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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 26, 2019 8:00pm-9:00pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines. the prime minister has defended his language as dozens of mps demand an apology from him after furious exchanges in the commons i totally deplore any threats to anybody, particularly a female mp. the prime minister's language is encouraging people to behave in a disgraceful and abusive manner and i have witnessed it myself on the streets of this country. the rows comes as a man is arrested for allegedly verbally abusing staff at mpjess phillips' constituency office — she says staff had to be locked inside whilst he shouted and smacked constituency office president trump's top intelligence official faces congress — after a whistleblower claims the white house tried to cover up details of a phone call between donald trump and the ukrainian president
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the actions of the donald trump presidency revealed dishonorable fa cts presidency revealed dishonorable facts of the present and's betrayal of his oath of office, betrayal of oui’ of his oath of office, betrayal of our national security. with these guys are doing, democrats, are doing to this country isa democrats, are doing to this country is a disgrace and it should not be allowed. there should be a way of stopping it. former president of france, jacques chirac dies at the age of 86. emmanuel macron calls him ‘great frenchman' who ‘embodied' france minimum pricing in scotland leads to a fall in the amount in tribute to the former mayor of paris. the sir david attenborough is officially named at a ceremony in birkenhead — the uk's newest polar research ship otherwise known as boaty mcboatface.
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good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. the prime minister says tempers need to calm down in parliament after the torrid scenes in the commons last night. borisjohnson says he "totally deplores any threats to anybody, particularly female mps" but has refused to apologise for his use of language. several mps said they had been on the receiving end of death threats, partially blaming mrjohnson's speeches on brexit for fuelling extremist behaviour. the speakerjohn bercow described the culture as toxic and said it was the worst atmosphere he had ever witnessed in the house. this report from our political editor laura kuenssberg contains some very strong language.
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we will not betray the people who set us here. subject to death threats and abuse every single day. i have heard a humbug and all of my life. is the language. politics is never been forfaint life. is the language. politics is never been for faint hearts. we will not tolerate this. but there was poison in the air last night. you'll make whatever your views are. the language in the comments, was it appropriate? frustrated by lack of progress, he was happy to provoke. appropriate? frustrated by lack of progress, he was happy to provokeli deplore progress, he was happy to provoke.” deplore any threats to anybody, particularly female mps and a lot of work has been done to stop that and to give people the security that they need. but i do think it is important that in the house of commons, i should important that in the house of commons, ishould be important that in the house of commons, i should be able to talk about the surrender bill and surrender act and the way that i did. but this fury from labour mps
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for that kind of talk and encounter between a labour mp in the adviser in parliament was filmed by a member of the np's team. death threats. he had death threats last night. mr cummings answer, get brexit done. in the commons, a sense of disbelief for a moment in the morning after the night before. yesterday, the house did itself no credit. still rage though from a friend of the murdered mp. when i hear of my friend's murder in the way it has made me and my colleagues feel and feel scared, described as humbug, i
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actually don't feel anger towards the prime minister. i feel pity for those of you who still have to toe his line. when mp told me everyone isa his line. when mp told me everyone is a hypocrite, every site is guilty. yesterday, she was the person i heard the loudest from her bench. but most of the fire was reserved for the prime minister. to dismiss concerns from members about the death threats they receive and to dismiss concerns that the language used by the prime minister has been repeated in those death threats is reprehensible. the prime minister is not fit for office, his behaviour is an outrage and his government is treating people distasteful lead. but the prime minister's backers believe that the opponents would do everything they can to attack him. the prime minister is the last thing standing
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between ending the brexit enterprise entirely. he can expect no quarter. absolutely everything is going to be thrown at him. as he prepared to gather his cabinet, the prime minister said that tempers need to come down. but whatever the temple difficulty and distress, there is no intention of pulling back from their overall tough approach. a belief that this is a pent up conflict that must play out to clear the way for brexit. frustration built up in every corner at the strange political village. plaintiff might appeal to some but other might take freight —— others. take freight. take fright. labour mp jess phillips who earlier accused the prime minister of deliberately ramping up the rhetoric for political reasons — says a man has been arrested after trying to smash the windows of her constituency office in birmingham whilst allegedly shouting abuse. the mp said her staff had to be locked inside the office
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in birmingham while a man reportedly shouted "fascist" at them while hitting doors and windows.west midlands police have arrested a 36—year—old man in connection with the incident the mp said her staff had to be locked inside the office in birmingham while a man reportedly shouted "fascist" at them while hitting doors and windows. west midlands police have arrested a 36—year—old man in connection with the incident. and in the past 2a hours, as the government promises to ramp up security in parliament, a number of mps have tweeted about abuse that's been leveled at them. former lib dem leader tim farron said he'd been "called a traitor and shouted at by three blokes standing outside parliament." he added: "this is not about brexit now, it's about whether or not we're decent country. and the conservative mp maria caulfield revealed that her car tyres had been damaged with nails and screws for the second time. meanwhile labour parliamentary assistant amelia rose tighe said she had had to report 35 death threats in one week. it came as the daughter of labour mp
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yvette cooper spoke out about the fear she now feels for her mother — ellie cooper said she's scared when she scrolls through the replies to her mother's tweets calling her a liar and a traitor. she added: "i am scared when our house gets fitted with panic buttons, industrial—locking doors and explosive bags to catch the mail." why has this become a matter of life and death? she then called on borisjohnson to take a stand and unite the country." in a moment, we'll be speaking to drew hendry from the snp, liz saville roberts from plaid cymru and karen buck from labour — we did ask for someone from the government but there was no one available and we did bid many tory mps but no one could come on this evening. so here is conservative mp maria miller speaking in the commons earlier and defending the prime minister's use of language yesterday.
