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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  September 26, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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good afternoon from westminster. you're watching afternoon live with me, simon mccoy. the headlines at two... the speaker of the house of commonsjohn bercow tells mps to treat each other as opponents not enemies as the prime minister is urged to moderate his language. there was an atmosphere in the chamber worse than any i've known in my 22 years in the house. on both sides. boris johnson is meeting tory backbench mps as he faces claims of using inflammatory language as a political tactic. i'll have the latest. nick owen is in stoke—on—trent.
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hello, yes indeed. also... you will be talking about how people are reacting here in stoke—on—trent to the tumultuous events of the last few days concerning brexit and the vitriol that has been expressed by both sides. i shall talk to you shortly. also this afternoon — president trump's top intelligence official faces congress over a whistleblower complaint that sparked an impeachment inquiry. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with holly hamilton. 242 with 2a2 with england at the world cup and a conference victory over the united states put them top of the group. all reaction to 30 pm. —— at 2:30pm. thanks, holly. stav danaos has all the weather. into the weekend, we could be looking at a potent area of low pressure, heavy rain on saturday night into sunday with also some strong winds as well, all the details a bit later on.
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thanks, stav. also coming up — the duke and duchess of cambridge are to name the uk's new polar research ship. no, not boaty mcboatface, but the sir david attenborough. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. i in westminster. it's been quite a day already. the commons speakerjohn bercow has called on all sides to tackle the ‘toxic‘ political culture after borisjohnson was accused of using inflammatory language at the dispatch box last night. even some of his own cabinet ministers have raised concern over the language he used. but it's not confined to just one party or one side in the brexit debate. if you look up the word toxic in the dictionary and you'll find a definition along the lines of very unpleasant or unacceptable and last night mps on all sides
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were describing the atmosphere here in those terms. we can cross live to nick 0wen is in stoke—on—trent for us. nick 0wen has been getting reaction from people in the city. thanks, simon. yes, all this week the bbc is in stoke on trent as part of our "we are stoke—on—trent" series, discovering stories about what makes the city tick, hearing what matters to people there, you may remember they voted 69% in favour of leave. after a dramatic few days in westminster, we've been talking to students and businesses about what they make of what they've been hearing and seeing in the commons. thank you very much. there's been harsh language here throughout history, of course, but at the heart of this, the bitter divisions over brexit. it's also about mutual respect and at the moment that seems in short supply. 0ur political correspondent jessica parker reports.
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through the gloom, divisions surface. they surfaced in the chamber last night too. we will not betray the people who sent us here. the prime minister called efforts to delay brexit and avoid no—deal a surrender. many of us in this place are subject to abuse and death threats every single day, and let me tell the prime minister they often quote his words. i have to say, i have never heard such humbug in all my life. there were calls for moderated language after the murder of the mpjo cox. the best way to memory ofjo cox and indeed the best way to bring this country together would be, i think, to get brexit done. jo cox's widower said he felt sick at her name being used in this way, but today urged calm across the board. this stuff is not only wrong
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because actually on both sides of the debate people are just trying to do what they think is right for the country, but it's also dangerous. mps heading back into parliament today. what do you think of the tone of last night's debate? not very good. this is the language. the tone at the gates also tense. this is an idiot. keeping things courteous... sorry you have had to wait in the wet. the government saying the answer is to motor on and deliver brexit. i cannot see how this is going to calm down until the big issue which has caused such division has been resolved, that's why we are keen to get it done quickly. tempers are frayed, tensions running high. borisjohnson says ideally he wants to go to brussels, get a new brexit deal and have mps approve it. things moved fast in westminster but last night's events are another
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jessica parker there. we are awaiting a vote. the nose-mac to the left, 306. -- the noes to the left, 306. the ayes to the right, 289, the noes to the left, 306. the noes habit, the ayes have it, the ayes habit. unlock. a los of the government there. what does that mean? 0ur chief correspondent is here. it means the tory party conference in manchester will now be something of a cossie. normally we go off on a recess for three weeks while you have a liberal democrat conference, tory conference in three successive weeks. the snp get very annoyed about this because their conference does happen while parliament is sitting but on this occasion, the perrot king of parliament happened, though it then didn't happen, —— the
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proroguing of parliament. the government is hoping they would vote through a three day recess next week so through a three day recess next week so they could hold their conference in manchester and tory mps would be free to go there rather than having to be here, that has been rejected and leave said they were not willing to grant this to the government despite the normal conventions, so it means they will have to go ahead with the conference, i'm sure. i do not think they can cancel it, but it does mean... a lot of journeys back and forth to manchester. and that depends what is happening in parliament. the conferences on sunday, sunday is fine but on monday the parliament will be sitting and the parliament will be sitting and the question is what they do on those days, the question is do they have to keep coming back for important votes? back to commons. we dissolve parliament early next week, obviously mr speaker, any such general election would then have taken place general election would then have ta ken place passed general election would then have taken place passed the 31st of
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0ctober, brexit deadline. to help the public understand the current debate in parliament, could you confirm that a general election could not be held before the 31st of election deadline. i'm grateful to the honourable gentleman for his point of order and has courtesy and giving me advance notice of his intention to raise it. i can confirm that my understanding of the electoral timetable under the existing statutory framework is the same as his. i said, under the existing statutory framework. my understanding is the same as his. we come now to the business statement by the leader of the house, jacob rees—mogg. by the leader of the house, jacob rees-mogg. thank you for allowing me
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to make the statement at a slightly unusual time to facilitate the earlier division, which makes the business i'm going to read out rather more useful than had i done it earlier in the day and had to do it earlier in the day and had to do it again. the business for next week will be... monday 30th september, the bay to approve a motion in relation to section seven of the northern ireland executive formation etc act 2019 historical institutional abuse. followed by the bay to approve a motion related to section six of the northern ireland executive formation etc act 2019, victims payment. followed by debater approve and the motion relating to number five of the act, human trafficking. followed by debater approve a motion relating to section four of the northern ireland executive formation etc act 2019, gambling. tuesday the 1st of 0ctober, motion to approve a
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statutory instrument relating to the d raft, statutory instrument relating to the draft, common organisation of the markets and agricultural products, transitional arrangement etc amendment, regulations 2019, followed by motion to approve a statutory instrument relating to the d raft statutory instrument relating to the draft common agricultural policy of common organisation of the markets and agricultural products, miscellanea event —— make miscellaneous amendments, eu regulations 2019, followed by motion to approve a statutory instrument relating to the draft import and export licences, megan's, eu exit, regulation 2019 followed by... followed by a motion to approve a statutory instrument relating to the d raft statutory instrument relating to the draft pesticides amendment 2019. wednesday the 2nd of october... second reading of the domestic abuse bill. it was worth waiting for i
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think. thursday 3rd of october, debate on a motion relating to women was mental health. followed by general debate on the spending of the ministry ofjustice. these subjects and times will be determined by the backbench business committee, friday fourth 0ctober, the outs will not be sitting. thank you. can i thank you leader of the house for the business statement? you will know this could have actually been agreed through the usual channels and we are trying to compromise and come to a consensus, and there would have been no need for this division. there is no need —— like this is no way to run a parliament and we earlier heard how we have to start as we mean to go on and respect each other in the way we speak to each other. i do want to ask user of the house if you could ask user of the house if you could ask the attorney general come to the
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house to apologise for calling as a dead parliament and turkeys... we are talking about language so we will but i but i want but i want to but i want to bring but i want to bring vicky but i want to bring vicky and but i want to bring vicky and just but i want to bring vicky and just explain what we are just watching because this is all procedural. what has happened there is the leader of the house has now had to lay out what will happen next monday, tuesday, wednesday when the conservative party conference is going on and they were hoping parliament would be sitting which is the normal convention but mps have refused to grab —— grant him that, so refused to grab —— grant him that, so they are now announcing legislation... not legislation but things which aren't too controversial because they do not wa nt tory controversial because they do not want tory mps to want to come back all the way from manchester every couple of hours to do votes so they have found some statutory instruments which will probably go through, maybe even without —— which will probably go through maybe even without a vote and then the second reading of the domestic abuse bill, which is the bill everyone thought was lost because of the crow road king of parliament, the fact that did not happen means it can be
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brought back. that meant the proroguing of parliament. lots of mps on the oversight have wanted that to be brought back and they've been urging the government to do so is, so what the government is hoping is, so what the government is hoping is now that candy be debated on wednesday and is uncontentious in the sense it would get through the house of commons without too much whipping on either side, telling mps where to go and wednesday as the day borisjohnson the prime minister should be addressing the conservative party conference. the unknown in all of this is where the backbench mps try again to take over the order paper, to take over what happens in the house of commons and because tory mps might not be here, as many of them, could they do that and bring in some other kind of bill legislation? that is the unknown at the moment but it looks like you can see what the government is trying to do their carpeting. that is not too controversial. a slight change in feel then. we had a reference to the earlier intemperate language. it's worth just reflecting on what we've seen in the last 2a
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hours. a lot of people very shocked by what's happening here and what they have seen. it was an extraordinary atmosphere here yesterday and it's started in the morning with geoffrey cox coming in and saying it was a dead parliament, which really set the tone for the day. boris johnson came which really set the tone for the day. borisjohnson came to the house and there was no apology, but if you've been watching what the government has been doing for the last few weeks, that is not a huge surprise and i think although it was shocking to lots of people, it was definitely a fibril atmosphere, the idea that this kind of atmosphere started last night is not true, this has been happening for a long time particularly around the brexit debate, the anguish, and on all sides, not one or the other. that is not particularly a healthy atmosphere but it's just the truth that has been going on for quite some time. i think the problem for borisjohnson some time. i think the problem for boris johnson last night some time. i think the problem for borisjohnson last night as there was clearly a labour mp who himself —— who has faced the most terrible death threats and that was not
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acknowledged by borisjohnson. it was answered like a normal political question which meant... well, he even called it humbug. young people we re even called it humbug. young people were upset about that, he answered it like a run—of—the—mill question when it clearly was not, so that is a problem and i have to say today there are senior government official saying they have no regrets about what happened and they have been saying actually they are not whipping upa saying actually they are not whipping up a frenzy. what they are trying to do is make mps face the consequences of their actions in the sense that they don't like most of them voted for a referendum, most of them voted for a referendum, most of them voted for a referendum, most of them voted to trigger article 5a the what they think was going to happen? some of the government would say they are trying to ignore their responsibilities and what the government is trying to do is to force them to accept that referendum result and get behind what the government is doing. don't go too far, things happen. let's get out of this bubble and back to my colleague who is getting reaction to all the stuff that has been going on not
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just here but around the country. tell us exactly where you are, what's going on? hello, i at the dodson centre in hand the. one of the six towns of stoke—on—trent and there was a community hub here where there was a community hub here where there are lots of businesses. it is also centred on the museum, based on also centred on the museum, based on a very well—known pottery company. it only closed recently and has a 200 year history. the centrepiece is a bottle kiln right here behind me, as you see the rain coming down between me and it. that is a fascinating museum of wares that shows what the company has made over the last two centuries. it is a historic place packed with heritage and so on, and i'm here to talk to sophie who is the staffordshire political reporter. what do you make of the events and what the stout make of the events of the last few days? a lot of frustration, not only is our confusion about what all this means and what it will mean going forward for brexit, but frustration,
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seeing the scenes in parliament last night. i've got conservative councils getting in touch with me saying the scenes in the house of commons were a disgrace and it's not how they want politics to be seen because they say they all get on and they try to move forward for what is best for staffordshire and stoke on trent, so there is an element of waiting to see what is next but also hoping that something moves forward quickly. we hear a lot that some people just want something done. when i have to go out and ask what people think about brexit, a lot of people think about brexit, a lot of people say, get it done, get it out the way, move forwards and that is what people are feeling right now. and family background on how stoke—on—trent voted in the referendum. it was 69.4% leaving referendum. it was 69.496 leaving stoke—on—trent particularly. referendum. it was 69.496 leaving stoke—on—tre nt particularly. really strong feeling. highest in the country? highest city, bigger city voting to leave. that is where we hear a lot of the feelings. there are still remain voters here but even some of those are saying, just get it done now. they are saying,
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despite them voting to stay in, they understand that was the result of the referendum and theyjust want something to move forward. clarity. clarity is a big word here people wa nt clarity is a big word here people want to see. again, there is frustrations that the mps are halting proceedings are not letting it go forward, so there's a bit of frustration at some of the mps in stoke—on—trent and staffordshire as well. mps turning out a deal three times, then no deal. what do they want? —— like turning down a deal. well, two mps have admitted in the la st well, two mps have admitted in the last few weeks they regret not voting for theresa may's deal when it was first brought to them earlier on and they are now part of this group of mps for a deal because they wa nt group of mps for a deal because they want to be brought that might want it to be brought back to the house of commons. from talking to them, do you get the impression it might be a nationwide thing that people will
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vote for a deal if it back comes now? potentially, yeah, because the risk of no deal is a bit too much for a lot of those labour mps because they are worried about work is' rights and the industrial people of stoke—on—trent and how they would act when faced with a no deal. how is stoke—on—trent generally at the moment bearing in mind the uncertainty? i think that this frustrated. it'sjust the uncertainty. something about what happens, just make a decision now because how can we plan for the future if we do not know what the future if we do not know what the future is going to hold? do we stockpile and that stuff goes to waste and we may be wasted a bit of outcome, out lay there? that is maybe how people are feeling and then that is definitely reflected among the voters as well, so it will be very interesting if there is a general election of exactly where people go. just really, why did stoke—on—trent vote leave? people go. just really, why did stoke—on—tre nt vote leave ?|j people go. just really, why did stoke-on-trent vote leave? i think pa rt of stoke-on-trent vote leave? i think part of it is they felt that they we re part of it is they felt that they were not being engaged in national politics, felt left out as well as
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some of the industry is being left behind, it tends to be industrial areas that are voting to leave so there is part of that as well and there is part of that as well and there was frustration with some of there was frustration with some of the processes. thank you very much indeed. let's get back to you in westminster. we will talk to you throughout the afternoon. more on what we've been hearing in the last hour and one of the most interesting aspect of all of this, the use of language by the prime minister, is those who have known him for a long time, none of them more perhaps than his own sister, racheljohnson, who has been appearing on bbc radio four and this is what she had to say a short time ago. it's not the rather icy at home. it's a different person, —— its not the brother i see at home. it makes you think if it is at home. it makes you think if it is a deliberate strategy to whip up, raise the tempo so much that people feel that they've had their democracy stolen all they have had the vote betrayed and therefore
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whips up the base into believing that if only they cleave to him and the strongman rhetoric, the strongman strategy, they will get what they want. i've just been speaking to rachel, i made that point, she said she is speaking more widely, more of the half of what she thinks people are feeling, not necessarily specifically about what you think about all this. now to sebastien payne. that fibril atmosphere. we have seen the build—up of it, the exit referendum result, if you like. that seems now that people are saying. last night in the house of commons, it was pretty unprecedented. i've been covering westminster for eight years know is in an atmosphere like that last night, on both sides, both those who are pro—brexit and anti—brexit, getting increasingly wound up about the state of affairs. if you talk to remain minded people, they say that boris johnson using this language of the surrender bill
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regarding this idea of brexit being delayed through hilary benn‘s legislation but brexit is on the other hand saying this is mps coming to terms with the fact that there was a referendum —— mike brexiteers saying there was a referendum. you have to deliver on that, they say. when you look back at the vote, it was we are leaving the eu, that was the result of it and mps have struggled to fulfil that and that is why the government sees these tensions building their and boris johnson has addressed conservative mps this morning to ask about this and some of them did raise concerns saying, is this really wise, is this a good idea? as you arejust saying. the prime minister was my own sister has raised the question as well but the fact is borisjohnson wants to repaint this whole upcoming election as the people versus parliament and he has simply not resigned from that language as he thinks it works for his case. we need to make the case that this language has been around for a long time at all sites have been... i will use the word guilty
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of overdoing the language and the intemperate nature of it. but where are we right now in terms of the politics of brexit? we haven't actually moved on any further from where we were when the government was zero prorogued. this was not about the supreme court case, this is about proving a point about whether boris johnson is about proving a point about whether borisjohnson acted in a way that misled the queen in parliament. mps have spent yesterday in may break today, debating all kinds of things. all about these allegations of the american businesswoman and mr johnson but the fact is parliament has voted against every single way of resolving brexit, a soft brexit, ha rd of resolving brexit, a soft brexit, hard brexit, second referendum, no—deal brexit, no brexit. they've talked about everything and they still cannot say what they want so until mps have a plan in parliament can keep talking and keep debating, it is going to come down to that crunch point, can you prime minister get a new deal? that is really where we are at now. we have the
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conservative party conference next week and after that you will have a week and after that you will have a week and a half... would you say that what we had devote saying the house will stay sitting so the conservative party conference is thrown into some disarray, isn't it? it is what i've spoken to people in westminster and downing street saying we will go ahead as normal. if labour tried to ambush the conference, one minister said to me manchester is only two hours away so they want to do business as usual and what is the message of the conference going to be? people versus parliament once again. boris johnson saying parliament was like sitting, they are trying to the shop, i'm the one trying to get on with this and get a better deal, so i think once the conference has passed, you will have this week and a half period where mrjohnson will intensify those efforts, we will be back on the eurostar trying to get a deal and we will come to that crunch eu summitabout deal and we will come to that crunch eu summit about the 17th—19th of 0ctober eu summit about the 17th—19th of october to see if he gets a new deal. if he does, it is back to parliament to see if they want to pass that deal and if not the
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question is does he delay, extend or does he resign? prime ministers questions next week, doesn't go ahead? we think so it's on the order paper but mrjohnson is due to be speaking in manchester at that point so they may have to do a bit of schedule reshuffling. there's been some rumours mrjohnson might speak on tuesday but the governmentjust wa nts to on tuesday but the governmentjust wants to do business as normal and rise above what is going on here in westminster. always good to see you. thank you forjoining us. the european union's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier has been briefing other eu leaders on his latest talks with his british counterpart this morning. he told reporters that there were no new ideas that could break the brexit impasse. and that the eu are still ready to work on any new legal and operational proposals. trump administration officials tried to "lock down" the transcript of the us president's controversial phone call to ukraine's leader, according to a whistleblower‘s report. the white house says nothing has changed.
