, as you have said, mr speaker, has a monopoly of virtue. inappropriate language has been used by all sides. but we all have a duty to keep our debates political and not to descend into personal abuse. i disagreed profoundly with the previous prime minister but she did offer cross— party previous prime minister but she did offer cross—party talks to try to find a compromise. she also set out her approach to this house, allowing for scrutiny and debate. i was also pleased to participate in a meeting with the former prime minister and other party leaders about conduct and abuse in the house and around the parliamentary estate. the current prime minister, u nfortu nately, the current prime minister, unfortunately, has sought to entrench divisions, refused to set out any detail of the deal he is seeking and continues to pledge that they will leave with no deal on the
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31st of october, despite the fact that this house has voted against and legislated against that outcome. not only should the prime minister comply with the law, he should come to this house and apologise for his conduct yesterday, which fell well below the standards expected by the people of this country of the way their elective representatives behave, speak and should treat each other. minister foster. thank you, mr speaker. i think it‘s clear having outlined what the government is doing but of course, the opposition mentions the murder ofjo cox, a dreadful crime, committed by an extremist. many of us who are in the house at that time know where we were when we heard that terrible news. i was attending a constituency event. much like our
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previous colleagues would remember where they were when other previous collea g u es where they were when other previous colleagues were killed. the delay will bring more division to this country, and in terms of having... bradford, robert bradford, i apologise for stop thank you for correcting me, mr speaker. in terms of looking to how we are tackling this as a government, we do need to bring a resolution to debates. as the leader of the opposition will know, the government has been clear that we are prepared to take our arguments to the country on tuesday the 15th of october and ask the electorate to pass a judgment. that would have given a chance to not only resolve the division affecting this house, but also to give a way that the country to move forward. as
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you yourself have reflected, mr speaker, the passions of this issue has inflamed will only carry on if there is not a resolution. and milton. thank you mr speaker, i want to associate myself with the marks are made at the beginning of proceedings today that i fear the minister will go to great lengths to take this argument to the wider issues. but what this question is about is what happened here yesterday. it was com pletely u na cce pta ble happened here yesterday. it was completely unacceptable behaviour in every way. creating division is not create four, from what ever side it comes. if we cannot do this in this place, mr speaker, may it is time to put aside our party parliamentary t—shirts, our brexit remain t—shirts and put on a t—shirt that stands for
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parliamentary democracy. unity of purpose, consensus and agreement. yesterday was unacceptable and if we don‘t do something to change theirs, we are putting our parliamentary democracy at threat. minister. thank you, mr speaker. in terms of the question, it clearly relates to creating a safe environment both in the country and in parliament. certainly, as the minister responsible, i don‘t want to see this being a case of mps on their own. many have faced abuse and intimidation that being a part of this from the judiciary intimidation that being a part of this from thejudiciary committee journalist and to those who will never be members of parliament who just want to take part in a part of this from the judiciary just want to take part in a part of this from thejudiciary committee journalist and those who will never be members of parliament who just wa nt to ta ke be members of parliament who just want to take part in our democratic process. but as was touched on, we had the scottish uk this morning about thoughts and reflections about
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what might happen in the for the house to decide how it regulates itself, what changes it may make to itself, what changes it may make to its own standing orders and we can rely on yourself, mr speaker, and whoever is elected to replace you to lead the way in enforcing them. ki rsty lead the way in enforcing them. kirsty blackman. mr speaker, as others have said, the scenes in the house of commons last night were deeply disturbing. the prime minister‘s tone was appalling, his behaviour was appalling and his language was appalling. we have at number 10 a man who has built his career on making inflammatory remarks, stoking division and shouting down those who disagree with him. mr speaker, the prime minister is not fit for office. his behaviour is an outrage and his government is treating people disgracefully. people want leadership, mr speaker, and they wa nt leadership, mr speaker, and they want accountability. what should have happened yesterday is the prime minister should have come in front at this house and apologised for
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acting unlawfully. he should have held his hands up at agreed he acted wrongly and pledged not to do it again. instead, he chose to brazen out, proving he embodies the very worst of the wrongs in our society and totally ignoring the seven principles of public life. mr speaker, young people are watching our parliament today. they are watching and learning that in order to get to the top, all you need to do is break the law and shout people down. the house of commons and the prime minister should be setting a good example to all of those living across these isles. the prime minister should be here today. the prime minister should pledge to stop using language that incites hatred or violence, whether that is against other mps, citizens with different political beliefs or migrants who have chosen to come and live and work in the uk.
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will the minister ask the prime minister to come before us and do that? minister? thank you, mr speaker. i have to say, when we look at how we reflect on creating a safe environment for debate many collea g u es environment for debate many colleagues will reflect on how that was shown online in the 2014 scottish independence referendum. i think what i would say hearing the comments that have just been made, if the scottish national party has no confidence in the prime minister, then there was a perfect opportunity offered yesterday for them to table a motion to debate that today and also for them to take that to the country on the 15th of october but it is an invitation they declined. sir bernard jenkin. there is already a danger in these exchanges of it
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turning into a holier than thou competition. i think we should reflect on how much unhappiness and anxiety there is amongst members of the house and that this is going to be expressed in various ways and people are going to use robust and emotive language in order to express their views and that is entirely understandable. may i just their views and that is entirely understandable. may ijust make one request, mr speaker? that we no longer invoke the name of any person who has been a victim of attacks in order to try and make political points? well, there we are... simply used as an opportunity to shame other members of this house. i don‘t personally think any of the exchanges and mentions ofjo cox yesterday was particularly fair on herfamily. yesterday was particularly fair on her family. that's outrageous!
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minister? thank you, mr speaker. it is always useful to benefit from the experience of the right honourable member in this house over many yea rs. member in this house over many years. he is right to say that we can have robust and emotive debates. the issue is settled in this parliament are matters of great concern across the nation and rightly people will get passionate about that. but in doing so, we should not do so with this respect. i know, of course, if that happened, that would be dealt with. jo swinson? thank you, mr speaker. i would gently say to the honourable gentleman opposite that i don‘t think it is for any member of this house to determine whether another member can talk about their own grief and how they feel in a certain circumstance and whether that should somehow not be allowed. the language that leaders use matters, because it sets the tone for public debate. i‘m sure i‘m not alone in looking across
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the atlantic at the rallies of crowds of people chanting "lock up! " about hillary clinton, or "send her back" and by the way it‘s no coincidence it is women that are often the targets of this hate and especially women of colour and see worrying echoes in our own politics of that trump —like approach. so i ask the minister whether he can give any assurance that there will be no deliberate campaign use that kind of language to inflame, but i fear he cannot because the repeated use of those inflammatory words by the prime minister yesterday was, it seemed, very obviously deliberate. i would just end by saying on tuesday morning, i spoke to a group of 400 young women. they asked me how i
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dealt with abuse and hate on social media as a woman in public life. they asked me whether i thought going in politics was something i would recommend. iwant going in politics was something i would recommend. i want to be able to say to young women like that and to say to young women like that and to all young people that they should play their role in public life and we need to be able, those of us in this house, to create the environment that enables those young people to come forward into public life and i feel we are failing to do so. we all want to see an environment where people feel they can take part. that is what the government is looking to do. she gives some exa m ples of looking to do. she gives some examples of what we have seen over the atlantic and whilst i never voted for him seeing a group of people chanting about tony blair can
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die, we don‘t want to see an indication of that. but what would inflame in further debate would have more delay and people feel when they do vote and have a say they are then ignored. that is why we do need to bring the brexit matter to a resolution as the government is seeking to do. mr kenneth clarke. what concerns me about all this is whether there is any sense of deliberate strategy in all this and i would like my honourable friend to reassure me. iassure him i have beena reassure me. iassure him i have been a junior minister myself sol do realise he is probably not consulted closely about strategy. i'm not so many members of the cabinet have much idea. it seems to
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me that firstly the prime minister is absolutely desperate to have an election before the 315t of october so he can fight it. i also fear that the strategy is to fight it on this people versus parliament platform that nigel farage invented and which we are now being imitating. can my honourable friend the show me that what happened yesterday was one of these occasions when people lost control of themselves and the house erupted in disorder and this is part of some grand discrediting of the usual political institutions in order to fight a populist and nationalist campaign. as a junior
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minister it‘s always welcome to benefit from the advice of the father of the house. what i would reassure him is that the strategy of the government has is to do with the vast majority of the nation wants to see which is to bring a resolution to brexit and deliver the referendum result. given his own views the father of the house has already voted for deals. where the government will look to fight the general election is a platform of resolving brexit, no more delay, bringing 20,000 extra police officers onto a street, increasing school funding and taking our economy forward. 0ur platform will be far stronger than the one opposite. harriet harman. ithank be far stronger than the one opposite. harriet harman. i thank my honourable friend for bringing this urgent question and to you for your comments last night. i agree with
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the father of the house and everything he has said. ithink the father of the house and everything he has said. i think that what happened last night wasjust an ugly spectacle of things getting even worse that have been happening for months. we all know that honourable members on all sides of the house have felt inhibited in doing their work that they are elected to do. it is essential that everybody who was elected to this house is able to speak out without fear or favour to say what they believe in and nobody in this house should do anything that stops any other member exercising that right. whether its threats to people who are remain as people in balaclavas boosting into a university meeting which was being addressed by the leader of the house, we cannot allow
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that in our democracy. no can we have a situation where members are fearful not only for themselves and their own safety but their staff and also their families. now the government minister has mentioned a numberof government minister has mentioned a number of initiatives and we've had enough discussion about these problems over the months in this chamber. we have had a number of initiatives but there is a lack of coherence and focus for action. that is why the father of the house and myself have proposed they should be a speaker plasma conference that brings together the police, the cps, the house authorities, the parties and looks at what can be done to ensure that we protect our democracy. it also needs to look at our political culture. we know for example that we cannot call each other blackguard or get a snipe or
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stool pigeon or various other things. we need to have the rules that are updated and protectors to enable us to do our business today. ican enable us to do our business today. i can reflect the productive conversation we had when the mother of the house was present with... and again people should be able to speak out. ido think...