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language matters in politics. behaviour matters in politics. but i'm afraid, mad and deputy speaker, that the inflammatory language that was used by members accusing others of being inflammatory was as damaging as damaging can be. but the very idea that calling the withdrawn number two build a surrender bill is on the inflammatory, it is not. it is simplya on the inflammatory, it is not. it is simply a way of explaining to people who did not do as all of us did, read it word for word. people who did not do as all of us did, read it word forword. i people who did not do as all of us did, read it word for word. i could say calling something a bedroom tax is inflammatory, but this is part of the cut and thrust of politics. and for members to be intimidating members from being able to be use that language i think is wrong. to take a closer look at this i'm joined now by plaid cymru mp liz saville roberts, karen buck — the labour mp for westminster north and drew hendry— the snp mp for inverness, nairn, badenoch & strathspey.
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thank you so much forjoining us. your views on the use of language both today and yesterday. you will have heard the argument and where do you think we stand? i think the atmosphere of the commons was very intense, unnecessarily aggressive andi intense, unnecessarily aggressive and i think the language isjust pa rt and i think the language isjust part of the problem. i think dismissing peoples concerns and taking a position that all of this has to be the polar opposite of the criticism and trying to avoid answering questions but instead just throwing back an insult is the main difficulty with in the commons. i don't think the public looking on really are warm to that kind of shouting across the chamber. i do not think they are warm towards like a traitor or like things like being called for example, a surrender bill. particularly that example because it evokes a militaristic field. we look at the situation in
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the house of commons yesterday and compared with the business that was going on between all parties put to the climate change act and the scottish parliament, you see the difference and people prefer to see that working together, even if you have difficulties rather than this kind of atmosphere. hold that thought because i think we are being joined by the leader in westminster. thank you forjoining in on this. i do not know how much of the last point you heard, but i would like to ask at this point is whether you accept his opposition party to some extent that this is the responsibility for all parties of that house and notjust the prime minister and the government.” that house and notjust the prime minister and the government. i think all of us should be careful of the language we use. all of us are mps ina language we use. all of us are mps in a position where we are being
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looked at and responses are considered and taken as something other people can work from. but that does not really let the prime minister off the hook. he is the prime minister and he aspired for thisjob in the way prime minister and he aspired for this job in the way that prime minister and he aspired for thisjob in the way that he behaves and very much sets the tone and how the whole of the house behaves. but i think is important to say is the main issue this week with the prime minister has been very successful in diverting attention away from it is at the prime minister and the government has vowed to be elected in the supreme court and we are talking about the tone that the prime minister is more concerned about the actions and how we hold them to account. i hope we can speak to karen as well. the labour mp who i was hoping would join us at this point and i was hoping would join us at this pointandi i was hoping would join us at this point and i think we can. the
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question i want to put to you as an mpfor question i want to put to you as an mp for the labour party is, now i am being told that she cannot hear us so being told that she cannot hear us so there's no point putting the question to her if she cannot hear it. so let us go back to drew henry and ask you the question. do you think there is a connection with the language used inside the commons and the more volatile atmosphere between parliament and parliamentarians and constituencies in the second question, do you find in your constituency, a greater degree of angerfrom constituency, a greater degree of anger from constituents and constituency, a greater degree of angerfrom constituents and do constituency, a greater degree of anger from constituents and do you feel more threatened?” anger from constituents and do you feel more threatened? i think she made a very good point about the actions because it is not necessarily just the words that are
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used by the things that are done and your primary example is a prime minister who is being found to act unlawful, who is willing to mislead people, to be that kind of person and setting the example, that is going to have an effect and this tory government throughout the past three and a half years has behaved appallingly and i'm not saying that there is not fault on the other benches either, but the example that is being set by the government is really poor and you asked about the situation here in my constituency and i'm very lucky to have lived in the highlands of scotland, so i do not really have the same kind of effect that is visited on people like jess effect that is visited on people likejess phillips effect that is visited on people like jess phillips and effect that is visited on people likejess phillips and feel i feel very sorry for and people are put under extreme pressure purely for having a different political view over the situation and that is not acceptable. we should be able to
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disagree, we should be able to have robust argument about positions, but it should not be a case where people that are affected in this way. i know that there are mps, very good friends of mine were genuinely concerned about their personal safety but more importantly, the safety but more importantly, the safety of their families and indeed those constituents that come to see them. we have with one of my colleagues, these far—away protesters coming up to one of the of eye surgeries and that is not good for anybody and encouraging the kind of behaviour by the actions of you have seen from borisjohnson and others over the past while this does not on. did you think that this was more severely directed against women, the actualfemale more severely directed against women, the actual female mps? more severely directed against women, the actualfemale mps? that some mps are facing. do you think there is a gender dimension?”