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acting national intelligence directorjoseph maguire is now appearing before us congress. let's listen in to that national security meeting in washington now. back then they accuse the tron campaign of colluding with the russians when the democrats themselves were colluding with the russians and preparing the still dossier. today they accuse the president of pressuring ukrainians to ta ke president of pressuring ukrainians to take actions that would help himself or hurt his political opponents. yet there are numerous exa m ples of opponents. yet there are numerous examples of democrats doing the exact same thing. joe biden bragged that he extorted into firing a prosecutor who happened to be investigating joe biden‘s own son. three democratic senators wrote a letter pressuring the ukrainian general prosecutor to reopen the
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investigation... into former tron campaign officials. another democratic senator went to ukraine and pressure of the ukrainian president not to investigate corruption allegations involving joe biden‘s son. according to ukrainian officials, the democratic national committee contractor alexander... alexandra charlie parr try to get ukrainian officials to provide dirt on trump associates and try to get the former ukrainian president to comment publicly on the ties to russia. —— alexandra chalupa tried to get ukrainian officials... there was another one who was a source, the... as she worked on the aunt i tron operation conducted by fusion gps and funded by the democrats. of course democrats on this very committee negotiated with people they thought were ukrainians in
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order to obtain nude pictures of trump. people can ask why the democrats are so determined to impeach this president when in just a year, they will have a chance. in fa ct, a year, they will have a chance. in fact, one democratic congressman, one of the first to call for drop's impeachment gave us the answer and he said, quote, i'm concerned that if we don't impeach the president, we will get re—elected, and quote. winning elections is hard. when you compete, you have no guarantee you will wind. the american people do have a say in this and they made their voices heard in the last presidential election. this latest gambit by the democrats to overturn the people was that mandate is unhinged and dangerous. they should end the entire dishonest, grotesque spectacle and get back to work at solving problems, which is what
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every member of this committee was sent here to do. judging by today's charade, the chances of that happening any time soon as zero to none. i thank the gentleman. director, would you rise for the oath and raise your right hand? do you solemnly swear or affirm that the testimony you will give today shall be the truth, the whole truth and nothing but the truth you god? you may be seated. the record will reflect that the witness has been duly sworn. director maguire, would you agree that the whistle—blower complaint alleges serious wrongdoing by the president of the united states? mr chairman, the
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whistle—blower. .. states? mr chairman, the whistle-blower. .. i apologise, director. that we recognise you for your opening statement. and you may ta ke your opening statement. and you may take as much time as you need. thank you very much, mr chairman. members of the committee, good morning. i'd like to begin by thanking the chairman and the committee for agreeing to postpone the hearing for one week. this provided sufficient time to allow the executive branch to successfully complete its consultations regarding how to accommodate the committee's request. i've told you this on several occasions and i would like to say this publicly. i respect you, i respect this committee, and i will come and take seriously the committee's oversight role. during my confirmation process, to be the director of the national centre, told the senate select committee of intelligence that congressional oversight of the intelligence activities is critical and essential
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to successful operations with the intelligence community. having served as a director of the national counterterrorism centre for eight months, and as the acting director of national intelligence for the past six weeks, i continue to believe strongly that the role of congressional oversight. as i post to the senate, i pledge to you today that i will continue to work closely with congress while i'm serving either in this capacity as acting director of national counter terrorism or when i return to the national counterterrorism centre. to ensure you are fully and currently informed of intelligence activities to facilitate your ability to perform your oversight of the intelligence community. the american people expect us to keep them safe. the intelligence community cannot do that without this committee support. before i the matter at hand, there are a few things i would like to say. i am not
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partisan, and i am not political. i believe in a life of service, and i'm honoured to be a public servant. i was served under eight presidents while i was in uniform, i have taken the oath to the constitution 11 times, the first time when i was sworn into united states navy in 1974, and nine times during my subsequent promotions in the united states navy. most recently, former director dan coats administrated the oath last december when i became a director of the national counterterrorism centre. i agree with you, the oath is sacred. it's a foundation of our constitution. the oath, to me, means not only do i swear faith and allegiance to that sacred document but more importantly i view it as a covenant i have with my workforce, that i lead and every american, and i will faithfully discharge the duties of my office. i come from a long line of public
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serva nts come from a long line of public servants who have stepped forward even the most difficult and austere times to support and defend our country. when i took my uniform off injuly 2010, it was the first time in 70 years that an immediate member of my family was not wearing a cloth of my family was not wearing a cloth of the nation. as a naval special wa rfa re of the nation. as a naval special warfare officer, i had the honour of commanding at every level in the community, and it was, at times, very demanding. but the rewards of serving in american special operations community, more than make up operations community, more than make upfor operations community, more than make up for the demands. after my retirement, i was fortunate to work for a great private sector firm. i left the business world after three yea rs left the business world after three years to lead a nonprofit charity. some question why i would leave a promising business career to run a charity. the answer is quite simple. it was another opportunity to serve. i lead a foundation dedicated to honouring the sacrifice of our fallen and severely wounded special
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operatives, the foundation i led enabled hundreds of children of fallen to attend college. it is extremely meaningful, and rewarding. in the winter of 2018, i was asked by former director dan coats to return to government service to lead the national counterterrorism centre. this request was totally unexpected, and was not a position i sought. but then again, it was another opportunity to serve my country. in particular, i knew that many of the young sailors and junior officer i'd trained 20 years earlier we re officer i'd trained 20 years earlier were no senior veterans officer i'd trained 20 years earlier were no senior veterans deploying and still sacrificing. i decided if they could continue to serve, returning to government service was the very least i could do. and now, here i am, sitting before you as the acting director of national intelligence. with last months departure of dan coats and sue gordon, two exceptional leaders, and
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friends, i was asked to step into the very big shoes and lead the entire community until the president nominates and the senate confirms the next director of national intelligence. i accepted this responsibility because i love this country, i have a deep and profound respect for the men and women of our intelligence community, and the mission we execute every day on behalf of the american people. throughout my career, i have served and led through turbulent times. i have governed every action by the following criteria. it must be legal, it must be immoral, and it must be ethical. no one can take on individuals liberty away, it can only be given away. if every action meets those criteria, you will a lwa ys meets those criteria, you will always be a person of integrity. in my nearly four decades of public service, my integrity has never been questioned until now. i'm here today to unequivocally state that, as acting dni, iwill continue to unequivocally state that, as acting dni, i will continue the same faithful and nonpartisan support as
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ideas to the constitution and the laws of this great country, as long asi laws of this great country, as long as i serve in this position for whatever period of time that may be. i want to make it clear that i have upheld my responsibility to follow the law every step of the way in the matter before us today. i want to also state my support for the whistle—blower and the rights and the laws. whistle—blowing has a long history in our country dating back to the continental congress, this is not surprising. because, as a nation, we desire for good government. therefore, we must protect those who demonstrate courage to support alleged wrongdoing on the battlefield or in the workplace. indeed, at the start of ethics training at the executive branch, we are reminded that public service is a public trust. and, as public servants, we have a solid responsibility to do what's right, which includes reporting concerns of waste, fraud and abuse and bringing
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such matters to the attention of congress. under the intelligence community whistle—blower protection act. i applaud all employees who come forward under this act. i am committed to ensuring that all whistle—blower complaints are handled appropriately, and to protect the rights of whistle—blowers. in this case, the complainant raised the matter with the intelligence community inspector general, general is properly protected his identity, and will not permit him or her to be subject to retaliation or adverse consequences for communicating the complaint to the inspector general. upholding the integrity of the intelligence community and the workforce is my number one priority. throughout my career, i relied on the men and women of the intelligence community to do theirjobs so i could do mine andi to do theirjobs so i could do mine and i can personally attest that their efforts saved lives. i would now like to turn to the complaint and provide a general background on how we got to where we are today. on
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august 26, the inspector general forwarded a complaint to me from an employee in the intelligence community. the inspector general stated that the complaint raised an urgent concern, a legally defined term under the whistle—blower at protection act which has been discussed at length which led us to the committee on september the 16th - 17th. the committee on september the 16th — 17th. before the committee on september the 16th —17th. before i turn to the discussion about whether the complaint is a definition of urgent concern, i first want to talk about an even more fundamental issue. upon reviewing the complaint, we were immediately struck by the fact that many of the allegations of the complaint are based on a conversation between the president and another foreign leader. such calls are typically subject to executive privilege. as a result, we consulted with a white house cancels office and we were advised that much office and we were advised that much of the information of the complaint was in fact subject to executive privilege. a privilege that i do not
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have the authority to waive. because of that, we were unable to immediately share the details of the complaint with this committee. but continued to consult with a white house cancels in an effort to do so. yesterday, the president released a transcript of the call in question and therefore we are now able to disclose the details of both complaint and the inspector general slatter transmitted to us. as a result, i have provided the house and senate intelligence committees with a full unredacted complaint as well as the inspector general slatter. let me also discuss the issue of urgent concern. when transmitting a complaint to me, the inspector general took the legal position that, because the complaint alleges matters of urgent concern, and because he found the allegations to be credible, i was required under the intelligence community whistle—blower protection act to forward the complaint to our overseas committees with seven days
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of receiving it. as we have previously explained in our letters, urgent concern is a statutorily defined term, to be an urgent concern the allegations must in addition to being classified, assert addition to being classified, assert a flagrant a serious problem, abuse or violation of law, and relate to the funding, administration or operation of an intelligence activity within the responsibility of the director of national intelligence. however, this complaint concerns conduct by someone outside the intelligence committee unrelated to funding, administration or operations of an intelligence activity under my supervision. because the allegation on the face did not appear to fall in the statutory framework, my office consulted the us department office consulted the us department ofjustice office office consulted the us department of justice office of legal office consulted the us department ofjustice office of legal counsel and concluded the inspector general was included in those consultations.
