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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  September 27, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm martine croxall. today at 2pm: downing street is accused of using aggressive language that incites violence. former cabinet minister amber rudd criticises some of number 10's tactics as immoral but borisjohnson denies his language is divisive. can you use words like surrender to describe a certain act, a certain bill? and quite frankly, i think that she can. meanwhile, the snp suggest they could accetheremy corbyn as a caretaker prime minister. cleveland — the police force so bad it's putting the public at risk, according to inspectors. calls for the bbc to overturn its ruling against its presenter naga munchetty over remarks she made about president trump. and following in his mother's footsteps — prince harry walks through a partially cleared
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minefeld in angola. coming up on afternoon live all the sport with john. world atheltics championships in doha getting underway... they are due to start any minute now, out into hat, agitate, by the heat and he militates proving as much a talking point as much the track. thanks john and stav has all the weather. unsettled weekend in prospect. we had very heavy showers around this afternoon, blustery winds, too. a little bit of sunshine, a rainbow behind me. as we head on into the weekend, something very disruptive. we could see in gales and heavy rain, all leading to some travel disruptions. i will have all the detail a bit later on. thanks, stav. also coming up — we'll talk to a travel writer as saudi arabia announces it'll open its doors to international tourists as part of a broader push to cut its dependence on oil.
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hello, everyone, this is afternoon live. the former cabinet minister amber rudd has accused number 10 of using aggressive language that "does incite violence". in a newspaper interview, she said some downing street tactics over brexit are immoral, with a "casual approach" to the safety of mps and their staff. borisjohnson, though, on a visit to a hospital this morning, defended the words he uses. our political correspondent jonathan blake reports. he is not talking about events at westminster, but extraordinary would not be a bad word used this week. the prime minister visiting a hospital in essex this morning, denied he was exploiting divisions of the brexit. on the contrary, i think what we need to do now is to get brexit done by october the 31st
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and i genuinely think that once you do that, then so much of the heat and the anxiety will come out of the debate. i think a lot of people are very tense, i think businesses are still uncertain and get it done, i think we will all be able to move on. attracting anger from many in westminster, this man, man, dominic cummings, the prime minster‘s senior adviser. confronted by one mp yesterday. and this morning, the man behind the successful vote leave campaign, asked to clarify comments he made last night. it does not look like a walk in the park, does it? walk in the park? yes. who said it would be a walk in the park? you said it, last night at book launch. here is what he said.
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in a week where mps have spoken about fears for their safety, dominic cummings said threats of violence should be taken seriously. but it was not surprising, he said, that people were angry, given that mps had spent three years swerving all over the shop, as he put it, after the referendum result. his comments sum up a government strategy to deliver brexit by the end of october, come what may, and present anything parliament does as getting in the way. we will not betray the people who sent us here. government has failed to silence our democracy. for some in westminster and beyond, the state of debate is now unacceptable. it is a bit like a family argument that has gone really,
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really toxic and really wrong. we are calling for a sense of humility, of moderation, of really coming together at a time in the country needs that moral leadership. yet more criticism has come from the former working pensions secretary, amber rudd. who has said the prime minister's words incite violence. tactics, as well as language, are under scrutiny. another warning from a former prime minister over an attempt by the current pm to get around the law requiring a brexit extension. if this route is taken, if this route is taken, it will be a vagrant defiance of parliament and utterly disrespectful to the supreme court. it will be a piece of political chicanery that no one should ever forgive or forget. downing street has again insisted it will obey the law and leave the eu by october the 31st.
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our political correspondentjessica parker is at westminster. how are amber rudd to's comments being viewed? look, these comments are being viewed? look, these comments a re pretty being viewed? look, these comments are pretty strong and stinging in terms of this debate. it has really engulfed westminster this week, over the use of language. just depended on elizabeth context, it was that wednesday night debate that got particularly heated, where boris johnson repeatedly prepare to an act thatis johnson repeatedly prepare to an act that is designed to stop a new deal brexit as they surrender act. he talks about not betraying leave voters and a number of mps or opposition mps raised their concerns about the language being used and the fact that they often face abuse, even death threats. amber rudd begin to the evening standard, asked if number ten‘s languages petting people against parliament and inciting balanced she said, it does.
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it is the sort of language people think that it is a more aggressive approach and sometimes violent. but government sources have said to me that amber rudd is actually being deeply disingenuous on a boat load of issues and that she is on the movers. looking elsewhere, tells a bit about the smp‘s the of who might make a good caretaker prime minister showed meet need one. so, this week as well as other debate about language, there has been a discussion amongst opposition parties about how they would go about preventing a new deal brexit. yes, they have passed the axe, referred to by borisjohnson is the surrender act, some people say more needs to be done among the options is building down boys needs to be done among the options is building down bostohnson‘s government with a boat of no confidence and potentially instilling some sort of caretaker prime minister who would definitely ask for an extension to brexit, deficit delayed and then call a snap election a lot of hesitancy in four
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example the liberal democrat camp, as to whether not they would want to installjeremy corbyn into number ten the lib dems are semi—absolutely do not want to do that. but the snp seem to be opening the door more and more to that possibility. source i have spoken to had been vitally of could be for two purposes only and would be time—limited to get another referendum on brexit. the former leader of the scottish conservatives, richard davidson, suggesting today this is all about tried to bargain for another referendum on brexit and scottish independence. the brexit secretary, steve barclay, is meeting the european union's chief negotiatior, michel barnier, in brussels today, amid growing pessimism in the eu about the possibility of a deal. last night, mr barnier told senior diplomats he was still waiting for workable proposals on managing the border between northern ireland and the republic. our europe correspondent kevin connolly is in brussels.
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why the growing pessimism? well, not for the first time there is something of a disjuncture, if you like, between what you hear in london and in brussels. so, there is talk in london that negotiations are seeking a pace, talk of cautious optimism, a sense, if you like, that things are happening here, which people are saying and what we heard from the nish primus earlier today, his country was irritating presidency of the eu at the moment, is that what the uk has produced so far for short of what the once, which is something that would be a complete replacement in every particular of the celebrated irish backstop. ireland's foreign minister has been time people this afternoon that there is still significant gaps between the two sides and of course the sense here in brussels, the real message that steve barclay body giving today, it will be no surprise
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to him of course, is tight and it's getting tighter. but it was only, was it last week? that it was said... it implied there was some sort of room for manoeuvre.” said... it implied there was some sort of room for manoeuvre. i think the keywords that was emotionally, legally and politically he is very attached to the backstop and all the eu means by this is let, if you can find something which does everything that the backstop does, which is to keep the border open, to maintain peace in ireland and to protect the integrity of the singer market, then that would be fine. but i think what they are really implying there is that there is not really anything else which can't do that in their view and it is up to britain to prove them wrong. so far, they say, the british proposals short. so, then, it seems that downing street
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because my position that this is how negotiate. you make it clear whether it is possible in westminster are not like living on the 31st of october despite the act, how are nerves holding up within the eu? well, it is an adjusting question. who really has a sense that they know how that is going to play out. they are not really talking in terms ofan they are not really talking in terms of an extension, they are still focusing on negotiating process. i do not think there are really any circumstances in which they would refuse a request for an extension if it were to come sincerely from london. but they do not know what borisjohnson's tactics london. but they do not know what boris johnson's tactics are they do not know what the british government is going to do at the end of october. so, there is a real sense that time is running out and that it is not clear what the landing point for these negotiations is really going to be. they have said all along, they have been saved for months now, that they do not want a
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new deal brexit, of course, but they are prepared for 14 they have done the paperwork and laid the political ground right, they have done legal stuff. so, if it happens, they said they said they are ready. but it would be a lose— lose solution, those of the word you often hear around here. thank you very much. a spending watchdog has warned that ministers still have a lot of work to do to ensure the supply of vital medicines to the nhs and care sector if there's a no deal brexit. the national audit office says there are still ‘significant gaps‘ in the government's plans, and that leaving without a deal presents a risk for the nhs. the department of health and social care claims everything is being done to make sure patients do have access to medicines after brexit. katherine da costa reports. some health experts are warning that findable patients in nursing and ca re findable patients in nursing and care homes could be the most at risk from any disruption caused by a new deal brexit. the report today
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highlights at the government has not enabled to get assurances that social care services have made plans to secure the supplies they need. social care services have made plans to secure the supplies they needlj think there are two big risks, one of them is that we know dependence on eu staff has been rising in the social care sector of the last yea rs, if social care sector of the last years, if that turns right and ee stats are leaving, they will be in a very difficult place then, the whole question of products, like they'd and lennon, how exposed is that two experts at the eu? what is the disruption there? even though mps are passed a law to prevent a note about that, this actor has been working on ways to minimise the risks should it happen for stops stockpiling six weeks of medicine and supplies, to arranging extra freight capacity and alternative cross—channel rates. a new deal bags that could cause serious disruption to medical supplies, not least because of the 12,300 medicines licensed for use in the uk, around
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7000 come from or by eu countries. the government's own worst case scenario is that a note deal brexit could mean cross—channel goods are cut by up to 60%. it is about getting additional ports on stream, there will be six or seven additional ports, so we will not be going primarily for dover calais. in fa ct, going primarily for dover calais. in fact, this report shows that 25% of my members have already moved away from dover calais, because of the concerns about those blockages. the national audit office has the government has already done an enormous amount to manage the basques, but there are still significant work to be done. they next for weeks will be crucial in getting a place those... we also heard from trade bodies and representatives that they still need more practical information from government on things like exactly what they have to do to comply with new processes that might be in place at the border. the department of health
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and social care says everything is being done to make sure patients can continue to access medicines after brexit, whatever the circumstances. but with just weeks to go, today's report shows that may be an impossible task. katherine da costa, bbc news. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: downing street is accused by former cabinet minister amber rudd, of using aggressive language that incites violence — but borisjohnson denies his words are divisive. snp leader, nicola sturgeon, suggests the party could accept jeremy corbyn as a caretaker prime minister to prevent a no—deal brexit. a police watchdog says cleveland police has been putting the public at risk as it becomes first force in the uk rated as ‘failing' in all areas. the world athletic championships getting under way, issues over the heat and humidity in the coast city.