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think, in all honesty, i do not want to present myself as a victim. i am very much aware that i chose to go into the public life. but i have had some death threats and i don't think that it does any good in our public debates to have a prime minister who is deliberately using aggressive language and a dog whistle way. we do not have a labour mp on, but when you see opposition mps talking about treason, talking the language of a coup d'etat and talking about nazis and lynchings, decapitations, the language is as extreme surely on the opposition benches?” language is as extreme surely on the opposition benches? i am not going to countenance any member of parliament who uses overly to make
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such language, i measure myself and regret some of the way that i have phrased something. but with caution here, the prime minister has chosen to be prime minister and was elected by the tory party. he has a duty to behave as a leader and yet he is following a donald trump's footsteps by using incendiary language, dog whistle language. he is appealing to a dangerous base, he is winding that base up. this isn't the sort of politics that whether we go through the brexit, whether we remain in the eu, but from the prime minister's point of view, if he is trying to create this new britain, i don't really think is going about it in the best way. he is breaking more things than he is bringing together.
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thank you so much forjoining us this evening. the headlines on bbc news. president trump's top intelligence official faces congress — after a whistleblower claims the white house tried to cover up details of a phone call between donald trump and the ukrainian president during the call, mr trump is said to have pushed volodymyr zelensky to investigate the democrat, joe biden, who hopes to run against him in the 2020 presidential election. the accusations come after the democrats launched an impeachment inquiry — the process by which an american president can be removed from office. here's our north america editorjon sopel. joseph maguire is a man who spent his career living in the shadows. not any more. the evidence of the acting director of national intelligence is giving today could have a critical bickering on the future of donald trump's presidency
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—— bearing. donald trump who met at the meeting, insisted that the call was perfect in that he blatantly asks the ukrainian leader to investigate his political rival, joe biden. but a whistle—blower‘s letter was made public and the allegations are damning. he says that after an initial exchange of pleasa ntries, the president use the remainder of the president use the remainder of the call to advance his personal and he goes on... according to white house officials i spoke with, this is not the first time under this administration that a presidential school transcript was
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put into the system solely for the purpose of protecting politically sensitive. would you agree that the complaint and play serious wrongdoing by the president?m seemed to cause wrongdoing by the president?m seemed to cause some wrongdoing by the president?m seemed to cause some discomfort. wrongdoing by the president?m seemed to cause some discomfortm involved the allegations of that, but is not for me to decide how the president conducts his foreign policies. the intelligence chief was noticeably not going there.” policies. the intelligence chief was noticeably not going there. i think he did the right thing, i think he follow the life a step of the way stop print the white house try to lock down all records. and they are seizing on the letter. this is a cove r. seizing on the letter. this is a cover. donald trump's anger and anxiety is evident. tweeting...