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after reviewing the complaint, and the inspector general is letter, the office of legal counsel determine the allegations do not meet the statutory requirements definition concern, legal, urgent concern, and found i was not legally required to transmit the material to our oversight committee over the whistle—blower protection act and a classified version of that office of legal counsel memo was publicly produced. as you know, for those of us in the executive branch, the office of legal counsel opinions are binding on all of us. in particular, the office of legal counsel opinion states that the president is not a member of the intelligence community and the communication with a foreign leader involved no intelligence operation or activity aimed at collecting or analysing foreign intelligence. this did not require transmission of the complaint to the committees, but did leave me with the discretion to forward the
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complaint to the committee. however, given the executive privilege issues are discussed, neither the inspector general nor i were able to share the details of the complaint at the time. when i was informed the director—general intended to inform the committees of the existence of the committees of the existence of the complaint, mr chairman, i supported that decision. to ensure the committees were capped as informed as possible of this process moving forward. i want to raise a few other points about the situation we find ourselves in. first, i want to stress that i believe that the whistle—blower and the inspector general have acted in good faith throughout. i have every reason to believe that they have done everything by the book and followed the law. respecting the privilege nature of the information and patiently waiting while the executive privilege issues were resolved. wherever possible, we have worked in partnership with the
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inspector general on this matter. while we have differences of opinions on the issue of whether or not it is a virtue of concern, i strongly believe the role of the inspector general and i value the independency brings and his dedication in his goal of keeping me and the informed of matters within the intelligence committee, second, although executive privilege prevented us from showing the details of a complaint with the committees until recently, this does not mean that the complaint was ignored. the inspector general in consultation with my office referred this matter to the department of justice for investigation. finally, i appreciate that in the past whistle—blower complaints may have been provided to congress regardless of whether they were deemed credible or satisfied the urgent concern requirement. however, iam not familiar with any prior instances where a whistle—blower complaint touched on such complicated and
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sensitive issues including executive privilege. i believe that this matter is unprecedented. i also believe that i handled this matter in full compliance with the law at all times. and i am committed to doing so, sir. i appreciate the committee providing me this opportunity to discuss this matter, the ongoing commitment to work with the ongoing commitment to work with the congress on your important oversight role. thank you very much. thank you, director. we are going to hear the first question because it is going to put to mr maguire that what has happened was the president breaking the law. let's listen to the response. the whistle-blower complaint involve the allegation of that. it is not for me, the intelligence community, to decide how the president conducts foreign policy or as interaction with leaders of foreign countries. i'm
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not asking you that, i'm asking you whether, as the statute requires, this complaint involves serious wrongdoing in this case by the president of united states, an allegation of serious wrongdoing by the president of united states? is that not the subject this complaint? yes, that is the subject of the allegation. of the complaint. two things, mr chairman. let me ask you about that. the inspector general found that serious allegation of misconduct by the president credible. did you also find that credible? i did not criticise the inspector general‘s decision on whether or not it was credible. my question was whether or not it meets the urgent concern in the seven day time frame that would follow once i was notified. i have no question in
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hisjudgment that was notified. i have no question in his judgment that he considers it a serious matter. and you would concur, would you not, director, that this complaint alleging serious wrongdoing by the president was credible? it's not for me to judge, sir. it is for you to judge, apparently. you shall provided to congress. indeed, you didjudge whether this complaint should be provided to congress. can we at least agree that the inspector general made a sound conclusion that this whistle—blower complaint was credible? that is correct. in the cover letter which has been provided to the committee, i believe that's also been public, the decision at the recommendation by the inspector general, that in fact the allegation was credible. can we also agree it is urgent, that if the president of united states was withholding military aid to an ally, even as you receive the complaint, and was doing
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so for nefarious reasons, to exercise an average with the president of ukraine, to dig up manufacture dirt on his opponent, can we agree it was urgent while that aid was being withheld? i'm talking about the common understanding of what urgent means because the inspector general said this was urgent, not only the statutory meaning but urgent as everyone understands that term. can we agree it was urgent? it was urgent and important. but myjob as a director of national intelligence was to comply with the whistle—blower protection act and are dearto whistle—blower protection act and are dear to the definition. we are going to pull away from mud hearing with the intelligence director facing questions. 0ur washington correspondent gary 0'donoghue can speak to us now. we will attempt to find out how that's progressing later on. the bbc
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is reporting from stoke—on—trent all week. let's cross again to my colleague nick 0wen. thanks, simon. i'm joined now by peter coates, chairman of stoke city fc and bet365. thank you forjoining us. i want to talk about stoke—on—trent broadly. you are born and bred here. is that what you have based your self here business—wise? what you have based your self here business-wise? i started my own business-wise? i started my own business in 1968, based in stoke, so i've never left. and how is the climate now for business in stoke? it's challenging, that's the word we use. it's not easy. why? it's not easy anywhere. i suppose the south—east is better than the rest of the country but always competitive and it's not going to change and there's been huge changes in technology and the way the world works with lots of manufacturing
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jobs. we had two basic industries in stoke, mining and potteries. the pottery industry is to employ 100,000 people. now i'm saying 20,000. a slight gas on my part. it isa 20,000. a slight gas on my part. it is a few places to have retained manufacturing and we still have some good brands who are doing 0k. manufacturing and we still have some good brands who are doing ok. in a highly competitive market. in that sense we have done better than a lot in retaining that tradition of ceramic tradition. the mines have gone as they gone everywhere. a lot of it is about modernisation. your betting firm is a classic example. we are very much an it business, started in developing in 1999, launched 2000, and now we've got a very large successful business. the largest online sports book in the world, all operated from stoke—on—trent.
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world, all operated from stoke-on-trent. you are a noted campaigner for a referendum on brexit. first of all, why? well, because it's a huge important issue. i know everybody seems to think it is set in stone, the decision be made which amazed everybody in 2016. it was a democratic vote. it was a democratic vote, but it wasn't set in stone. nobody talked about the terms. the conditions. 0r anything like that. simply did we want to come out? not on what basis we wa nted come out? not on what basis we wanted to come out of europe. nothing about that. a lot of this argument is about that, the fact there's been a referendum, i have to say, i think people know a great deal more now than they did then. i venture to say they knew very little them. itjust seemed very simple. get out of europe. lots of irony about this. we now have our parliament and judges telling us
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what to do and this is what we want to back, that's the great irony. thanks very much. i'm going to move on. with just over a month to go before the uk is scheduled to leave the eu what are businesses making of the continuing uncertainty? and what impact will last night's heated words in the commons have? 0ur correspondent danni hewson has been speaking to businesses in stoke on trent. by tonight, most customers here will have swapped coffee for a pint but the conversation will be about brexit. it doesn't matter where you go, people talk about brexit. there are lots of people with lots of views. what's incredible is we don't end up with the kind of anger we saw in the house of commons
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yesterday in the pubs. people seem to accept differing views and just want to get through the process now. keith brews his own beerfor his 12 bars. 90% of his ingredients are uk—sourced so does he agree with michael gove business is ready for no—deal? we are as ready as we possibly can be, but without the crystal ball that tells us what happens post brexit, how can we say we are ready? we don't know what will happen so we cannot be ready for every eventuality. it is impossible to know what flavour of brexit will flow out of the tank but stoke has dealt with the erosion of its pots. for many local businesses, weathering this seems doable. julie's family have run a roofing business for 26 years and they are cautiously optimistic. we don't think it has had too much of an effect on us, only saving the timber we import from the eu but suppliers are starting to stockpile now in case of a shortage, but again we don't know the date we are leaving, if we are leaving, if they will be a shortage of or a price increase so we are in the dark.
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this is one of our animation studios... we are working on a variety of projects at the moment. you may have caught their animations on a number of television shows and they are currently working on a film. they worry brexit could affect them. i think we could ride the wave. am i worried for the larger industry of film effects in the uk? yes, it hasn't been handled well and there are things that could go badly wrong. all three businesses are doing what they can, if anything, to get ready. for what? they still don't know. it will come down to stoke—on—trent‘s resilience rather than any plans from westminster.
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danny is with me now. i'm nowjoined by mo chaudry, the founder of waterworld. just explain what waterworld is what people who don't know the area. just explain what waterworld is what people who don't know the areal host hope people do know it, it's a water park, an indoor water park situated in stoke—on—trent. water park, an indoor water park situated in stoke-on-trent. we've been talking to businesses across the region about brexit today. clearly, no deal potentially, brexit day getting closer. are you prepared? who day getting closer. are you prepared ? who is day getting closer. are you prepared? who is prepared, that's the big question? can you be prepared? we don't know what's happening, what kind of brexit, whether there's going to be a deal, no deal? the fact of the matter is, these are uncertain times and it's not good for business. and we have concerns and i just not good for business. and we have concerns and ijust hope a deal can be done. but clearly, there are also
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opportunities, particular when it comes to trade. of course. there is two aspects to it. uk—based businesses, like myself, leisure businesses, like myself, leisure businesses, it would be an issue because of people got less disposable income it will have an effect. nonessential items. i think, looking at the bigger picture, like everything else, business enterprise is always challenging. i'm quite an advocate of enterprise and looking internationally, the pace of my birth, pakistan, went there last year and birth, pakistan, went there last yearandi birth, pakistan, went there last year and i saw world of opportunities. it's all there to be grabbed and we just gotta go and get it. thank you. the boss of wate rwo rld. it. thank you. the boss of waterworld. i've been talking to lots of different businesses across the region today and really the key message that i'm getting as they just don't know. thank you very much for that. back to you in stoke—on—trent a little later on. now you may remember boaty mcboatface — the name chosen by the public for the uk's new £200 million
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polar research vessel. it gives me great pleasure to name this ship sir david attenborough, and may god bless her and all those who sail in her. applause the duchess of cornwall has given the ship, its official title — named after the broadcaster and naturalist, sir david attenborough. they were joined by prince william in birkenhead, and were treated to a performance by 200 school children dressed as penguins. the royal research ship is the first addition to the fleet in 50 years, and will be stationed in the arctic and antarctic. we will be back headlines in a moment. time for a look at the weather with stav da naos. hello there. sunshine and showers now for today and for tomorrow. low— pressure now for today and for tomorrow. low—pressure nearby sending these
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showers from west to east across the uk. strong winds, as well. the isobars close together affecting england and wales. closest to the centre for northern ireland. it won't be quite as strong. we end the day with heavy showers and western areas, temperatures, 20. but the mid to high teens elsewhere. tonight, shallow and blustery too. most of the showers in the north and west we re the showers in the north and west were dry interludes further east and most were dry interludes further east and m ost pla ces were dry interludes further east and most places because of the wind should remain in double figures overnight but there will be a few spots and the length of clear skies could drop into single digits. low— pressure could drop into single digits. low—pressure with us on friday. just to the north—west of the uk. in the north, the wind will be lighter. further south, breezy. north, the wind will be lighter. furthersouth, breezy. more intense weather fronts could enhance the shower activity so they could merge together to produce longer spells of rain spreading from west to east through the day. there will be some sunshine in between and another windy one for england and wales. temperatures come a few degrees down
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across the board, in fact. the mid teens in the north. 16—18, england and wales. the all—important weekend and wales. the all—important weekend and unfortunately looks like it's going to stay unsettled. low— pressure going to stay unsettled. low—pressure nearby on saturday. just to the north of the uk, a few degrees down across the board, in fa ct. degrees down across the board, in fact. the mid—teens in the north. 16-18, fact. the mid—teens in the north. 16—18, england and wales. the all—important 16—18, england and wales. the all—importa nt weekend 16—18, england and wales. the all—important weekend and u nfortu nately all—important weekend and unfortunately it looks like it's going to stay unsettled. low— pressure going to stay unsettled. low—pressure nearby on saturday. just to the north of the uk, north lasley went. something drier here but i will feel cooler. sunshine and showers elsewhere. to the south—west, this next area could have some potency to it, heavy rain to the south—west of the uk later in the day. temperatures, 15—18. later on saturday, through saturday evening, overnight, the heavy rain spills in from the south—west. this low— pressure spills in from the south—west. this low—pressure contain some tropical moisture which is why the rain will be quite heavy. localised flooding problems. uncertainty to how far north of this low pressure will be but during sunday morning the heavy rain clears away and we will see strong gale force winds on its back edge. 50—60 miles an hour along the east coast. that coincides with high
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tide, so that could cause some issues but much of the country on sunday will see some sunshine and showers. temperatures ranging from around 13—15 in the north, 17—18 in the south.
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good afternoon from westminster, you're watching afternoon live with me, simon mccoy. the headlines at 3... the speaker of the house of commonsjohn bercow tells mps to treat each other as opponents not enemies as the prime minister is urged to moderate his language. the government loses a vote to allow a recess for the tory party conference. debates continue in the house of commons — we'll bring you all the latest developments this afternoon. nick 0wen is in stoke—on—trent. where we'll be talking about brexit in a city that voted overwhelmingly in favour of it. thanks, nick. also this afternoon... president trump's top intelligence official faces congress — over a whistle—blower complaint on president trump that sparked
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an impeachment inquiry. this is the scene live in washington. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with holly. 242 for england at the world cup and they, and is a victory over the united states. another bonus point for eddiejones‘ united states. another bonus point for eddie jones' side. united states. another bonus point for eddiejones‘ side. see you at 3:30pm. and we are ending on an aunt u nsettled 3:30pm. and we are ending on an aunt unsettled notes just like we started the week. high pressure nearby. you can bring is a really potent area of low pressure on saturday night into sunday to ring his bell of very heavy rain and then gale—force winds on sunday. i'll have all the details for you later on. thanks, stav. also coming up — the duke and duchess of cambridge have named the uk's new polar research ship — no not boaty mcboatface — but the sir david attenborough.
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hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. the commons speakerjohn bercow has called on all sides to tackle the ‘toxic‘ political culture — after borisjohnson was accused of using inflammatory language at the dispatch box last night. even some of his own cabinet ministers have raised concern over the language he used. but it's not confined to just one party — or one side in the brexit debate. if you look up the word toxic in the dictionary and you'll find a definition along the lines of very unpleasant or unacceptable — and last night mps on all sides were describing the atmosphere here in those terms. meanwhile, in the last hour, mps have voted not to adjourn for the conservative party conference. it's the seventh vote that the government has lost since borisjohnson became pm. well let's get reaction from nick 0wen, who's in stoke—on—trent for us and has been getting the views of people in the city. thanks, simon. yes, all this week
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the bbc is in stoke on trent, as part of our "we are stoke—on—trent" series, discovering stories about what makes the city tick, hearing what matters to people there, and bringing those issues to a wider audience. stoke—on—trent is the city with the highest number of "leave" votes in the uk. after a dramatic few days in westminster, we've been talking to students and businesses about what they make of what they've been hearing and seeing in the commons. well, the house of commons has voted not to adjourn during next week's conservative party conference. let's listen to the result. the the ayes to the right, 289. the noes to the left, 306. the ayes to the right, 289. the noes to the left, 306.
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so, the noes have it, they noes have it. unlock. that was one hour ago. there's been harsh language here throughout history, of course — but at the heart of this — the bitter divisions over brexit. it's also about mutual respect — and at the moment that seems in short supply. 0ur political correspondent jessica parker reports. through the gloom, divisions surface. it surfaced in the chamber last night too. we will not betray the people who sent us here. the prime minister called efforts to delay brexit and avoid no—deal a surrender. any of us in this play subjective death threats —— may of us in this play subjective death threats and abuse every single day, and let me tell the prime minister they often quote his words. i have to say, i have never heard such humbug in all my life. there were calls for moderated language after the murder of mpjo cox. the best way to memory ofjo cox
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and indeed the best way to bring this country together would be, i think, to get brexit done. jo cox's widower said he felt sick at her name being used in this way, but today urged calm across the board. this stuff is not only wrong because actually on both sides of the debate people are just trying to do what they think is right for the country, but it's also dangerous. mps heading back into parliament today. what do you think of the tone of last night's debate? not very good. this is the language. the tone at the gates also tense. this is an idiot. keeping hings courteous... sorry you have had to wait in the wet. the government saying the answer is to motor on and deliver brexit. i cannot see how this is going to calm down until the big issue which has caused such division has been resolved, that's why we are keen to get it done quickly.
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tempers are frayed, tensions running high. borisjohnson says ideally he wants to go to brussels, get a new brexit deal and have mps approve it. things moved fast in westminster but last night's events are another example of how the possibility of finding consensus in this place feels far away. now today an urgent debate on the prime minister's language. the labour mp says she has had a death threat this week quoting borisjohnson, and a claim that the language used has a certain intent. it has clearly been tested and work shopped and worked up, and it is entirely designed to inflame hatred and division. but a reminder there had been heated exchanges on all sides. yesterday she was the person i could hear screaming the loudest from her bench. earlier the speaker was clear,
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everyone needs to take care. on both sides passions were inflamed, angry words were uttered. we can turn many of us have is that there is a deliberate strategy of division and confrontation. there is a strategy, the prime minister is the last thing standing between ending brexit enterprise entirely. you can expect no quarter. absolutely everything is going to be thrown at him, isn't it? earlier the speaker was clear, everyone has to ta ke speaker was clear, everyone has to take care. on both sides, patterns we re take care. on both sides, patterns were inflamed, angry words were uttered. the culture was toxic. the prime minister headed to see his own conservative mps earlier and got a warm reception. now the challenge, stopping things from getting too heated. jessica parker, bbc news. the leader of the house
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of commons jacob rees—mogg this afternoon repeated the government line that the best way to breeak the currrent parliamentary impasse would be to hold a general election. the attorney general has called this a turkey parliament. i think it's more of a chick in parliament because it is trying to flap away from the general election that we need that would clear the air, and yes we get gesticulation and murmur durations coming forth from the benches opposite saying we will get one but when? the country wants one as soon as possible and i think this parliament addled likely part of a woman of 1614 which was known as the addled parliaments who also came to be known in such a way. with me is our chief political correspondent, vicki young. it may not be the language, it may be an attitude thing because that will have riled a few people.