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certainly for the government our focus is this isn‘tjust about members of parliament, this is about engaging public life. journalists who face abuse for what they say and others who just do the public duty and share their opinion. justine greening. like many people in this chamber! greening. like many people in this chamber i was shocked by the u na cce pta ble chamber i was shocked by the unacceptable conduct i felt of the prime minister and particularly his attitude which succeeded that of the attitude which succeeded that of the attitude of the attorney general earlier in the day to how this house works. my concern is that these institutions, both the one that we debated earlier in the supreme court and the judiciary and of course parliament, the place where lows are set in the first place, and absolutely crucial to the well— being
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of people in our country and we all rely on them. all of those who are pa rt of rely on them. all of those who are part of these institutions had effectively can study and is for protecting their well—being effectively can study and is for protecting their well— being is effectively can study and is for protecting their well—being is for the future. what we're seeing in politics is a deliberate race to the bottom of the form of gutter politics that i have to say unfortunately directly disadvantages those of us not willing to be part of that race. the sooner the leadership of the main political parties in this country rise to the challenge of showing levels of integrity in the conduct and behaviour that the british people are entitled to expect the better.” a lwa ys are entitled to expect the better.” always reflect well on the comments made by the right honourable lady.
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what i would say is we as a government are committed to ensuring that the public discourse particularly online is notjust about how we make sure that people are not breaching the law and how people can participate without fear of abuse but it is ensuring we can tackle some of the issue of disinformation which can have such a corrosive impact on our society. we do see that the social media giants have made some moves but there is a need to do even more. ed miliband. all of us need to take care of our language and none of us is without fault but the prime minister of our country holds a special responsibility and i say to members across this house, i spent four and across this house, i spent four and a half years opposite david cameron andl a half years opposite david cameron and i never saw a performance like the performance we saw last night from this prime minister. he said this in answer, the best way to ensure that every parliamentarian is
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properly safe and to dial down the current anxiety in the country to get brexit done. mr speaker, everyone in this house she is the frustration of the last three and a half years and some of us didn't wa nt half years and some of us didn't want the referendum on the first place but none of us can agree that the safety of members of this house should depend on the way they vote in this house. it is a disgrace that the prime minister said this yesterday. he should apologise and the minister should apologise on behalf of. this and the language of surrender suggests we are at war either with europe or with each other. as someone who grew up with parents who were born in the shadow of war, we are not at war with europe and we are not at war with each other. go down any street in
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this country and there are people who voted remain a people who voted leave and there are people with different views about how brexit should be resolved. the prime minister has a special responsibility, he is not exercising that responsibility, he is trying to divide an already divided country. some people say this strategy will work. i say this strategy will not work. i say this strategy will not work because of the british people are better than this. it was interesting to hear him mention his pa rents interesting to hear him mention his parents and a member of the attacks he faced when —— in terms of his own father which took politics to a place... when i would say in terms of the strategy, i am clear when we liaise with the police and when we are talking with them about appropriate measures to be taken
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that that implies whatever opinion anyone takes within this house. i suspect my discussions are more likely to focus on those who disagree with me but i have every right to put those arguments forward. but as we all know we did give the british people an opportunity to express their views on tuesday the 15th of october 2019 but for the first time in history government wanted an election to resolve the matter and was blocked from doing so by the opposition. there is a strategy. the prime minister is the last thing standing between ending the brexit enterprise entirely. he can expect no quarter. everything will be thrown at him,
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isn't it? it's safe to say that the brexit process has caused passions and arguments and debate but where the prime minister is very clear is that his view is the way to deal with this and the government because mcphail is to ensure we deliver brexit on the 31st of october 2019. this isn‘t actually about brexit and know for many of us is that this about how do we make this stop because if we want to do that we need to understand where it starts and how the extremists on all sides of our political culture will trump proudly about how they might stand at cable street defends peoples rights or listen to steve bannon disagree with him have no understanding or comprehension about
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how we get to that cable street or steve bannon in the first place. the danger with the prime minister‘s conduct last night is that it is feeding a culture and a language that normalises extremism so that those of us who have had to shouted at us in the street as well as online experience this as the heat of the kitchen rather than a language that does nobody any favours in our democracy. and i say to the minister the most important thing you can do now is go and listen to what we are missing because this doesn‘t affect everyone equally. we are still going to have white men of a certain age with independent means in our politics but it is the young people and the women and the people from minority communities who are already saying they are not going to take part no politics not because they have already experienced the death threats and the bomb threats and
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intimidation but when the trolls are in parliament how do we stop feeding the trolls? has the member outlines the trolls? has the member outlines the importance we get the message out there that action is being taken. notjust online but off—line. we say to people they have a place here and they can make a difference and that their votes can count. ultimately the longer indecision goes on on one issue, brexit, the more they will be frustrations. but that doesn‘t justify more they will be frustrations. but that doesn‘tjustify people crossing the line of abuse and hatred and intimidation. the same legal standards will apply whatever end of the extreme people are. some people at two sides of the same kind of hate. i will take a few more but please,
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single line question. last night i asked the prime minister if it was not just about language but also about tone. i commend my honourable friend for his tone today, but how should he suggest i respond to those in the beautiful marketplace of romsey who three saturdays ago told mei romsey who three saturdays ago told me i was romsey who three saturdays ago told meiwasa romsey who three saturdays ago told me i was a traitor who deserved to be shot when the language of traitor is heard in this house? thank you, mr speaker. as i said earlier, there is no one in this house who is a traitor. there is no one in this house who should be threatened in that way and that those who shouted that in the marketplace should realise that if they are making those sorts of nonsense and that sort of threat, there is a criminal law they can be held accountable to. mr speaker, our words carry consequences. they reverberate far and wide beyond these four walls and the prime minister who holds the
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highest office in our land there is the highest responsibility for what he says and inspires. i don‘t believe the minister can in one breath tell this house he seeks to reduce online harm whilst the prime minister booms out toxic divisive sound bites, the clips of which are immediately put on hate filled social media channels. we had seen the incidence of hate crime in our country increase and as a member of this house that sin no fewer than six people convicted of the harassment and hate crimes directed at me, can i ask the minister to ta ke at me, can i ask the minister to take back to the prime minister that he has to urgently reconsider this deliberate strategy of sowing seeds of division in our country? thank you, mr speaker. as the honourable member rightly points to, those who behave in certain ways will face the criminaljustice system and conviction for their offences. but i would just gently
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reflect on the idea of a national party going around with nonsense to brexit won‘t tone down the debate. ultimately, for us all, there is, bringing a resolution to this issue isa bringing a resolution to this issue is a key part to what this parliament is meant to be here for. if it cannot do it in this parliament, i look forward to having a mature, sensible and informed debate with the electorate that we should have been having on tuesday the 15th of october. if you were to reread your samuel pepys, you will find a line in the diaries of over 350 years ago, which says that solo has this rump fallen in the eyes of the people, that the lads in the street cry kiss my parliament. if we are to avoid that same reputation persisting today in our
