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tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  September 27, 2019 10:00am-10:59am BST

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actually says in theirjudgment that naga munchetty was a racism, y actually says in theirjudgment that naga munchetty was a racism, we can who have experienced racism, we can talk about those experiences but to remain impartial about whether they we re remain impartial about whether they were good or not. it's an absurd thing to say. the bbc's point is naga munchetty could give her lived experience, she is presented to the audience and then stop it there, hello. it's friday, it's10:ooam. allowing the audience to draw their i'm chloe tilley. own conclusions. by suggesting if we "not worthy of our country share our experiences of racism, or the leadership we now need." church of england bishops call for people in and out which by the way is a deeply of parliament to tone uncomfortable thing to do. the last down their language over brexit. thing you come on air to do is talk we'll be talking to one of them about their calls for respect, about the painful experiences of and what advice they might have racism you've had in this country. i've been in the same position, when for these two mps who are contrite about some trying to hold debates about current affairs and do myjob i drawing into of the language they've used. sharing my personal experience has come of them by others who pulled me earlier this week thomas cook went bust, leaving thousands unemployed. into that. i don't think it is we can exclusively reveal that over something any of us do lightly or a hundred of them are taking legal action to see if the company failed often enthusiastically. to then be invited to share that experience but to refrain from casting a judgment to keep them properly informed. about whether that experiences good or not is actually the worst absolutely position the bbc could come to. it to keep them properly informed. furious, and i can imagine absolutely furious, and i can imagine that lots of people in this is saying share your experience and country will be feeling absolutely then leave it for others to decide
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furious that a man in that position whether you think that is legitimate feels it is ok to skirt the lines by experience to her. isn't that about using language like that. earlier this week the bbc ruled impartiality? isn't it potentially a against naga munchetty over comments she made slippery slope? that's why racism about donald trump. now this programme has seen a letter falls into... it's not an opinion from dozens of bame broadcasters, including lenny henry, like should happen or whether calling for the bbc to reconsider. austerity was good. racism is a and we'll be revealing the latest contestant set to take fundamental ideology that removes part in the next series the humanity of people because of their race. we as a democratic of dancing on ice. society have said time and time and time again, for years and decades that we do not accept or tolerate racism. it is not an opinion that should be treated as something with two sides that is up for debate. if hello, welcome to the programme. we're live until ”am this morning. the bbc takes that stance, it will many of you have already been find people of colour will not be in touch about the language used able to fulfil their professional in the brexit debate. role at the bbc because we cannot in elitsa has emailed to say: good conscience come on air and "unfortunately, i think the reality pretend that racism is something of fear and violence that we will debate and if people wa nt to that we will debate and if people want to suggest we do not belong in is not new at all. our own country, that is something people were scared even we will treat with impartiality. so during the referendum! if you wanted to put a pro eu poster is ita on your house you were likely we will treat with impartiality. so is it a slippery slope that the bbc presenters increasingly feel they to have your window broken.
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my husband is english, but i am not. can presenters increasingly feel they ca n ex press presenters increasingly feel they can express personal opinions, the day after the referendum i had something that is heartfelt, that a drunk man peeing in front of me you feel racism has to be an and my toddler in the park exception to that rule? there are telling me to "go home". already exceptions to the rule. i unfortunately this is a reality don't think it is a slippery slope. a lot of people are living in every single day and i cannot really see i think many on—air personalities how it will change. politics are making expressed a view on president trump, it worse by the day." likejon sopel who hasn't that is one experience. do get in touch expressed a view on president trump, like jon sopel who hasn't faced expressed a view on president trump, likejon sopel who hasn't faced any on all the stories we're talking sanction because it is widely about — use the hashtag victoria live. accepted it is a legitimate stance. first, annita mcveigh has the news. good morning. i think it's interesting naga munchetty was a person sanction for good morning. good morning, thank you very much. it. this is bbc politics and i need good morning, thank you very much. good morning, thank you very much. to explain to the audience, within good morning, everyone. one of the prime minister's most the guidelinesjon to explain to the audience, within the guidelines jon sopel to explain to the audience, within senior advisers has said he is not the guidelinesjon sopel is the surprised that some voters are angry bbc‘s north america editor and as a with mps over brexit. result, he is within his realm of dominic cummings said the only way the issue of abuse would be solved expertise allowed to put forward is if mps "respected" the result of the eu referendum. those points of view, because it is in further evidence of growing acrimony over the language his area of expertise. as a surrounding brexit, more than 100 presenter, you're not allowed to do archbishops and bishops have that, your role is more to be warned against "further entrenching our divisions" — calling for respect on all sides. presenting both sides and allowing the government's preparations the audience to make their own to ensure supplies of vital decision. that is what the bbc is medicines and nhs equipment are not disrupted in the event saying. i watch bbc breakfast. the of a no—deal brexit have been
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strongly criticised. the national audit office says presenters often express personal there is still a significant amount of work to do before anecdotes and feelings, that's why people love the show, because a october 31st. the department for health says it human. naga munchetty was invited to wants to reassure patients it's doing everything it can to make sure they can access the express her opinion by her co—host. the fact she has been reprimanded medicines they need. for doing that, even carefully with five days on since the collapse of thomas cook, caveats, for conforming to what we this programme has learned that more than 100 former employees asa caveats, for conforming to what we as a society agree which is that are taking legal action to see racism is wrong, to sanction herfor whether the company failed in its duty to keep staff informed thatis racism is wrong, to sanction herfor that is ridiculous. i would also like to add that the real slippery when the business collapsed. slope here i feel is that black and ethnic minority staff within the bbc lawyers say that thousands could be have been being warned not to sign due a windfall payment. so far, 6,000 uk employees have up have been being warned not to sign up to internal and external letters been made redundant. condemning this judgment. i'm up to internal and external letters condemning thisjudgment. i'm very we will speak to one of those concerned about the atmosphere of fear in this organisation and that employees and a lawyer representing thomas cook staff later people who feel and feel in the most in the programme. powerful and profound way that their police forces need to do more to prevent officers legitimacy, their humanity is on the abusing their authority to have sex line here are not being allowed to with vulnerable people, according to a new report. express themselves. this is all related to the same culture here her majesty's inspectorate that refuses to accept that as of constabulary says forces need to ensure they're able to detect abuse—of—position people of colour, these experiences by officers and staff. are not matters of academic debate for us. if you want us to be on air, it estimates that up to 10% of the police workforce did not you want us to bring our have up—to—date vetting.