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everyone was extremely angry. people are more calm today. some people sitting there last nightjust thought they would want to be a part of it and move things on. there was a slightly less toxic debate today about it all but i think this language and rhetoric used around the brexit debate has been going on for a few years now. it's not true to say it simply started last night. it has been from all sides directed that all sides and it is extremely unpleasant particularly for the mainly female mps who have been getting death threats over the last couple of the years. the problem for borisjohnson couple of the years. the problem for boris johnson last night couple of the years. the problem for borisjohnson last night is all this language is flying around in any distress labour mp gets up, has had death threats, evokes the memory of a colleague was murdered during a referendum and boris johnson dismisses it, because it humbug and treated like a normal answer to a parliamentary question and itjust was not appropriate and has upset a
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lot of people, and some on his own side for mp said they went to the 1922 meeting where borisjohnson was addressing tory mps and asked what the reaching out strategy is given that in three weeks' time, if he gets a deal and comes back to the house of commons, we will need mps to get behind him and vote for it, and he could not give an answer for that. isn't the role of the speaker to keep control on this? there was clapping for the boris johnson to keep control on this? there was clapping for the borisjohnson was clapped after making his statement by his own benches and i did not think that was allowed. has been going on again, for years, and the snp liked it because they did not like the convention of not doing it. it was allowed to happen underjohn virgo, laboured on it, it would be ha rd virgo, laboured on it, it would be hard for him to stop at last night for the first time ever. —— john bercow has allowed it. the strategy of the former cabinet minister and former tory now, he spoke about his concern about it being a deliberate strategy by the government and a
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policy to divide and confront, and thatis policy to divide and confront, and that is fuelling all of this. on the other side, a senior government official has said today that this is about making mps confront the reality that they voted for a referendum, the referendum happened. during it, people were told it would be binding at the triggered article 50 to start the whole process, now they won't deliver on it, and they say that is what they are trying to do to force the issue one way or another, to try and make sure what the people want to do is delivered. 0n the issue of playing games, we had the vote which means parliament continues next week, right bang in the middle of a conservative party conference. is that petty mindedness by those who just want to mess the tories about? some will say it was com pletely tories about? some will say it was completely unfair given the liberal democrats and labour had therefore conferences. although jeremy democrats and labour had therefore conferences. althoutheremy corbyn had to switch a speech to one day earlier but this could be a bit disruptive for the conservatives,
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but they have announced legislation for next week, announcing statutory instrument, things that are uncontroversial, so they hope there will not be any vote that mps need to come back for from where the conference is in manchester. there is always a but. but labour could ta ke is always a but. but labour could take control of what is happening in common is what time is running out for all of that if they chose to do it. the thing is borisjohnson does not have a majority in array, having lost almost all of his vote so far. whether his mps are here or not, he cannot really get a novel through parliament, so his conference will go ahead, there willjust maybe be some tweaks around the agenda. thank you. the european union's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier has been briefing other eu leaders on his latest talks with his british counterpart this morning. he told reporters that there were no new ideas that could break the brexit impasse. and that the eu are still ready
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to work on any new legal and operational proposals." just hearing... come back, because i'm just saying here that uk prime minister borisjohnson said political cabinet will take place at 4pm this afternoon. which a microphone on. now, that explain... it was 5pm, we were told earlier five p m. it now says for pm. what is it about was my goal the conservative party conference, that is indications earlier, nothing more than that. there has been speculation of whether he was about to decide he would try to prorogued parliament again. we are being told thatis parliament again. we are being told that is not the case, it is about the tory party conference but you never know. don't go too far. good example why just never know. don't go too far. good example whyjust there. thank you, we will have more later on. now
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to washington. trump administration officials tried to "lock down" the transcript of the us president's controversial phone call to ukraine's leader, according to a whistleblower‘s report. the white house says nothing has changed. acting national intelligence directorjoseph maguire is appearing before us congress this afternoon. during that session, the chair of the congress' intelligence committee — the democrat adam schiff read from the rough transcript of the whistleblower‘s release. it details the content of an alleged phone call between president trump and the president of ukraine — in which the us president asked his ukranian counterpart to "dig up dirt" on his closest opponent in next years us election — joe biden. let's hear what congressman schiff said. zelinsky begins by ingratiating himself, and he tries to enlist the support of the president. he ex presses support of the president. he expresses his interest in meeting with the president accesses country wa nts to with the president accesses country wants to acquire more weapons from us to defend itself. and what is the
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president's response? well, it reads like a classic organised crime shakedown. shorn of its rambling character and a not so many words, this is the essence of what the president communicates. we've been very good to your country. very good. no other country has done as much as we have what you know what? i don't see much reciprocity here. i hear what you want, i have a favour i want from you, though. and i'm going to say this only seven times so you better listen good. i want you to make up dirt on my political opponent, understand? lots of it. on this and on that, i'm going to be due in touch with people, notjust any people, i will put you in touch with the attorney general of the united states, my attorney general, bill barr. he has the whole weight of the american law enforcement behind him. i'm going to put you in touch with rudy, you're going to
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love him, trust me. you know what i'm asking in time only going to say this a few more times, in a fume or ways. and by the way, don't call me again, iwill ways. and by the way, don't call me again, i will call you when you've done what i asked. this is in some in character what the president was trying to communicate with the president of the ukraine. it would be funny if it wasn't such a graphic portrayal of the president's —— betrayal of the president's oath of office. but the senior ranking republican in the congressional intelligence committee pushed back at the accusations. devin nunes said the whistleblower complaint was an attempt by partisan democrats to smear the president. the complaint relied upon hearsay evidence provided by the whistle—blower. the inspector general did not know the contents of the phone call at issue. the inspector generalfound the phone call at issue. the inspector general found the whistle—blower displayed arguable political bias against the drop. the department ofjustice investigated the complaint and determine no action is warranted. he denies being
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pressured by president trump so, once again, the supposed scandal ends up being nothing like what you are told and once again the democrats, their media mouthpieces, and the lea kers democrats, their media mouthpieces, and the leakers are journeying up a fa ke story and the leakers are journeying up a fake story with no regards to the monumental damage they are causing to our public institutions and to trust in government. the acting director pot acting director of national intelligencejoseph maguire has been questioned by the democratic chair of the intelligence committee adam schiff. the whistle—blower — a member of the intelligence community — works under him. he said he thought the whistle—blower did the right thing — and followed the law correctly but he found it difficult to make a public statement supporting them. i believe they followed us every step of the wave but the statute was one in this situation involving the president of the united states who is not in the intelligence community or matters underneath my supervision did not meet the criteria for urgent
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concern. i'm asking about the whistle—blower concern. i'm asking about the whistle— blower right now. concern. i'm asking about the whistle— blower right nowl concern. i'm asking about the whistle-blower right now. i think they did the right thing, following they did the right thing, following the watery step of the way when we just got... why when the president called them a political hack and suggest that he or she might be disloyal to the country, why did you remain silent? i did not remain silent. i issued a statement to my workforce telling the committee my commitment to the whistle—blower protection and ensuring i would provide protection to anyone within the intelligence committee who comes forward but the way this thing was blowing out, i did not think it was appropriate for me to be making a press statement so that we counter each other every step. 0ur washington correspondent gary 0'donoghue has been following the proceedings in congress. the members of the committee have been cross questioning joseph maguire closely this morning about his actions in handling that complaint from the whistle—blower. it turns out he got the details of
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that on the 26th of august, about two weeks after the whistle—blower made the initial complaint, and he had to make the determination whether or not it was of urgent concern and whether or not it should be referred to the intelligence committees here in congress. he made the decision in consultation with the decision in consultation with the white house, it now turns out, and at the department ofjustice, that it didn't need to go to congress and that's something he has been heavily criticised for by democrats during this hearing so far. he also been pressed on the nature of the whistle—blower, him or herself. we do not know their identity and the president has referred to the whistle—blower as a political hackjoseph maguire has said he has absolute confidence in the good faith of the whistle—blower but he would not be drawn on whether or not he felt their fears, their concerns were credible and would not give any kind of personal opinion on them. he is now taking the committee
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through the various stages of his enquiry, he has been pressed from both sides as you can imagine, and shortly, and the next couple of hours, he is going into a private session with the senate intelligence committee where he can talk about more classified matters but this is a crucial development in the whole question of the impeachment of the president and it will give democrats a lot more ammunition as they build their case to prepare for those articles of impeachment. just a quick line of copy coming from the lobby here. the prime minister was disappointed, it says, that a recess was rejected from commons. you may have seen after 2pm that vote in the commons well they voted to keep parliament running next week which will cause problems for the tory party conference schedule to get under way on sunday.
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the quote from the official spokesman, for many years parliament has done this but conference will go ahead as planned. a confirmation that will be a political cabinet with vicky young being right, it is at five o'clock tonight. that is the latest from here in westminster. as you know, the bbc is reporting from stoke—on—trent this week and it is the city that recorded the highest number of the city that recorded the highest nu m ber of leaflets the city that recorded the highest number of leaflets in the united kingdom. back to my colleague. —— leave votes. i'm joined by our political reporter. and also a labour councillor and the chair of the stoke—on—trent liberal democrats. good afternoon to you all. before i talk to you, sophie, put them into context. here we have a conservative party which are making the ground in stoke—on—trent. they took a stoke
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seat which was historical, massive vote in the general election. this used to be a massive stronghold for stoke—on—trent but they are seeing a challenge for the conservative party and liberal democrats who really wa nt to and liberal democrats who really want to have their say when it comes to brexit here within stoke—on—trent. you see some of the support there and politically this is very interesting times for stoke—on—trent because it voted 69%... stoke—on—trent because it voted 69%. .. 0verwhelmingly stoke—on—trent because it voted 69%... 0verwhelmingly to leave the european union in this referendum. both sides i think, what you're hearing, as they are saying they just want something sorted, they are so frustrated. your reaction to the events of the last few days. cataclysmic events. pretty shocking what is going down in parliament, a real shame. mps not getting on with the job the public set them to task to do. you are a lever. absolutely, i let the local vote in 2016 and i
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am furious the mps are not getting on with the job of delivering brexit which is what people... loss of sound. well, we have a problem stoke—on—trent but you don't need me to tell you that. we will be back there later on as part of our we are stoke series here all week on bbc news. the news you're in westminster dominated by that chat this morning with the vote also to keep parliament sitting throughout the tory party conference next week. we will hear more on that at 5pm. we have re—established the line with stoke. don't do that with me again. back to you. my apologies. terrible business. talking to alistair watson, labour councillor for stoke—on—trent. i was asking, i do not know if they caught it, are you
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angry or frustrated ? not know if they caught it, are you angry or frustrated? puzzled. breathtaking speed while all eyes are on westminster, you cannot turn your eyes away from a television or the radio without there being for developments, it is so fast paced right now. it is leaving most people puzzled and confused. prichard, chair of the liberal democrats. i presume you're very, very clearly a second referendum man. you'll might very clearly and remain as well. the referendum in 2016 was ill—defined, it was poorly conducted. there are huge issues with it but alongside that, one thing i've been doing over the past couple of years as i've been involved with the pro—eu group, out on the streets, in stoke—on—trent, holding street stalls in hanley and tom stall, and people are coming up to us and saying we were lied to, i've changed my mind. if i had another chance, i would vote to remain now. we have
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seen that quite clearly and the polling has shown it overwhelmingly. do you see that as well?l polling has shown it overwhelmingly. do you see that as well? i couldn't disagree more respectfully because i go out there every week and i see people out there who are frustrated to death, they want us to leave the eu. people want more money in the nhs, improvement of schools, 20,000 more police officers on the beat. that's what they want to do, they wa nt that's what they want to do, they want to get on with it because they have fantastic opportunities for free trade deals around the world. can't you see that, steven? we need to get on with it, no other referendum. if we leave without a deal, does not end, it starts, it sta rts deal, does not end, it starts, it starts and it goes on for at least a decade and probably much longer, so if you want to stop talking about brexit, the best thing to do is to stop brexit. that cannot be necessarily true if you get a deal?
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that is the point, we need to leave with a deal. that still is the target? he doesn't sound like he is doing that much to work for apart from some rhetoric. do you agree? try the prime minister has worked extremely hard to get a deal, he is making it very clear he wants a deal, he wants the eu to shift their democratic vote. of course, we still need to leave. all your colleagues and all the parties have vetoed a deal three times in the house of commons. that deal was not what we voted,, let's commons. that deal was not what we voted, , let's remember that. commons. that deal was not what we voted,, let's remember that. the dili prime minister is trying to strike as brexit, not in name only what real brexit. that's what people of north staffordshire voted for. i'm sorry, i need to come in on that one. that is completely untrue because, in 2016, we were promised all of these benefits without the obligations, some little plans, they
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need us more than we need them, etc, etc, etc. there is no plan for no deal because you're going to get a great deal. none of that is true. it's quite clearly not true. as we run out of time, let me ask you all, and a perfect world, what do you wa nt to and a perfect world, what do you want to see now? i don't think i need to ask. revoked arkansas 50. radical as that? against what was voted for them erratically? there was a 2017 general election after the referendum. we are a representative democracy. quickly. our two representative democracy. quickly. ourtwo mps representative democracy. quickly. our two mps have been working to leave with a deal, one of the referendum result and we need a deal so leave with a deal. mps need to come together, respect the result andl come together, respect the result and i ideally want a deal but if we cannot get one, we get on and leave without a deal. what do you say to all of that? you have not heard anything new. no, it is not going away anytime soon. people are just waiting to find out what will happen and want something to be done,
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sometime soon. why is my clarity is what we need. thank you, all of you. it's what we all need. we will come back to you later on. let's still show the skies of westminster because it looks a bit threatening as cloudy skies, rain, clouds seem to be heading this way. the flags fluttering in an increasing breeze. do not know what is happening inside, i would guess the temperature is still quite hot. later the new chamber when the comeback but meanwhile to the weather for all of us, let's find out what is going on. yes, shower clouds gathering across eastern parts of the country. they settled and to friday and saturday, influenced by an area of low pressure sweeping and showers from the west. —— unsettled finish to the week. early strong winds associated with the area of low pressure, particularly for england and wales
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where there are lighter across scotland, slow—moving showers here. temperature still only mild side for the time of year, high teens, 20 celsius possible across the east. those showers rattle on across western areas through the night, if you getting over towards eastern areas but there will be some lengthy, dry spells here. another mild night in the south, cool across scotla nd mild night in the south, cool across scotland and northern ireland, especially out of town in sheltered glands because temperatures are into mid single digits. low pressure with us on into friday, these weather fronts enhancing the showery activities, some of the merging together to produce longer spells of rain, forming in bands as well as they spread from west to east through the course of the day. it looks like scotland are seeing lighter winds but further south, another blustery one with those westerly winds being quite a feature through the afternoon. temperatures cooler across the board. mid teens in the north, 1718 across the south. the weekend unsettled again. no pressure continues to dominate like it has gone all week. this area of
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low pressure to the north of the uk brings further showers on saturday, good sunny spells around, too, but to the south—west, this area of low pressure has some potency, tropical air makes them so the rain could turn out really heavy through saturday night into sunday. it sta rts saturday night into sunday. it starts very wet for the south—west of england and wales into the first pa rt of england and wales into the first part of the evening and that rain pushes its way north—east so a bit of uncertainty to the northern extent of this rain but it looks like england and wales could get quite a pasting, particularly northern and western parts of england and into wales. this loan moves through saturday and into sunday, rain pushes into the north sea as we have a strong gust of westerly winds, 60 mph, gales and to the morning and afternoon with a coinciding high tide across the east coast there so looking at issues. they wended our blustery afternoon for many, showers in the north and west but sunny spells, feeling cooler at 13—18dc.