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the england... england's piers francis has been cited for a high tackle during yesterday's world cup win. more to come on all of the stories at around half past. cleveland police has become the first force to be classed as "failing in all areas". it's been placed in "special measures" after the inspectorate of constabulary for england and wales rated it as "inadequate" across the board. cleveland's new chief constable says the report is a wake up call but argued the force must be given time to sort out its problems. angus crawford's report contains flashing images. a police service trying... what am i getting arrested for? you're getting arrested to prevent a breach of the peace. officers on the front line, protecting the vulnerable, arresting criminals. but at the most senior levels, failing — rated inadequate
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by inspectors in all areas. a service already dogged by scandal, allegations of racism, illegal monitoring ofjournalists' phones. the inspection found: inappropriate behaviour by senior leaders, lack of strategic direction, and no coherent financial plans. cleveland police simply does not understand the demand that's coming into the organisation. and it's not managing that properly and it's not understanding the vulnerability of some of the people that call for this service and that creates risk to the public. but it's lost 500 offices since 2010 and had six chief constables in almost as many years. the latest only in post for a matter of months. front line staff work extremely hard in cleveland police. i see it, i patrol as much as any chief constable does and i see how they work to protect our members of the public. but our staff members have not been well served by senior leadership in this force,
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providing a direction of what is required and being clear about what is required and a performance regime being set up to hold people to account. a force described by some as broken, one inspectors say needs critical improvement and fast. angus crawford, bbc news. and we'll be talking to barry coppinger, the police and crime commissioner for cleveland, just after four o'clock. the whistleblower at the heart of impeachment investigations against president trump is reported to be a cia officer. he says the white house tried to cover up details of a phone call between mr trump and the president of ukraine, where mr trump asked the ukrainian government to help smearjoe biden, political rival in next year's presidential election. david willis reports. a beleaguered president trump returned to the white house last night. even by the breathless standards of his administration, the last few days have been particularly tumultuous.
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a whistle—blower‘s report maintains not only that mr trump misused the office of the president for personal gain, but that white house officials, alarmed by his request for dirt on democratic rivaljoe biden, then sought to bury the evidence. president trump, seen here with mr zelensky earlier in the week, lashed out publicly and privately at a closed—door event in new york. he suggested that white house staff who spoke about the telephone conversation should be seen as traitors. who is the person who gave the whistle—blower the information? laughter democrats in the house of representatives launched a formal impeachment inquiry earlier this week. on capitol hill, the battle lines are being drawn along party lines.
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this phone call is a nothing burger in terms of a quid pro quo. the president of the united states did not remotely suggest to the ukraine that if you do not do my political bidding against biden, i'm going to cut your off. the president of the united states in his actions on a telephone call with a head of state betrayed his oath of office, our national security and the integrity of our elections. trump: my call was perfect. last night, trump renewed the attack on his political rivals. ijust watched a little bit of this on television. it is a disgrace to our country, it is another witchhunt, here we go again. it is adam schiff and his crew making up stories and sitting there like pious. . .whatever you want to call it. it is just really disgrace. the president is not without his supporters, however. sheriffs from across the us converged on the white house looking
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to raise his spirits at the end of a brutal week. seven days ago, most people in america had yet to hear of mr trump's fatal conversation with the president of the ukraine. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. more than 40 presenters, actors and broadcasters have signed an open letter calling on the bbc to reverse a ruling against breakfast host naga munchetty. she was found to have breached bbc guidelines by criticising president donald trump after he said four female politicians should "go back" to "places from which they came". david sillito reports. bbc breakfast and a question to presenter naga munchetty about donald trump. he'd called for a group of american politicians, all women of colour, to go back to where they came from. every time i have been told, as a woman of colour, to go home, to go back to where i came from, that was embedded in racism. now, i'm not accusing anyone
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of anything here, but there is... you know what certain phrases mean. she was then pressed to discuss the impact of president trump's words. and i can imagine lots of people in this country will be feeling absolutely furious that a man in that position feels it's ok to skirt the lines with using language like that. does that then... do you feel that his use of that... because that was the point i was trying to make, then legitimises other people to use that? yes. and as our guest was saying there, it feels like a thought—out strategy to strengthen his position. and it's not enough to do it just to get a attention. naga munchetty has now been reprimanded for those comments. the bbc‘s executive complaints unit says she was allowed to say the words were racist, but not comment about donald trump. describing a remark as a racist is not the issue at stake here, the issue at stake is whether it was a right to go on to ascribe motive, in this case, to president trump. it could have been to anyone else. it suggests we are impartial on racism. i mean, the bbc isn't impartial on crime. if a crime happens, we call people a criminal.
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what we have to be impartial on is the reasons why those remarks are made. and there was speculation in the programme, which she made, amongst others, about the nature and the reasons of why those comments we re made. and we can't do that, whether it's president trump or whether it's anybody else that we are assessing in that way. but many disagree. a number of bbc journalists have signed a letter, backed by prominent writers, actors and broadcasters, saying the decision must be overturned. it is ludicrous to say it's fine for a presenter to express her own experience of racism, but she shouldn't cast judgment on the person being racist. that's suggesting that, as people of colour who have experienced racism, we can talk about those experiences, but remain impartial about whether we think they're good or not. the bbc complaints unit says it won't change its mind over a decision that has been described in today's letter as having wide—ranging consequences for the whole of the media on how it treats racism. david sillito, bbc news. and let's get more
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on this from david... there is growing support. this letter, more than 40 people had signed it, ithink letter, more than 40 people had signed it, i think that is a fraction of the number who actually support naga munchetty. it is not just about the ins and out of this particular complaint, it is what it says more widely. we the undersigned group of black people who work in media and the uk strongly condemn this finding and assert that it amounts to both a misunderstanding of the bbc editorial guidelines and a form of ritual discriminatory treatment towards be an ae people who work on programming. they talk about essentially devastating consequences for people working here in the bbc and across the wider media, about how racism is treated. can you be impartial on this topic. of course, the issue is quite
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difficult to explain, because the bbc‘s editorial complaints unit is essentially saying it is ok to say the word racist, it is not ok to try and say what we think donald trump was trying to say. of course, all of this is underpinned by the editorial calendar the bbc, which are pinned together over many decades that we all rely on. to tell us what we can and cannot say. it is the issue of your opinions. now, you can't state asa your opinions. now, you can't state as a fact that something as racist, can you definitely say as it that what you think somebody‘s motives are? that is the issue that is a pa rt are? that is the issue that is a part of the complaint. but for the people who signed this letter, essentially, they are saying that the impression it gives was of an organisation that says we can be
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impartial over the issue of racism, that we can note, the way we say we treat crime, for instance was deeply say someone has committed a crime and they are a criminal, somerset someone “— and they are a criminal, somerset someone —— someone said something racist, to become and erase this? thank you very much. a british couple have been jailed for eight years by a portuguese court for drug smuggling on a cruise ship. roger and susan clarke, who are both 72, were caught last year while attempting to smuggle nine kilograms of cocaine, with a street value of a million pounds. damian grammaticas has this report from lisbon. lisbon — beautiful in the autumn sun. last december, a different ship was here. the marco polo, just arrived from the caribbean. in cabin 469, roger and sue clarke, pensioners who took frequent, costly cruises, living beyond their modest income. police had noticed.
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today, the couple, both 72—years—old, were brought to court in handcuffs. sentenced to eight years each for drug smuggling. as the judge spoke, sue dropped her head in tears and roger, also shaken, turned to her and said, "i'll be nearly 80 when i get out. it's ridiculous!" as he left the court, he turned to me and said, "the truth needs to come out. come and visit me in prison." but the truth is the couple have a history. this was roger injail in norway, caught 15 years ago with 200kg of cannabis hidden in his car. and recently frequent trips to jamaica — the photo they took from their hotel, the wedding they attended. but police caught them with these cases. "empty ones for a friend," they said. the drugs officer who raided their cabin found more than £1 million of cocaine in the lining of the bags. translation: at first,
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they acted confident. they said, "you're not going to find anything." but afterwards, they admitted they'd known all along the cases had drugs. now, instead of enjoying their sunset years, the couple may be spending the rest of them behind bars. damian grammaticas, bbc news, lisbon. time for a look at the weather... last week, if you remember, high pressure and the jet stream is made to the north of the uk, we started to the north of the uk, we started to import that warm air permit near continent. by the weekend apparent really warm and imported that french and spanish air. this is a picture from anglesey, unbroken sunshine there. people did head to the beach, that one is a bit empty. i promise you, it was a very summery feel to things. then the autumn equinox arrived on monday. you can see,
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after eight viewed thunderstorms at the weekend, you can see the stormy clouds gathering there on the horizon. there was a massive sign of things to change, things to come during the autumn equinox. bang on q, thejet during the autumn equinox. bang on q, the jet stream during the autumn equinox. bang on q, thejet stream change. we started to see it dive right across the north atlantic. very typical autumn passion, but it really did come on the autumn equinox itself. this jet strea m the autumn equinox itself. this jet stream pattern always steers in low pressure systems towards our choice asa pressure systems towards our choice as a form just to the north. we had as a form just to the north. we had a series of them all. this bus last tuesday, if you remember. that dairy vigorous area of low pressure, the balance of a tropical storm in it and brought some very heavy rain. there was a rainfall deficit across the south—east of england up until the south—east of england up until the last few days. now we are about nearly 90% by richard b. we have made upright now. we were complaining about the rain, people
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had been saying they need rain for the garden and that's only what they had. this is a picture from earlier on, heavy showers moving to the irish sea coast into wales and twice in england. they will be arriving across the east and south—east later today. because billing is flash flooding, in fact. and then come at the weekend, of course, i willjust show you this. the satellite picture shows saturday night and sunday, some tropical air mix at it again. it again. it could be pretty potent. this is the big area of low pressure that we have got over us now. i hugger into the uk broadcast but the radar picture, just to show that cluster of very heavy showers which is raising into parts of wales, western england, at the moment. brambles of under with the showers. merging together cheaperjust longer spells of rain, you will notice that onceit spells of rain, you will notice that once it moves through later this afternoon across eastern and south—east areas that they went is picking up, as well. thus a 42 may be that the miles and are across the south—west coast. a pretty wild
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afternoon in—store. a little bit quieterfor afternoon in—store. a little bit quieter for scotland and northern ireland, the went is not so light. some sunny spells and a few showers. in the evening, that first batch of showers moves away and we see another cluster of showers pushing into western areas. again, some of the quite heavy and it was a pretty blustery for england and wales. for most, temperatures in double figures, but some chilly spots in central and northern scotland. in between weather systems, that is that feature moving in later on saturday. a brief edge of high pressure for saturday means things should be briefly,. they went gradually following lighter through the course of the day. there will be a few showers around, particularly through the morning and into the afternoon that should fizzle out. which is a fair amount of sunshine around, increased sunshine, slightly later went, 16 to 19 degrees, it should not feel to bad. things go downhill very quickly across the south—west, this area of low pressure. some very heavy, widespread rain spreading across parts of england and wales this
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saturday night. polished by some strong gale force went across the south. gusts up to 50 miles an hour in places. butler will continue to made solely eastwards during sunday morning, some dairy wet weather around in central northern, eastern pa rt around in central northern, eastern part of a length. temperature rise, about 15 to 19 degrees. the sunshine will be emerging by the north and west, but a sting in the tail and of this area below as it slides out into the north see. strong mental effects central and issue portions of england. thus abta 60 miles an hour, in fact. this will coincide with high tide along the east coast. because this coastal flooding, as well. very wild began to come, heavy rain and gales likely to cause some disruption. keeping to the bbc local radio subsequent weather forecast. that is offer me. —— that is all from me.