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ata at a news conference last night, donald trump was unusually downbeat. almost morose. and now it is clear why. the allegations in the letter could not be more serious. and this evening, president trump has been giving his reaction to the impeachment hearing after he stepped off a plane at andrews airforce base in maryland. it isa it is a disgrace to our country. it is another witchhunt, here we go again. it is adam and his crew making up stories and it is just a disgrace. it is a terrible thing for a country. they cannot do any work, they're frozen, the democrats are going to lose the election and they know it and that is why they're
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doing it. and that should never be allowed what is happened to this president and i think i've done just about more than any president in the first two and a half years in office, i think you'll see very few could compete with what we have done for the military, the economy, we have the best economy everywhere in the world. by far. we have rebuilt our military, we have done so many things are so incredible. i have to put up with adam on an absolutely perfect phone call to the new president of the ukraine. there was a perfect call. well, we can speak now tojohn hudak, who's a senior fellow for governance studies at the brookings institution. he joins us live from washington. how much trouble is the president and after today's hearing? well, i think after today pots ‘s hearing and the information has come out
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over the past few days this week. the president is in serious jeopardy. he is likely to be impeached by the house of representatives, the evidence in the whistle—blower‘s report on the part of the transcript and the phone call that the white house released and from the president's on comments about the incidents, it is clear that he has abused his office and that he has abused his office and that he has likely tried to engage ina that he has likely tried to engage in a cover—up and it's probably trying to bribe a foreign head of state to interfere in an election. can you explain the cover up to us because that is in there were allegations that were coming from information, largely from people inside the white house who said that the transcript of the phone call with the ukrainian president was put into a system within the white house that is
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reserved for the highest priority national security information. but this call did not involve, as far as we know, any information that would rise to that level. instead it was put there to protect the president politically and likely to hide this information from others in the government from seeing it because the president understood there was a problem with what he did and that it was wrong. you said at the beginning that he is in a lot of trouble and the house will act against them on impeachment crowns. but if they cannot convince senators to vote against the republican president then this will go nowhere and you will not be impeached. the house of representatives will impeach a president and then that impeachment most of the senate for a trial. and you're absolutely right, if there we re you're absolutely right, if there were in impeachment trial today, he would not be convicted, he would not be removed from office because it
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will require every democrat to vote to convict as well as 20 republican senators to convict them. and you do not see that type of opposition to the president within his own party. but this process is really beginning in over the coming weeks, we are going to learn more about these allegations, more about the whistle—blowers and what was said in the report and that kind of information can begin to move votes. i think it is very unlikely that president trump is going to be removed from office even if he is impeached by the house, but time will tell and if you have this conversation two weeks ago, we would not have believed that this type of behaviour was going on in my guess is that there is a lot more to learn. a british couple have been sentenced to eight years in prison after being found guilty for attempting to smuggle drugs, a portugese court has heard. roger and susan clarke, both in their seventies were arrested in lisbon last year after they were found with more than two million dollars worth
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of cocaine in the linings of their suitcases during a luxury cruise. the couple had picked up the cases in st lucia before setting sail for portugal. a ten—year—old girl who was left fighting for her life after a suspected hit and run has died in hospital. the school girl died this afternoon following a collision with a vehicle on hillsview avenue in kentonjust after six—thirty last night. police have arrested one person they believe was driving the vehicle. there's been a fall in the take up of all routine vaccinatons for the under—fives in england in the past year. coverage of the measles, mumps and rubella vaccination, mmr, has also gone down, for the fifth year in a row. just over 90 percent — 9 out of 10 children aged two, were vaccinated against mmr last year. a drop from over 91% the previous period.
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but the world health organisation's target is 95% — a target scotland and northern ireland are already achieving. our health editor hugh pym has the story. there wasn't a care in the world for children at this play centre this afternoon. but for their parents, there's plenty to think about. when key decision is whether or not to get their children vaccinated. some are having second thoughts, the mothers that i spoke to were clear that it was the right thing to do. 100% for vaccinations. i believe that putting the child's health and happiness is always more important stop at what you think is behind the following numbers? social media may have a lot to do it that it a lot of people post on social media and a lot of people believe what other mums say so lot of people believe what other mums say so if you have a mum that has a big following group on instagram or something and she says that she is against it that i think
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a lot of people would not follow it in nearly all but one of the english regions. the only area where the vaccination rate remained unchanged was the northeast, which at the highest level of coverage and 94 and a half percent. london was the worst of just over a half percent. london was the worst ofjust over eight out of ten children receiving the inoculation. the message is very clear, make sure they have had all the vaccinations because these diseases can be very unpleasant and can even lead to death. so it is important that we all get the vaccines. measles is a serious illness that can cause severe complications and public experts say the following vaccinations is very worrying. they have called for more resources to get a positive message across to pa rents. get a positive message across to parents. to increase public awareness of the value of vaccines and to invest more funding into our local vaccine services that are delivered in the community to our