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this is bbc news. our latest headlines. borisjohnson will meet his cabinet at five o'clock this afternoon as he faces claims of using inflammatory language as a political tactic. the government has lost a vote to allow a recess for the tory party conference. president trump's top intelligence official is facing congress over a whistleblower complaint that sparked an impeachment inquiry. prince harry speaks out on a tour of botswana as he takes aim at climate change deniers. also coming up. the uk's new polar research ship, originally due to be called "boaty mcboatface", is launched today by the duke and duchess of cambridge, named after sir david attenborough. sport now on afternoon live with holly hamilton.
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holly mcauley face has a ring to it. i knew you were going to go for that. over to you. england are getting into their stride at this world cup now. it was almost a demolition of the united states as they made it two bonus point wins out of two, bearing in mind, they still have to face argentina and france in their group — tougher tests lie ahead but as far as eddiejones is concerned seven tries and another bonus point is a case of so far so good. patrick gearey reports. to face the united states, here was new england. ten changes from a team that took on tonga, we were promised that took on tonga, we were promised that england would play faster, sometimes at speed is in the mind. todayis sometimes at speed is in the mind. today is captain george ford spotted a highway through america, a short trip for the first try. it went quiet for a while before england realised the best way to crack the states was through strength in numbers. luke cao and dickie was
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escorted into american territory. 19-0 at escorted into american territory. 19—0 at the break. the eagles are fast rising england were quicker still. jonathan josef went to the brink of the line. then batted away any remaining resistance. opportunities now for personal landmarks. rory mcconnachie has worked as way up from division five by worked as way up from division five rugby to become a world cup try scorer. lewis ludlow, who is very future as a professional player was in doubt, little more than a year ago, whose dreamlike journey continued to the us line. 38—0, the special relationship was being stretched. this charge at owen farrell earned him the world cups first red card. england seventh try came but in the closing seconds, the eagles finally landed. bryce campbell, the leading man in a hollywood ending to an english evening. italy are clearly looking to cause a bit of an upset in the group they share
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with heavyweights new zealand and south africa. they've made it two bonus point wins in a row after dismantling canada 48-7. they scored seven tries in fukuoka in their biggest world cup win to date. they also comprehensively beat namibia in their opener lsat week but remember, still to come for the italians, its new zealand and south africa. any hopes bury may have had of returning to the league now appear to be over after a proposal for the club to be readmitted to league two next season was rejected by the efl‘s 71 member clubs. bury, who were in league one, were expelled from the efl in august after a last—ditch takeover bid collapsed. earlier this week, a group trying to rescue bury submitted a proposal for "compassionate re—entry" to league two. but, a league statement said the proposal did not have the necessary support. only one team will go down from league two this campaign, rather than two. derby county captain
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richard keogh has been ruled out until the end of the season due to a knee injury sustained in a car collision that led to the arrest of two team—mates. tom lawrence and mason bennett have both been subsequently charged with drink—driving following the incident after a team—building dinner. keogh was a passenger in a range rover involved in a collision on the outskirts of derby on tuesday night. the club said lawrence and bennett know they will pay a heavy price for their actions but they will be supported with their " rehabilitation back into the squad and team". ac milan and inter have presented their proposal for a new arena that will replace the current san siro stadium. the two clubs have come together to build the new venue, which will be right next to the current stadio giuseppe meazza, so still technically in the san siro area of the city. a joint press conference was held earlier to unveil the proposals which the clubs say represent "a new landmark of world class excellence in milan. "
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and australian tennis player nick kyrgios has learned his punishment for his outbursts on court at the cinnicinati masters lsat month. he smashed two racquets as well as verbally abusing the umpire and spitting in his direction amongst other offences. tour chiefs have handed him a 4 month suspended ban and a hefty fine and told him he's on probabtion for the next six months. well, kyrgios has responded to his punishment. he's taken to instagram with this image saying, "guess i'm on my best behaviour for six months". hashtag detention. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. holly, thank you very much. you're watching often live from bbc news. —— mike afternoon live from bbc news. the former french president
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jacques chirac has died at the age of 86. many in france considered him as their favourite president. he had been suffering from ill health for many years. he served two terms as president from 1995 to 2007 and famously opposed the us—led war in iraq. our correspondent jonathan marcus looks back at his life. when the lofty figure ofjacques chirac became president in 1995, he seemed to characterise the very essence of french politics. his political career extended over a remarkable 40 years, and he's seen by many as the most influential french man of his generation. chirac‘s presidency began in a bullish mood, outraging world opinion by restarting french nuclear weapons tests in the pacific. the president insisting that france's nuclear deterrent was an essential element of its security and its effectiveness had to be tested. but there were seismic political shifts going on at home. in the 2002 presidential election, the socialist vote collapsed and the far right national front ofjean—marie le pen won through to the vital second ballot.
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chirac ultimately crushed le pen but the warning signals for french politics were clear. little could mask the endemic problems of french society. high levels of unemployment, bitter divisions over immigration and uncertainty about just where the country was heading. for a time, jacques chirac was able to contain the storm. his absolute refusal to countenance any french involvement in the us invasion of iraq won him strong support at home. but it wasn'tjust france that was changing, it was europe too. comfortable with the idea of a european union with france and germany in the driving seat, a wider membership changed the eu's whole character. the french president often railed against britain's eu rebate, as well as its failure to contribute to what he saw as its fair share of the costs of enlargement. jacques chirac is a president with a mixed legacy. he was convicted of corruption
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in relation to his time as mayor of paris, but he was also the president who finally accepted france's responsibility for its involvement in the deportation of frenchjews to nazi death camps during the second world war. he was a president who reconciled france with key elements of its past, but he was ultimately unable to reconcile it with its future. jacques chirac, who died today aged 86. the duke of sussex has said the world will be a "very, very troubling" place if people continue to deny climate change. speaking during a visit to botswana, prince harry said the facts and science were getting stronger, and he praised young campaigners like greta thunberg for taking action. from botswana, our royal correspondent nicholas witchell reports. this is the africa where he feels most at home, away from the cities and the crowds. this morning harry was in northern botswana, helping to plant a baobab tree.
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it was a moment for harry to reflect on why africa means so much to him. it's a sense of escapism, a real sense of purpose. i came here in ‘97, ‘98, straight after my mum died, so it was a nice place to get away from it all. but, now, ifeel deeply connected to this place and to africa. it's been harry's involvement in conservation projects in africa, helping children today to plant trees. this is what's brought home to him the urgent need to combat climate change. this last week, led by greta, the world's children are striking. there's an emergency that we are... it's a race against time, one of which we are losing. i don't believe there is anybody in this world that can deny science, undeniable science and facts. science and facts that have been around for the last 30, maybe 40 years. and it's only getting stronger and stronger. i genuinely, i don't understand how
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anyone in this world, whoever they are, you, us, children, leaders, whoever it is, no—one can deny science, otherwise we live in a very troubling world. undeniable science, in harry's words, and note the dig at leaders who deny it. those remarks by harry on climate change were as unambiguous as any you're likely to hear on the subject from any member of the royal family, his father included. harry took to the water on the river chobe, close to the border with zambia and zimbabwe, a place with bountiful wildlife, where nature conservation is a priority. the message of the day was clear, "our world must be protected." nicholas witchell, bbc news kasane, botswana.
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now you may remember boaty mcboatface. the name chosen by the public for the uk's new £200 million polar research vessel. it gives me great pleasure to name this ship sir david attenborough, now you may remember boaty mcboatface. the name chosen by the public for the uk's new £200 million polar research vessel. it gives me great pleasure to name this ship sir david attenborough, and may god bless her and all those who sail in her. applause the duchess of cambridge has given the ship, its official title, named after the broadcaster and naturalist, sir david attenborough. they were joined by prince william in birkenhead, and were treated to a performance by 200 school children dressed as penguins. the royal research ship is the first addition to the fleet in 50 years, and will be stationed in the arctic and antarctic. jonathan amos was at the launch for us earlier. a day of great celebration here on the wirral. we have the duchess of cambridge press a button which then threw a bottle of champagne at the side of this vessel which is now officially called the royal research ship sir david attenborough, and it's going to be used principally by the british antarctic survey, so they
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are very keen to get their hands on it and with me i have professor mike meredith. what's it going to be like using the ship? fantastic, it's an incredible new facility we have got full that we will be able to scale up full that we will be able to scale up the amount of science and the impact the science has. it's going to be wonderful new tool for science in the uk and overseas. it's come at an amazing moment, hasn't it, really, for polar science and climate science in particular? you are one of the authors on the big climate report that we've had this week that has set outjust how fast theice week that has set outjust how fast the ice poles are melting, so it's a big job to do. it has. what we are finding increasingly is the polar regions are changing and those changes are accelerating quite rapidly in some areas. the impacts of those changes are felt all over the world and of course what we, as scientists, need to do is learn more about what's causing those and how it affects everybody around the world and this ship will be a really
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fantastic new tool for doing that. you do a lot of work in the oceans, don't you? how will it be used to the water? we go out on ships and we measure how the oceans are circulating, how they are taking up heat from the atmosphere, taking up carbon from the atmosphere, and all of these things affect global climates and this ship will be able to do that over a wider range than we've ever done before with advanced techniques and really push for the science. there was a dispute over the name, bow team at both face, it was given to yellow submarine which does ought ominous work but you will use not submarine. we will. increasingly that's the way the science is going. it's this partnership between fantastic vessels like this and autonomous has gone to another name. and we'll be getting fantastic new data from that, as well. -- boaty mcboatface i've looked on board the ship and
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its not quite finished. a few things need to be painted, but they will start checking it out for real in the next few weeks and then they are expected to go on trial is to the arctic and the antarctic. back to the studio. jonathan amos of air with boaty mcboatface, sorry, the sir david attenborough. let's pick up sir david attenborough. let's pick up on politics. i'm joined by the labour mp stephen kinnock who is with me now. what are the options they are discussing? obviously the call for a general election is a ring around everyone's ears. yes, of course, there a push to table a vote of no confidence, but there is real concern that if we do that we are thrown into an incredibly turbulent situation, even more turbulent than is now which could potentially and with us leaving the eu without a deal. almost by accident. there is a vacuum here in westminster. i think the consensus amongst the opposition
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parties as we first of all need to ensure the prime minister obeys the law and gets the extension to article 50 but it may well be rapidly after that we can move to a general election. you get the sense jeremy corbyn would like to call the prime minister is black. leaders of the opposition should always be looking for opportunities to unseat the government. but we are in extraordinary circumstances where there is a particular need to protect our economy, protect peace in northern ireland, we must get that extension so we can take a breathing space and then find a way forward. it could be a general election. my personal preference would be for parliament to agree a deal and leave the european union on the basis of a deal that protects jobs and livelihoods. it's notjust a labour party meeting but all opposition parties. is there much difference between them or will there be a consensus do you think? from what i've picked up in the media, the scottish nationalists seem to be more keen on trying for
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the vote of no confidence right now. i assume they have the agenda for a whole range of reasons, but the consensus in our party and certainly as far as consensus in our party and certainly as farasi consensus in our party and certainly as far as i understand it from the leader of the opposition of our party, as we need to keep our powder dry. we await for the result of that meeting. were you in the house last night? i was and it was a very u nfortu nate night? i was and it was a very unfortunate and nasty tone. and it's a pity, it's not smart politics either, because the prime minister needs to build cross—party support for a deal that he may need. has not been damaged as a result of last night? it does not make it any easierfor night? it does not make it any easier for us. night? it does not make it any easierfor us. particularly night? it does not make it any easier for us. particularly his response to my colleague paula sherriff, which ijust thought response to my colleague paula sherriff, which i just thought was crass and very illjudged and i think the prime minister should apologise to her for that. think the prime minister should apologise to her for thatl think the prime minister should apologise to her for that. i don't know if you saw in the commons this morning, maria miller on the tory benches said she only had one person screaming and shouting and that was her, rather than the prime minister.
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i think she direct that atjess phillips. look, ithink i think she direct that atjess phillips. look, i think everybody needs to moderate their language, compromise is not a dirty word. we needin compromise is not a dirty word. we need in a particular hung parliament, we need sensible moderate pragmatic mps to work together but the prime minister has together but the prime minister has to help us by leading by example. he sets the tone and when he uses that sort of aggressive rhetoric i think it doesn't help the chances of us building a cross—party compromise and, my goodness, british politics needs to rediscover compromise. i think we have got this toxic balloon which is brexit and we got to take the air out of that bloom for the best way to do that is to leave the european union with a deal. that's the position i stood on in the 2017 ma nifesto the position i stood on in the 2017 manifesto and i think labour should stick to its guns on that. the prime minister needs to do lots of hard work in brussels to get the deal he can bring back to parliament. the parliamentarians also need to come crashing out on the 30th of october
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without a deal which could lead to the end of the northern ireland peace process, catastrophic for our economy, for national security and the future of our uk. the stakes are very high. in the situation we are in. we can't allow the polarisers and the bandwagon jumpers to win the day and that starts with a language and tone we use. stephen, good to talk to you. thank you very much. that's what's happening in westminster. as you've been hearing, the bbc is reporting from stoke—on—trent this week. it's the city that recorded the highest number of "leave" votes in the uk. let's cross again to my colleague nick owen. thanks simon. i'm here at the dudson centre and museum in hanley, one of the six towns that makes(ad . the museum is a fascinating place with selection of ceramics from a 200—year—old who closed this year.
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stoke—on—trent said uncertainty particular anthrax of the court is putting pressure on the city. earlier i spoke to peter coates, chairman of stoke city fc and founder bet365. he started his business here in stoke in 1968 and says the climate is challenging. well, i don't think it's easy anywhere. i suppose the south—east is easier than the rest of the country, but business is always tough. it's very competitive. and that isn't going to change. there's been huge changes in technology and the way the world works. we've lost lots of manufacturing jobs like stoke. we had two basic industries in stoke. mining and potteries. the pottery industry used to employ 100,000 people. now, and this is a slight guess on my part, i'm saying 20,000. but it's one of the few places that actually retained a manufacturing presence and we've still got some good brands here. they're doing ok. in a highly competitive market. so we, in that sense, have done better than a lot in retaining that ceramic tradition.