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this is bbc news. our latest headlines... the prime minister is accused of using aggressive language that incites violence in the debate over brexit. former cabinet minister amber rudd criticises some of number 10's tactics as "immoral" but borisjohnson denies his language is divisive. can you use words like surrender to describe a certain act, a certain bill, and quite frankly, i think that you can. meanwhile, the snp suggest they could backjeremy corbyn as a caretaker prime minister. cleveland — a police force so bad it's putting the public at risk, according to inspectors.
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sport now. the world athl;etics championships have started. . . . .and seven the major number for team gb. the name 100s heat is about to get under way. the championships moved back from teh traditional august date because of the heat and humidity, one of the main talking points in the lead up. the air conditioned khalifa international stadium, the first of its kind in the world, staging the event. so temperatures will be much cooler inside the arena. thanks to the cooling system there. lynsey sharp goes in th women's 800m heats in the next hour, morgan lake begins her quest to qualify in the highjump —
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the first medal of the games will be contested in the women's marathon which starts at a minute to midnighht, when temperatures will be at their lowest but still around 31 degrees, spare a thought from —— spare a thought for them. they will not benefit for the air conditioning. i hope they have a long line and before they get started. some surprising news for england cricket. one of their brightest talents. yes, this is desperately sad. england wicketkeeper sarah taylor has retired from international cricket because of her ongoing battle with anxiety. she previously took a break from the game three years ago because of the same issue. she returned to win the world cup with england in 2017 and has been named the best women's t20 player in the world three times. she's also second on the england women's list of run—scorers. those anxiety issues have returned
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which meant that she is retiring from international. chris froome will race in japan next month, his first compettion since his crash at the criterium du dauphine injune the 34—year—old, four—time tour de france winner, broke his femur, elbow and ribs in the carsh that ruled him out of the summer's grand tours. the team ineos rider wasn't expected to be back in action until next year. england hookerjosh hodgson will captain canberra raiders in next weekends nrl grand final. his side beat fellow england international sam burgess' south sydney rabitohs16—10 in this mornings semi—final. england teammates john bateman and elliott whitehead will also feature in canberra's first grand final for 25 years. they'll play either sydney roosters or melbourne storm. some rugby world cup news that england had been expecting, their centre piers francis has been cited for a high tackle in yesterday's world cup win over the united states. he's facing a likely suspension of three matches. it's a rest day at the world cup today, but some big matches coming
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up over the weekend. wales coach warren gatland has named an unchanged side to play australia on sunday in tokyo. what a game that is going to be. there's just one change to the replacements — owen watkin coming in for leigh halfpenny. captain alun wyn jones will win his 130th cap, making him the most capped wales player of all time, he had been level with gethinjenkins wales beat georgia in their first match of the tournament. they would desperately love to come out on top. we will be keeping an eye on those events to come. for myself and have —— for myself and the rest of the team have a good afternoon. saudi arabia is opening its doors to tourists from around the world for the first time. the kingdom is launching visas for 49 countries and relax strict dress codes for female visitors. until now, visas have largely been restricted to pilgrims, business people and expatriate workers. saudi arabia is also hoping to secure foreign investment
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in the tourism industry. it wants tourism to rise from three to 10% of gross domestic product by 2030. lauren keith is a travel writer who has travelled extensively around saudi arabia. she joins via webcam from the capital riyadh. thank you forjoining us. why is saudi arabia doing this now? there isa saudi arabia doing this now? there is a document called vision 2030 that the government put together a few years ago now and tourism has been a key part of diversifying the economy, to make it less dependent on oil. and trying to keep some of the tourism money inside the country from domestic tourists while also inviting international tourist. from domestic tourists while also inviting internationaltourist. what are the attractions for tourists? saudi arabia is a huge country. it is nine times the size of the uk. it has almost 2000 km of coastline
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along the red sea. for cities are great, with wonderful countryside. a highlight of the country would be an archaeological site it is called the second picture i. it was billed by the same ancient civilisation —— it was built by the same organisation. it won't be open until 2020, so international tourists will have to wait. it has the same immaculate hand—carved tombs. it is a very inspiring site. what restrictions will tourist face? they will not have unfettered access to every will they? they should have. non-muslims will not be able to go to mecca and to the medina, but british travellers should follow the guidelines given by the foreign and commonwealth office which currently states that they advise against travelling near the border with
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yemen. behaviour wise, in terms of dress that you can wear? you cannot behave as if you are at home, can you? not exactly. it is! it wasjust announced that the women will not have to wear the full length cloaks that you see most saudi arabian women wearing. it is still requested that as it is dressed modestly. what that as it is dressed modestly. what that usually means is down to the kneesis that usually means is down to the knees is covered and shoulders are covered as well. how will people be able to reconcile their desire to see somewhere new that is just opening up to tourism with the concerns about the human rights record? that is a very good question. it is one that travellers will have to ask themselves and see what the red line is for them. i think that you could argue a lot of
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countries in the world are not blemish free on that issue. i think there is a lot to be learned and i lots of cultural exchange that can travellers can get exploring for themselves. lauren, good to talk to you. lauren keith, thank you very much. prince harry has walked through a partially—cleared minefield in angola, 22 years after his mother, princess diana, did the same. prince harry detonated a landmine at a distance and said that clearing the mines would help the community find peace. our correspondent, pumza fihlani is in cape town in south africa — where the duchess of sussex and four—month—old son archie are staying while prince harry tours angola. the parallels between princess diana's visit our unless capable? entirely. and that is something we
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are getting a really strong sense of as the duke retraces the same path that his mother walked on. what we see have change is that that area where princess diana walks and has now become a bit dealt. it is about to become angola's second city. markets and businesses have sprung up. prince harry was saying that this is an example of what can happen if there is deliberate and considered effort to remove the landmines which pose a real threat to everyday life for people living there. it hampers economic growth. businesses cannot go into certain areas because they do not know where the landmines are. they pose a real risk to people and wildlife. how well received are the royal visitors? can you just say that again please? how well received are
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they? they received a very warm welcome throughout the countries they visited. it is a very special place for him angola because of the special connection that princess diana had to it. it is an important pa rt diana had to it. it is an important part of his visit. he did not want it to just be about cultural exchange. he wants to see that real work and change comes out of this visit. there are people he is meeting today that were part of the entourage that met princess diana. for him, it is also a chance to kind of rebuild the ties and re—communicate to the people as and all that that the uk is still interested in helping whatever effo rts interested in helping whatever efforts need to be made to make sure that that country is safe. and of course the people of the country are
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incredibly grateful and want to build closer relationships and partnerships to make sure the area is saved by 2025 for all the people. pumza fihlani in cape town. jamie is here with the business. we will hear from him injusta here with the business. we will hear from him injust a second. but first i look at the headlines. the prime minister is accused of using aggressive language that incites violence in the debate over brexit. former cabinet minister amber rudd says some of number 10's tactics are "immoral" — but borisjohnson denies his language is divisive. cleveland — a police force so bad it's putting the public at risk, according to inspectors. here's your business headlines on afternoon live... the civil aviation authority says it has now flown a total of 61,000 thomas cook customers back to the uk, taking the total to 40% of passengers. the caa says operation matterhorn will continue until six october with more than 1,000 flights planned in total.
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the bank of england may need to cut interest rates should brexit uncertainty persist, one of its policymakers has said. even if the uk avoids a no—deal brexit, rates may still need to be cut, michael saunders said. interest rates have been on hold at 0.75% since august 2018, when they were raised from 0.5%. the uk housing market is going through an adjustment — leading to more realistic prices — that's according to property website zoopla. the biggest house price fall in august was in aberdeen, where house prices were 4% lower than a year earlier. not a single one of the uk's biggest cities saw annual property growth edge above 5% in august — the first time since 2012 that this has happened. so what has happened to the flotation of peleton, my favourite workout regime?
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this is news to me. with a figure like yours... study on. what is it? i know what it is, but not everybody knows what it is. peloton priced its initial public offering at $29 on wednesday, at the higher end of its expected price range, raising why are you wiggling around. one of the problems is that it is very expensive, it is about $2000 some of these bikes. but they are linked in. if you are interactive on gym training sessions. the problem is you are sitting at home doing it on your own and there is a sense of isolation. when you go to a gym it isolation. when you go to a gym it isa isolation. when you go to a gym it is a social experience. and they are trying to sell this virtual kind of
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experience, which many people believe are not going to be successful. and it has now slipped below 27 dollars which isn't so good. a lot of people are saying a great idea, but where are we going to be able to take this. another interesting thing about it is it is one of these classic technology companies where the growth of revenue is going through the roof, but losses are as well. and they say it is because we are investing lots and lots of many in it it's going to get right eventually... us markets when impeachment is being talked about. historically when presidents get impeached... or there are attem pts get impeached... or there are atte m pts to get impeached... or there are attempts to impeach president, nixon, markets collapsed, but it has much more to do with the oil prices. clinton they tried to impeach, again, it does not seem to have much
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correlation with the markets. don't really react to these political earthquakes. we can talk to our united states political correspondent about this. is a little bit surprising isn't it? we have a bit of a political earthquake going on but the markets of ready casual. that's right. looking up, all the markets are green. they are all the markets are green. they are all up. slightly. markets do not seem rattled. when the news broke, there was a bit of a wobble, but since then the markets have set on the fence. they are not making a decision. if we were to see an impeachment, the traitors here say they would be a significant fall. and president trump tweeted that if he were to be impeach the us markets will crash. i would be more
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interested in corporate news in terms of company profits. there are a couple of things going on. there was the repo market. the federal reserve pumping money into the overnight lending system. there is a series of ipl flaps. not only did we see one cancel their plans. over went public and their sale prices dropped. today we are supposed to see an entertainment company list on the stocking chain, they decided not to do that yesterday. not a lot of appetite among investors. and a gulf between what the companies are achieving in private valuations and public. there is a story we have just been talking about that fits into that sort of scenario. a lot of excitement about it but that actually when push comes to shove,
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all the excitement for peloton disappears. absolutely. peloton was down 11% at the close after opening, listing for the first day. today it has fallen off farther 4% on the nasdaq. the same we saw a lot of hype around another company we work that ended up tumbling from 50 billion to 15. investors chickened out and cancelled plans for an ipl. it isa out and cancelled plans for an ipl. it is a very interesting story on wall street at the moment. thank you very much. you are really excited about those bicycles aren't you?” have seen them in a station i pastor and that is as close as i've ever comes towards them.” and that is as close as i've ever comes towards them. i will not pass comment on that. the pound is the interesting story. is a little bit
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wea ker interesting story. is a little bit weaker today because one of the headlines was about the comments coming out of the bank of england saying that the possibility that we might have a rate cut if we have a no—deal brexit. but even if we do not we might still have to have a cuts to stimulate the economy. join us in our. i will, cuts to stimulate the economy. join us in our. iwill, i look cuts to stimulate the economy. join us in our. i will, i look forward to it. all this week the bbc has been in stoke—on—trent, discovering the stories about what makes the city tick and hearing what matters to the people who live there. our correspondent beccy wood is there this afternoon. tell us a bit more about the stories you've been hearing about? yes, good afternoon. this is one of the six towns that make up this unique city. we have completely taken over the unique city. we have completely ta ken over the city unique city. we have completely taken over the city this week. in the distance we have got our own blue room set up with all the latest technology. and this is our pop up dome. a pop up news room and we are
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asking people to bring us stories. this is an opportunity for people who live here to tell us about the issues that matter to them. to help us at the news agenda. we have had lots of people coming to cs over the past few days. some fantastic ideas. a group of young men who came over from the gold coast to play football at getzen stoke—on—trent players. this is a city well—known for the potteries. there is still a lot of ceramic that are made here and exported around the world. the industry has changed. we caught up with some china painters to find out what they are doing about it. sentiment i have been doing this for about six weeks.