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current politics, may i ask the minister and all in his house to apply the same standards, mr speaker, you are asking for today to our conduct on social media and it should include us, journalists and the wider public if we are not to see the continuing debasement of the body politic? thank you, mr speaker. i‘m not sure whether i‘m going to reduce to using that kiss my parliament adage again. laughter never kissed an mp, there‘s a new ta ke never kissed an mp, there‘s a new take ona never kissed an mp, there‘s a new take on a famous t—shirt some people like to wear. but he‘s absolutely right to say it‘s notjust about mps, it‘s about journalists, right to say it‘s notjust about mps, it‘s aboutjournalists, judges, anyone involved in public life. some of the comments this morning we had seen directed at one journalists would would hardly be seen to be the top row of political debate. it is
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about the government looking to create an environment that is safe for all to engage in, notjust this house. it is culture and debate outside this house that will reflect in the parliament reflected in the parliament elected to be in this house. down the years since i‘ve been a member of this house, we have had memorable and important debates on the highly contested issues. on iraq, when i remember robin cook‘s speech. 0n 9—11, when i remember david blunkett because my speech. 0n the great crash, when i remember gordon brown‘s speech. when i come into the chamber today, and i think last night was the culmination of a trend, i feel last night was the culmination of a trend, ifeel i‘m coming into a session of the burlington club. that‘s what it feels like in here. and that culture is set by the leadership. it is always set by the leadership. it is always set by the leadership. it is always set by the leadership. i think the courageous thing that the prime minister could have done today is to come to this
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house and explain to us why he thinks that leadership is appropriate. in his absence, will be minister tell us what are the practical steps that the prime minister will undertake to set a new culture of leadership which brings this house back to sensible debate on critical issues and makes us the important chamber we should be? thank you, mr speaker. i do sometimes wonder and reflect, if we look at some of the great debates on issues of the past, how the political discourse may have been affected if twitter, facebook and facebook social media had existed at that time, certainly going back to the 1975 referendum. what the prime minister and government will do is continue to work on what i‘ve already outlined, to tackle intimidation, hatred and abuse and also, in terms of this parliament, sorting, bringing back a deal that
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will deliver the referendum and finally put the brexit issue to bed. i hope that is when we can look forward to a wide cross support for. in terms of creating more diversity in parliament, does the minister agree with me that this toxic nasty aggressive behaviour coming from all sides of the house, itjust does, is something that is stopping many more women and some men from coming to this place, from feeling safe, for enjoying it and believing parliament isa enjoying it and believing parliament is a place where they can achieve and progress and reach their full potential? thank you, mr speaker.” potential? thank you, mr speaker. i hear the honourable member‘s passion and we do want to see more people coming in and feeling that they can standard not just as members and feeling that they can standard notjust as members of parliament, but also in terms of the local council, to be an elected mayor, to bea council, to be an elected mayor, to be a police and crime commissioner and not face of the type of abuse at
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some sadly have faced over recent yea rs. some sadly have faced over recent years. but ultimately also its about people seeing parliament as a place where people are decided, where things move on, not as a place that literally ends up going on a merry—go—round of delay but not actually making a decision on behalf of the nation. that is ultimately why people stand, to make that difference. we want to see people from all backgrounds, i‘m a council house kid, my father was a painter and labourer. yesterday, i asked the prime minister to moderate his language andi minister to moderate his language and i desperately wanted to remind him that words have consequences. i accept it is necessary for all of us in this place to reflect on our language and our behaviour after all, i do accept i have been known to have the odd heckle in here. i‘m grateful this morning for the solidarity from my fellow mps, including many on the government benches. but last night, i was literally horrified to see a tweet
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from the member of middlesbrough south and east larry cleveland. i notified his office i would talk about him this morning. he sent a tweet tonight appearing to mock me, calling the labour party toxic, which sadly brought more abuse. the minister this afternoon said his government wants to stamp out abuse but how can we believe him when the prime minister refers to genuine concerns from female mps as humbug? and the prime minister‘s official spokesperson confirmed the prime minister has no regrets about the language that he used. so, will the minister confirmed to me that the tweet from the member for middlesbrough and east cleveland reflects that of the government‘s? and will he take the opportunity, further to the comments from the prime minister‘s spokesperson to say he stands by the prime minister‘s
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comments that threats to female mps, death threats and daily abuse is humbug? thank you, mr speaker. having had the odd heckle of my own speeches from the honourable member i always recognise the spirit in which they are done, a passionate competition rather than come and disagreement, rather than come and disagreement, rather than come and disagreement, rather than disrespect of the remarks i make. what i would say is the government is looking to defend the democracy programme. it is taking action around online homes and looking to tackle the social media giants about this issue. ultimately, ithink where i would say as the minister whose responsibility for this policy area, it‘s about looking at what the government would bring forward. i hope we would have her support in doing so when we do bring legislation forward around intimidation before an election and that ultimately is where the test of this will be, in what difference we
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can all make in terms of legislation and in tackling those who feel and impunity to abuse people online in a way they would never do on the street. it's street. it‘s a sad fact that study of parliaments across europe show that more than four out of ten women mps have received threats of death, rape or beating. the language that we use does matter and the language yesterday, actually from all sides of the house, was an acceptable. was unacceptable. we need to dial it down. i would also like to remind people, unfortunately, that the protest on the night when we last met also unleashed a huge amount of hatred towards people who had voted leave and colleagues who had voted
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leave and colleagues who had voted leave in this house have literally had to pull nails and screws out of their car tyres last week because of their car tyres last week because of the threats and the language used against them. and the liberal democrats sadly are not innocent here, either. fouractions i democrats sadly are not innocent here, either. four actions i would like to see. first of all, mr speaker. one sentence. can you that is where we are going to leave the commons now. jess phillips asked foran the commons now. jess phillips asked for an apology from the prime minister asking to meet him with friends and family ofjo cox to discuss the hopeful language and incitement of hatred and violence —— hateful language. jeremy corbyn spoke. disappointed that mrjohnson wasn‘t there to answer the question himself. boris johnson wasn‘t there to answer the question
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himself. borisjohnson was actually facing a 1922 committee of conservative lawyers. there he said that he was indeed within his rights to describe the act as a surrender act. he says he can still secure an agreement to leave the eu and described jeremy corbyn a coward for not calling a general election. you can not calling a general election. you ca n follow not calling a general election. you can follow this on bbc parliament. in the meantime, here is helen with the weather. good afternoon. . for some, we have already seen a month worth of rain this week. we have low pressure this week. today, the main rain cleared through but we have showers following behind will stop we will see some sunshine as you see here. there are more showers to come and still the persistent rain lingers across shetland. there
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will be some lengthy showers, particularly for northern ireland. they will blow through across england and wales with sunshine in between. it is still relatively mile, 18 to 20 celsius. overnight it will be notably cooler in the north whether showers die back. already by morning, the potential is that for some more persistent showery rain to come in, this time with some thunder and embedded in it. rather more slow—moving over scotland and northern ireland. tomorrow temperatures are down, feeling cooler during the day tomorrow. that area of low pressure moves out of the way on friday night and we start to see the next area of low pressure brewing up and marching its way in. this looks like rainfall initially but it will be accompanied by strong winds as well. head of these weather
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systems, we will see a dampening down a shower activity. for the bulk of saturday it might not be too wet a day, except through the afternoon in southern and western areas which is why warnings are already in force from the met office. that then brings a spell of persistent heavy rain overnight to many parts except perhaps the north of scotland. it will take its time to clear on sunday. 0nce will take its time to clear on sunday. once it does, we get the northerly wind replacing those strong gusts delete winds. the northerly winds could be even stronger and they will, clearly, drop our temperatures because they are coming from the arctic. full moon, high tides and strong winds for the north sea coast. the warnings are on the website as well.