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the mines have gone, as they've gone everywhere. with just over a month to go before the uk is scheduled to leave the eu, what are businesses making of the continuing uncertainty? and what impact will last night's heated words in the commons have? our correspondent danni hewson has been speaking to companies in stoke on trent. by tonight, most customers here will have swapped coffee for a pint but the conversation will be about brexit. it doesn't matter where you go, people talk about brexit. there are lots of people with lots of views. what's incredible is we don't end up with the kind of anger we saw in the house of commons yesterday in the pubs. people seem to accept differing views and just want to get through the process now. keith brews his own
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beerfor his 12 bars. 90% of his ingredients are uk—sourced so does he agree with michael gove business is ready for no—deal? we are as ready as we possibly can be, but without the crystal ball that tells us what happens post brexit, how can we say we are ready? we don't know what will happen so we cannot be ready for every eventuality. it is impossible to know what flavour of brexit will flow out of the tank but stoke has dealt with the erosion of its pots. for many local businesses, weathering this seems doable. julie's family have run a roofing business for 26 years and they are cautiously optimistic. we don't think it has had too much of an effect on us, only saving the timber we import from the eu but suppliers are starting to stockpile now in case of a shortage, but again we don't know the date we are leaving, if we are leaving, if they will be a shortage
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of or a price increase so we are in the dark. this is one of our animation studios... we are working on a variety of projects at the moment. you may have caught their animations on a number of television shows and they are currently working on a film. stoke has worked from home largely due to talent from the university. they worry brexit could affect them. i think we could ride the wave. am i worried for the larger industry of film effects in the uk? yes, it hasn't been handled well and there are things that could go badly wrong. all three businesses are doing what they can, if anything, to get ready. for what? they still don't know. it will come down to stoke—on—trent‘s resilience rather than any plans from westminster.
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we heard some of what businesses have been saying, what else have you heard? it is small businesses i've been talking to today and for them if the indirect impact rather than a direct impact which is the biggest issue, so it's what potentially could happen to consumer confidence because i don't have confidence they won't spend their money and if they're not going to spend their money than places like the bars are not going to be able to keep going. and the other thing we are concerned about isjobs, and the other thing we are concerned about is jobs, employment. and the other thing we are concerned about isjobs, employment. what happens if workers from the eu aren't available any more? potentially they disappear and potentially the workers here in stoke could be tempted somewhere like london, so that is something they are really concerned about. let's talk to louise harris from fenns, one of the oldest companies in stoke. louise, you do business supplies, protective workwear, you
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don't import directly, but you do have wholesalers. are you concerned about brexit? have you made changes? we've made changes in terms of our uk supply chain for the furniture pa rt of uk supply chain for the furniture part of our business but from a business supplies point we import from the far east, so that won't have an impact. from a workwear point, we've got our own recycling solutions, we've had to levy our supply chain partners to put in place recycling solutions for plastics. and work now, so i feel we are ready depending which way it goes. that's something of an opportunity for you. very much though. i think there's an opportunity under threat. all business people are saying that. as long as the eu have the right strategy in place for us, it could be potentially an opportunity because our supply chain, people could consolidate the supply chain so we could do more for our
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customers. what about cost implications? are any of your suppliers saying we might have to put prices up? yes, certainly prices may go up. we are the uk's leading supplier of woodland trust paper, and the concern we have is its carbon neutral, the levy on that could actually make the paper more expensive for customers. we wouldn't then be able to support the charity. costs are going up. you also do an awful lot with the construction industry. we've heard that there's not a lot of investment in some places now. is that having a knock—on two orders? places now. is that having a knock-on two orders? we are seeing a down turn slightly in consumption because of that sector. as a whole, we are maintaining the path, but we work with a spread of industries but certainly you can actually see a downturn in some areas. ok, louise, thank you very much. that's very much what i'm hearing at the moment, that there is such a huge amount of
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uncertainty for businesses right across the board. it's incredibly difficult for them to figure out how they will be impacted come the 1st of november. it's a question we ask in many places. back to you later on. thank you very much. time now for a look at the weather. it's getting very dark in westminster. we are ending the week on an u nsu btle we are ending the week on an unsubtle note. no pressure nearby, sunshine and showers, some of it heavyin sunshine and showers, some of it heavy in northern and western areas. —— unsettled note. plus three across england and wales. some lengthy dryer interlude through central and eastern areas. most places in temperatures in double figures overnight but a few chillier spots under clear skies where temperatures dip into single digits. no pressure with us on friday. these weather fronts enhancing the shower activity so we could be showers west to east. a blustery day for england and
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wales. less windy across scotland. showers will be heavy. in the sunshine, temperatures reaching the high teens in the south. mid teens further north but a cooler day across the board. into the weekend, saturday, sunshine and showers and heavy rain, strong wind in the south—west. very bad start on sunday. windy with gales for many areas.
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good afternoon from westminster, you're watching afternoon live with me, simon mccoy. the headlines at 4.00: boris johnson is due to meet his cabinet in the next hour as the speaker of the house of commons tells mps to treat each other as opponents not enemies — the prime minister is urged to moderate his language. the government loses a vote to allow a recess for the tory party conference — mrjohnson says he's disappointed. debates continue in the house of commons — we'll bring you all the latest developments this afternoon. nick owen is in stoke—on—trent, where we'll be talking about brexit in a city that voted overwhelmingly in favour of it. yes, here we will be talking about brexit in a city that voted overwhelmingly in favour of it. thanks nick. also this afternoon — president trump's top intelligence
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official faces congress over a whistleblower complaint on president trump that sparked an impeachment inquiry. this is the scene live in washington. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. it is two 424 england rugby cup. comprehensive victory over the united states. more at 4:30pm. now, let's get the weather. thanks, simon. yes, we're ending the week on an unsettled note much like we started the week. sunshine and showers today and tomorrow, thanks to low pressure nearby. then into the weekend a really potent area of low pressure is expected saturday night into sunday to bring a spell of very heavy rain and gale force winds on sunday. i'll have all the details for you later on. thanks stav. coming up on afternoon live...
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the duke and duchess of cambridge have named the new polar research ship, the sir david attenborough. borisjohnson is to meet members of his cabinet in the next hour, after he was accused of using inflammatory language at the despatch box last night during a heated debate in the commons. it prompted the commons speaker john bercow this morning to appeal to mps on all sides to tackle the ‘toxic‘ political culture. even some of mrjohnson's own cabinet ministers have raised concern over the language he used but it's not confined tojust one party, or one side in the brexit debate. meanwhile, earlier this afternoon, mps voted not to adjourn for the conservative party conference. it's the seventh vote that the government has lost
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since borisjohnson became pm. well, let's get reaction from nick owen, who's in stoke—on—trent for us and has been getting the views of people in the city. thanks simon, yes all this week the bbc is in stoke on trent, as part of our "we are stoke—on—trent" series, discovering stories about what makes the city tick, hearing what matters to people there, and bringing those issues to a wider audience. stoke—on—trent is the city with the highest number of "leave" votes in the uk. after a dramatic few days in westminster, we've been talking to students and businesses about what they make of what they've been hearing and seeing in the commons. all and seeing in the commons. the details later. the prime minister's official spokesman said boris johnson was "disappointed" that mps had rejected a commons recess for the conservative party conference. the spokesman said the conference will go ahead as planned. let's listen to the result which happened earlier. the ayes to the right, 289.
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the noes to the left, 306. so the noes have it, the noes have it. unlock. there's been harsh language here throughout history, of course, but at the heart of this, the bitter divisions over brexit. it's also about mutual respect and at the moment that seems in short supply. our political correspondent jessica parker reports. through the gloom, divisions surface. they surfaced in the chamber last night too. we will not betray the people who sent us here. the prime minister called efforts to delay brexit and avoid no—deal, "a surrender".
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many of us in this place are subjected to death threats and abuse every single day. and let me tell the prime minister they often quote his words. i have to say, mr speaker, i have never heard such humbug in all my life. there were calls for moderated language after the murder of the mpjo cox. the best way to memory ofjo cox and indeed the best way to bring this country together would be, i think, to get brexit done. jo cox's widower said he felt sick at her name being used in this way, but today urged calm across the board. this stuff is not only wrong because actually on both sides of the debate people are just trying to do what they think is right for the country, but it's also dangerous. mps heading back into parliament today. what do you think of the tone of last night's debate? not very good. you see, this is the language. the tone at the gates also tense.
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this is an idiot. keeping things courteous... sorry you have had to wait in the wet. this minister is also office bound. the government saying the answer is to motor on and deliver brexit. i can't see how this is going to calm down until the big issue, which has caused such division has been resolved, that's why we're so keen to get this done quickly. tempers are frayed, tensions running high. that, as borisjohnson says that ideally he wants to go to brussels, get a new brexit deal and have mps approve it. things move fast in westminster but last night's events are another example of how the possibility of finding some consensus in this place feels far away. jess phillips... now today an urgent debate on the prime minister's language. the labour mp said she has had a death threat this week quoting borisjohnson, and a claim that the language used has a certain intent.
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it has clearly been tested and work shopped and worked up, and it is entirely designed to inflame hatred and division. but a reminder that there have been heated exchanges on all sides. yesterday she was the person i could hear screaming the loudest from her bench. disagreement between mps, clearly not wiped off the agenda today. we've got in number ten a man who has built his career on making inflammatory remarks, stoking division and shouting down those who disagree with him. the concern that many of us have is that there is a deliberate strategy of division and confrontation. there is a strategy. the prime minister is the last thing standing between ending the brexit enterprise entirely. he can expect no quarter, absolutely everything is going to be thrown at him, isn't it? earlier the speaker was clear,
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everyone needs to take care. on both sides passions were inflamed, angry words were uttered. the culture was toxic. the prime minister headed to see his own conservative mps earlier and got a warm reception. now the challenge, stopping things from getting too heated. jessica parker, bbc news. the leader of the house of commons jacob rees—mogg this afternoon repeated the government line that the best way to break the current parliamentary impasse would be to hold a general election. the attorney general has called this a turkey parliament. i think it's more of a chicken parliament because it's trying to flap away from the general election that we need and that would clear the air. and yes, the gesticulation and murmurations coming forth from the benches opposite saying that we are going to get one, but when mr speaker, when? the country wants one as soon as possible. and this parliament, i think rather than dead,
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i would use the word addled, like the parliament of 1614, which was known as the addled parliament. this i think may also come to be known in such a way. with me is our chief political correspondent, vicki young. so, it has been calmer today but my word, it needed to be? most people i have spoken to wished they hadn't been there and the ones who did left feeling pretty distressed about the whole thing. the question is, is this a new moment in british politics? i think it has been going on for several years, that kind of language, from all sides, directed at all sides has been going on for a long time. on the labour side, they we re very long time. on the labour side, they were very offended by borisjohnson really not acknowledging that a labourmp really not acknowledging that a labour mp was pretty distressed, had raised the memory of a colleague who was murdered during the referendum and the fact that he just said humbug in response, is clearly a
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problem, but i have to say, no senior government officials are drawing back from that, they say they don't have any regrets about what happened, they say what they are trying to do is make mps focus on the choices and focus on the choices they made years ago whether they voted for a referendum, voted to trigger article 50, but now there has been no resolution to this. there was a view held by some that the prime minister is goading jeremy corbyn and others saying the vote of no confidence starts now. that started yesterday morning when the attorney general talked about a dead parliament. goading the opposition into calling the vote of no confidence because borisjohnson wa nts confidence because borisjohnson wants an election. it is one way out of the corner he is in. but they are carrying along with the same strategy. the 1922 meeting today of tory backbenchers, one tory mp got up tory backbenchers, one tory mp got up and said, what is your reaching out strategy, given that in three weeks, if he gets a deal from
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brussels, he is to come back here and persuade a large chunk of labour mps to vote for it. they are concerned the strategy isn't working, but in downing street they think it is working. stephen kinnock said his colleagues in the labour party, anyone who was minded to think of a compromise was very put off by what happened? yes, jo cox was his best friend. people find fundamentally difficult. in a few weeks' time, it won't have blown over com pletely weeks' time, it won't have blown over completely but we could be looking at something very different. the other point that somebody in the chamber might have thought, it was so horrible and toxic, one way out is to lead with a deal. it is clearly the option the government wa nts. clearly the option the government wants. but there are others, particularly some of the former tory mps who have been booted out of the party, who think it is a deliberately divisive strategy. it wasn't just someone losing deliberately divisive strategy. it wasn'tjust someone losing their temper, it was a divisive strategy, trying to polarise people, trying to divide people and it is being done
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on purpose to try and get to the point at the end of october, where, borisjohnson hopes, point at the end of october, where, boris johnson hopes, he point at the end of october, where, borisjohnson hopes, he gets a deal and mps voted through. anything else going on? the tory conference will be going on, but it will be different, because they will not have a recess here next week, but it will still continue. vicki young, thank you. the european union's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier has been the bbc is reporting from stoke—on—trent this week. it's the city that recorded the highest number of ‘leave' votes in the uk. let's cross again to my colleague nick owen. i'm joined now by sophie calvert, our staffordshire political reporter. and lucas yeomans from bbc radio stoke. good to have you both along. we have spoken already, sophie, so i will
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speak to lucas, you have been finding out what students think about life in general, notjust brexit? student life is difficult to adjust to, especially for the first year. a lot of things to consider, not just the course year. a lot of things to consider, notjust the course and making friends, but financial as well. it isa friends, but financial as well. it is a different time of their life, may be used to living at home with theirfamily. you may be used to living at home with their family. you are working may be used to living at home with theirfamily. you are working out, you have got to pay for rent and food and it is a lot of students. we have been learning how they deal with it and how the university supports them. and also, how they make friends and enjoying the different societies. is it a stressful time, they are coming along and being away from home for the first time? i cannot speak personally, my friends are going away now. from speaking to the stu d e nts away now. from speaking to the students this week, it has been an eye—openerfor students this week, it has been an eye—opener for me. students this week, it has been an eye—openerfor me. not students this week, it has been an eye—opener for me. not going students this week, it has been an eye—openerfor me. not going myself, you don't appreciate exactly what they have to go and deal with. a lot of growing up as well, when they are
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studying, they have to get into a routine and they have to become adults. it is that transition, you have gone to college, you can go on your night out, but it is learning about how it is to be an adult and getting that next step in life. about how it is to be an adult and getting that next step in lifel a lwa ys getting that next step in lifel always saw university as the real world but with the safety net. that there is a great way of putting that. students traditionally have been seen quite angry about the world and wanting to change the world, did you get a sense of that? there are patterns out there, and in university they have debating societies and they talk about the things on their mind like brexit and climate change. things like that are still issues. it is important for them to make sure they enjoy life whilst they cannot separate their political and everything else going on in the world with enjoying living in the bubble and then prepare themselves for the future. sophie, you are totally concerned with politics. i bet you could imagine
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covering such tumultuous events you are at the moment, where will it end? ifi are at the moment, where will it end? if i knew that, are at the moment, where will it end? ifi knew that, iwould are at the moment, where will it end? ifi knew that, i would be very rich, if i knew where it was going to end. it is following the twists and turns, it is an exciting time to work and cover politics. but also people talk to me all the time saying, what is going to happen and when is it going to happen? do you think people in stoke and the surrounding areas are changing their minds, because we have talked about how overwhelmingly they voted to leave ? how overwhelmingly they voted to leave? there are some that voted leave. people have said they voted leave. people have said they voted leave and they voted on the claims made about the nhs and they have changed their minds. but on the other side i have heard people voting remain, but they want to get it done. they want to see it happen. we are talking to the chairman of the liberal democrats earlier and he
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said they are adamant they need a referendum and they will get it and they will vote remain?l referendum and they will get it and they will vote remain? i don't think there is a big appetite for that amongst the people i have spoken to in stoke—on—trent. 69% of people in stoke—on—trent voted to leave and i don't think the feeling has changed that much if it were to come down to another vote. i don't know where that would go. both of you, thank you very much. back to you, simon. thank you, i will be back to you later on. let's look at what's been happening in the us trump administration officials tried to "lock down" the transcript of the us president's controversial phone call to ukraine's leader, according to a whistleblower‘s report. the white house says nothing has changed. acting national intelligence directorjoseph maguire is appearing before us congress this afternoon. during that session, the chair of the congress' intelligence committee, the democrat adam schiff read from the rough transcript of the whistleblower‘s release. let's hear what congressman schiff said. zelinsky begins by ingratiating
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himself, and he tries to enlist the support of the president. he expresses his interest in meeting with the president and says his country wants to acquire more weapons from us to defend itself. and what is the president's response? well, it reads like a classic organised crime sha kedown. shorn of its rambling character and in not so many words, this is the essence of what the president communicates. we've been very good to your country. very good. no other country has done as much as we have what you know what? i don't see much reciprocity here. i hear what you want, i have a favour i want from you, though. and i'm going to say this only seven times so you better listen good. i want you to make up dirt on my political opponent, understand? lots of it.