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i have got no artistic skills whatsoever. i was known for a good wash and off. which means it was good, but we will wash it off. i used to meet up at linda for coffee and i said why don't we do something creative. so we came along. and i have never done any art at all. i thought i was in the wrong place here, but she said no, i can teach you. and gmac has.” place here, but she said no, i can teach you. and gmac has. i love teaching. it is good to come and just be able to do this same job and easy pace, it is very relaxing. what has inspired me is keeping the scale
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alive because that, i think, is so important to the city. it is history. is dead now, but there are priced each piece is. sol history. is dead now, but there are priced each piece is. so i think it is nice to do it. colours, they are called colours. if you do not look after them, they consume the damp and when that happens you cannot really use them. you have to keep them dry and warm. that is just one of the many stories that we have already had submitted to us. people still coming through giving us lots of ideas about what they want to see coverage here. there has been lots of talk about pottery, but also other things. people want to talk about the great
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work that community groups do in the city. you can find out more about that on our website. we are going to be here for another day continuing to gather those stories and it does not and they are, the journey will continue. you can follow us on social media as well. just make sure you use the hashtag we are bbc vr stoke—on—trent. you will keep up to date with all of the projects going on in the city. becky wood in stoke—on—trent. time for a look at the weather forecast. let's cross enjoying sam. hello. i set up to end the week like it has been all week can really. because of low pressure we have had some strong winds and localised flooding. the low pressure is with us. it is going to arrive during the week and we have got some tropical moisture and heavy rain and wind. in
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the uk, it looks like it is going to be very windy and wet in the afternoon. bands of heavy rain what's under. the first batch will clear away and then another one will move into western areas this evening and overnight and they will be heavy. with the wind and showers the temperatures will be... that is today's area of low pressure. this is saturday night and sunday. in between there is a bump of high pressure to settle things down. it will be breezy, lots of showers, but into the afternoon as the high pressure begins to clear away the showers it will be dry with lengthy spells of sunshine. in the sunshine, 16 to 19 degrees it will feel pleasant. it will go downhill very quickly. there are signs that low pressure is bringing widespread rain
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and it could cause some flooding as it moves towards the east mainly across england and. there will be a band of strong winds on saturday night in the early hours of sunday 40 to 50 mph. sunday morning it will be wet and windy for most of us. it will be slowly pushing off into the north sea. not too bad for scotland and northern ireland, a few showers. a bit cooler in the north. temperatures in the high teens in the south. it is not done with us yet, that low pressure. they will be a real squeeze and isobars later on on sunday. so gust of 50 to 60 mph. it will coincide with high tides so coastal flooding will be an issue. heavy rain and gail's. stay tuned to your radio or continue to watch the weather forecast. into next week,
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you can see it starts off unsettled with some brief settled whether. high—pressure. it will turn later, windy and milder towards the end of the week.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm martine croxall. today at 3pm: the prime minister is accused of using aggressive language that "incites violence" in the debate over brexit. former cabinet minister amber rudd says some of number 10's tactics are immoral — but borisjohnson insists he "deplores any threats to anybody". can you use words like surrender to describe a certain act, a certain bill? and quite frankly, i think that you can. meanwhile, the snp suggest they could backjeremy corbyn as a caretaker prime minister. cleveland police — the force inspectors say is so bad it's putting the public at risk. sir lenny henry leads calls for the bbc to overturn its ruling against breakfast presenter naga munchetty for remarks she made about president trump.
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and following in his mother's footsteps — prince harry visits a minefield in angola. coming up on afternoon live all the sport... athletes having to cope with the heat into her. yes, the world athletic championships are under way. the heat and humidity proving as much a talking point as matters on the track. a rather different picture here for the weather with us. yes, unsettled. sunshine and showers, some could be very heavy with localised flooding risk. a bit of sunshine in between. that the weekend, a settled start, but then again deep area of low pressure bringing some very heavy rain and gale force wind saturday night into sunday. i'll be down in the all the details later. also coming up — why the conker tree —
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or horse chestnut — has been put on the official extinction list. hello, everyone, this is afternoon live. the former cabinet minister amber rudd has accused number 10 of using aggressive language that "does incite violence". in a newspaper interview, she said some downing street tactics over brexit are immoral, with a "casual approach" to the safety of mps and their staff. borisjohnson though, on a visit to a hospital this morning, defended the words he uses. our political correspondent jonathan blake reports. he is not talking about events at westminster, but extraordinary would not be a bad word to use this week. the prime minister visiting a hospital in essex this morning, denied he was exploiting divisions of the brexit. on the contrary, i think what we need to do now is to get brexit done by october the 31st
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and i genuinely think that once you do that, then so much of the heat and the anxiety will come out of the debate. i think a lot of people are very tense, i think businesses are still uncertain and get it done, i think we will all be able to move on. the latest criticism came from amber rudd. she said... a government source said amber rudd is being deeply disingenuous. attracting anger from many in westminster, this man, dominic cummings, the prime minster‘s senior adviser.
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confronted by one mp yesterday. and this morning, the man behind the successful vote leave campaign, asked to clarify comments he made last night. it does not look like a walk in the park, does it? walk in the park? yes. who said it would be a walk in the park? you said it, last night at book launch. here is what he said. in a week where mps have spoken about fears for their safety, dominic cummings said threats of violence should be taken seriously. but it was not surprising, he said, that people were angry, given that mps had spent three years swerving all over the shop, as he put it, after the referendum result.
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his comments sum up a government strategy to deliver brexit by the end of october, come what may, and present anything parliament does as getting in the way. we will not betray the people who sent us here. government has failed to silence our democracy. for some in westminster and beyond, the state of debate is now unacceptable. it is a bit like a family argument that has gone really, really toxic and really wrong. we are calling for a sense of humility, of moderation, of really coming together at a time in the country needs that moral leadership. tactics, as well as language, are under scrutiny. another warning from a former prime minister over an attempt by the current pm to get around the law requiring a brexit extension. if this route is taken, if this route is taken, it will be a flagrant defiance of parliament and utterly
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disrespectful to the supreme court. it will be a piece of political chicanery that no one should ever forgive or forget. downing street has again insisted it will obey the law and leave the eu by october the 31st. earlier i spoke to our political correspondent, jessica parker. she explained what was behind amber rudd's comments on the government's use of language. these comments are pretty strong, petite stinging in terms of this debate. it has really engulfed westminster this week, over the yea rs of westminster this week, over the years of language. to just put it in context, it was that wednesday night debate that got particularly heated, where borisjohnson repeatedly prepared to an act that is designed to stop a new deal brexit as they surrender act. he talks about not betraying lead voters and a number
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of mps, opposition mps, raise their concerns about the line which being used and raised the fact that they often used and raised the fact that they ofte n fa ce used and raised the fact that they often face abuse, even death threats. now, amber rudd speaking to the evening standard asked if number ten's languages pitting people against parliament and inciting violence, she said it does. i'm afraid the language we see more and more coming out of number ten does inside balance. it is the sort of line which people think should just more aggressive approach and sometimes violence is a government source had said to me that amber ruddis source had said to me that amber rudd is being deeply disingenuous on a boatload of issues and that she is on manoeuvres. looking elsewhere, tells a bit about the snp's view of who might make a good caretaker prime minister should we need one. so, this week, as well as of the debate about line which, there has been a discussion amongst opposition parties about how they would go about preventing a note deal brexit. yes, they have passed the ban act, referred to by borisjohnson as they
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surrender act, but some people say more needs to be done. among the options, voting down borisjohnson's government that vote of no confidence and potentially installing some sort of caretaker prime minister who would definitely ask for an extension to brexit, daphne is a delayed and then got a snap election. there's a lot of hesitant in the liberal democrat camp, as to whether they would installjeremy corbyn, the labour leader, into number ten. the lib dems i may definitely not want to do that. but the snp seem to be opening the door more and more to that possibility. sources i have spoken to have been by clear, it'll be for two purposes only and it would be time—limited. get that time extension to brexit and get another referendum. the former leader of the scottish conservatives rick davidson suggested today it is all about right to bargain notjust for a referendum on brexit but scottish independence. —— risk davidson. i am not pushing jeremy corbyn as interim prime minister, or anybody else as interim prime minister,
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i am no great fan ofjeremy corbyn. my point is the opposition needs to act, to get borisjohnson, the most disreputable prime minister in my lifetime, out of office. stop a no deal, and then as quickly as possible with an open general election. i am very open minded as to who might emerge as an interim prime minister. for literally a matter of days. to secure that extension before we move to a general election. but if we leave johnson in office, the danger as he finds a way to force through new deal or even force to be the worst thing the opposition can stand back and allow to happen. the brexit secretary, steve barclay, is meeting the european union's chief negotiatior, michel barnier, in brussels this afternoon, amid growing pessimism in the e—u about a the possibility of a deal. last night, mr barnier told senior diplomats he was still waiting for workable proposals on managing the border between northern ireland and the republic. our europe correspondent, kevin connolly has been following negotiations from brussels
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not for the best time there is something abate disjunctu re, not for the best time there is something abate disjuncture, of ely, between what you hear in london and what you are in brussels. so, london there is... talk of cautious optimistic, a sensibility that things are happening. here, watch micro to have told diplomats and what we hardly finish by minister earlier on today, his country holds the rotating presidency of the eu at the rotating presidency of the eu at the moment, is that what the uk has produced a far balls short of what the eu once. —— falls short of what the eu once. —— falls short of what the eu once. ireland's foreign minister has in telling people this afternoon that there is still significant gaps between the two sides and, of course, they sense here in brussels, the real message that steve barclay will be getting today and it will be no surprise to
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him, of course, is that time is tight and it is getting tighter. but it was only, was it last week? i lose track of time. jean—claude was saying he was no longer attached to the backstop —— new longer emotionally attached.” the backstop —— new longer emotionally attached. i think the key word there is emotionally, legally and politically he is very attached to the backstop. all the eu means by this is if you can find someone that does evidently backstop does, which is to keep the border open, to maintain peace in ireland and to protect the integrity of the single market, then that would be fine. but i think what they are implying there is that there is not really anything else which can do that in their view and it is up to britain to prove them wrong. so far, they say, the british proposals all short. so, then, it seems from
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downing street's possession but is a site negotiate. you make it clear whether it is possible in westminster or not, we are living on the 31st october despite the ban act. how art nerds holding up within the eu? well, an interesting question. i do not know anybody here who really has a sense that they know how that is going to play out. imean, know how that is going to play out. i mean, they are naturally talking in terms of extension, they are still focusing on the negotiating process. i do not think there are any circumstances in which they would refuse a request for an extension. if it were to come sincerely from london. but they do not know what boris johnson's tactics are, they do not know what the british government is going to do at the end of october. so, there isa do at the end of october. so, there is a real sense that time is running out. and that it is not clear what the landing point for these negotiations is really going to be. they have said, all along they have said for months now, that they do
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not want a new deal brexit, of course, but they are prepared, they had done the paperwork, late the political groundwork, done all the legal stuff. so, if political groundwork, done all the legalstuff. so, if it political groundwork, done all the legal stuff. so, if it happens, they say they are ready, but it will be a lose— blues solution. a spending watchdog has warned that ministers still have a lot of work to do to ensure the supply of vital medicines to the nhs and care sector if there's a no deal brexit. the national audit office says there are still ‘significant gaps‘ in the government‘s plans, and that leaving without a deal presents a risk for the nhs. the department of health and social care claims everything is being done to make sure patients do have access to medicines after brexit. katherine da costa reports. some health experts are warning that vulnerbale patients in nursing and care homes could be the most at risk from any disruption caused by a new deal brexit. the report today highlights the government has not