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experiences, which this judgment says we should come you can't expect black and asian figures in broadcasting, including us to stop at suggesting we are lenny henry, david harewood impartial about whether those experience as a good or not positive and adrian lester, have written an open letter to the bbc it is suggesting racism is questioning its decision to uphold a complaint against bbc legitimate enough to be considered from both sides and i think it is brea kfast‘s naga munchetty. dangerous and needs to stop now. ok, the complaint concerns on—air let me redo some comments coming in. one says, i watch the programme and comments made by the presenter about president trump's tweet i feel what she said about her own calling on fourfemale expense are being told to go home by politicians to go back people was so sad for someone who is to the place they came from. an excellent presenter. whoever the bbc says that president trump's complained to the bbc should be comments were "widely condemned as racist, disgusted for this. keep your chin and we reported on this extensively". up. another says, i'm disgusted for this. keep your chin up. anothersays, i'm an disgusted for this. keep your chin up. another says, i'm an englishman living in wales and have been told dozens living in wales and have been told d oze ns of living in wales and have been told dozens of times to go back to where i come from. naga is making we will speak to the journalist afua hirsch — who has organised this letter later in the programme. controversial remarks on the bbc the whistle—blower that claimed should stop presenters having the white house tried to cover up discussions about their own opinions. another says, details of a damning telephone discussions about their own opinions. anothersays, i'm no conversation, between donald trump discussions about their own opinions. another says, i'm no fan of naga but what she said and how and the president of ukraine, is reportedly a cia officer. she handled the issue at that time according to us reports, the unnamed officer once is exemplary, considering all the worked in the white house. complaints the bbc flicks back and view it is that it berates a bame female presenter after a single it's alleged that during the phone call, mr trump pushed complaint is telling. it wasn't a volodymyr zelensky to investigatejoe biden, single complaint, just to save us
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who hopes to challenge him in next that the reason david jordan said year's presidential election. naga munchetty was investigated with the complaint was against her, none prince harry has retraced we re the steps of his mother, the complaint was against her, none were made against dan walker for princess diana by walking bringing her into it. which i think through a former minefield in angola. it's telling about how we as people of colour are disproportionately bear the burden of having to explain why racism is problematic and how it the images of princess diana's visit affects us. i don't think it's good in 1997 spurred a global for a presenter to be in the campaign to ban landmines. position of having to talk about her during his visit, the duke of sussex described landmines as an "unhealed experiences of racism. it's a very scar of war" and called for further uncomfortable thing to do in effect international efforts to clear are more than her colleagues. the remaining landmines. fa ct are more than her colleagues. the fact she's been willing to do that is something to be commended. the fa ct is something to be commended. the fact she's been reprimanded for that is deeply concerning. thank you ever that is a summary of our main story so much for coming in, afua hirsch. so that is a summary of our main story so far. back to you, chloe. iconic images from angola. the bbc has learned that some thank you very much. universities are starting to open up even by the fraught and fractious their own food banks on campuses the standards of the brexit debate, it's been a tense and angry few stu d e nts their own food banks on campuses the students who are living in poverty. days at westminster. heated exchanges in the house staffordshire university of commons have raised fears is one of them. more than one in four students that our politics might be heading at staffordshire university in a dangerous direction. are from deprived areas, those fears have been shared and more than half of the students by all of the church of england's there are the first in their families to go to university. bishops and archbishops who this as part of a week of storytelling across bbc news from stoke on trent, morning issued a joint rebuke of mps
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ben moore and lucas yeomans have for using language which they say is unacceptable and ‘not worthy been to see how the university is of our country nor adapting to the needs of students. the leadership we now need'. here's a reminder of some of the exchanges in parliament on wednesday night. they could vote no confidence at any time. welcome to the first week but they are too of the rest of your life. cowardly to have a go. yet, despite all the clubs to join, societies to sign up for, this parliament is a disgrace! and all the new friends to be made at freshers' week, students are only thinking about one thing. to come here with his barrister's i think every student's got money bluster, to obfuscate the truth, and finance on their mind. and for a man like him, i spend my money on unnecessary things and now i'm looking to be a party like this, and a leader a bit more calm about it. money's always going to be a problem like this, this prime minister, cos i get about the lowest amount to talk about morals and morality of maintenance loan. is a disgrace! i mean, it's been difficult so, yeah, i've got to you will exhaust your vocal cords. save up and everything. you will get nowhere. it won't work. we stand here, mr speaker, under the shield of our departed with tuition fees, accommodation friend with many of us in this place and living costs, students in stoke need to find an average subject to death threats of about £17,500 a year before and abuse every single day. they can even start lectures. and let me tell the prime minister
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that they often quote his words — i left school with no surrender, betrayal, traitor — qualifications, started hanging around with the wrong people. and i, for one, am sick of it! i have to say, mr speaker, ended up getting kicked out. i've never heard such joined the army. humbug in all my life. because the reality is... that didn't go the way i planned shouting either and then, after that, ..this is a bill... i got made homeless. shouting ben is not your typical student. i'm kind ofjust winging it right now, just riding, just going with the flow. i know it's going to be a struggle, with student loans and stuff. i know, what spare time i've got, after this exchange — i'm going to have to work and stuff the daughter of an mp said she is "scared every single day" and just get that extra money. for her mother's safety. with your budget, what's in an emotional plea to politicians your priority like? over their language — is it food, is it rent? just rent and food. ellie cooper, whose parents i've had previous issues with rent arrears before. are labour mp yvette cooper i don't want to be in that sort of situation again, and former mp ed balls, said definitely not, no. she is terrified "something awful" like jo cox's murder ben got his place here through could be repeated. the university's step up programme. in a series of tweets basically, a two—month she writes: academic crash course. and it's landed him on one of the most popular courses at the university.