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children. these boys had their vaccinations. the question is whether or not the parents who have had not had the jabs if, health authorities say they could be a step too far the stage, but ministers have not ruled out. now it's time for a look at the weather with helen willetts. hello throughout the evening overnight, swirling around in the areas of low pressure but they will ease and activity particularly through parts of scotland that will lead back to the coast from northern ireland there will be a few for eastern wells and parts of england. fairly brisk went to the saulteaux keep the temperatures up, later ones further north means will be cooler overnight here and notably so it could be a bit of nastiness as well. but otherwise, it is business as usual. morris and scattered showers and link rain for a time passing
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northern ireland. there could be pretty intense and some thunder and lightning and again, i feel it will bea lightning and again, i feel it will be a bit cooler with temperatures a degree or two down so some sunny showers again and then it's the weekend for the weekend, it looks as if it could be potentially very wet once again and also with the possibility of some severe gales. hello this is bbc news. the headlines. the prime minister has defended his language as dozens of mps demand an apology from him after furious exchanges in the commons i totally deplore any threats to anybody, particularly female mps. the prime minister's language is encouraging people to have in a
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disgraceful way against other public figures. i've witnessed it myself. the rows comes as a man is arrested for allegedly verbally abusing staff and smacking the doors and windows at mpjess phillips' constituency office. president trump's top intelligence official faces congress — after a whistleblower claims the white house tried to cover up details of a phone call between donald trump and the ukrainian president. former president of france, jacques chirac dies at the age of 86. emmanuel macron calls him a ‘great frenchman' who ‘embodied' france. the sir david attenborough is officially named at a ceremony in birkenhead — the uk's newest polar research ship otherwise known as boaty mcboatface. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good evening sir. good evening. essex have won the cricket's
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county championship title for the second time in three years. they secured the draw they needed against somerset at taunton after a match that had been severely affected by the weather. but still managed to deliver a twist. essex collapsed to 141 all out on the final day in reply to somerset‘s 203. somerset then forfeited their second innings in a desperate bid to pull off a remarkable victory by taking 10 quick wickets. but they only managed one so the match was drawn enough for essex to start their celebrations. it's two wins with two bonus points for england at the rugby wrold cup after they ran in seven tries to beat the usa 45 points to 7 in kobe. the match will also remembered for the first red card of the tournament with us flanker john quill dismissed for a shoulder charge on 0wen farrell. we are pleased where we are. after two games we are ten points and conceded one tribe. but fantastic
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experiences. tonight, 27,000 people, first major rugby game here for a while. a great rugby city. great occasion and we are pretty humbled to be part of it. and we are in a good position. can we play better? yes. and we will need to play again. so englnad six points clear. at the top of pool c. but they have played a game more. and tougher games are to come against argentina and france. meanwhile in pool b there was also a seven try win for italy, 48—7 against canada. glasgow city ladies and wsl champions arsenal are hoping to reach the last 16 of the women's champions league tonight. arsenal are 1—0 up in their second leg against fiorentina. that's 5—0 overall. while glasgow's advantage was a little more slender they started tonight's match 1—0 up on aggregate. and went a goal down in the first five minutes. but goals from hayley lauder and clare shine restored their lead.
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they're just into the second half in glasgow with the home side leading 2—i that's 3—1 on aggregate. any hopes bury may have had of returning to the football league now appear to be over after a proposal for the club to be readmitted to league two next season was rejected by the efl‘s now 71 member clubs. bury were expelled from league one in august after a takeover bid collapsed. earlier this week, a group trying to rescue bury submitted a proposal for "compassionate re—entry" to league two. but a statement said the proposal did not have the necessary support. only one team will go down from league two this campaign, rather than two. derby county captain richard keogh has been ruled out until the end of the season due to a serious knee injury sustained in a car crash that led to the arrest of two team—mates. tom lawrence and mason bennett were both charged with drink—driving. keogh was a passenger in a range rover driven by lawrence when the collision happened on the outskirts of derby
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on tuesday night following a team—building dinner organised by the club. who said ‘those involved know they will pay a heavy price for their actions'. but they will be supported with their "rehabilitation back into the squad and team". britain's andy murray is out of the zhuhai championships after losing to alex de minaur in the last 16 in china. murray — who's continuing his return from hip surgery — claimed his first atp tour singles win since january in the first round. but despite winning the first set against de minaur, murray slipped to a three set defeat to australia's world number 31. judd trump's is—match winning run has ended. he was beaten by fellow englishman joe perry, losing 5 frames to 2 in the last—i6 of the evergrande china championship in guangzhou. that's all the sport for now. if you'd like to follow radio or text commentary of the super legaue
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playoff match between salford and castleford you can do that via the website and app. and i'll be back for sportsday at half past ten. more now on our top story. borisjohnson is refusing to apologise for his language after he was accused of "inflaming divisions" in the country over brexit. the prime minister has faced widespread criticism for using words such as "surrender" and "betrayal" during an angry debate in the commons last night. tempers need to come down, and people need to come together. because it's only getting brexit done that you are actually lance the boil, as it were, of the current anxiety. i totally deplore any threats to anybody, particularly female mps and a lot of work has been done to stop that and to give
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people the security that they need. but i do think it's important that in the house of commons i should be able to talk about the surrender act in the way that i did. do you really question that? i think that's important point. what that act would do is take away the power of the government and power of this country to decide how long we would remain in the eu. and give that power to the eu. that's quite an extraordinary thing. the prime minister's sister, racheljohnson, has been a prominent remain campaigner — speaking to bbc radio 4 this lunchtime, she said she doesn't recognise the man at the despatch box. it's not the brother i see at home. it's not the brother i see at home. it's a different person, and so it's sort of raising this question as come you know, is it a deliberate as it were, strategy to whip up, to