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enabled to get assurances that social care services have made plans to secure the supplies they need. i think there are two big risks, one of them is that we know dependence on eu staff has been rising in the social care when it comes to bed and linen, how exposed to that is disruptions if we lose the european union? even though mps have passed a law to prevent a new deal backed it, the department of health and social care has them working on ways to minimise the risk should it happen. but stockpiling six weeks of medicines and supplies, treatment and extra freight capacity and alternative cross—channel routes. a note deal brexit could cause serious disruption to medical supplies, not least because of the 12,300 medicines licensed for use in the uk, around 7000 come from or by eu
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countries. the government‘s own worst case scenario is that a new deal brexit could mean cross—channel goods are cut by up to 60%.m deal brexit could mean cross—channel goods are cut by up to 60%. it is about getting additional put on stream past the rubber six or seven additional points, so we will not primarily be going to dover or calipers impact, this report shows that 25% of my members have already moved away from direct, because of the concerns about those blockages. the national audit office says the government has done an enormous amount to manage the risks, but there are still significant work to be done. they next savings will be crucial in getting a place the contracts crucial in getting a place the co ntra cts to crucial in getting a place the contracts to ensure the extra transport options to keep kids away from the channel, short channel crossings are in place. we also heard from trader, trade bodies and representatives that they still need more practical information from government on things like exactly what they have to do to comply with new processes that might be in place
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at the border. the department of health and social care says everything is being done to make sure patients can continue to access medicines after brexit whatever the circumstances. but with just weeks ago, today‘s report shows that may be an impossible task. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the prime minister is accused of using aggressive language that incites violence in the debate over brexit. former cabinet minister amber rudd says some of number 10‘s tactics are "immoral" — but borisjohnson denies his language is divisive. cleveland — a police force so bad it‘s putting the public at risk, according to inspectors. day one of the world and dick championships in doha. one of the first event is under way, the better sprinter goes into the men‘s 100 metres heat later. england wicketkeeper at sarah taylor has announced her retirement from
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international cricket following anxiety issues. it forced out of the game three years ago, before returning to when the world cup. england‘s piers francis has been cited for a high tackle join yesterday‘s world cup win. more to come in all of the stories at around half past. cleveland police has become the first force to be classed as "failing in all areas". it‘s been placed in "special measures" after the inspectorate of constabulary for england and wales rated it as "inadequate" across the board. cleveland‘s new chief constable says the report is a wake up call, but argued the force must be given time to sort out its problems. angus crawford‘s report contains flashing images. a police service trying... what am i getting arrested for? you're getting arrested to prevent a breach of the peace. officers on the front line, protecting the vulnerable, arresting criminals. but at the most senior levels, failing — rated inadequate by inspectors in all areas.
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a service already dogged by scandal, allegations of racism, illegal monitoring ofjournalists‘ phones. the inspection found: inappropriate behaviour by senior leaders, lack of strategic direction, and no coherent financial plans. cleveland police simply does not understand the demand that‘s coming into the organisation. and it‘s not managing that properly and it‘s not understanding the vulnerability of some of the people that call for this service and that creates risk to the public. but it‘s lost 500 offices since 2010 and had six chief constables in almost as many years. the latest only in post for a matter of months. front line staff work extremely hard in cleveland police. i see it, i patrol as much as any chief constable does and i see how they work to protect our members of the public. but our staff members have not been well served by senior leadership in this force, providing a direction of what is required and being clear
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about what is required and a performance regime being set up to hold people to account. a force described by some as broken, one inspectors say needs critical improvement and fast. angus crawford, bbc news. and we‘ll be talking to barry coppinger, the police and crime commissioner for cleveland, just after four o‘clock. more than 40 presenters, actors and broadcasters have signed an open letter calling on the bbc to reverse a ruling against breakfast host naga munchetty. she was found to have breached bbc guidelines by criticising president donald trump after he said four female politicians should "go back" to "places from which they came". david sillito reports. bbc breakfast and a question to presenter naga munchetty about donald trump. he‘d called for a group of american politicians,
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all women of colour, to go back to where they came from. every time i have been told, as a woman of colour, to go home, to go back to where i came from, that was embedded in racism. now, i‘m not accusing anyone of anything here, but there is... you know what certain phrases mean. she was then pressed to discuss the impact of president trump‘s words. and i can imagine lots of people in this country will be feeling absolutely furious that a man in that position feels it‘s ok to skirt the lines with using language like that. does that then... do you feel that his use of that... because that was the point i was trying to make, then legitimises other people to use that? yes. and as our guest was saying there, it feels like a thought—out strategy to strengthen his position. and it‘s not enough to do it just to get a attention. naga munchetty has now been reprimanded for those comments. the bbc‘s executive complaints unit says she was allowed to say the words were racist, but not comment about donald trump. describing a remark as a racist is not the issue at stake here, the issue at stake is whether it was a right to go on to ascribe motive, in this case, to president trump.
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it could have been to anyone else. it suggests we are impartial on racism. i mean, the bbc isn‘t impartial on crime. if a crime happens, we call people a criminal. what we have to be impartial on is the reasons why those remarks are made. and there was speculation in the programme, which she made, amongst others, about the nature and the reasons of why those comments we re made. and we can't do that, whether it's president trump or whether it's anybody else that we are assessing in that way. but many disagree. a number of bbc journalists have signed a letter, backed by prominent writers, actors and broadcasters, saying the decision must be overturned. it is ludicrous to say it‘s fine for a presenter to express her own experience of racism, but she shouldn‘t cast judgment on the person being racist. that‘s suggesting that, as people of colour who have experienced racism, we can talk about those experiences, but remain impartial about whether we think they‘re good or not. the bbc complaints unit says it won‘t change its mind over a decision that has been described in today‘s letter as having wide—ranging consequences
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for the whole of the media on how it treats racism. david sillito, bbc news. a mother has pleaded guilty to the murder of her two teenage sons at sheffield crown court. sarah barrass is charged with the murder of 14—year—old blake and 13—year—old tristan after an incident in the shiregreen in may. her family member brandon machin also admitted to the murder of the two boys. our correspondent phil bodmer is in sheffield. remind us what happened. as you mentioned, the emergency services we re mentioned, the emergency services were called to an address to a semidetached house in the north of sheffield on may be 24th this year, at about 7:30am. two teenage boys, tristan who was 13 and 14—year—olds blake, died. police officers have never revealed any details of what
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happened, they described it at the time isa happened, they described it at the time is a major incident. but they have never gone into exactly the circumstances of how the two boys died. now, today at sheffield crown court, as you mentioned, 35—year—old sarah barras, their mother, and a family friend, flanked by security staff as they enter the dock, each pleaded guilty to two counts of murder, by plans of attempted murder and one count of conspiracy to murder all six children. their web or other children, as well, who we cannot name for legal reasons. now, barras sobbed as she entered guilty pleas. the family friend remained impassive throughout the 20 minute hearing. what did the judge say in court? thejudge hearing. what did the judge say in court? the judge warned both defendants that they could be sentenced to spend the rest of their lives behind bars. he said no words of mind cadaver reflect the enormity of mind cadaver reflect the enormity of what you both had done. —— he
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said no words of mine cadaver reflect. he said he had little doubt they would both be sentenced to several times of life imprisonment. they both have to appear for another hearing on november the trial. 22 years after his mother‘s iconic walk through an angolan minefield, prince harry has retraced her footsteps. the duke of sussex wore body armour as he walked through an area partially cleared by the same landmine charity supported by princess diana. the prince said the halo trust was helping communities to find peace, by eliminating the ‘unhealed scar of war‘. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell is following the royal couple‘s tour of africa and sent this report. it‘s 17 years now since the civil war here in angola ended. yet, there are still more than 1,000 minefields just like this one scattered across the country. the task of clearing these minefields, of course, is an immense one. it is being led by britain‘s halo trust. it is an issue in which prince harry
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has taken a particular interest, following the lead set by his mother, who visited angola shortly before her death in 1997. harry was shown the painstaking work of clearing the minefields, he watched the de—miners moving metre—by—metre through the minefields. and he detonated one of the mines which was found in this particular minefield. by clearing the landmines, we can help this community find peace, and with peace comes opportunity. later today, harry will go on to the city of huambo. that was the city that princess diana visited in 1997. you will remember those famous images of her walking through a minefield. and it was that visit, her interest, which did so much to bring this whole issue to the attention of the world, and which led then to the passing of the ottawa convention, which finally outlawed the use
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of antipersonnel land mines. nicholas witchell, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. big changes, massive changes. the jet stream as to the north of the uk last week, as you remember, there is conditions with high pressure, lots of sunshine. quite chilly nights, if you remember. by the end of the week, into the weekend, we saw temperatures reaching the mid to about 20 celsius. 27.8 degrees summer in norwich. it was lovely. people at the beaches. and then, we had the autumn equinox, which was on monday just had the autumn equinox, which was on mondayjust gone. we had a few chavez and thunderstorms moving in. almost on cue with the autumn equinox, thejet almost on cue with the autumn equinox, the jet stream almost on cue with the autumn equinox, thejet stream change. moving to the bar north of the uk
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with high pressure across our shores and over europe last week. now, we have a very typical autumnaljet stream. quite strong living across the mid—atla ntic, stream. quite strong living across the mid—atlantic, heading right towards the uk. when we see the jet strea m towards the uk. when we see the jet stream like this, underneath the jet strea m stream like this, underneath the jet stream areas of low pressure develop and that is what has been steering them into words our shores. similar quite deep, a lot of heavy rain involved. this was hertfordshire on tuesday, flash flooding and like i mentioned last time, a deficit of rainfall for september in the south—west and we have nearly made up south—west and we have nearly made upfor south—west and we have nearly made up forjust south—west and we have nearly made up for just over the south—west and we have nearly made up forjust over the last south—west and we have nearly made up for just over the last few south—west and we have nearly made up forjust over the last few days. i think we are about 85 to 89% of the month was migraine. if you my days to go and it is looking very wet for this weekend and into the start of next week, as well. some places may even surpass on the average as we have seen. to call it changeable and unsettled as a bit of an understatement, really. orton has come with a vengeance, after the automatic knock stay. this is earlier in the isle of man, lots of
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heavy and pantry showers moving on. this feature is what is heading our base at the weekend. tropical moisture in it, again we could be looking at flooding rain. this well is the low pressure that we have across the uk, at the moment. it is bringing torrential downpours. the radar picture shows as showers and storms moving three. best next coming in across wales, central and insta nt coming in across wales, central and instant england is trying to but the risk of localised flooding some members of done debit at. blustery, as well, across england and wales. some gas close to 50 miles an hour. that could cause some disruption. further north, they went is not as strong when scotland and northern ireland. slower moving showers here are debit cooler across the board. the mid to high teens, 17 to 18 degrees, as opposed to 20 to 21 over the last couple of days. overnight, more showers for the best. remains blustery for england and wales, temperatures here around ten to 12
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degrees. something a bit earlierfor a northern scotland under clear skies, with lighter events. by the start of the weekend, this is the feature i was talking about eye-p0ppin9 feature i was talking about eye—popping wet, when the weather later on saturday and into sunday. we are in between by assistance for much of saturday. it looks like much of the showers fizzle out and into the afternoon we will have increasing sunshine. still quite blustery across the south. not quite as many as it has been. my sunshine china mantra saturday afternoon, should be a quite pleasant. across the south—west, the state blow moving upbringing heavy and widespread rain depositing and and wales. the wind picks up because southern, south—western areas. 50 to 55 miles an hour here. wet monday through saturday night. sunday morning is very wet and windy, the low pressure slowly clearing out into the north sea. not quite a bad for scotland and northern ireland, one or two showers and northerly
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winds begin to set in, making it chillier. the low teens, 18 or 19 across the gradually close—outs later later on sunday, the low pressure leads some gale force north or north—west winds which could reach about 60 miles an hour across the south and east of the country. that‘s concise at high tide, they could be an issue because of flooding down the east coast. the weekend, heavy rain and gales will lead to some disruption one way or another. so, staging to the forecast and bbc local radio. there are warnings on the website.