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staffordshire's e—sports course is only a year old and ben is one of 110 new undergraduates. the course isn'tjust about playing video games all the time, is it? so, how can we reduce no, no, absolutely not. the temperature of the political it's more the business side debate, whilst still making of the whole e—sports industry. sure our politicians can i think doing this degree express their passionate beliefs? will have a massive impact and could the heightened rhetoric on where i'm going to end up and i'm just honoured to be a part of it. even be putting our elected politicians and their families back at the freshers fair, we've been looking further in physical danger? than the inevitable poster sale. stoke takes more than a quarter of its students from deprived areas, now let's talk to matthew syed, many from the local area, which creates a particular set of problems. author of rebel ideas: the power according to the latest figures of diverse thinking. from staffordshire university, 38 first—year students dropped out entirely in the 2016—17 nick boles, former conservative mp academic year citing money problems as the reason why. what that basically means is one in 25 students had to stop studying because they couldn't afford to. who is pledging to moderate his own
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behaviour, lbour mp rupa huq that may be why staffordshire is one of only a handful of campuses who acknowledges she has sometimes with a food bank on site. well, more of a food cupboard. gone too far in the commons, and yeah, so we've got everything. from leeds kim leadbeater — we've got all the pasta and stuff here. the sister of murdered labour mp dry ingredients. jo cox, right reverend how do you make sure dr helen—ann hartley — you handle the people that she is the bishop of ripon — are genuinely in need of help? and signed that letter calling because it comes through for restraint. an adviser, either through the university or ourselves, yesterday you said on twitter that you have been "intemperate, they assess what the best route is to help that student, even brutal" in your language. so it's never abused and, what did you have in mind? because of the stigma one thing! of using food banks anyway, you wouldn't want to use it one thing i had a tendency to do was to describe people as liars rather unless you have to. i've used the student union's food hub. than to identify a particular thing i've gone home with somebody might have said that was a bags full of food. lie. and i think that's a very as well as younger undergraduates, important distinction because the 33% of students at staffs are older. truth is that borisjohnson, i some mature students are parents, believe, has said some things that who are just managing. we re believe, has said some things that were untrue and can be fairly i got to the point where i had described as liars but i don't think to give up something. it helps anyone, and i don't think it was either university, the family or work. it helps anyone, and i don't think it is fairto it helps anyone, and i don't think it is fair to describe anybody as, i couldn't get rid of the family. to define them as a liar, just
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because they have said some things i wasn't giving up uni because it that were untrue. i hope that in the future i will be able to just take a took me 30 years to get here. breath before sending that tweet and but we weren't living — we were existing. getting into all kinds of debt because we didn't have making sure that i'm talking about any money coming in. nat‘s university experience particular statements or events or was so hard on her, she set up the parents and carers support group. actions, rather than besmirching what the student finance companies need to do is look, someone‘s entire character and sort of demonising them as something that not treat a parent—student the same as they would a stereotypical 18 isn't a fair picture of who they to 21—year—old who have got are. rupa huq, do you feelyou have parents to fall back on. a lot of us haven't got gone too far sometimes? the house of parents to fall back on, do you know what i mean? commons chamber, people all know in prime minister's questions, it is 45 minutes on a wednesday, there is a ben is about to move lot more that mps do other than that into student accommodation. but the geography of the place and he's been at stoke's ymca for five the fact it is a gladiatorial years since he came off the streets. combat, there are two sides facing but now he's at university, each other. in town halls, in the someone else needs his room. my standard charge is £15 european parliament it is more of a horseshoe, semi circle thing with a a week to live here. more friendly setup. you are kind of the house that i'm going to be staying in costs trained to think that is the enemy £75 a week to live in. across from you and especially in a i'm really not thinking pmqs type of thing. boris johnson about it as of yet. i've been putting it to the back and i'vejust been, like, has only done one pmqs, although he's been in for 65 days now. there focusing on just going to uni at the minute and just
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like getting over that. have been six sitting days of parliament. every time he pops up we you're at a university where, automatically reflexively start on average, about 40 students drop out each year due shouting "resign." to financial difficulty. automatically reflexively start shouting "resign. " on automatically reflexively start how determined are you to make sure shouting "resign." on tuesday when we we re you're not part of that 40? shouting "resign." on tuesday when we were recalled, wednesday, i don't even know what day it is! a couple this is kind of make—or—break for me. of days ago when he came back having that's how i look at it. lost the supreme court case, a it's not an option. i'm not going to drop out. historicjudgment, that's it. lost the supreme court case, a historic judgment, he was lost the supreme court case, a historicjudgment, he was quite bombastic about it. he started sort of blustering on that he wasn't and that film was part going to change. our side were of we are stoke—on—trent — a bbc project which encourages local shouting, you should be in prison. people to tell the stories that matter to them. and i was going, "lock him up, lock him up." are you ashamed of that? dancing on ice — the show that sees celebrities become ice skaters — the way our workplace works is hits our screens again in the new year. unlike any other adult workplace in music: i'm still standing by eltonjohn. # now i'm still standing the world, everything is televised and also he was playing to the after all this time gallery. it is veryjuvenile and # picking up the pieces of my life what did that achieve? but their side is also shouting, so your side without you on my mind wants to shout louder. do you think # i'm still standing