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raise the temperature so much that people feel that they've had their democracy stolen, or had the boat betrayed? and democracy stolen, or had the boat betrayed ? and therefore democracy stolen, or had the boat betrayed? and therefore obviously whips up the base into believing that if only they cleave to him and the strongmen rhetoric and the strategy, they will get what they want. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn says the prime minister's language is encouraging others to act in a disgraceful and abusive way. there is rough—and—tumble in politics and badly was used and admitted very clear today that i think members on all parties should look about their language and think about it very carefully. there is increasing threats being made on streets and increasing abuse being made to those elected to office. and a lot of abuse and death threats. jo cox was murdered on the streets of
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her constituency during the eu referendum. her neighbouring mp raised a question in parliament yesterday, her success for as an mp raised a question yesterday and the response of the prime minister was hardly empathetic. to what had happened or realising the enormity ofa happened or realising the enormity of a public figure being assassinated in their constituency and said this is humbug. that is not a cce pta ble and said this is humbug. that is not acceptable in the prime minister refused to come to parliament today to answer questions that had been put directly to him. are you searcy saying that borisjohnson's words are putting mp's lives at risk? what i'm saying is that mps using the emotive language, betrayal, surrender, all of these things, about negotiations with the european union create an atmosphere in which some people take it to unbelievable extremes, and i think we should tone
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down the rhetoric, engage the politics, engage in issue of the problem of a no deal exit and problem of a no deal exit and problem of a no deal exit and problem of food supplies for the problems of exports of our goods. engage with that and understand why people voted remain and why people voted leave. those that wanted security and those that felt they had been offered nothing by the british political establishment. had been offered nothing by the british political establishmentm sounds like you're blaming boris johnson for making mps less safe but without being willing to name him. is the prime minister making them less safe ? is the prime minister making them less safe? his language is encouraging people to behave in a disgraceful and abusive way against other puppet figures. i've witnessed it myself on the streets of this country. many veteran mps and political commentators say they've not witnessed such angry scenes — in all their years at parliament. but what's been the reaction outside westminster? 0ur political correspondent alex forsyth has been to the conservative constituency of walsall north — which voted to leave the eu — to find out.
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life on this factory floor feels a far cry from the chaos in westminster. this family firm in warsaw designs and makes high—end door and window fittings. and plenty here think parliament needs to get a grip. i've never heard such a humbug in all my life. peter's from slovakia, and has lived in the uk for eight years. he thinks the language being used is stoking division. they shouldn't be using that kind of language in there. like betrayal and stuff because it is probably fuelling the atmosphere in society. for people trying to get on with work and life, frustration at politicians is right. director paul is craving an end to brexit uncertainty and the scenes in parliament don't fill him with confidence. when people are trying to make decisions in a highly emotive state like last night, are unlikely to reach an agreement. as a business, we
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could not act in that way, we need to keep planning and moving forward and this kind of almost childish behaviour is not what you want to see. this is a conservative constituency, but only by a narrow margin. most people here voted leave and it is the kind of place number ten hopes its firm brexit message will play well. from the start, borisjohnson has tried to paint himself as the man who will stick up for the brexit back public, the person who will deliver for those who voted leave and the language he is using its part of that strategy, trying to put himself on the side of the people versus what he portrays as a parliament trying to hinder brexit. critics say it is a decisive tactic, but for some, it is working. he is right in many things he says. colin is convinced. what other language could he use? they are hypocrites. of course we voted out, whether you like it or not,
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the country voted brexit. but his son does not trust anyone? what am i going to do now, i hate them all. for many, the heated arguments are simply a turn—off. it can get out of hand, i think. they never seem to agree with each other, it is like one, long battle all of the time. at the local pet shop, there is a stronger view. the public are thinking, this is what we voted go, this is our government and it's disgraceful. while westminster continues to wrangle, the country continues to watch, still divided and increasingly frustrated. alex forsyth, bbc news. let's go to westminster now — our political correspondent helen catt is there. and i suppose the mps have to pay attention to the kind of frustration
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that we were hearing there, and in alex's report. going back to the issue of language there's obviously no intention from the government bench to turned on the language of surrender, act, betrayal and all the rest of it. absolutely. downing street in borisjohnson seem to be standing by at that phrase, surrender act. that's what he used to describe the bill that was passed by mps the other week to stop a no deal breaks out. the one that he's does not get a deal they're compelled to ask for an extension from the eu. he says that's harmed negotiations and that's why he refers to it as the surrender act so he stood by that phraseology. the former prime minister sirjohn major has been giving a speech and honed in on that word, surrender, and not one that should be used within the party politics or and also talked about other words the prime minister has not been accused of using. like
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enemy, and we see in the cropped up in the wider brexit base. from the other side we been hearing about mps and their concerns of their safety. and just phillips about the constituency office. any developments there? would been hearing from mps for several years about receiving death threats and abuse. and receiving the security issues. it's not right but it's something that's been the case for something that's been the case for some time. on the actual, with the premise or calls the surrender act which the opposition obviously c is a very legitimate attempts to avoid a very legitimate attempts to avoid a no—deal brexit, of course we are hurtling towards that deadline of