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this is bbc news. our latest headlines... the prime minister is accused of using aggressive language that "incites violence" in the debate over brexit. former cabinet minister amber rudd criticises some of number 10‘s tactics as "immoral" but borisjohnson has rejected the criticism. can you use words like surrender to describe a certain act, a certain bill, and quite frankly, i think that you can. meanwhile, the snp suggest they could backjeremy corbyn as a caretaker prime minister. cleveland — a police force so bad it‘s putting the public at risk, according to inspectors. and why the conker tree — or horse chestnut — has jumped onto the extinction list.
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sport now on afternoon live withjohn watson. the world atletics championships are under way in doha, the world‘s best athletes are there — but there are concerns over the heat. centre yes, we have ten days ahead of things to look forward to. but it‘s about the heat. we have seen in the air—conditioned khalifa stadium. this is it, the first of its kind built in the world. it is certainly making it more bearable. it can be in the high 30s or 40s inside. but low 20s inside the stadium. it will still be an issue for people competing in the women‘s marathon. is going to be very hot for them. there at the later stages of that trying to negotiate. they have move
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the start date at the championships from august to september to tackle the temperatures. we can hear from michaeljohnson right now. the former us athletes who explains it is one of the several challenges facing the athletes. not only this year, but next year as well. the 2020 olympic as well. there‘ll be challenges with how leave the championships, have a proper off season or not and then navigate how to get back into training for the season next year. it will create some serious challenges. the calendar was challenging for most people. if there is a good reason for that, the sport receives some benefit from, great. if not, then it is not a good idea. well, these are live pictures from doha. we‘ve see the men‘s long jump qualification underway. no british interest in this. she will not be competing this year. another british interest to come,
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holly bradshaw going in the pole vault. a little after four o‘clock, they will be similar at british players in action as well. pointed to look forward to you, notjust today but in the future as well. and intricate, a surprise retirement from one of the world‘s best wicked keepers. yes, this is a very sad one. england wicketkeeper sarah taylor has retired from international cricket because of her ongoing battle with anxiety. she previously took a break from the game three years ago because of the same issue. she returned to win the world cup with england in 2017 and has been named the best women‘s t20 player in the world 3 times. she‘s also second on the england women‘s list of run—scorers. it is desperately sad that the anxiety issues have return. some rugby world cup news that england had been expecting, their centre piers francis has been cited for a high tackle in yesterday‘s world cup win over the united states. he‘s facing a likely
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suspension of three matches. it‘s a rest day at the world cup today, but some big matches coming up over the weekend. wales coach warren gatland has named an unchanged side to play australia on sunday in tokyo. there‘s just one change to the replacements — owen watkin coming in for leigh halfpenny. captain alun wyn jones will win his 130th cap, making him the most capped wales player of all time, he had been level with gethinjenkins wales beat georgia in their first match of the tournament. chris froome will race in japan next month, his first compettion since his crash at the criterium du dauphine injune the 34—year—old, four—time tour de france winner, broke his femur, elbow and ribs in the carsh that ruled him out of the summer‘s grand tours. in action until next year. and there‘s live cycling going on right now... this the men‘s u23 road race.. it is being staged in yorkshire.
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173km from dioncaster in south yorkshire right up to harrogate in north yorkshire. there is british interest in stuart balfour, tom pidcock, jake stewart, matt wall and fred wright. you can follow it live via the bbc sport website and app. as you know we have got that men‘s and women may succumb over the weekend as well. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. i will see you then. john, thank you very much. see you in a while. the conker tree has been put on the official extinction list. ravaged by moths and disease, the horse chestnut is now classified as vulnerable to extinction. the tree is among 454 native european tree species, which were assessed for their risk of extinction by the international union for the conservation of nature. of those, 42% are threatened with
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extinction. and 58% of europe‘s endemic trees — those that don‘t exist anywhere else on earth — are threatened. we can speak now to david allen from the international union for conservation of nature, who is one of the authors behind the report. it sounds depressing is there anything good in this report?” think what is interesting, it is better news that there are still quite a few that are in good condition here. but the main reason for that high level of threat is that many of the species have small populations. they can occur in small discrete population and that is why they are being threatened.“ discrete population and that is why they are being threatened. if they are endemic trees. what do we do to replace them if they are dying out? one of the key things is that we need a lot more research. we need to
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preserve some of the species in conservation like botanical gardens to ensure that if they do become extinct we can at least reintroduce them. how do you make sure that they are healthy? that they are going to be able to resist the diseases that are putting them at risk now. well... that is a big problem. we need more research into the impacts of introduced species and pathogens and pass. and we also need much better bio—security. we need to prevent them from coming in the first place. how do we do that? it is checking material before it comes into the continent. it is making sure that we have... that we test
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the material when it is here to make sure that when it comes to our local garden centre, that it does not carry these diseases. well, we await further news from you and hope that it can be stopped in its tracks, these declines. david allen thank you for your time. thank you. all this week the bbc has been in stoke—on—trent, discovering the stories about what makes the city tick and hearing what matters to the people who live there. our correspondent beccy wood is there this afternoon — tell us a bit more about the stories you‘ve been hearing about? good afternoon. we have had a whole host of stories delivered to us from the people who live here and want to see them hitting the news. everything from the work that charities do all the way through to promising young sports stars and where they are going. stoke—on—trent
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is well known for being the potteries. it is where most of the ceramics made in this country are shipped from. quite often people talk about the industries that have left this city. staffordshire university is climbing through the rankings, but it is really proud of the work that it does for people that are from more disadvantaged area of the country and also the work that they do with mature students. welcome to the first week of the rest of your life. you have decided all of the things to do parents stu d e nts all of the things to do parents students are only thinking about one thing. i think every student has money on their mind. of money is always going to be a problem.
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money on their mind. of money is always going to be a problemm money on their mind. of money is always going to be a problem. it has been difficult. i have to say for everything. with tuition fees, living costs students need about £17,500 a year before they can even start lectures. i had no qualifications, ended up getting kicked out, and after that, i became homeless. ben is not your typical student. i know it is going to be a struggle with everything. i know i‘m going to have to work. more than a quarter of the students are from deprived areas. according from the latest figures, 38 first—year stu d e nts latest figures, 38 first—year students dropped out entirely in the 2016 two 2017 academic year citing money problems. that basically means that one in 25 students had to stop
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setting because they could not afford to. that may be why staffordshi re afford to. that may be why staffordshire may be one of a handful of campuses with a food bank on site. we have the pasta here. people come through and we advise them. they rss what the best route is to help that student. because of the stigma of using food banks, he would not want to use it unless you have to. ben is about to move into student accommodation. now he is at university, someone else will need his room. my fee is £15 a week to live here. the house i‘m going to be saying and is going to be £75 to live in. i have not really thought about it as of yet. this is kind of make or break for me. that is how about it as of yet. this is kind of make or breakfor me. that is how i look at it. it is not an option, i
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am not going to drop out, that is it. what is really interesting is i have been speaking to a student who is from lancaster, she says it is the best city she has ever been to. hundreds of people have been in touch. the journey will not end there. he can watch all the videos at our website. follow us and use the hashtag we are bbc, we are stoke—on—trent. in a moment we will get the business news from jamie. but first the headlines. the prime minister is accused of using aggressive language that incites violence in the debate over brexit. former cabinet minister amber rudd says some of number 10‘s tactics are "immoral" — but borisjohnson denies his language is divisive. cleveland — a police force so bad it‘s putting the public at risk,
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according to inspectors. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. the civil aviation authority says it has now flown a total of 61,000 thomas cook customers back to the uk, taking the total to 40% of passengers. the caa says operation matterhorn will continue until six october with more than 1,000 flights planned in total. the bank of england may need to cut interest rates should brexit uncertainty persist, one of its policymakers has said.even if the uk avoids a no—deal brexit, rates may still need to be cut, michael saunders said.|nterest rates have been on hold at 0.75% since august 2018, when they were raised from 0.5%. the uk housing market is going through an adjustment — leading to more realistic prices — that‘s according to property website zooplathe biggest house price fall in august was in aberdeen, where house prices were 4% lower than a year earlier. not a single one of the uk‘s biggest cities saw annual property growth edge above 5% in august — the first time since 2012 that this has happened.