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you need to apologise to each other? # yeah, yeah, yeah. # as politicians? we have always got on and that no the truth is, that is today we can exclusively reveal that the next what is so misleading about it, contestant to take part is... ..libby clegg, the gold medal winning paralympian because 99% of the time, 99% of the who is registered blind. people in parliament get on very libby is not only a champion well with each other, including athlete, but she's also an mbe and she only had a baby five people right on one extreme and and a half months ago. right on the other extreme. the what are you signing up to?! problem is a lot of what the public see is these kind of exchanges. she's with us now to talk about taking on one of the biggest problem is a lot of what the public see is these kind of exchangeslj think see is these kind of exchanges.” think there is a great paradox here challenges of her career so far. that the modern world was supposed thank you for coming in. and your to be one of diversity and interconnection and supposed to make guide dog hattie who is sitting us more interconnection and supposed to make us more collectively intelligent, here. i did stroke her earlier! this and we have seen the emergence of echo chambers were people online and is amazing, congratulations. why did you decide to sign up? to be honest, beyond surround themselves with people who look and think like after rio, i obviously achieved my themselves. there is also the ultimate goal, double paralympic phenomenon of the algorithms inside, for example, google's search gold medallist, world record invisibly personalising our searches so we see more holder... what else to do? so i invisibly personalising our searches so we see more of what we want to see and we are not exposed to decided to have a baby on this diverse opinions that can help the opportunity came about and i nuance, finesse and improve our couldn't pass it up. i love
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ideas. there has also been a great down interest so when we are exposed challenging myself and experiencing to alternative opinions, for new things and... do it on the ice! example, across the dispatch box, we tend to immediately reject what they are saying, not because we reject can you skate? i've only skated a their opinion but we reject their couple of times before, long time ago, i'm ok. i'm not quite sure how ideological identity. in a few debates i have heard people coming i'm going to do. this is incredible up debates i have heard people coming up with an assertion and the group on two levels, not only did you have will ponder it and someone will say, a baby five and a half months ago, hang on, are you a remainer or a which is incredible, your body is leaver? in other words, still changing. still getting back hang on, are you a remainer or a leaver? in otherwords, i hang on, are you a remainer or a leaver? in other words, i will only ta ke leaver? in other words, i will only take your opinion, data, evidence to where it was before. and you are still competing. yes, i have the seriously if i trust your position. when there is a breakdown in trust, world championships in november. and when trust becomes tribal, that is a the olympics. next year, fingers fundamental problem for our democracy. i want to bring in kim, crossed! so you don't want to be because this must have been an getting injured, clearly. definitely incredibly difficult week for you, not. have you got a partner, what is hearing your sisterjo cox's name brought up in the house, some people the regime like? how it's going to work, you have to do 30 hours of would say, for political gain, what training first and then you normally have your feelings been about the last few days? it has been a very meet your professional skater. basically, for me, it's all about emotionalfew last few days? it has been a very emotional few days last few days? it has been a very emotionalfew days for last few days? it has been a very emotional few days for myself and my pa rents emotional few days for myself and my building up that trust, that parents and for all of my sister's communication and relationship with
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my partner because that will be key on the ice. let's talk about this, when you are running come you have a guide runner, explain how it works. friends and family. we all need to think about how we can draw a line when i'm on the track i have a under the last few days and sign up to treating each other with more blindfold and a guide attached to me respect and understanding. there is by the wrist and everything has to a lot of voices saying that thing, be in sync. we have a lot of verbal which is excellent to hear. i have communication, which is really important, the description and also absolutely no political allegiance we have some physical communication andi absolutely no political allegiance and i have absolutely no agenda as well stop which is really minute other than trying to make something positive come from our family's like the pressure from his elbow or the tilt of a hand that can give me horrific situation. and i think we need more voices of reason coming a lot of indication of where i am on through in the middle who actually the track and what i need to do wa nt to through in the middle who actually want to calm the situation down next. so your partner needs to rather than add fuel to the fire. i basically do that as well question a nswer think it will only change if basically do that as well question answer trust is the key? trust, yes. everybody takes responsibility. we it's going to be absolutely crucial that i have that relationship with are lacking leadership in politics, my partner because it is going to we are lacking moral leadership at make a huge difference on the ice. the moment, and i think we need to obviously i won't be able to see where i'm going as well, so it's all look to our politicians to reset going to be extra important that i the parameters around how they behave. but it will only change if feel safe. how much will you be able to see when you're skating? probally everybody does it and it will also only change if the media takes some
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not very much at all! i have a loss responsibility for how they behave as well and the things they report. of central vision anyway and i have one of the things i always do is try and see both sides of things and try some use of my peripheral vision in and see both sides of things and try my left eye, not much in my right and be very balanced and objective, but that doesn't make the headlines eye at all, just pretty much because it's a bit too boring and movement. everything feels quite beige and the media has a closed in. it's a new challenge. i'm responsibility to focus, as somebody has said come on the positive stuff just so excited to have a go and see where it takes me! you will be doing that goes on in parliament. mps have lifts and stuff? yes, i'm not a responsibility, the media has a responsibility, as do the rest of us to move forward from this in a worried about those. what are you civilised, respectful manner. worried about those. what are you worried about? my feet won't be on bishop, i want to bring you in the floor! it they will have to be because you felt strongly enough strong and support you. at the about this to write this letter. moment, i'm not nervous about explain the thinking from all of the anything, i'm just more excited. but bishops and archbishops in england to sign this letter and call for to obviously when it comes to the live shows, i think i will be really, language, more understanding, bishop really scared! will it be difficult, the world champs in november, they will be gone but you will be on a helen—ann. language, more understanding, bishop helen-ann. language itself is training schedule for the olympics. perform true, there is the phrase will it be difficult to marry the that actions speak louder than words but in this instance i think it is two together? my coach is absolutely amazing and i have discussed it with words that do matter. the bishops' statement has been issued in the him, how the training for the context where it is a bit like a skating will work and my trackwork.