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on this and on that. i'm going to put you in touch with people, notjust any people, with the attorney general of the united states, my attorney general, bill barr. he's got the whole weight of the american law enforcement behind him. i'm going to put you in touch with rudy, you're going to love him, trust me. but the senior ranking republican in the congressional intelligence committee pushed back at the accusations. devin nunes said the whistleblower complaint was an attempt by partisan democrats to smear the president. the complaint relied upon hearsay evidence provided by the whistle—blower. the inspector general did not know the contents of the phone call at issue. the inspector general found the whistle—blower displayed arguable, political bias against trump. the department ofjustice investigated the complaint and determined no action was warranted. the ukrainian president denies being pressured by president trump. so once again, the supposed scandal ends up being nothing like what we were told and once again, the democrats,
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their media mouthpieces and a couple of leakers are ginning up a fake story with no regard to the monumental damage they are causing to our public institutions and to trust in government. acting director of national intelligencejoseph maguire is also being questioned by the democratic chair of the intelligence committee adam schiff. the whistle—blower, a member of the intelligence community, works under him. he said he thought the whistle—blower did the right thing and followed the law correctly, but he found it difficult to make a public statement supporting them. i believe they followed us every step of the wave but the statute was one in this situation involving the president of the united states who is not in the intelligence community or matters underneath my supervision did not meet the criteria for urgent concern. i'm asking about the whistle— blower right now.
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i think they did the right thing, following the law every step of the way when we just got... why when the president called them a political hack and suggest that he or she might be disloyal to the country, why did you remain silent? i did not remain silent. i issued a statement to my workforce telling and committing my commitment to the whistle—blower protection and ensuring i would provide protection to anyone within the intelligence committee who comes forward but the way this thing was blowing out, i did not think it was appropriate for me to be making a press statement so that we counter each other every step. that hearing is still under way in the united states. let's cross again to my colleague nick owen in stoke—on—trent. yes, simon, all this week the bbc is at stoke—on—trent speaking to the people and businesses about life here.
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it's time for ‘ask this‘ with our reality check correspondent, chris morris. we have got loads of questions here. are you ready? first one, i keep reading that parliament will force borisjohnson to go to the eu for an extension. how can anyone force someone to do anything? force is probably the wrong word. it is about the law of the land. parliament makes all law and one of the issues over the last three years we had a referendum but referendums don't make laws. they offer an instruction to parliament but it is mps who make laws. if you are talking about forcing the prime minister to do something, if you change the law to instruct him to do so, it will be difficult for him to wriggle out of that. the next one says, if the uk we re that. the next one says, if the uk were to remain in the eu, would it
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be on the existing terms and receipt of our rebate etc, or will our terms of our rebate etc, or will our terms of membership be renegotiated and the rebates lost? if it was state income terms remain the same. if we stay in, we would never have left and we retain our veto over changing any of the rules. every few years when there is a budget battle, it is a lwa ys when there is a budget battle, it is always the british rebate up for grabs, we say no, we want to keep it. margaret thatcher negotiated it and we want to keep it. if we stay in it would stay the same. if we left then try to rejoin, things could be different. and more difficult? yes. simon asks, why do the tories want a general election so soon? all parties want an election soon because they want the majority in parliament. one of the things that has bedevilled politics over the last couple of years is there has been no majority for anything on brexit. we have a
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majority now in parliament for not leaving with no deal but that is if you like a negative majority. obviously the tories right now want an election as soon as possible. so they feel they have that? they feel they feel they have that? they feel they have some momentum. the party that really has momentum is labour who says it desperately wants an election but says we are not going to call that selection until we are absolutely confident that an extension to the brexit period will be sought from the eu. in other words, we are happy to have an election once we know we are not going to leave with no deal on october the 31st. we saw from their party conference this week, their plan, if they get into government, is to negotiate a new deal. then put that deal or remain to the people in another referendum. we do have an election, it will be clear blue water between the conservatives, between labour and then of course, on the other side of the debate with
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the liberal democrats who say they would revoke article 50 and stay in the eu straight so there is more clear blue water than there has been? things have shaken down and we know where the three party stand. russell have been in touch and say how can boris johnson russell have been in touch and say how can borisjohnson obey the rule of law and then not ask for an extension by the benn bill? we saw amber rudd recently resigned from the cabinet, being asked this question. the benn bill says you must ask for an extension, it is the law of the land. the prime minister says i will respect the law, but i will not ask for an extension. she does not know how that is possible. he will look for loopholes in the law. but if it is the law, it is the law. but if it is the law, it is the law. if borisjohnson tried to ignore the instruction of the law, pretty quickly we will be back at
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the supreme court. the supreme court has strengthened, if you like, the role of parliament in our constitutional system. it feels like if it went back to the supreme court, that is another battle he would not win. simon wants to ask you a question, are you listening? iam you a question, are you listening? i am listening, but i can barely hear you because we have had a total downpour. it is lovely and dry where you are. now, it has been pouring all afternoon. shall i ask the question for you? could you? he says, what have people in stoke—on—trent been asking you? there has not been many questions about all the shenanigans where he is, about who is right and wrong about the battle of wills and who has been using the right or wrong language in parliament. a lot of the questions have been about what might brexit mean for me? emphasis is on the word might. it is frustrating for someone like me, people want precise answers and the honest
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a nswer precise answers and the honest answer is often, it depends what gets negotiated. we don't really know what economic forecast might produce in five, ten, 15 years' time. one question we had from joshua, how might brexit affect the nhs? the big question, everyone wa nts to nhs? the big question, everyone wants to know particularly as boris johnson was so keen to say, if we leave we will have £350 million a week to spend on the nhs. you could look at that question in one interesting aspect, staff numbers in the nhs. 19% interesting aspect, staff numbers in the nhs.19% of interesting aspect, staff numbers in the nhs. 19% of nurses who joined the nhs. 19% of nurses who joined the nhs. 19% of nurses who joined the nhs in 2015, 2016 came from eu countries. the number of nurses from the eu has been falling and if free movement comes to an end, they won't be coming in such large numbers. one impact potentially would be we need to find thousands of nurses every year from elsewhere. the to find thousands of nurses every yearfrom elsewhere. the question then, do we try and train more nurses here, get more nurses from overseas? it is another sign that brexit would change many of the
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basic ways we run our economy, the nhs included. the most used phrase that used at the moment is, no one really knows. anyone who says they do know, it's probably not telling you the truth. let's go back to simon, hard to hear you have been drenched. take it away, simon. one of the reasons we do this, we are stoke—on—trent, come to areas like that is get a sense of what people think when they watch the shenanigans at westminster. i just wondered what they had to say about what has been going on here? it is the same as everyone, everywhere else in the country, people are so fed up. i could use a stronger turn of phrase, but they are so fed up with the lack of clarity, lack of clarity and the paralysis. they want to get it done now. it seems
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impossible to break this deadlock. deals get suggested to parliament, they get turned down. no deal is suggested, it gets turned out. what now? people are very frustrated and anxious, they don't know what will happen next and none of us do. no, it is interesting to spend more time in an area like that. it is nice to get a sense over a week what people's frustrations are. notjust with the political situation but also with the bbc and how we perceive places like stoke—on—trent. it is one of the reasons we are concentrating on what is going on there at the moment. we will be back to later on and i know you have plenty more to do in the next hour or so. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello there. we're ending the week on an unsettled note, low pressure nearby. sunshine and showers, some of which will be heavy across northern and western areas. now this evening and overnight, the showers continue. it will remain blustery, particularly across england and wales. most of the showers
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across the north and the west. some lengthier, drier interludes though through central and eastern areas. most places should see temperatures in double figures overnight, but there could be a few chillier spots under clear skies where temperatures dip just into single digits. low pressure still with us then into friday, these weatherfronts enhancing the shower activity so we could see bands of showers, longer spells of rain moving from west to east. again, it's going to be another blustery, windy day for england and wales, less windy across scotland. again, some of the showers will be heavy but in the sunshine temperatures reaching the high teens celsius in the south, mid teens further north but a cooler day across the board. into the weekend then, saturday, sunshine and showers then heavy rain, strong winds moves into the south—west later on. very wet start on sunday and it'll be windy with gales for many areas.
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this is bbc news. our latest headlines...
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borisjohnson will meet his cabinet at five o'clock this afternoon as he faces claims of using inflammatory language as a political tactic. the government has lost a vote to allow a recess for the tory party conference. president trump's top intelligence official is facing congress over a whistleblower complaint that sparked an impeachment inquiry. sport now on afternoon live with holly. good afternoon. england are getting into their stride at this world cup now. it was almost a demolition of the united states as they made it two bonus—point wins out of two. bearing in mind, they still have to face argentina and france in their group, tougher tests lie ahead but, as far as eddiejones is concerned, seven tries and another bonus point is a case of so far so good. patrick gearey reports. to face the united states, here was
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new england, ten changes from the team that took on tonga, we were promised this england would play faster and sometimes speed is in the mind. to date's captain, george ford, spotted a highway to america, a short trip for the first try. it went quite for a while before england realised the best way to crack the states was through strength in numbers as a blip apollo went over and then luke cowan—dickie was escorted into american territory, 19—0 at the break. the eagles, as the us team are known, are fast rising but england were quick still. jonathan joseph whirled his way to the brink of the line and joe cokanasiga his way to the brink of the line and joe coka nasiga batted his way to the brink of the line and joe cokanasiga batted away any remaining resistance. opportunities now for personal landmarks, like robbie mcconnachie, who has worked his way from division five rugby to become a world cup try scorer. and lewis ludlam, who is very cute as a professional was in doubt little more than a year ago and whose dream likejenny continued to the line ——
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whose very future. the special relationship was being stretched, this charge on owen farrell earned him the first red card of the world cup. joe cokanasiga ran over his second and england publicly seventh try but in the closing seconds of the eagles finally landed as bryce campbell made a hollywood ending to an english evening. we are pleased with where we are, after two games, ten points, we have considered one try. two fantastic spiritus in sapporo and cobre —— experiences. the first major rugby game in kobe for a while, a great occasion and we are pretty humbled to be part of it. and we are in a good position. can we play better? yes, and we know we can and we will need to in our next game. any hopes bury may have had of returning to the league now appear to be over after a proposal
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for the club to be readmitted to league two next season was rejected by the efl‘s 71 member clubs. bury, who were in league one, were expelled from the efl in august after a last—ditch takeover bid collapsed. earlier this week, a group trying to rescue bury submitted a proposal for "compassionate re—entry" to league two. but, a league statement said the proposal did not have the necessary support. only one team will go down from league two this campaign, rather than two. derby county captain richard keogh has been ruled out until the end of the season due to a knee injury sustained in a car collision that led to the arrest of two team—mates. tom lawrence and mason bennett have both been subsequently charged with drink—driving following the incident after a team—building dinner. keogh was a passenger in a range rover involved in a collision on the outskirts of derby on tuesday night. the club said lawrence and bennett know they will pay a heavy price
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for their actions but they will be supported with their " rehabilitation back into the squad and team". ac milan and inter have presented their proposal for a new arena that will replace the current san siro stadium. the two clubs have come together to build the new venue, which will be right next to the current stadio giuseppe meazza, so still technically in the san siro area of the city. a joint press conference was held earlier to unveil the proposals which the clubs say represent "a new landmark of world class excellence in milan. " and australian tennis player nick kyrgios has learned his punishment for his outbursts on court at the cinncinati masters lsat month. he smashed two racquets as well as verbally abusing the umpire and spitting in his direction amongst other offences. tour chiefs have handed him a four—month suspended ban and a hefty fine and told him he's on probabtion for the next six months. well, kyrgios has responded
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to his punishment. he's taken to instagram with this image saying, "guess i'm on my best behaviour for six months" hashtag detention. speaking of a man always on his best behaviour, back to simon! six months, you'll be lucky! thank you. you are watching afternoon live from bbc news live from westminster. the former french presidentjacques chirac has died at the age of 86. many in france considered him as their favourite president. he had been suffering from ill health for many years. he served two terms as president from 1995 to 2007 and famously opposed the us—led war in iraq. our correspondent jonathan marcus looks back at his life. when the lofty figure ofjacques chirac became president in 1995, he seemed to characterise the very essence of french politics. his political career extended over
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a remarkable 40 years, and he's seen by many as the most influential frenchman of his generation. chirac‘s presidency began in a bullish mood, outraging world opinion by restarting french nuclear weapons tests in the pacific. the president insisting that france's nuclear deterrent was an essential element of its security and its effectiveness had to be tested. but there were seismic political shifts going on at home. in the 2002 presidential election, the socialist vote collapsed and the far right national front ofjean—marie le pen won through to the vital second ballot. chirac ultimately crushed le pen but the warning signals for french politics were clear. little could mask the endemic problems of french society. high levels of unemployment, bitter divisions over immigration and uncertainty about just where the country was heading. for a time, jacques chirac was able
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to contain the storm. his absolute refusal to countenance any french involvement in the us invasion of iraq won him strong support at home. but it wasn'tjust france that was changing — it was europe, too. comfortable with the idea of a european union with france and germany in the driving seat, a wider membership changed the eu's whole character. the french president often railed against britain's eu rebate, as well as its failure to contribute to what he saw as its fair share of the costs of enlargement. jacques chirac is a president with a mixed legacy. he was convicted of corruption in relation to his time as mayor of paris, but he was also the president who finally accepted france's responsibility for its involvement in the deportation of frenchjews to nazi death camps during the second world war. he was a president who reconciled france with key elements of its past, but he was ultimately unable to reconcile it with its future.