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is there an end in sight for the thomas cook tourists and the people who worked for it? we are working our way through it. we are working our way through it. we have 40% of the customers who have been able to come back. we have still got a bit of a way to go. we have also got problems with the staff. people have lost theirjobs. more than a hundred former staff are looking to take legal action against them. they believe they acted unlawfully by the way they were dismissed and they have appointed
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lawyers. we still have quite a way to go. . nearly everyone is going to be able to get back. what about the people who are still left? the caa says operation matterhorn will continue until 6 october with more than 1,000 flights planned in total. the authority said 95% of passengers have been flown home on the planned day of their departure. guy anker, managing editor, money saving expert. everything seems to be going pretty much according to plan at the moment. but to people who were already on holiday can you genuinely say relax, enjoy yourself, you are going to go back on the day you expected? there is clearly going to be lots of worry because you might
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be lots of worry because you might be ata be lots of worry because you might be at a different time. your checkout time might have changed. at least, the silver lining is that most people will be able to do... be able to get back on the same day or shortly after. i would stress that this is only for people abroad to sunday week. anyone after that we'll have to make their own arrangements. if you bought a package with the flight, if you bought a package with the flight, you will be protected. is that government protection scheme. that is hundreds of thousands of people who are still the holidays to come, they are not included in that. the vacations will not go ahead. come, they are not included in that. the vacations will not go aheadm you are coming back after october six, what do you do? you‘ve got to make your own way back and then get compensation? exactly. it should be
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a minority of people, nevertheless it will affect them. if this was all put in place last weekend. most people do not go away for more than two weeks, but some people do. they should take care of most people who are abroad at the moment. you mention people who have got trips booked in the weeks ahead. what do you do about that? what about compensation? if you have a package holiday, you are almost certainly protected. if you have a flight it will be part protected by caa. if not... some people have only booked flights with thomas cook, some will be protected some will not, you will have to check your booking confirmation. if you are not, it is not necessary at the end of the road. some people can make a claim with their credit card or debit card
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company. and we are already seeing some banks gave people money back. there was someone in the office who had a trip booked and got their money return. thank you very much indeed. the us markets are mixed. the pound is down. a little bit weaker because of the comments that we have been talking about of the cuts of the interest rates. when you hear that, it will weaken the pound. jamie, thank you. see you again just before 5pm. it‘s been a momentous week in westminster — so many big moments, that you‘d be forgiven for losing track. so as the week draws to a close,
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let‘s take a look back at a dramatic week in british politics. our political correspondent jessica parker is at westminster. the weeks feel so elastic there is so much that goes on. let‘s look at the beginning of the week. that is right it has been very dramatic and very long for some people. everyone came to work on monday waiting to hear what the supreme court ruling would come in as to whether the prorogation was unlawful. we heard on monday that the result will come in on tuesday and eight dated. tuesday morning it was a dramatic moment, a unanimous decision by all 11 judges that the prorogation, the suspension of parliament, had been unlawful. it was a bombshell moment. let‘s listen to that moment. court has already concluded that the prime minister's advice to her majesty was unlawful, void and of no effect. this means that the order
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in counsel, to which it led, was also unlawful, void and of no effect. and should be quashed. this means that when the royal commissioners walked into the house of lords, it was as if they had walked in with a blank sheet of paper. the prorogation was also void and of no effect. parliament has not been prorogued. this is the unanimous judgement of all 11 justices. it is for parliament, and in particular the speaker and the lord speaker, to decide what to do next. unless there is some parliamentary rule of which we are unaware, they can take immediate steps to enable each house to meet as soon as possible. it is not clear to us that any step is needed from the prime minister, but if it is, the court is pleased that his counsel has told the court that he will take all necessary steps to comply with the terms of any declaration made by this court.
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lady hale, president of the supreme court to. it meant that prorogation had not happened and that parliament had not happened and that parliament had to resume the session. yes, it was one of the moments where people thought what on earth happens next. mps go straight back and indeed, he saw some of them going back into the chamber where tourists were standing around listening to audio tours. with the mps taking selfie saying i‘m ready to get back to work. the next day, there were a series of questions on a range of questions. the big advantage of the day was to hear from boris the big advantage of the day was to hearfrom borisjohnson. the big advantage of the day was to hear from boris johnson. he the big advantage of the day was to hearfrom borisjohnson. he had to fly back early from the un general assembly in new york to address them. that debate on wednesday turned into quite a stormy affair
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with a number of opposition mps taking boris johnson to with a number of opposition mps taking borisjohnson to task for the language he used. what are the focuses of this is that an act that was passed earlier this month designed to stop a no—deal brexit, designed to stop a no—deal brexit, designed to stop a no—deal brexit, designed to mandate the prime minister, he keeps calling it the surrender bail. he said he would not betray leave voters and many thought that that language was unhelpful. they talked about the threats and abuse they face. a big came and incredibly heated debate. the next day there was an emergency debate to talk about the prime minister‘s language. labour mp said that there was a clear strategy to the neck strategy to the language coming from downing street. the use of language use over the last few days. betrayal and treachery etc has clearly been tested and workshops and worked up
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and it is entirely designed to inflame hatred and division. but the conservative and p stood up and said while she had huge respect for that labourmp, she heard while she had huge respect for that labour mp, she heard boisterous language coming from both sides. but lam language coming from both sides. but i am sorry to say it was yesterday that it was her who was screaming aloud as from her bench. and then we have had further criticism of borisjohnson‘s language and tactics coming out of number ten. yes, we heard from amber rudd talking about the sort of language she thinks is coming from downing street. she says it
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legitimises a more aggressive approach and sometimes violent. that is major criticism. amber rudd dramatically clicked from the parliament and resigned as whip as well. semi—saying that she is on manoeuvres and is very disingenuous with what she is saying. we heard from borisjohnson last night on the criticism which he has used. tempers need to calm down and people need to come together because it is only by getting brexit done that you will actually lance the boil as it were of the current anxiety. i totally deploy any threats to anybody particularly female mps. and a lot of work has been done to stop that and give people the security they need to. but i do think it is important in the house of commons
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that i should be able to talk about the surrender they'll and the surrender act in the way that i did. i think it is an important point. what that act would do is take away the power of the government and the power of this country to decide how long it would remain in the eu and give that power to the eu. that is really quite an extraordinary thing. a pretty seismic week in british politics with big implications on brexit and our constitution as well. what can we expect? conservative party conference is due to start on sunday despite mps rejecting that there could be a recess to allow for that conference. what you might see next week although much business has been tabled, tories shuffling back
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and forth. boris johnson‘s been tabled, tories shuffling back and forth. borisjohnson‘s speech is due to take place on wednesday. also prime minister questions on wednesday. we are going to see whether those events are going to clash or whether he‘s going to have a standing in the house of commons. jessica parker and westminster. let‘s ta ke jessica parker and westminster. let‘s take a look at the weather now. hello there. low—pressure bringing a very unsettled day today. windy for england in the way torrential showers with a risk of some localised flooding. there it is showing up on the pressure chart. this feature would some tropical air mixed into it is going to be deepening low, which will be arriving on our shore during this weekend. but we end the day with plenty of heavy showers pushing off towards into the southeastern areas. some sunshine in between too. temperatures mid to high teens. a little bit cooler than what we have had the last couple of days. and then we see another batch of showers pushing in overnight into central and western areas. some of these will be quite heavy.
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for most areas again, double figures overnight. there will be a few chilli spots across northern scotland under clear skies. perhaps down into the low, single digits out of town. that is today‘s area of low pressure, pushing off into the north sea. this is the new area of low pressure, which means business and it will arrive saturday night and into sunday. it will bring some wet and windy weather. saturday, it does not look too bad. we have got a brief reach of high pressure between these other systems. so it looks like many of the showers will fizzle out through the day, increasing amounts of sunshine. not too bad if you are in that sunshine. temperatures of 16 to 19 degrees. but things go downhill quickly across the southwest of the uk as this low—pressure arrives. it will bring a spell of very heavy and persistent rain to swathes of england and wales. and notice the squeeze in the isobars behind the rain there. it is going to turn very windy with south—westerly gusts reaching 40 to 50 miles an hour, maybe even stronger than that. the heavy rain will continue to pivot and move towards the east during sunday morning. it could be very wet across northern/eastern parts of england for a while, but not so wet for scotland and northern ireland here.
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a few showers around, but also some good sunny spells and it will feel quite cool. the wind is pushing down from the north. generally the high teens for the south. and there is a sting in the tail this area of low pressure as we move through sunday. it will push off into the north sea. we will see another band of strong winds. gusts reaching 50, 60 miles an hour across central and eastern areas and this will coincide with high tides along the east coast. there could be some coastal flooding as well. so it is all happening this weekend. a spell of very heavy rain followed by gales, thanks to this deep area of low pressure. but keep tuned to the weather forecast. a quick peek into next week. it looks like mid week we could see high—pressure settling things down briefly before it turns more unsettled again.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m martine croxall. today at 4pm: the prime minister is accused of using aggressive language that "incites violence" in the debate over brexit. former cabinet minister amber rudd says some of number 10‘s tactics are immoral — but borisjohnson has rejected the criticism. can you use words like ‘surrender‘ to describe a certain act, a certain bill and quite frankly i think that you can. meanwhile, the snp suggest they could backjeremy corbyn as a caretaker prime minister. cleveland police is found failing in all areas by inspectors. they say blunders by officers left children at risk of abuse. calls for the bbc to overturn its ruling against breakfast presenter naga munchetty for remarks she made about president trump.
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and following in his mother‘s footsteps — prince harry walks through a minefield in angola — 22 years after diana did the same. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. all eyes until hand for the world athletics championship. former european champion lynsey sharp fails to qualify for the semi finals of the 800 metres. sunshine and showers, but the weekends low—pressure brides just in time per saturday night and sunday bringing a spell of heavy rain and also gale force wind is. i will have all the details later.
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all eyes on the humble horse like chestnut tree, as itjumps onto the extinction less. hello, everyone, this is afternoon live. the former cabinet minister amber rudd has accused number 10 of using aggressive language that ‘does incite violence.‘ in a newspaper interview, she said some downing street tactics over brexit are immoral, with a ‘casual approach‘ to the safety of mps and their staff. borisjohnson though, on a visit to a hospital this morning, defended the words he uses. our political correspondent jonathan blake reports. he is not talking about events at westminster, but extraordinary would not be a bad word used this week. the prime minister visiting a hospital in essex this morning, denied he was exploiting divisions of the brexit. on the contrary, i think what we need to do now is to get
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brexit done by october the 31st and i genuinely think that once you do that, then so much of the heat and the anxiety will come out of the debate. i think a lot of people are very tense, i think businesses are still uncertain and get it done, i think we will all be able to move on. the latest criticism has come from amber rudd, in an interview she said... a government source said amber rudd has been deeply disingenuous. attracting anger from many in westminster, this man, dominic cummings, the prime minster‘s senior adviser. confronted by one mp yesterday.