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family argument that has gone we are going to be able to combine really, really toxic and really wrong, and we are calling for a some of the stuff from skating that will translate quite well into my sense of humility, of moderation, of really coming together at a time when the country needs that moral running. so obviously posture, core, glued strength, those things i'll be leadership, as kim just said. there doing in skating will marry up quite is the phrase, do unto others as you nicely to my athletics training as would have them do to you, which i think a something shed across the well. so hopefully, some of it will cross over, which will be great. the board by people of all faiths and big question, will you do a none and if jesus board by people of all faiths and none and ifjesus was sitting in the studio with you now that's one of head—banger? the one where they threw up and spin you around? don't the things he would say. —— shared know about that! i'm just intrigued across the board. and the tone to know how much i can push myself between rupa huq and nick boles and and see how far i can get. i'm not i want to compare do not commend them for that and we need more of going to rule anything out, that at this time. that is the definitely. i'm up for anything. do context broadly the bishops' status you have a partner you particular isissued context broadly the bishops' status is issued into. i want to read you you have a partner you particular you want? i don't mind, i'm quite some messages coming in from our easy going about a lot of things. viewers. christopher on twitter just a man who is quite patient because they will have to learn to says, borisjohnson was right to use describe things in a different way the term surrender document and save to what they are probably used to, humbug. he hasn't got anything to more verbal description rather than apologise for just to appease the hurt feelings of lefty snowflake mps visual. best of luck, first of all who brought up jo at the world athletic championships hurt feelings of lefty snowflake mps who brought upjo cox to score political points. how about our mps in november. and in dancing on ice. just deliver brexit asap? andy on thank you for coming in. hattie,
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e—mail says, i'm tired of being called unpleasant names merely for thank you for being beautifully behaved. bbc newsroom live is coming up the offence of voting leave, racist, behaved. bbc newsroom live is coming up next stop thank you for your company and for all your messages can have a lovely day and we will be xenophobic, stupid, ill educated, back at the same fascist. these insults are baseless and also vicious. richard says, we time on monday. are all guilty of using inappropriate language. social media has made it so much easier. we all need to moderate our language. threats of violence are never a cce pta ble threats of violence are never acceptable in any walk of life. martin raises a point, i support the hello, good morning. a lot of practice partied in what is showers out there at the moment, considered to be a remain primarily across western parts of constituency and i feel unable to the uk but they are moving their way express my opinions or views for eastward. quite cloudy skies here in the isle of wight. showers not too fear of abuse and i am a silent far away and this band of showers supporter. —— i support the brexit party. i fear my business will be and longer spells of rain will move affected if i declare my views. it is clear this goes beyond eastward as we go through the rest of today. quite gusty winds, parliament, doesn't it? but do you agree that parliament sets the tone particularly around the southwest. here and mps like yourselves need to 40-45 particularly around the southwest. 40—45 miles an hour wind gusts. the calm this down? yes, that's rain is quite heavy in places but definitely true. how do you do it? for western parts, as the rain clears away, there will be some the truth is that what happens very sunny spells breaking through. quickly words and phrases that are maximum temperature is about 14—18.