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calls to end the toxic culture in parliament after a night of furious exchanges in the commons. the speaker of the house of commonsjohn bercow tells mps to treat each other as opponents, not enemies, as the prime minister is urged to moderate his language. there was an atmosphere in the chamber worse than any i‘ve known in my 22 years in the house on both sides. here in westminster, boris johnson is meeting backbench mps, as he faces claims of using inflammatory language as a political tactic.
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i‘ll have the latest. also on the programme this lunchtime: former french president jacques chirac has died at the age of 86 — he was considered by many as one of france‘s favourite leaders. minimum pricing in scotland leads to a fall in the amount of alcohol people are buying and prompts calls for the rest of the uk to follow suit. prince harry on climate change — the world will be a very troubling place, he says, if people continue to deny it. and england are taking on the usa this lunchtime in their second group match at the rugby world cup injapan. coming up in the sport later in the hour on bbc news: we hear from the 16—year—old, who equalised against manchester united last night, and how his studies are more important than scoring. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. the commons speaker, john bercow,
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has called on all sides to tackle the toxic political culture after borisjohnson was accused of using inflammatory language at the dispatch box last night. the prime minister suggested his opponents were surrendering to the european union and sabotaging his brexit negotiations. even some of his own cabinet ministers have raised concern over the language he used. simon mccoy is at westminster. sophie, look up the word toxic in the dictionary and you will find a definition along the lines of very unpleasant or unacceptable, and last night mps on all sides were describing the atmosphere here in those terms. in the last hour, the labour mp jess phillips raised the issue of the language used in the house of commons, with claims that the prime minister is using inflammatory language as a political tactic — particularly in his comments over the killing of mpjo cox. labour leaderjeremy corbyn said neither side had a monopoly on virtue and called on mrjohnson to apologise. there‘s been harsh language here throughout history, but at the heart of this is the bitter divisions over
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brexit — but it‘s also about mutual respect — and at the moment that seems in short supply. 0ur political correspondent jessica parker reports. through the gloom, divisions surface. it surfaced in the chamber last night too. we will not betray the people who sent us here. the prime minister called efforts to delay brexit and avoid no—deal a surrender. any of us in this play subjective death threats and abuse every single day, and let me tell the prime minister they often quote his words. i have to say, i have never heard such humbug in all my life. there were calls for moderated language after the murder mp jo there were calls for moderated language after the murder mpjo cox. the best way to memory ofjo cox and indeed the best way to bring this country together would be, i think, to get brexit done. jo cox's widower
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said he felt sick at her name being used in this way, but today urged calm across the board. this stuff is not only wrong because actually on both sides of the debate people are just trying to do what they think is right for the country, but it‘s also dangerous. mps heading back into parliament today. what do you think of the tone of last night's debate? not very good. this is the language. the tone at the also tense. things courteous... sorry you have had to wait in the wet. the government saying the answer is to motor on and deliver brexit. i cannot see how this is going to calm down until the big issue which has caused such division has been resolved, that‘s why we are keen to get it done quickly. tempers are frayed, tensions running high. borisjohnson says ideally he wants to go to
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brussels, get a new brexit deal and have mps approve it. things moved fast in westminster but last night‘s events a re fast in westminster but last night‘s events are another example of how the possibility of finding consensus in this place feels far away. now today an urgent debate on the prime minister‘s language. the labour mp says she has had a death threat this week quoting borisjohnson, and a claim that the language used has a certain intent. it has clearly been tested and work shopped and worked up, and it is entirely designed to inflame hatred and division. what a reminder there had been heated exchanges on all sides. yesterday she was the person i could hear screaming the loudest from her bench. earlier the speaker was clear, everyone needs to take care. 0n clear, everyone needs to take care. on both sides passions were inflamed, angry words were uttered.
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the culture was toxic. the prime minister headed to see his own conservative mps earlier and got a warm reception. now the challenge, stopping things from getting too heated. jessica parker, bbc news. let‘s speak to our assistant political editor norman smith, who‘s inside the houses of parliament. the prime minister was not there for the urgent question on the use of language. no, and that pretty much reflects his response which is to shrug his shoulders and carry on regardless. indeed we have had some of his allies defending his language, and in particular the reference to the legislation blocking no—deal as a surrender act, saying that is pretty much what it is because it undermines the government‘s ability to get a deal. another senior government source saying boris johnson another senior government source saying borisjohnson is not the problem, this place is the problem by acting as a wrecking ball to
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democracy. you sense there is no way borisjohnson will back off, in part because all of this is deliberate. he is seeking to go, to rile, to provoke opposition mps in the hope they will have a rush of blood to they will have a rush of blood to the head and think, that‘s it, we will trigger a motion of no confidence enabling boris johnson will trigger a motion of no confidence enabling borisjohnson to get the general election he wants. and also, language designed to appeal to voters in the country who are fed up, angry at the delay and the deadlock. the risk however is profound, that by using this sort of language, you cement the already deep divisions within the country over brexit. norman, thank you very much indeed, and from westminster where it is fair to say the temperature is still rising, back to you in the studio, sophie. thank you. with just over a month to go before the uk is scheduled to leave the eu,
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what are businesses making of the continuing uncertainty? and what impact will last night‘s heated words in the commons have? 0ur correspondent danni hewson has been speaking to businesses in stoke on trent. by by tonight most customers here will have swapped coffee for a pint but the conversation will be about brexit. it doesn't matter where you 90, brexit. it doesn't matter where you go, people talk about brexit. there are go, people talk about brexit. there a re lots of go, people talk about brexit. there are lots of people with lots of use. what‘s incredible is we don‘t end up with the kind of anger we saw in the house of commons yesterday in the pubs. people seem to accept differing views and just want to get through the process now. keith brews his own beerfor through the process now. keith brews his own beer for his 12 through the process now. keith brews his own beerfor his 12 bars. 90% of his own beerfor his 12 bars. 90% of his ingredients are uk sourced so does he agree with michael gove business is ready for no—deal? does he agree with michael gove business is ready for no-deal? we are as ready as we possibly can be, but without the crystal ball that tells us what happens post brexit, how can we say we are ready? we
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don‘t know what will happen so we cannot be ready for every eventuality. it is impossible to know what flavour of brexit will flow out of the tank but stoke has dealt with the erosion of its parts. for many local businesses, weathering this seems doable. julie‘s family have run a roofing business for 26 years and they are cautiously optimistic. we don't think it has had too much of an effect on us, only saving the timber we import from the eu but suppliers are starting to stockpile now in case of a shortage, but again we don‘t know the date we are leaving, if we are leaving, if they will be a shortage of or a price increase so we are in the dark. this is one of our animation studios... we are working on a variety of projects at the moment. you may have caught
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their animations on a number of television shows and they are currently working on a film. they worry brexit could affect them.” think we could ride the wave. am i worried for the larger industry of film effects in the uk? yes, it hasn‘t been handled well and there are things that could go badly wrong. all three businesses are doing what they can, if anything, to get ready. for what? they still don‘t know. it will come down to stoke—on—trent‘s resilience rather than any plans from westminster. 0ur reality check correspondent chris morris is in stoke. is it right to assume that a no—deal brexit is the biggest concern for businesses? yes, sophie, ithink yes, sophie, i think it is because it carries with it the biggest degree of uncertainty, particularly for businesses that import and
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export. if there were to be a deal, which borisjohnson says he wants, with that deal would come the transitional implementation period where basically the way we trade with our neighbours would stay the same while we then go on to negotiate the future relationship. without a deal of course it comes to a juddering halt very quickly, and you take in the million moving parts of the british economy and overnight you have to transfer them to one place —— from one place to another, and nobody knows if it will be your bit which suffer the most. that is a concern for businesses who feel they haven‘t been... they have been waiting patiently over three years, they have been taken toward the possibility of no—deal a couple of times before, in march and again in april, and now being asked to prepare potentially for it again. we heard from michael gove yesterday being asked questions for a couple of hours. there is a lot of
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preparation is going on behind—the—scenes but the preparation also has to come from businesses, and while big business has the money to spend on it some smaller businesses don‘t. the other pointjust smaller businesses don‘t. the other point just briefly to smaller businesses don‘t. the other pointjust briefly to bear in mind, the supreme court verdict this week probably makes no—deal a lot less likely because it reinforces the supremacy and the power of parliament. chris, thank you. the european union‘s chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier, has been briefing other eu leaders on his latest talks with his british counterpart this morning. he told reporters that there were no new ideas that could break the brexit impasse. and that the eu are still ready to work on any new legal and operational proposals. the former french president jacques chirac has died at the age of 86. many in france considered him as their favourite president. he had been suffering from ill health for many years. he served as president of france for two terms, from 1995 until 2007, and famously opposed the us—led war in iraq.