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jaques chirac, who died today, aged 86. researchers say the amount of alcohol people in scotland are buying in shops has dropped by nearly eight percent since the country introduced a minimum pricing scheme last may. the study suggests people are drinking less at home as a result. campaigners are calling for the rest of the uk to follow suit. our scotland correspondent lorna gordon reports. it's more than a year since the price people paid for some alcohol in scotland went up after it became the first country in the world to introduce a minimum price per unit of alcohol. some of the high—strength ciders obviously went up in price... some shop owners have noticed a change in what people are now buying. people have moved away from high strengths, they're buying a lot less of the high—strength ciders now. people have even moved on to zero—strength lagers now. that's what you are seeing here. that's what we definitely seeing here. since may 2018, the minimum price for alcohol has been 50p per unit.
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research has found in the first eight months following the new law, the amount of alcohol purchased per week per person fell by 1.2 units on average. that's a fall of nearly 8%. that's equivalent to just over half a pint of beer or a measure of spirits every week. we do not think it's too early to draw these conclusions. we were quite surprised with the suddenness of the change, which really was quite dramatic. and i think that really does indicate that the introduction of a minimum unit price is doing what it was intended to do. it's just over a year in so it's still very early days when it comes to this policy. but experts say this research suggests that minimum pricing has achieved its ambition. it provides evidence that minimum unit pricing is having exactly the effect that we intended it to have, in that it's reducing alcohol purchasing by the people who are purchasing the most and who are purchasing
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the cheapest types of alcohol. wales is looking to introduce minimum pricing next year. neither england nor northern ireland currently have plans to introduce their own limit. reducing the harm from alcohol is complex, but the scottish government says these findings reinforce why scotland was right to introduce minimum unit pricing. lorna gordon, bbc news, glasgow. now, you may remember boaty mcboatface, the name chosen by the public for the uk's new £200 million polar research vessel. it gives me great pleasure to name this ship sir david attenborough, and may god bless her and all those who sail in her. the duchess of cambridge has given the ship its official title, named after the broadcaster and naturalist sir david attenborough. they were joined by prince william in birkenhead, and were treated to a performance by 200 school children dressed as penguins. i know how they feel.
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the royal research ship is the first addition to the fleet in 50 years, and will be stationed in the arctic and antarctic. there comes a moment where everything just goes, especially the brain! our science correspndentjonathan amos was at the launch earlier. well, a day of great celebration here on the wirral. we had the duchess of cambridge press a button which then threw a bottle of champagne at the side of this vessel which is now officially called the royal research ship sir david attenborough. it is going to be used principally by the british antarctic survey so they are very keen to get their hands on it. with me i have professor mike meredith. what is it going to be like using this ship? it's going to be fantastic. this is an incredible new facility that we've got and we're going to be able to really scale up the amount of science and the impact that the science has. it is going to be a wonderful new tool for science in the uk and overseas. it has come at an amazing moment, hasn't it, really, for polar science
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and climate science in particular. and you are one of the lead authors on the big climate report we have had this week that set outjust how fast the poles are melting. really, it has a big job to do, hasn't it? it has. what we are finding increasingly is that the polar regions are changing and those changes are accelerating quite rapidly in some areas. and the impact of those changes are felt all over the world. of course, what we, as scientists, need to do is go and learn more about what is causing those and how that affects everybody around the world. and this ship is going to be a really fantastic new tool for doing that. you do a lot of work in the oceans, don't you, so how will the attenborough be used to study the water? well, what we do is we go out on ships and we measure how the oceans are circulating, how they are taking up the heat from the atmosphere, how the oceans are taking up carbon from the atmosphere and all of these things affect the global climate. this ship will be able to go and do that over a wider range than we have ever done before and with advanced
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techniques that will really push forward the science. there was a dispute over the name, wasn't there! boaty mcboatface was given to a yellow submarine that does autonomous work. you will be using that submarine, won't you? we will, and, increasingly, that is the way the science is going. it is this partnership between fantastic vessels like this and robotic techniques, autonomous techniques. the boaty name has gone to a yellow submarine and we will be taking boaty on this ship and deploying it in the southern ocean around antarctica and getting fantastic new data from that as well. well, i've had a little look on board this ship. it's not quite finished, there are a few things that need to be tucked away and painted but they will start checking it out for real in the next few weeks and then they expect it to go on trials to the arctic and antarctic next year. back to the studio. princess beatrice is to marry the property developer, edoardo mapelli mozzi. the 31—year—old is the eldest daughter of prince andrew and sarah, duchess of york.
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the engagement is reported to have happened earlier this month while the pair were away in italy. the wedding will take place in 2020. and nowhere will they be rejoicing more than in stoke—on—trent! that is where we are going now. i know you are excited by that news, nick owen! yes, you are right, combined joy here but it is a very engaging story —— unconfined joy. congratulations to the princess. i'm here at the dudson centre and museum in hanley. this is an ancient bottle oven, it's a brilliant building. i'm joined now by alison morgan, dudson museum curator. tell us about the building. tell us about the buildingm tell us about the building. it is an original bottle oven built in 1872
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it is one of the very few that are still remaining in the city. it is estimated there were between 2000 and 3000 of them their heyday but now there are only about 46 left. and it had we been hit when it was in working mode, we would have been quite warm! we would indeed! there was an internal chamber as well as the external chamber that we can see him and that was where the firing we nt him and that was where the firing went on. and this is the original? it is, all the buildings here, this isa it is, all the buildings here, this is a grade two listed building and we are ve ry is a grade two listed building and we are very proud of it. it is unique to have the museum housed in here as well. and originally this building was part of the landscape of the potteries? absolutely, there we re of the potteries? absolutely, there were so of the potteries? absolutely, there we re so many of the potteries? absolutely, there were so many of them and in 1956, when the government passed the clean airact, allthe when the government passed the clean air act, all the pottery firing had to be moved to gas and electric. tell us about the collection here.
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it dates back to 1800. it tells the story of dudson ceramics. locally we are acutely aware of the fact that dudson sadly had to close in april this year which really rocked the city because about 400 jobs were lost. but on the plus side, this museum also had to close but it has reopened recently due to the fact that a local charity, voluntary action stoke—on—trent have taken over the management and they are based here so we have been able to open the doors again which is fantastic. the collection is very unique. it tells one company's story, and a fantastic social history as well contained within the exhibits. it is fantastic to be here and thank you for having us. i'm good to talk about another important pa rt good to talk about another important part of the heritage around here and
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thatis part of the heritage around here and that is oatca kes. and i'm alsojoined by alex povey of povey‘s oatca kes. hello, alex. let's have a look at these first. you can't come to stoke—on—trent these first. you can't come to stoke—on—tre nt without trying these first. you can't come to stoke—on—trent without trying one of these! this is a staffordshire or stoke oatca kes ? these! this is a staffordshire or stoke oatcakes? staffordshire would take. what is special about it? it is round and rugged and the world's most versatile food! you have practised that! how do they vary from derbyshire oatca kes? practised that! how do they vary from derbyshire oatcakes? they are slightly thicker and the staffordshire ones are thinner. these oatcakes staffordshire ones are thinner. these oatca kes have staffordshire ones are thinner. these oatcakes have been going since the 1800s. these oatcakes have been going since the 18005. i these oatcakes have been going since the 1800s. i have traced it back as faras the 1800s. i have traced it back as far as yorkshire, so we must have inherited them. what are they used for? you say they are versatile.
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they are like a pancake, hot or cold, microwave, sweet or savoury, you name it, you can get it. i get criticised for putting spinach online! people in stoke—on—trent are very cheese and bacon mad. so am i! cani very cheese and bacon mad. so am i! can i try? yes. you keep talking! i can't talk and eat at the same time! they are quite rubbery, nothing personal! povey's oatcakes was founded in 1994 by my dad, he passed away in 2011. i was just 23 at the time. i took it on, i'm 31 now. away in 2011. i was just 23 at the time. itook it on, i'm 31 now. how successful is it? very. losing my parents at a young age, i channelled
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the energy into the business and thatis the energy into the business and that is what is keeping it alive and making it more successful. and are you affected by the uncertainty over brexit? no, bring it on. let's get it over and done with and move forward and start afresh because theyjust look like a chicken coop with eight fox inside at the moment! you know what i'm saying! you're not worried? no, if i can you know what i'm saying! you're not worried? no, if! can make oatcakes, ican do worried? no, if! can make oatcakes, i can do anything! thank you, i will finish that in a moment. we are talking about brexit today, it is the big issue in the country today and our business reporter has been speaking to business people in stoke—on—trent to find out how challenging they are finding the time is and what they think of the situation in this constitutional crisis. by tonight, most customers here will have swapped coffee for a pint but the conversation will be still about brexit. it doesn't matter where you go, people talk about brexit.
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there are lots of people with lots and lots of views. what's incredible is we don't end up with the kind of anger we saw in the house of commons yesterday in the pubs. people seem to have an ability to get on and accept that people have differing views and just want to get through the process now. keith brews his own beerfor his 12 bars. 90% of his ingredients are uk—sourced, so does he agree with michael gove that business is ready for a no—deal? we are as ready as we possibly can be, but without the crystal ball that tells us what's going to happen post—brexit, how on earth can we say that we are ready? we don't know what will happen and therefore we cannot be ready for every eventuality. it is impossible to know what flavour of brexit will eventually flow out of the tank but stoke has dealt with the loss of its pits and the erosion of its pots. for many local businesses, weathering this seems doable. julie's family have run a roofing business for 26 years and they are cautiously optimistic.
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we don't think it will have too much of an effect on us. the only problem is we have had to think about saving the timber we import from the eu. we've spoke to our local suppliers are they're mentioning they're starting to stockpile now in case there's a shortage, but again, we don't know the date we're leaving, we don't know if we're leaving, we don't know if there'll be a shortage and we don't know if there'll be a price increase so we're in the dark. this is one of our animation studios... the only roofs dan builds are virtual. we are working on a variety of different, exciting projects at the moment. you may have caught their animations on any number of television shows and they are currently working on a film. stoke has worked as home, largely due to talent from the university, but they worry brexit could change that. i think, as a company, i think we are small enough that we can ride the wave. am i worried for the larger
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industry of film and visual effects within the uk? yes, it really hasn't been handled well and i think there are things that could go badly wrong. all three businesses are doing what they can, if anything, to get ready. for what? they still don't know. it will come down to stoke—on—trent‘s own resilience rather than any plans coming from westminster. and danni hewson is here. what are the main issues people have in business? i have been talking to a lot of small businesses, so they do not have direct concerns because they are not importing and exporting but mostly they are concerned about public confidence affecting consumer spending. in the likes of bars and restau ra nts, spending. in the likes of bars and restaurants, if people don't have the money to spend or they are worried about where the money is coming from, potentially they could stop spending. they are also worried about a stop spending. they are also worried abouta drain stop spending. they are also worried about a drain of talent because, if some of the big companies in london
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potentially lose people from the eu, they might find that talent here in they might find that talent here in the stoke could drain away. that is the stoke could drain away. that is the negative side but is there a positive side? do they see opportunities? some do, particularly because of the way the pound has been against the euro and the dollar, which means that selling services to the eu and places like the united states becomes a lot more affordable so they are finding opportunities there. water in terms of trade. many people are now looking outside the uk for the first time —— also in terms of trade. could they make it work in places likejapan, china, pakistan? are there opportunities for them? that's something they are looking at, and another thing, i was talking to a lady who said recycling them a lot of businesses are thinking about what they can do in the uk and that is providing massive opportunities for her business. thank you very much. one business who is probably
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the best known in stoke—on—trent and the best known in stoke—on—trent and the region in general is peter coates who founded his own business in the city in 1968, born and bred here, 81 now and chairman of stoke city football club and that pound bet 365 and he told me that these times really are challenging. i don't think it is easy anywhere, i suppose the south—east is better but business is always tough and that will not change. there have been huge changes in technology and the way the world works and we have lost a lot of manufacturing jobs, like in stoke. we have a two basic industries, mining and potteries. the pottery industry used to employ 100,000 people and now, a slight guess, but i would say 20,000 to. it is one of the few places that had actually retained a minor battering present and we still have some good brands here which are doing ok —— manufacturing presence. and in a highly competitive market so in the absence we've done a lot better in
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retaining that ceramic tradition the mines have gone, as they have everywhere. that was peter coates, the chairman ever stoke city football clu b the chairman ever stoke city football club and founder of bet 365. we are coming to the end of a week we have been looking at that climate in stoke—on—trent at an incredible difficult time for the constitution and the uk as a whole and we still don't know what will happen with brexit. we will find out now how the weather is looking as we join stav. hello there. it is sunshine and showers now for today and tomorrow, with low pressure nearby sending these showers from west to east across the uk. fairly strong winds as well, the isobars close together but affecting mainly england and wales. closer to the centre of the low, the winds for scotland and northern ireland will not be quite as strong. we end the day on a showery note with heavy ones across western areas. temperatures topping out at around 20 degrees across the south—east
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but in the mid to high teens celsius elsewhere. as we head through tonight, it stays very showery and quite blustery as well. most of the showers in the north and the west with drier interludes for the east. i think most places, because of the wind, should remain in double figures over night but there will be a few spots under lengthy clear skies which could drop into single digits. low pressure still with us on friday. again, just to the north—west of the uk so in the north the winds will be lighter. further south, breezy, and we will have more intense weather fronts which could enhance the shower activity. so, they could merge together to produce longer spells of rain, bands of rain spreading from west to east through the day. there will be some sunshine again in between and another windy one for england and wales. temperatures a few degrees down across the board. in fact, in the mid teens in the north, 16—18 for england and wales. now, the all—important weekend and, unfortunately, it looks like it will stay unsettled. we will have low pressure again nearby on saturdayjust to the north of the uk so we will have north—westerly winds for scotland, maybe something a little drier here with some sunshine but it will feel cooler. sunshine and showers elsewhere, and then we look to the south—west and this next area of low pressure
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which could have some potency to it. it's going to bring some heavy rain to the south—west of the uk later in the day. temperatures of 15—18d for much of the country. but later on saturday, through the evening and overnight, that heavy rain spills in from the south—west. this low pressure contains some tropical moisture which is why the rain will be quite heavy and there could be some localised flooding problems. a bit of uncertainty as to how far north this low pressure will be but during sunday morning the heavy rain clears away and then we will see strong, gale force winds on its back edge with gusts of 50, maybe 60 mph along the east coast. and of course that is coinciding with high tide so that could cause some issues. but much of the country on sunday will see sunshine and showers, temperatures ranging from 13—15 in the north, 17 or 18 in the south.
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today at five, we're at westminster where borisjohnson has said that "tempers need to calm down" in parliament. dozens of mps demanded an apology from the prime minister after furious exchanges in the commons sparked unease. do think it's impt the i do think it's important that in the house of commons, i should be able to talk about the surrender bill, the surrender act in the way that i do. there was... ..an atmosphere in the chamber worse than any i've known in my 22 years in the house. on both sides. meanwhile, the government loses a vote to allow a three

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