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used in parliament and used on pmqs what about the weekend? staying by whomsoever most immediately pop u nsettled, what about the weekend? staying unsettled, low pressure still there, up by whomsoever most immediately pop up on by whomsoever most immediately pop upona a few weather systems moving by whomsoever most immediately pop up on a tweet that you get that night and then may be a death threat eastward before this area of low that you get by e—mail. it happened pressure m oves eastward before this area of low pressure moves in three saturday literally just yesterday to jess night into sunday because of some uncertainty as to how far north or phillips, the labour mp, that she received a death threat that used a south the rain and winds will move specific phrase that the prime minister had used only a few days but you can see for many of us over before. so we have all got to be the weekend, it looks really quite wet at times. strong winds and those very careful in the words we use. temperatures down a little bit, especially during sunday. bye—bye. but the strange thing is, i represent a very, very strongly leave constituency and i voted remain. i've tried to get a brexit deal through but i'm not somebody who is willing to put up with no—deal brexit and i've left my party over it, so i have taken some fairly controversial steps. i'm about to go to my constituency to do some surgeries. ever since i left my party everybody has been lovely, nobody has shouted at me, this is in real life, on the street, in the you're watching bbc newsroom live — it's11am and these are the main surgery. real life, on the street, in the surgery. it is not true for all mps. stories this morning: other mps have had people coming up shouting at them. it happens, but
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i'm glad to say it is still very the prime minister's top advisor, dominic cummings says it's "not rare. even the atmosphere around surprising" some people are angry parliament is quite toxic. the with mps over brexit, entrance we take out of westminster saying parliament hasn't respected tube, there are people with placards the result of the referendum. saying, we voted to leave, get on with it. the public is frustrated it comes as more than 100 church of england's bishops warn with it. the public is frustrated politicians on all sides not with what is going on. but there is to further ‘entrench divisions' in society. about ten different ways of leaving, in the us, a cia officer is reported to be the whistle—blower whose i'io about ten different ways of leaving, no deal, parliament keeps voting claims have prompted impeachment against. we just need to find a proceedings against president trump. reasonable sustained promotes and if you have two sides with their arms a watchdog report finds tens folded, someone has got to budge. of thousands of people working for the police in england and wales shouting abuse at each other.m folded, someone has got to budge. shouting abuse at each other. it is have not been properly vetted. not going to continue like this and we have a prime minister who doesn't really wa nt we have a prime minister who doesn't really want to... he is very and on tour in africa, prince harry uncompromising and that's not going walks through a partially—cleared to work. there is an important minefield in angola — 22 years after his mother phenomenon psychologically called cognitive dissonance when you have two groups, one adamantly leave and the other adamantly remain and new evidence comes in, they tend to selectively cherry pick the evidence that suits their argument and therefore become more and more polarised, and we are seeing that a lot. nick made an important point about the ad hominem attack were instead of assessing the data, you
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start to attack the person. to use a sporting metaphor, playing the person rather than the ball. there isa person rather than the ball. there is a lesson for all of us. just listening to some of those tweets, the polarisation is incredible. we do want to surround ourselves with opinions that suit our own. it reflects our own world view back to us, it is validating. we become more creative, i think, us, it is validating. we become more creative, ithink, more open—minded and empathetic when we are prepared notjust to hear other and empathetic when we are prepared not just to hear other views and empathetic when we are prepared notjust to hear other views but and empathetic when we are prepared not just to hear other views but to listen to them and grow in our capacity to innovate and to compromise. i wanted to just bring in kim. i know when reading these m essa 9 es in kim. i know when reading these messages out you were nodding away. i think it's important while our mps are here for you to say what lead you would like mps, from the prime minister, in light of the experiences you and your family have gone through in losing jo cox?” think what is good as we're having this conversation, that's a really good starting point and fantastic the mps have come and join the conversation and others across the
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political spectrum have done likewise today. it is about personal responsibility for everyone, but particularly the politicians and the leaders of the country at the moment to think about the actions they take and the language they use. for me again this is across the political spectrum, cross the brexit debate. there no side to be taken from my perspective on what we are doing through the jo cox foundation perspective on what we are doing through thejo cox foundation is trying to find a way through the middle of this, trying to establish a standard of behaviour that all politicians sign up for and we are doing a lot of work on that and would appreciate support from across the political spectrum. it is about, like people have said, taking a breath, taking a step back before you press send or open your mouth, is it adding to the discussion or moving the debate forward? we are so polarised at the moment that we need to reign things in again and also acknowledge that what happened tojo is very real and happened not that long ago and ourfamily is very real and happened not that long ago and our family will never be the same again. we must not forget that but what we must not do is use what happened tojo as a way
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of silencing debate or as a way of political point scoring and i find that very worrying and it's the last thing jo would want and the last thing jo would want and the last thing we want as a family, but that's difficult to get the balance right. it happened, an mp was murdered, she was shot and stabbed to death, let's not forget that as a country, we don't want to live in a country, we don't want to live in a country where things like that happen. but equally, i don't want to see politicians from any party using jo's name to score points and add to the toxicity of the debate rather than enhance it and move it forward. bishop helen—ann, what you want to see politicians do now?” bishop helen—ann, what you want to see politicians do now? i think there needs to be humility, there needs to be listening and generosity andl needs to be listening and generosity and i do think that at some point there needs to be some sense of apology and forgiveness. this is not about one person one party. it's about one person one party. it's about the whole way in which the parliamentary democracy works and they need to engage positively, particularly at this time, which is
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critical in our national and public life. briefly, nick boles, rupa huq, do you think that you as mps, all mps, should sign up to a pledge agreeing to moderate language? yes, certainly. but actually more than signing up to a pledge, what i hope that we can do is take the, to me, extraordinary example set by kim leadbeater and brandon cox, jo cox's widower, who frankly have every reason in the world to feel hatred and angerand a reason in the world to feel hatred and anger and a desire for vengeance and anger and a desire for vengeance and the way they have behaved in the last three years has been one of the most remarkable displays of sort of humanity and principle and moral depth. i think we can sign as many pledges as you like, but let's just try and behave a bit more like them. i would agree with that. i knewjo and it is still very difficult to process, our generation who came in with her, i knew her a bit before. i
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would say the house of commons is resistant to change on some things and has the most bizarre rules, only as recently as 2015, all the clerks would have wakes and they wrote all the statutes on parchment made out of calfskin. should a pledge to be signed up to buy mps to moderate language? yeah, i would sign that and the fish rots from the head down and the fish rots from the head down and we have a prime minister of this deliberate strategy of dog whistle politics and he is saying these things on purpose. i had to leave after paula sherriff actually because it wasjust after paula sherriff actually because it was just so difficult to because it was just so difficult to be there. people were saying, stop using this term, surrender bill, it is an act of parliament and has been passed by our mps and he was doing it almost like a swear box, like he was getting rewards from dominic cummings every time he said it. he was saying it to provoke. the prime minister has said he will continue to use it. if he doesn't change, it starts from the top. thank you all for coming in and thank you for your time.