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0ur correspondent jonathan marcus looks back at his life. when the lofty figure ofjacques chirac became president in 1995, he seemed to characterise the very essence of french politics. his political career extended over a remarkable 40 years, and he‘s seen by many as the most influential french man of his generation. chirac‘s presidency began in a bullish mood, outraging world opinion by restarting french nuclear weapons tests in the pacific. the president insisting that france‘s nuclear deterrent was an essential element of its security and its effectiveness had to be tested. but there were seismic political shifts going on at home. in the 2002 presidential election, the socialist vote collapsed and the far right national front ofjean—marie le pen won through to the vital second ballot.
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chirac ultimately crushed le pen but the warning signals for french politics were clear. little could mask the endemic problems of french society. high levels of unemployment, bitter divisions over immigration and uncertainty about just where the country was heading. for a time, jacques chirac was able to contain the storm. his absolute refusal to countenance any french involvement in the us invasion of iraq won him strong support at home. but it wasn‘tjust france that was changing, it was europe too. comfortable with the idea of a european union with france and germany in the driving seat, a wider membership change the eu‘s whole character. the french president often railed against britain‘s eu rebate, as well as its failure to contribute to what he saw as its fair share of the costs of enlargement. jacques chirac is a president with a mixed legacy. he was convicted of corruption in relation to his time as mayor of paris, but he was also the president
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who finally accepted france‘s responsibility for its involvement in the deportation of frenchjews to nazi death camps during the second world war. he was a president who reconciled france with key elements of its past, but he was ultimately unable to reconcile it with its future. jaques chirac, who has died age 86. researchers say the amount of alcohol people in scotland are buying in shops has dropped by nearly 8% since the country introduced a minimum pricing scheme last may. the study suggests people are drinking less at home as a result. campaigners are calling for the rest of the uk to follow suit. 0ur scotland correspondent lorna gordon reports. it‘s more than a year since the price people paid for some alcohol in scotland went up after it became the first country in the world to introduce a minimum price per unit of alcohol. some of the high—strength ciders obviously went up in price... some shop owners have noticed a change in what people are now buying. people have moved away from high strengths,
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they‘re buying a lot less of the high—strength ciders now. people have even moved on to zero—strength lagers now. that‘s what you are seeing here. that‘s what we definitely seeing here. since may 2018, the minimum price for alcohol has been 50p per unit. research has found in the first eight months following the new law, the amount of alcohol purchased per week per person fell by 1.2 units on average. that‘s a fall of nearly 8%. that‘s equivalent to just over half a pint of beer or a measure of spirits every week. we do not think it's too early to draw these conclusions. we were quite surprised with the suddenness of the change, which really was quite dramatic. and i think that really does indicate that the introduction of a minimum unit price is doing what it was intended to do. it‘s just over a year in so it‘s still very early days when it comes to this policy. but experts say this research suggests that minimum pricing has achieve its ambition.
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—— achieved. it provides evidence that minimum unit pricing is having exactly the effect that we intended it to have, in that it‘s reducing alcohol purchasing by the people who are purchasing the most and who are purchasing the cheapest types of alcohol. wales is looking to introduce minimum pricing next year. neither england nor northern ireland currently have plans to introduce their own limit. reducing the harm from alcohol is complex, but the scottish government says these findings reinforce why scotland was right to introduce minimum unit pricing. lorna gordon, bbc news, glasgow. the time is coming up to 1.20pm. our top story this lunchtime: calls to end the toxic culture in parliament after a night of furious exchanges in the commons. and coming up... the naming ceremony for the uk‘s latest polar research ship. but it could have been called something very different. coming up in the sport in the next 15 minutes on bbc news: nick kyrgios is given a four—month suspended ban from tennis, after showing a pattern
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of abuse towards officials and spectators. a bbc investigation has found that children as young as seven are being groomed to work in one of the world‘s largest licenced brothels. it‘s in a small village in bangladesh and it‘s thought 1600 women and children are employed in the brothel. now global charities are trying to offer the girls a way out. frankie mccamley has been to see for herself. you may find parts of her report distressing. this is a dark world, where the unimaginable happens to children. they‘re born into a life where sex is sold on every street corner, in a brothel that is so popular it‘s grown into a village — home to nearly 2,000 sex workers. train whistle a familiar noise
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at the end of the line, signalling the arrival of more customers. it‘s clear many don‘t want us here. one woman though says she will talk to me in a few minutes. we can‘t go in yet, we‘ve just got to waitjust inside the door because the woman currently has a customer with her. when we do go in, her client hasn‘t left yet. the $3 us he spends includes lunch. her biggest concern is her daughter. she‘s now the same age this women was when she started work. translation: my girl is growing up, i‘m stuck here. but she has turned 11. how long has she got left before they take her? for the youngsters, this is their escape. save the children has set up schools to help break the cycle, integrating them with others from the area. translation: they would often put them through several forms of torture, beating them, verbally abusing them.
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they simply didn't know how to look after them. we're trying to change that scenario through counselling. these two 13—year—olds grew up in the brothel but managed to escape to a safe home. translation: i didn't eat deliberately, so i was too skinny to do the work. i knew the men preferred bigger girls. this member of staff secured a place when she was a child but had to leave her seven—year—old friend behind. translation: she did not want to join in. one night, her motherforcefully put a customer in her room. after he left, she hanged herself. train whistle as new customers continue to arrive, the future of these projects is uncertain. the un says aid for education has dropped globally. police say there are also laws to protect young girls but the reality is, children are worth too much in
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this adult world. frankie mccamley, bbc news, in bangladesh. there‘s been another fall in the number of children across england receiving routine vaccinations. nhs figures show uptake of the first dose of the mmr vacine fell from 91% to 90 in the last year. —— vaccine. our health editor hugh pym is here. it is only one percentage point, does it make that much of an impact? it isa does it make that much of an impact? it is a concern because this is a trend. there has been a fall now for five years. it should be at 95% were deemed to be a safe level, so called herd immunity let‘s look at the latest figures for england. they show the mmr vaccination, normally at the age of one is the first and the other a few years later. there
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was a bounce back after previous yea rs was a bounce back after previous years when it had fallen because of scares linking the vaccine to autism which were disproved and discredited. from five years ago it has been falling again back to 93% for the first mmr vaccine. their concern is, where does it go from here? it ought to be back to higher levels but experts say there is a concern about whether people are looking more at anti—vaccine messages, negative campaigns about vaccines which are said to be of concern. maybe parents are getting complacent and forgetting to go to get the vaccine is done for their children, to stave off these potentially very nasty diseases. northern ireland and scotland are above the 95% of herd immunity level but not wales. what is to be done about it? there is talk of moving towards a compulsory situation for
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preschool children. the health secretary has not ruled that out as things stand now. remember boaty mcboatface — the uk‘s newest polar research ship which was cheekily given that name after a public vote? well, today, it gets its official title at a champagne ceremony in the next hour. it will actually now be named after the broadcaster and naturalist sir david attenborough, as our science correspondent rebecca morelle explains. heading for the most remote parts of our planet, this 130—metre long polar ship is almost complete. the rrs sir david attenborough, ready for its royal ceremony today. the ships that we have at the moment are 25, 30 years old. it is an extremely advanced ship. certainly one of the most advanced ships in the world, if not the most advanced ship. it‘s taken just three years to build this vessel. a million pieces of steel slotted into place. on board, the team is putting together the finishing touches. for a ship this size,
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everything is on a huge scale. my primary role on board has been to get the ship painted, internally and externally. ship total, it's taken 60,000 litres of paint to paint this ship, which isjust mind boggling, the amount we've actually used. this ship has been designed to operate in incredibly tough environments. now usually vessels will do anything they can to avoid the ice. this though can push through ice sheets up to a metre thick. and, on board, there are state—of—the—art labs and equipment and it can even sail silently, so scientists can study the creatures of the icy deep. and what of boaty mcboatface — the name the public chose for this ship? well, boaty lives on in the form of a robotic yellow submarine. it will be deployed from the ship to the icy deep. and this is how the sir david attenborough will look when the exploration begins. in ourwarming world, trillions of tonnes of ice have vanished from the poles.