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0ctober hurtling towards that deadline of october the 19th and it's still very unclear what's going to happen. this is of the opposition parties have been looking at again this afternoon and many have met, jeremy corbyn met with others this afternoon and they are looking at, they are not entirely convinced that it is going to be enough, this act. they said it will comply with the law but said that he will not ask for that extension which is what the law compels him to do. so they say they will be looking at parliamentary actions next week to sort of follow up actions next week to sort of follow up on this and two, we are not entirely sure with those actions will be yet, but set to meet again on monday morning to come up with the precise mechanisms that they intend to use. the headlines on bbc news... the prime minister has defended his language as dozens of mps demand an apology from him after furious exchanges in the commons
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a man is arrested for allegedly verbally abusing staff and smashing the doors and windows at mp jess phillips' constituency office. president trump's top intelligence official faces congress — after a whistleblower claims the white house tried to cover up details of a phone call between donald trump and the ukrainian president. monday has been declared a day of mourning in france in honour of the country's former president, jacques chirac, who has died at the age of 86. many in france considered him as their favourite president. he had been suffering from ill health for many years. he served as president of france for two terms, from 1995 until 2007 and famously opposed the us—led war in iraq. this evening the lights of the eiffel tower in paris were switched off in tribute to mr chirac. 0ur correspondent jonathan marcus looks back at his life. when the lofty figure
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ofjacques chirac became president in 1995, he seemed to characterise the very essence of french politics. his political career extended over a remarkable 40 years, and he's seen by many as the most influential french man of his generation. chirac‘s presidency began in a bullish mood, outraging world opinion by restarting french nuclear weapons tests in the pacific. the president insisting that france's nuclear deterrent was an essential element of its security and its effectiveness had to be tested. but there were seismic political shifts going on at home. in the 2002 presidential election, the socialist vote collapsed and the far right national front ofjean—marie le pen won through to the vital second ballot. chirac ultimately crushed le pen but the warning signals for french politics were clear. little could mask the endemic problems of french society. high levels of unemployment, bitter divisions over immigration
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and uncertainty about just where the country was heading. for a time, jacques chirac was able to contain the storm. his absolute refusal to countenance any french involvement in the us invasion of iraq won him strong support at home. but it wasn'tjust france that was changing, it was europe too. comfortable with the idea of a european union with france and germany in the driving seat, a wider membership changed the eu's whole character. the french president often railed against britain's eu rebate, as well as its failure to contribute to what he saw as its fair share of the costs of enlargement. jacques chirac is a president with a mixed legacy. he was convicted of corruption in relation to his time as mayor of paris, but he was also the president who finally accepted france's responsibility for its involvement in the deportation of frenchjews to nazi death camps during the second world war.
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he was a president who reconciled france with key elements of its past, but he was ultimately unable to reconcile it with its future. jaques chirac who died today — aged 86. the car makerjaguar land rover has confirmed that it is halting production at its uk assembly plants from early november, in case of border disruption caused by a possible no—deal brexit. the company says most staff will still be expected to come into work, but rather than building cars they will carry out other tasks. the amount of alcohol people in scotland are buying in shops has dropped by nearly eight per cent — since the country introduced a minimum pricing scheme last may. researchers say the minimum price of 50p per unit has cut the amount of strong cider and spirits being sold, and that people are drinking less at home as a result. buckingham palace has announced princess beatrice is to marry her boyfriend edoardo mapelli mozzi. the 31—year—old daughter of prince andrew and sarah,
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duchess of york, got engaged to the 34—year—old property tycoon in italy earlier this month. their wedding is set to be next year. the turner prize exhibition, featuring work from the four contemporary artists shortlisted for this year's award, opens in margate this weekend. the kent seaside town was a favourite setting for the painterjmw turner — after whom the prize is named. 0ur arts editor will gompertz has been in margate to cast an eye over this year's hopefuls. i'm standing in the turner contemporary art gallery in margate where the painter would stand and look out at the sea and the sky over there to the north. he was a radical and inventor, amazing painter after whom of course the turner prize is named, and it's here this year in margate. i just named, and it's here this year in margate. ijust wonder named, and it's here this year in margate. i just wonder what named, and it's here this year in margate. ijust wonder what he would think of the four artists that have been shortlisted. let's start with
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the film, its a one hour and 40 minute piece by the artist helen currently state of the civil rights movement in northern ireland in 1968 and focuses specifically on the largely overlooked contribution by women. have you met my friends? they area bit women. have you met my friends? they are a bit creepy to be honest, they came down from london on the train isa came down from london on the train is a creation of the artist 0scar and effigies of the modern worker and effigies of the modern worker and they're and effigies of the modern worker and they‘ re looking and effigies of the modern worker and they're looking at not towards the sea, because that view was blocked by a big black canvas, because we are living in dark times. welcome to the fantastical world of the artist kind. is that he is telling me a story that goes on for seven hours. it's about the landscape the artist has created. which is a utopian vision of a new world order, i suppose. which is a utopian vision of a new world order, isuppose. but which is a utopian vision of a new world order, i suppose. but not from a male perspective this time come about from a feminine experience. we're prior to the stake out the law
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was a path that allowed police to acquire surplus apartment from the military, assault rifles, humvees, both in scopes transformed police departments into combat ready infa ntry departments into combat ready infantry units. this is andrew hampton, you can see him just there. he does not sculpt or paint committee is more like an events get a reporter, really. he goes out and finds audio testimonies from people who have been involved in criminal cases recreates stories that have been turned into films such as this one here. that's all of the artist, the big question is who would turner have gone for? the key would have liked them all he likes new ideas. of the code of been tempted by oscar mark marella and the composition of the films, but for a painter, where the films, but for a painter, where the i think he would've gone for the sound guy lawrence. because his work resonates today in a way that turner's did when he was painting from this spot nearly 200 years ago.