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still to come — why dozens of bame broadcasters have signed an open letter to the bbc, asking it to reconsider its ruling against breakfast‘s naga munchetty over comments she made about donald trump. if you're a fan of dancing on ice, stay watching, we will be exclusively revealing the next contestant to take part in a few minutes. it's five days since thomas cook went bust, leaving thousands of employees around the world without a job. many say they weren't warned that theirjobs were at risk. we have now been told exclusively that more than 100 former workers are taking legal action to see whether the company failed in its duty to keep staff informed when the business collapsed. lawyers say that thousands could be due a windfall payment. claire hoang is a former employee at thomas cook and aneil balgobin is from the law firm simpson millar and is bringing
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about the case. hi, thank you for coming in. claire, thank you forjoining us on the line. tell us about yourjob at thomas cook and how you found out the company was in trouble.” thomas cook and how you found out the company was in trouble. i worked in the airline side so i kind of ran the social media pages over there. soi the social media pages over there. so i have kind of been monitoring the situation. as a business we had kind of knowing that it was a bit up—and—down but we were hoping it had been resolved, there was a deal on the table, it was a really good deal and we were hoping it was all sorted out. and about a week ago it seemed there were a lot of rumblings and a lot of things in the media. last friday, we were given a bit more of, actually, we don't know where this is going to end up. and i was literally watching social media on sunday morning, really early in the morning with everybody else, and gotan e—mailat 1am the morning with everybody else, and got an e—mail at 1am to say you have got an e—mail at 1am to say you have got nojob.
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got an e—mail at 1am to say you have got no job. what does it do to you in that moment? what is the initial reaction? panic, is it anger? it is a little bit of shell shock. we are a little bit of shell shock. we are a family. we came into this business, we supported each other, we we re business, we supported each other, we were told on e—mails the leaders we re we were told on e—mails the leaders were doing their best to get a deal over the line, and to be honest, i didn't think the government would let us down. i didn't think anyone would say we are not going to support you. we are such a large number of people. so you are shell—shocked. you suddenly go, do i go into the office? i was one of the lucky people who knew what was going on because i was reading e—mails at one o'clock in the morning. a lot of people were not and i've heard of a lot of people who were travelling, or they were in the air and they even have —— haven't even had the monday morning debrief and even that was we are going to read a cole statement out to you, pack up your bags, leave your computers and off
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you go. what does it mean for you financially? have you been paid for the work you have done? do you get any redundancy payment? how is it working? this is one of the things we are looking at. we were supposed to be paid, we are not going to be. cash flow is going to be a lot —— a massive issue for a lot of stuff. i am one of the rare lucky ones, my husband works, i worked freelance so i kind of know the issues. there are people whose entire families worked for thomas cook. so they have no income coming in. they don't have any money coming to support them and they don't know when their nextjob is going to come along. so it does feel a bit like the rug has been pulled from under our feet. tell us what you decided to get involved in this legal action. i think, for me, we had felt let down by a lot of people and i almost understand from the managers' point of view and from the managers' point of view and from the leaders' point of view, six
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months ago we had a deal, a month ago rbs and lloyds suddenly pull out this demand they want £200 million. £200 million is not money you find down the back of the sofa so we understand it was a very, very tense time. but even then over the weekend we we re time. but even then over the weekend we were still thinking, ok, the government is going to let us —— isn't going to let us down. the taxpayers shouldn't have to pay for this, the taxpayers will have to pay for this anyway. they have two choices, they could have spent it rescuing, repatriating 160,000 rescuing, repatriating160,000 travellers who were out there, plus they are going to have to pay now for 9500 people who are coming into the system as benefits. the 9500 people who are no longer paying tax into the system. so, this is why i was like, there are two ways we can go about this. we can either sit back and look shell—shocked or we can do something about it for ourselves because we need to get together, our leaders have failed us, the safety net we were hoping we
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would have, the government has failed us, so let's do this, let's try and see, this law is in place to deal with these sorts of things and let's ta ke deal with these sorts of things and let's take advantage of it and work together because we work together as afamily and together because we work together as a family and let's do that. let's talk about that law with aneil, explain what this law is. this law is for thomas cook employees to access pay. because thomas cook falls into two camps, those who were told to pack up on the 21st of september, monday, and those who are doing some run—off work, be it repatriation or helping the business winds down. those who are they were told to basically pack your bags were not given consultation. that is where the law kicks in. if thomas cook was a trading company and they were making redundancies, they would have to
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call people in, tell them they were at risk of redundancy and have a mandatory period of consultation. because that hasn't happened, the law steps in. while these employees could get all an award of up to 90 days gross pay, effectively 13 weeks, people say what is the point of that? thomas cook is bust. this is where there is a national insurance fund. claire made some interesting points. on social media we get pushback, why should taxpayers pay? people forget these 9000 plus thomas cook employees are taxpayers. they have been paying in for this sad eventuality. so where does the money come from? from national insurance. just to be clear, there are some other payments. what we're talking about and what the legal action is about. it is not straightforward. they need to getan it is not straightforward. they need to get an employment tribunal judgment to unlock this payment but there are other payments that are spoon—fed to them that are easier for them to get. if they have two yea rs, for them to get. if they have two years, they are entitled to statutory redundancy payment, based
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ona statutory redundancy payment, based on a formula, the longer you serve, the older you are potentially the more you will get. that is from the national insurance fund as holiday that people are owed, they can access that as well. it is all capped at £525 a week. also, their notice period and that is based on the length of service up to maximum of 12 weeks. typically, the case we are bringing is seeking to unlock this eight weeks at £525, of which the people who were let go on monday are probably going to have some money because they have not been paid for september. my understanding from the literature i've is people who are being kept on will be paid for september, in the normalfashion and beyond, potentially up to the end of october. you have more than 100 former thomas cook employees you are representing, do you expect more to come forward? yes. the unions are involved as well. pilots, cabin crew, they would be covered off by