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the hope is the ship will transform our understanding of this region and how it‘s affecting the rest of the world. after the vessel‘s naming ceremony today, the next step will be sea trials, before it leaves for antarctica next year. and rebecca joins us live from birkenhead. so, it all happens in the next half hour. yes, that is right. the duke and duchess of cambridge arrived here about an hour ago to meet the crowds and they have just gone on board. they are currently taking a tour of the ship along with sir david attenborough. i am joined by a polar scientist for the british antarctic survey he will be using the ship. what makes the ship stand out? it is one of the most capable research vessels we had operating in the polar regions today. there are many exciting, state—of—the—art technologies that will be on board
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the ship. one of the exciting things is the moon pool, which is a hole in the depth of the ship, all the way down to the ocean to allow us to access the surface of the ocean directly and put the instruments straight through, direct. how will this change the way you do polar research? their biggest change they said david attenborough will make is the way we do our research in that we will be able to study multiple different parts of the environment, from the atmosphere to the ice itself, all the way to the seafloor and any in one go at the same time, using state—of—the—art technologies. in that way we are looking at the entire system and being able to understand it. the bottle smashing happensjust understand it. the bottle smashing happens just before two o‘clock and after that the hard work begins because the polar vessel will potentially be taking its maiden voyage of two and how -- off to
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antarctica. the duke of sussex has said the world will be a "very, very troubling" place if people continue to deny climate change. speaking during a visit to botswana, prince harry said the facts and science were getting stronger, and he praised young campaigners like greta thunberg for taking action. from botswana our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. this is the africa where he feels most at home, away from the cities and the crowds. this morning harry was in northern botswana, helping to plant a baobab tree. it was a moment for harry to reflect on why africa means so much to him. it‘s a sense of escapism, a real sense of purpose. i came here in ‘97, ‘98, straight after my mum died, so it was a nice place to get away from it all. but, now, ifeel deeply connected to this place and to africa. it‘s been harry‘s involvement in conservation projects in africa, helping children today to plant trees. this is what‘s brought home to him the urgent need to combat climate change.
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this last week, led by greta, the world‘s children are striking. there‘s an emergency that we are... it‘s a race against time, one of which we are losing. i don‘t believe there is anybody in this world that can deny science, undeniable science and facts. science and facts that have been around for the last 30, maybe 40 years. and it‘s only getting stronger and stronger. i genuinely, i don‘t understand how anyone in this world, whoever they are, you, us, children, leaders, whoever it is, no—one can deny science, otherwise we live in a very troubling world. undeniable science, in harry‘s words, and note the dig at leaders who deny it. those remarks by harry on climate change were as unambiguous as any you‘re likely to hear on the subject from any member of the royal family, his father included. harry took to the water on the river chobe, close to
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the border with zambia and zimbabwe, a place with bountiful wildlife, where nature conservation is a priority. the message of the day was clear, "our world must be protected." nicholas witchell, bbc news kasane, botswana. england are playing their second group game against the united states at the rugby world cup in japan this lunchtime. our sports correspondent andy swiss is at the stadium in kobe with the latest. yes, just a few minutes left here in kobe. the latest i can tell you if england are leading the usa by 38—0. of course, england arrived here after winning their opening game against tonga on sunday that they we re against tonga on sunday that they were looking for an improved performance and they got off to the perfect start when their captain george ford put them ahead after
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just five minutes, scampering through for the opening try. england we re through for the opening try. england were still making quite a lot of mistakes. they were not helped by the hot and humid conditions inside the hot and humid conditions inside the stadium but they scored two more tries before half—time courtesy of billy vunipola and luke cowan—dickie, to put them firmly in control at the break when they led by 19 zero. after the break they scored their fourth try of the match. a fourth try guaranteed them an extra bonus point and they have since extended their lead. this will be an emphatic victory for them. this was a game they were expected to win against the usa but it is going to be two wins out of two as they prepare for what will be their toughest group games against argentina and france. a few minutes left and england leading the usa by
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38-0. time for a look at the weather. we have already had a month‘s worth of rain in some parts. their weekend sees a full moon, a super moon, coinciding with severe gales and there are concerns for coastal flooding on sunday. we are monitoring the mass of cloud which is out into the atlantic. ahead of that we have no pressure sitting to the north—west of the uk. this cloud is bringing us rain, for most of us showers. for many there will be sunshine and between those rather brisk moving showers, particularly in england and wales where it is quite gusty. heavier downpours for a time. still respectable temperatures for the time of year, late september where it is 18—20. it will get
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cooler this evening and overnight. there is back to the coast allowing temperature is too full. in england and wales we will keep a brisk wind. we are looking at five and six but no frost worries. tomorrow there will be sunny spells and showers. these could be lengthy in the rush hourin these could be lengthy in the rush hour in northern ireland. a band of heavy, thundery rain moving its way in. ithink heavy, thundery rain moving its way in. i think there will be decent stars of dry weather in between the heavy downpours. cooler tomorrow, temperatures knocked down a couple of degrees was that then we get to the weekend. we say goodbye to that area of low pressure which has some tropical air in it and hence some heavy and persistent rain. the winds area heavy and persistent rain. the winds are a concern as well. more detail on saturday. 0ften are a concern as well. more detail on saturday. often the shower activity is dampened to head a bit that it may not be too bad a day
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intensive shower amounts but it does get wet and windy later. there is a tropical air mixed in. three saturday night, with the full moon, it will be quite warm in many parts, wet and windy. the north of scotland may be the escaping of that rain. we are not concerned about the northerly winds on sunday. but we are concerned about coastal flooding. then a blast of severe gales on the north sea coast as well. plenty going on with warnings on the website. we will keep you updated. a reminder of our top story... warnings about the toxic culture in parliament.
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you are watching bbc news. i‘m 0llie foster at the bbc sports centre. we are nearing fulltime in kobe where england are playing their second match at the rugby world cup injapan and they are heading for another big win. they are playing the usa. let‘s head live to the stadium now and speak to our sports correspondent andy swiss. a couple of minutes to go. we have had the first red card at this world cup had the first red card at this world cu p after had the first red card at this world cup after seven days of play. it was a horrific tackle. john quayle going in on 0wen farrell. a horrific tackle. john quayle going in on owen farrell. that is right. there has been a lot of talk at the refereeing at this world cup. the first red card was shown and there cannot be any question about it. as you say, it was a horrible no arms tackle by the flankerjohn quill on 0wen farrell. no question it was a red mark. —— red card. it looks
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worse with every replay. farrell needed treatment but has continued in the match which will be a huge relief as he is the captain. in such a key player. there has been criticism of the referees saying they have not been tough enough on these sorts of dangerous no arms tackle so it seems the referee tonight has taken heed of that warning. he has sent off john quill. i don‘t think there will be much argument around it. a horrible tackle but thankfully farrell seems 0k. horrible tackle but thankfully farrell seems ok. great stuff. thank you, andy. lots of personnel changes. he wasn‘t happy how they approach the game against tonga. those changes, you worry that might change things a little bit. disrupt things a little bit. with a four day turnaround which is not a lot in
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by turnaround which is not a lot in rugby terms, he had to freshen up the team. ten changes to the side that beat tonga on sunday. it was a scratchy performance against tonga. england haven‘t found it easy here tonight. not least because of the hot, humid conditions which has made life a slippery for the players but this has been a very emphatic victory for them ultimately. the capped internet put them on their way with the first try in just the fifth minute. england scored two more tries before half—time courtesy of vunipola and... to lead 19—0. they scored shortly after half time for that all potent bonus point for scoring the fourth try. and another try in the last few minutes. the new boys effectively for england‘s team here at the world cup have certainly got themselves on the scoresheet. just a few minutes to go now and england leading by 45 — zero. after
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this, they can look ahead to those two crunch games against argentina and france. andy swiss, thank you very much indeed. 45-0 45—0 and just a couple of minutes to go against the usa. the other match today was in pool b, italy sit top of that with two bonus point wins after a big win against canada. they scored seven tries in fukuoka. 48—7 the final score. italy beat namibia in their opener but like england they they have two tough matches ahead of them, matches against new zealand and south africa. the draw for the last 16 in the league cup has thrown up a couple of box—office ties. liverpool will face arsenal, manchester united will play chelsea. there are a five all—premier league affairs inclduing the holders mancxhester city against southampton. crawley and colchester from league 2
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have drawn each other. burton, semi—finallists in this competition last season host leicester. mancehster united scraped past rochdale on penalties last night. but 16—year—old luke matheson, the youngest player in rochdale‘s history grabbed plenty of headlines with the equaliser that sent the tie to a shoot out. he has just started his a levels after passing ten gcse‘s last month i love learning, it is what i want to do because football is not a guarantee. you never know what could happen. you could be the best player in the world and you never know what could happen. anything is possible so i want to make sure i have got that back—up plan just in case. that is all the sport for now. a quick update. england 45, usa zero. we will have more coming up through the rest of the afternoon. thank you, 0llie. well, extraordinary scenes in westminster last night and today calls for an end to the toxic culture at westminster from the speaker of the house of commons.