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remember boaty mcboatface? that was what the public voted to call the uk's new polar research ship. well today it has been officially named by the duke and duchess of cambridge — though it's actually now been called the sir david attenborough after the government intervened. it's hoped the vessel will help carry out world—leading research in the artic and antarctica over the next 25 to 30 years. from birkenhead, here's our science correspondent rebecca morelle. it's heading for the most remote parts of our planet, the uk's new polar ship. on board, the duke and duchess of cambridge. and sir david attenborough, who's lent the ship his name. it is my immense privilege and relief to welcome sir david attenborough, rather than boaty mcboatface. catherine did the honors. it gives me great pleasure to name this ship sir david attenborough,
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and may god bless her and all those who sail in her. for sir david, studying the poles is critical. ten or 20 years ago, i could stand at the end of the glacier and say it's melting at such and such a rate. i wasn't talking about the half of it. the speed in which we now realise things are happening is terrifying. and so we know we're only going to deal with that if we know what the facts are, and that's what this ship will do. this is one of the most advanced ships ever built. it contains1 million pieces of steel, it's covered in 60,000 litres of paint, and has 450,000 metres of cabling. it's set to transform our understanding of the rapidly changing poles. we'll be able to look at things like the atmosphere, what's going on in the ice, the surface ocean, the deep ocean, the mud at the bottom of the ocean,
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all in one go, and in that way we'll be able to tackle some of the really big global questions on environmental science. there to celebrate, a children's penguin parade. but soon the ship will be seeing the real thing. after sea trials, it will be leaving for the antarctic next year. rebecca morelle, bbc news. rain showers is become would've waited for the dry starch in september but more to come after watching this massive cloud brewing up watching this massive cloud brewing up in the atlantic. that's the next very significant rain makeup but even ahead of that come the area of low pressure will throw more showers are white in the next 24 hours. the system as we head towards the week and will bring with her the risk of gales as well. they will coincide with a full moon and high tide. as well as flooding with hundred 50 mm of rain coming in some parts way.
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for a shower a picture of their and overnight they tend to ease back a little bit but they gathered for us towards the end of the night towards the area of low pressure. clifford scotla nd the area of low pressure. clifford scotland and most definitely the mist and shallow fog towards morning. the rush overseas and have your showers and lengthier spells of rain torrential downpours, gusty winds and the light regime of wins to the north, they should push through more quickly. 0f to the north, they should push through more quickly. of course there will be sunshine between showers and outs of the wind in the showers and outs of the wind in the showers will be a cooler day compared with today and with recent days. just a degree or two down. that one area is up to the north sea and the next rainmaker coming in, tropical air mixed in among state and hence the concern that we will see an awful lot of rain coming our way this weekend. showers ease during the day on saturday and ahead
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of that developing area of low pressure, as well as rain coming into southern and western areas is to go through the afternoon a strengthening window. with the full moon and high tides and potential coastal flooding as well, look it just drags its heels and moves out to the north sea, then behind it we get a strong northerly wind hitting the east coast through sunday and into the start of monday. really wet start for most of us monday. does like to ease a little and perhaps we escape the rest of the range, but some what we will is that wind coming in behind and feel quite chilly in comparison. they passed the potential for severe gale force winds by then. the warnings are on the website. goodbye.
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hello, i'm kasia madera, this is 0utside source. the white house is accused of trying to cover up president trump's request to a foreign leader to interfere in the 2020 us election. the us director of national intelligence gets a grilling on capitol hill. among the questions — whether military aid was withheld from ukraine as leverage to get dirt onjoe biden. i do not understand, i have no situation awareness if that was withheld or why it was withheld, mr chairman. well i can tell you, we are going to find out. president trump meanwhile denies all the charges laid

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