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trade unions. where we are getting a lot of traction, claire and others, peterborough, 1000 people in hq there. always first port of call, if you are pilot or cabin crew or working another organised industry, get in touch with your union first if you don't fall in that bracket, get in touch with lawyers, including ourselves. claire, as you talk to your friends and colleagues at work, many of them getting involved in this legal action as well? well, so, the reason it kind of started is i set upa the reason it kind of started is i set up a linkedln group to try and help us get together and find out newjobs. then help us get together and find out new jobs. then when help us get together and find out newjobs. then when i found out there was an organisation that we could get money... we didn't even know that, a lot of us didn't know this existed. i have kind of set up a group now as well on facebook to get people to work together, because you actually need about 20 people from each location for stop so there is lots of little kind of thomas
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cook bases of people who are not in the unions because they are not pilots, they are people working in marketing, admin, people working in it. so for us to get together, we need groups. i set up a facebook group which i've mercenary called money for thomas cook star. the whole point of that is to get us together so that we have more than 20 people at each race who are eligible and can go forward and work together as a team, as a big group, together as a team, as a big group, to kind of get as much of this as we can. to support us. we are not being greedy, we just literally need it because there are staff with no income, staff who are relying on vouchers from abta charity to survive in a day—to—day basis. further down the line, it might be that every penny helps. thank you both for speaking to us today. black and asian figures in broadcasting, including lenny henry, david harewood
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and adrian lester, have written an open letter to the bbc, questioning its decision to uphold a complaint against bbc breakfast‘s naga munchetty over on air comments she made about president trump. we have seen the letter and it condemns the bbc‘s decision, saying that it "amounts to a misunderstanding of the bbc‘s editorial guidelines and a form of racially discriminatory treatment." the signatories want the bbc to seriously consider overturning its decision. naga munchetty and her co—presenter, dan walker, were talking about this tweet from donald trump, where he talks about four bame democratic congresswomen and said, "why don't they go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came." this is the conversation that followed. every time i have been told as a woman of colour to go home, to go back to where i came from, that was embedded in racism. now, i'm not accusing anyone of anything here but you know what certain phrases mean. are you still told that? do you get that? do you hear that regularly? yes. not regularly. but, you know, i've been told that.
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i know that you're sitting here not giving an opinion, but how do you feel, then, as someone who's been told that before when you hear that from... furious. ..when you hear that from him? absolutely furious. and i can imagine that lots of people in this country will be feeling absolutely furious that a man in that position feels it's ok to skirt the lines with using language like that. the bbc says that its editorial guidelines "do not allow for journalists to give their opinions about the individual making the remarks or their motives for doing so — in this case, president trump". we asked the bbc for an interview but they wouldn't give us anyone to talk to. the bbc‘ director of editorial policy, david jordan, was on the today programme this morning and said the ruling did not say that naga munchetty was wrong to react to clearly racist language if racist language is used by anyone, by anyone, whether it is president trump or anyone else, and it's clearly racist language, racist trope, which is well known to be such, it should be described as such.
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you've got a hell of a repairjob to do with non—white members of staff, and indeed, lots of people in the public who are outraged by this judgement. well, i think they need to understand, to be honest, the judgement on what it did say and what it didn't say. and what it didn't say, emphatically did not say, that naga munchetty was wrong to react to what is clearly a racist form of language and also to the effect it would have on people like her, people of colour the uk. joining me now isjournalist and broadcaster afua hirsch — she is the organiser and one of the signatories of the letter from bame broadcasters, actors and celebrities, calling on the bbc to reverse it's ruling. thank you forjoining us. first of all, just outline the concerns you have with this ruling. this ruling legitimises racist opinions by suggesting they should be treated impartially. by saying naga munchetty breached the guidelines of impartiality by clearly expressing an opinion on the author of these remarks, the bbc is suggesting we should take comments like this, like
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the ones president trump made, which we re the ones president trump made, which were acknowledged throughout the mainstream media worldwide as racist, and not express a view. in my opinion, that is wrong for several reasons. number one of which it isa several reasons. number one of which it is a misunderstanding of the bbc‘s own guidelines. the guidelines they presented should be impartial but there are exceptions to that. one of those exceptions is when it comes to fundamental principles. i would say racism falls into that category. so i think it is a very dangerous precedent and apart from misunderstanding its own guidelines, it suggests to people like me, i work for the bbc, i'm not employed staff that many people who signed this letter, we do work with and for the bbc and we care about the bbc deeply as an institution and we feel this ruling sends a message that our presence on the bbc is conditional on as acting as if do not have a sta ke on as acting as if do not have a stake in overtly racist comments. david jordan said it is absolutely
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a cce pta ble david jordan said it is absolutely acceptable within the bbc plasma editorial guidelines for presenters to call out racist comments. the problem here was the assumptions are the remarks. it says the corporation saysisin the remarks. it says the corporation says is in its editorial guidelines, they do not allow the journalist to give their opinions about the individual making the remarks or their motives for doing so, in this case president trump. we didn't play the full exchange so for our audience to see this, we will look at the full exchange now. it feels like a thought out strategy, to strengthen his position. it's not enough to do it just to get attention. he is in a responsible position. anyway, i'm
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not here to give my opinion. and thatis not here to give my opinion. and that is the point because it actually says in theirjudgment that 00:40:08,957 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 naga munchetty was absolutely
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