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and you‘ve been sending in more of your questions on brexit on what could happen next. it‘s time for ask this with our reality check correspondent, chris morris. chrisjoins me now chris joins me now from stoke—on—trent where he is this afternoon. what kind of questions have people been asking? not about what is going on in westminster and whether people are saying the right of the wrong things. predictably, like anywhere else in the country, the questions are a variation of what might brexit mean for me. we had one question from a guy whose pa rents had one question from a guy whose parents lived in portugal will air fa res parents lived in portugal will air fares go up? who knows? petrol, for example, is priced in dollars so if there‘s a significant fall in the pound against the dollar, that could have an impact but other factors
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have an impact but other factors have to be taken into consideration. also people saying what otherjob prospects after brexit and some did it the honest answer is some areas may suffer, others may prosper. if you area suffer, others may prosper. if you are a university student, though it should be people who want to employ brexit no brexit. we have a lot of questions here. let‘s start with a questions here. let‘s start with a question from mike. what constitutes a deal so far as parliament‘s definition goes? at the wto deal suffice? no, it couldn't. we get asked this question a lot. they are talking about a withdrawal agreement, the divorce deal, how we split up from the eu and divide things like money, ensure that citizen‘s rights both in the uk and the eu are protected, whereas
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something like trading on wto terms ora something like trading on wto terms or a free trade agreement or a much closer relationship with the single market, those are about what the relationship will be like in the future. if you think about it as a divorce, this is the divorce deal, not how we will get on with strange members of the family in the future and that is a difference. we have another one here. do we have to be governed by a single prime minister or could it be a job share such as harman and clark or the leaders of other parties acting in unison? that might be a tempting prospect for some politicians. it is not my fault she was in charge of city. there has to be a single prime minister and we would need to make pretty significant legal and constitutional changes to turn it into a job share. that is not going to happen. you can have close consultation but there needs to be a single prime minister. what about the queen here? could she have a role in this? mark underwood wants
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to know if the queen occurred dissolve parliament and call a general election? similar to what her governor general did in australia some years back, to solve a crisis? there would be constitutional outrage of the queen did that tomorrow. it simply would not happen. the monitors have leeway about dissolving parliament as it does over proroguing parliament as we saw a few weeks ago. the queen a cts we saw a few weeks ago. the queen acts on the instruction of her ministers there. but we know the queen does not want to get involved in politics and i see no sign of that changing. a couple he also about the supreme court and their ruling. what burden of proof did the supreme court need? balance of probabilities or beyond reasonable doubt? did they have any direct evidence from the pm? that is from ken. neither of those.
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it is not beyond reasonable doubt or balance of probabilities because this was an appeal, not a trial. in a trial, you have a process of finding of facts, in an appeal, you hear the arguments and then you decide which argument holds the most validity. did they hear directly from the pm, no. his lawyers were present making his case for him but he did not make a submission explaining directly why he thought the proroguing parliament was the right thing to do. and one more on the supreme court. how quickly can they be asked to sit? how did this decision occurs so rapidly says an anonymous viewer? some people get very frustrated with the court system was up if they want to take it to court, it can take a long time but any court can speed things up and the supreme court did just that, not just the supreme and the supreme court did just that, notjust the supreme court but so did the high court in england and the court of session in scotland. they produce original judgments
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which the supreme court was then asked to rule on. this did happen except shirley quickly —— exceptionally quickly but it was of huge importance with a deadline of the 31st of october coming up. it is not always quite that efficient. chris morris, thank you. ina in a moment, we will have all the business news. first the headlines on bbc news. borisjohnson is accused of using dangerous language following heated scenes in the house of commons last night the speaker describes the atmosphere there as "toxic." new figures reveal uptake of all 13 routine vaccinations for the under fives has fallen in the last twelve months. prince harry takes aim at climate change deniers while on a tour of botswana. hello there. here is the business news. £121 million. ba counts the cost of the pilot
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strike at the start of the month. the airline says further walk—outs will only exacerbate a weaker outlook for profits. a us regulator sues the online dating company match, which also owns tinder and 0kcupid, alleging that hundreds of thousands of people were duped into subscribing after receiving fake expressions of love interest. a thomas cook boss has apologised after a video emerged of staff cheering him and other executives at the firm‘s german subsidiary after it secured a bailout. the german government stepped in to save the business while thomas cook workers all lost theirjobs. hello, good to have you with us. we will be heading to stoke—on—trent shortly to see what business is doing there at the moment, how it is preparing to deal with the upcoming
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business climate ahead of potential brexit situation is there but let‘s first get a look at other business stories going on today. peleton will debut its shares on the nasdaq stock exchange on thursday, at a starting price of $29 apiece. that values the firm, that has yet to turn a profit, at about £65 billion. it‘s an expensive club to join. bikes start at around 2,000 and subscription to classes is £39 a month. scots are buying less alcohol since minimum price was introduced. a study says people in scotland are buying the equivalent of half a pint of beer less a week since the policy was brought in in may last year. and a bulgarian economist has been named the new head of the imf. that is the international monetary fund. kristalina georgieva starts on tuesday for a five year term. she has up to $1 trillion to lend to member countries.
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she joins from the world bank, where she was ceo for two years. christine lagarde is off to head up the european central bank. let‘s have a look to see what the markets are up to today. european stocks picked up slightly, following on from a mixed scene in asia, as donald trump sought to turn investors‘ attention from us politics to a more optimistic line on trade. and the pound on the move again today. the bbc is reporting from stoke—on—trent this week. it‘s the city that recorded the highest number of leave votes in the uk. today it‘s the turn of local businesses to discuss what they believe brexit might mean for the area. the city‘s business improvement district or bid is a business—led and business—funded not—for—profit organisation formed to deliver business improvements in the city centre, adding value for investors, visitors, workers and residents alike.
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jeremy is head of stoke—on—trent‘s bid. do you see this as an opportunity for the area?” bid. do you see this as an opportunity for the area? i think mixed to be honest. from a city centre point of view, through the main sectors, of course, is dining, retail and entertainment. not a lot of exporting connected to that so in terms of concerns, probably three concerns. 0ne terms of concerns, probably three concerns. one would be any implications in terms of supply of products or goods or any costs increased associated with that. second is consumer confidence. i think what will be the impact, particularly of a messy brexit, how will people respond to that, and will people respond to that, and will that affect their purchasing? will it mean they will not go out to the theatre as regularly, will they not eat out as often. third is the transition. we do not know how long the transition period will be. that is one of the concerns, particularly for smaller businesses. do they have
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enough cash flow to go through a process before things reposition at the other side? it seems to me that confidence is key, both from the consumers perspective, you want them to carry going out and enjoying what stoke—on—trent has to offer, but also from an investment perspective because that is something that you at the bid are very keen to continue to encourage, isn‘t it? at the bid are very keen to continue to encourage, isn't it? absolutely. to be honest, for us, there is a bigger narrative than brexit and thatis bigger narrative than brexit and that is the narrative of the journey of our city and city centre. 0ver recent decades, regeneration has been a key word for many cities and our city has lagged behind. people like birmingham, liverpool, manchester, sheffield stop that has been changing over the last nine to ten years. we are on a trajectory of continued regeneration. building blocks have been put into place in our city centre, the hive complex, the new hilton hotel is launching at the new hilton hotel is launching at the end of the year. i will give you
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an example, six years ago, the main high street had 19 empty shops for sale or to let. a couple of weeks ago, there wasjust sale or to let. a couple of weeks ago, there was just four. there sale or to let. a couple of weeks ago, there wasjust four. there is transformation, there is repositioning as a city centre, but there is also much more that we can do. whether it is the council of the bid, businesses working together, we do have a strong focus is what what our future strategy should be. exit comes along in the middle of that trajectory. for us, we have got half an eye on what is happening in westminster but 1.5 eyes on the current in the future. interesting thatis current in the future. interesting that is coming out in what a lot of our reporters are saying. actually, people are more concerned about how brexit will affect them personally, rather than what is necessarily happening in the chamber at the moment in london. the city‘s bid which you check, you represent 436 businesses and organisations in an
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area spanning 75 streets. you are relatively new, do you feel that you as an organisation, that you are having a good impact? do you think it is something that perhaps other areas across the uk should look to have improved business sentiment in the city? absolutely. over the last ten years, business improvement districts have really multiplied across the country. i think that is in excess of 300. it is are really something that businesses have picked up on. it is business as being proactive, they are not working for local authorities, central government, to have all the a nswe rs. central government, to have all the answers. they are taking responsibility for their area. the main priorities that bid focus in on other public realm, environment, the quality of environment, second it is all about activities, events, marketing, giving reasons for people to come into the city centre because it is quality and created an animated. third, it is about business support. going through
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brexit, we will have a business community support group who will be there to help appoint people to advice, we strongly with the staffordshi re advice, we strongly with the staffordshire chamber of commerce, we have lots of different aspects to help people through, brexit workshops, one—to—one business advisors, export documentation and other things. the bid is a real strong tool on behalf of levy payers. most of them, particularly small and medium sizes, only pay a small and medium sizes, only pay a small levy into that but what that generates for us is £2.2 million that we can put in over five years, specifically to improve upon where it was this time last year. ok, we are going to have to leave it there but many thanks. really good to talk to you. jonathan bellamy there. many thanks. that is all the business news for now. much more throughout the day and of course available at the website all day. back to you. inquiries into donald trump continue to grab headlines
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in washington after the white house published confirmation that the president asked the leader of ukraine to investigate his political rival, joe biden. but away from the capital, how do voters feel about the affair? are they more concerned about bread and butter issues? 0ur correspondent james cook has been to the crucial swing state of pennsylvania to find out. donald trumpmigrate to the white house ran through the midwest. it was critical in 2016. how pennsylvanians feel about the president now could determine his chances of re—election. so what do voters here make of mr trump is in ukraine‘s leader to investigate his potential opponent?” ukraine‘s leader to investigate his potential opponent? i don't like the idea that trump is asking are trying to get somebody to investigate joe biden. it didn‘t seem right.
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to get somebody to investigate joe biden. it didn't seem right. him being the president, he has permissions and can get away with different things that you are i wouldn't be able to get away with.” don't know the actual laws behind it, itjust sees not straightforward or appropriate of a public official. -- it or appropriate of a public official. —— it does not seem straightforward or appropriate. at the heart of this affair, isa or appropriate. at the heart of this affair, is a us relationship between uk and ukraine. in the ukrainian community, these voters sound pretty devoted to present rope.” community, these voters sound pretty devoted to present rope. i think it was probably a normal political conversation. i don‘t think there was any malicious intent behind it. for many voters, there are more pressing concerns. these american say the biggest issues at stake will be immigration and the economy. he is pushing entrepreneurship as well as individuality. donald trump would i pick him? probably not but he is
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in office so i am with him all the way as an american. as you know, he makes it very hard for... how shall i say? the coloured folks. african americans. and when we say make it harder, i mean some of the laws and policies that he is coming up with. he is tearing families apart. the focus here is the election, rather than impeachment. an air of scandal fatigue may help the president, although who knows what is coming down the track? donald trump really should have a one—way ticket to re—election. the economy is growing, unemployment has been falling and wages have been rising at last, and in normal times, that is what americans think about when they decide how to vote. the thing is, these are far from normal times. in us politics. james cook, bbc news, pittsburgh. we will be going to the
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weather in a moment. let‘s take you now to the house of commons where mps are going out to vote on whether to allow a parliamentary recess next week, just days after they have returned to parliament. whether to allow a parliamentary recess next week for the conservative party conference to take place, it is due to ta ke conference to take place, it is due to take place in manchester. it sta rts to take place in manchester. it starts on sunday afternoon. the conservatives at the moment as saying that their conference will go ahead and they are asking for a recess, ahead and they are asking for a recess , a ahead and they are asking for a recess, a three day commons recess, which would start on monday. mps voting on that right now. we should have the results shortly after 2pm. we will bring you the result life as soon as we get it. right now, let‘s have a look at the weather. good afternoon. for some, we‘ve already had a month‘s worth of rain this week in itself and we‘ve got more to come. we‘re watching this mass of cloud, it‘s got some tropical air in amongst it and it‘s brewing up into a deep area of low pressure
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just in time for the weekend. ahead of that, we‘ve had low pressure anywhere as we know this week. today, the main rain cleared through but actually we‘ve showers following in behind. but at least with showers, you see some sunshine, as you see here at llansteffan in carmarthenshire. but there are more showers to come and still the persistent rain lingers across shetland. there will be some lengthier showers, particularly for scotland and northern ireland. where the winds are lighter they won‘t move through quite so quickly. but they will blow through across england and wales with sunshine in between. it‘s still relatively mild, 18 to 20 celsius, for the time of year. now through the evening and overnight, it will remain mild in the south, but it‘ll be notably cooler in the north where the showers die back to the coast. in the glens of scotland, some of the valleys in northern ireland, we could get down to five or six celsius. but already by morning, the potential is there for some more persistent showery rain to come in, this time we think again with some thunder embedded in it, which means there be some really quite intense downpours briefly as that moves its way quite quickly eastwards, england and wales particularly but for scotland and northern ireland rather more slow—moving.
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but tomorrow‘s temperatures are down, it will feel a little bit cooler for most of us during the day tomorrow. now that area of low pressure then moves out of the way on friday night and we start to see the next area of low pressure brewing up and marching its way in. this looks like a rainfall event initially but it will be accompanied by strong winds as well. so what you actually see ahead of these weather systems is often a dampening down of shower activity. so for the bulk of saturday, for many parts, it might not actually be too wet a day, except through the afternoon in southern and western areas which is where warnings are already in force from the met office. and then through saturday evening and overnight, that, as you can see, brings a spell of persistent heavy rain, thundery rain because there‘s tropical air in there, to many parts except perhaps the north of scotland. it will take its time to clear on sunday. once it does, we get the northerly wind replacing those really strong and gusty south—westerlies. but those northerly winds could be even stronger and they will, clearly, because they‘re coming from the arctic, drop our temperatures. so it will get colder as we move into next week. but what we‘re concerned about, full moon, high tides
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and some strong winds for the north sea coast. the warnings are on the website too.
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good afternoon from westminster. you‘re watching afternoon live with me, simon mccoy. the headlines at two... the speaker of the house of commonsjohn bercow tells mps to treat each other as opponents not enemies as the prime minister is urged to moderate his language. there was an atmosphere in the chamber worse than any i‘ve known in my 22 years in the house. on both sides. boris johnson is meeting tory backbench mps as he faces claims of using inflammatory language as a political tactic. i‘ll have the latest.

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