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and this morning, the man behind the successful vote leave campaign, asked to clarify comments he made last night. it does not look like a walk in the park, does it? walk in the park? yes. who said it would be a walk in the park? you said it, last night at book launch. here is what he said. in a week where mps have spoken about fears for their safety, dominic cummings said threats of violence should be taken seriously. but it was not surprising, he said, that people were angry, given that mps had spent three years swerving all over the shop, as he put it, after
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the referendum result. his comments sum up a government strategy to deliver brexit by the end of october, come what may, and present anything parliament does as getting in the way. we will not betray the people who sent us here. government has failed to silence our democracy. for some in westminster and beyond, the state of debate is now unacceptable. it is a bit like a family argument that has gone really, really toxic and really wrong. we are calling for a sense of humility, of moderation, of really coming together at a time in the country needs that moral leadership. tactics, as well as language, are under scrutiny. another warning from a former prime minister over an attempt by the current pm to get around the law requiring a brexit extension. if this route is taken, if this route is taken, it will be a flagrant defiance
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of parliament and utterly disrespectful to the supreme court. it would be a piece of political chicanery that no one should ever forgive or forget. downing street has again insisted it will obey the law and leave the eu by october the 31st. earlier i spoke to our political correspondent, jessica parker. she explained what was behind amber rudd‘s comments on the government‘s use of language. these comments are pretty strong, pretty stinging in terms of this debate that has really engulfed westminster this week, with the use of language. just to put that in a little bit of context, it was not wednesday night debate that got particular heaters, where boris johnson repeatedly referred to an act that is designed to stop a new deal brexit as i surrender act. he talks about not betraying leave
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boaters and a number of mps, opposition mps, raise their concerns about the line which being used and raise the fact that they often face abuse, even death threats. now, amber rudd speaking to the evening standard, asked if number ten‘s languages pitting people against the parliament and inciting violence she said it does, the divine regina fate we see more and more coming out of number ten dozen side violence. it isa number ten dozen side violence. it is a sort of line which people think the jitters eyes police legitimises a more aggressive approach and sometimes violence was not a government source i said to me that amber rudd is actually being deeply disingenuous on a boatload of issues and that she is on the movers. looking elsewhere, tells a bit about the snp‘s new about who might make a good caretaker prime minister should we need one. so, this week, as well as of the debate about language, there has been a discussion amongst opposition parties about how they would go about preventing a new deal brexit. yes, they have passed the ban act, refer to borisjohnson as
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they surrender act, but some people say more needs to be done. among the options, voting down borisjohnson‘s parliament with a built of no confidence and potentially installing some sort of caretaker prime minister who as for an extension to brexit, definitely steeper sit delayed and then call a snap election. there‘s a lot of hesitant and for example the liberal democrats camp, as to whether or not they would want to installjeremy corbyn into number ten. the lib dems are saying they absolutely do not wa nt to are saying they absolutely do not want to do that. but the snp seem to be opening the door more and more to that possibility. sources i have spoken to a very clear, it would be 30 purposes only and it would be timely and it would be time—limited. get that extension to brexit and get another referendum on baxter. i notice they buy former leader of the scottish conservatives, rist davidson, saying it is to bargain not just a referendum davidson, saying it is to bargain notjust a referendum on brexit, but also scottish independence. let‘s hear what nicola sturgeon said. i am not pushing jeremy corbyn as interim prime minister, or anybody else as interim prime minister,
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i am no great fan ofjeremy corbyn. my point is the opposition needs to act, to get borisjohnson, the most disreputable prime minister in my lifetime, out of office. stop a no deal, and then as quickly as possible with an open general election. i am very open minded as to who might emerge as an interim prime minister. for literally a matter of days. to secure that extension before we move to a general election. but if we leave johnson in office, the danger as he finds a way to force through no deal or even force through a bad deal and that seems to me to be the worst thing the opposition can stand back and allow to happen. breaking news to be guarding an incident that happened outside the office of labour mp jess incident that happened outside the office of labour mpjess phillips. westminster plays a sign that a 36—year—old man has been charged with a section five public order offence, following a disturbance outside the constituency office of
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jess phillips. he is the mp for birmingham yardley was a 36 rules man, charged with connection without disturbance. the brexit secretary, steve barclay, is meeting the european union‘s chief negotiatior, michel barnier, michel barnier has stressed there must be a solution to paint a hard border with the island of ireland. what more can you tell us about these latest talks, kevin? well, a pretty intensive day of diplomacy. we have the finish payments are here, whose country is the rotating eu presidency at the moment. we‘ve had the island foreign minister and stephen barclay. a lot of made music in russells at the moment. friendly, it is pretty negative. it is that there is wide gaps between the two sides and that britain had not yet,
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but the right kind of proposals for replacing the irish backstop was the eu says you can replace the backstop if you can come up with something that achieves everything backstop achieves, in terms of maintaining the integrity of the single market and keeping the irish border open. so, that clearly is a pretty tall order. now, when he met michel barnier today, after that michel barnier today, after that michel barnier met stephen barclay, i spoke to stephen barclay just barnier met stephen barclay, i spoke to stephen barclayjust after his meeting with michel barnier and compared to all that other bustles made music, i had found him sounding relatively optimistic. there is still a long way to go. i think we are coming to the moment of truth in these negotiations. we will see the political will and both sides and top we are committed to securing a deal as living on the 31st october. but that deal has to be without the backstop. parliament has rejected the backstop three times. i have
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been very clear with michel barnier in the negotiations, the backstop has to go for but with goodwill and both sides deal can be done. so, obviously a great deal to do. great deal of talking still be done, but i‘m getting tighter and tighter. a crucial eu summit in the middle of october, any big new ideas would have to be putjust a bit before that to give the other eu leaders time to reflect on them. a spending watchdog has warned that ministers still have a lot of work to do to ensure the supply of vital medicines to the nhs and care sector if there‘s a no deal brexit. the national audit office says there are still ‘significant gaps‘ in the government‘s plans, and that leaving without a deal presents a risk for the nhs. the department of health and social care claims everything is being done to make sure patients do have access to medicines after brexit. katherine da costa reports. some health experts are warning vulnerable patients in nursing and care homes could be affected most by any disruption caused
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by a no—deal brexit. today‘s report highlights that the government hasn‘t been able to get assurances that social care services have made plans to secure the supplies they need. i think there‘s two big risks, one of them is that we know that dependence on eu staff has been rising in the social care sector over the last few years. if that turns around and eu staff start leaving, they will be a very difficult place for stop and there is a whole question of when it comes to the products at social care needs like food and linen, how exposed is that of imports from the european union and what is the possible disruption? the answer unfortunately is that we really don‘t know. even though mps have passed a law to prevent a no—deal brexit, the department of health and social care has been working on ways to minimise the risk should it happen. from stockpiling six weeks of medicines and supplies, to arranging extra freight capacity and alternative cross—channel routes. a no—deal brexit could cause serious disruption to medical supplies, not least because of the 12,300
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medicines licensed for use in the uk, around 7000 come from or via eu countries. the government‘s own worst case scenario is that a no—deal brexit could mean cross—channel goods are cut by up to 60%. it's about getting additional ports on the stream. so, there will be six or seven additional ports, so we won't primarily be going through dover or cali. in fact, this report shows that 25% of my members have already moved away from dover calais because of the concerns about those blockages. the national audit office says the government has already done an enormous amount to manage the risks, but there‘s still significant work to be done. the next few weeks are going to be crucial in getting in place those contracts to ensure that there is extra transport options to keep goods away from the short channel crossings are in place. we also heard from trade bodies and representatives that they still need more practical
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information from government on things like exactly what they have to do to comply with new processes that might be in place at the border. the department of health and social care says everything is being done to make sure patients can continue to access medicines after brexit, whatever the circumstances. but with just weeks to go, today‘s report shows that may be an impossible task. katherine da costa, bbc news. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the prime minister is accused of using aggressive language that incites violence in the debate over brexit. cleveland police becomes the first in england and wales to be found failing in all areas by inspectors. a mother admits motoring to a per teenage son and plotting to murder or more of her children. and coming up — sir lenny henry
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is leading calls for the bbc to overturn its ruling against breakfast presenter naga munchetty for remarks about racism. against breakfast presenter naga the against breakfast presenter naga former european sharp the former european champion lynsey sharp failed to qualify by the 800 metres at day one of the world of attic championships in doha. the men‘s heats are underwriters england wicketkeeper sarah taylor has announced her retirement from international credit get following anxiety issues. it was out of the game four years ago, and then she was 20 when the world cup. more to come at around half class. cleveland police has become the first force to be classed as "failing in all areas". it‘s been placed in "special measures" after the inspectorate of constabulary for england and wales rated it as "inadequate" across the board. cleveland‘s new chief constable says the report is a wake up call but argued the force must be given time to sort out its problems. angus crawford‘s report contains flashing images. a police service trying...
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what am i getting arrested for? you're getting arrested to prevent a breach of the peace. officers on the front line, protecting the vulnerable, arresting criminals. but at the most senior levels, failing — rated inadequate by inspectors in all areas. a service already dogged by scandal, allegations of racism, illegal monitoring ofjournalists‘ phones. the inspection found: inappropriate behaviour by senior leaders, lack of strategic direction, and no coherent financial plans. cleveland police simply does not understand the demand that‘s coming into the organisation. and it‘s not managing that properly and it‘s not understanding the vulnerability of some of the people that call for this service and that creates risk to the public. but it‘s lost 500 offices since 2010 and had six chief constables in almost as many years. the latest only in post
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for a matter of months. front line staff work extremely hard in cleveland police. i see it, i patrol as much as any chief constable does and i see how hard they work to protect our members of the public. but our staff members have not been well served by senior leadership in this force, providing a direction of what is required and being clear about what is required and a performance regime being set up to hold people to account. a force described by some as broken, one inspectors say needs critical improvement and fast. angus crawford, bbc news. barry coppinger is cleveland‘s police and crime commissioner — hejoins us now from middlesbrough. welcome, he had said that she will not resign. how bad would have to get in the cleveland force before you did so? well, i was very concerned at the reports that came out and it has confirmed actually a
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number of issues that we drew out during our scrutiny during the course of that year. i had set a strategic direction for the chief co nsta ble to strategic direction for the chief constable to put together a plan to make assessment of what is needed in terms of policing and to draw up the plan and! terms of policing and to draw up the plan and i will scrutinise him to make those changes and improve the performance of the boys. i have been elected twice by the people of clevela nd, elected twice by the people of cleveland, there are elections next may and the public will make the decision then as to who the police and crown commission of cleveland should be from may 2020 onwards. the inspectors said that the forces operating without a clear plan or direction. your role is to deliver effective and efficient policing in the community and you clearly cannot have done that all of these problems have done that all of these problems have been mounting up over many yea rs. have been mounting up over many years. yes, i am not denying that there are problems at cleveland and i‘m certainly not apologising for the force. my responsibility is to
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draw up strategic direction to drop a strategic plan for the first, which i do through my police and crime plan, which is published on their website that i have got. but also to give strategic direction to chief constable and two full—time to account. that is what i had been doing in the course of the year, three scrutiny meetings, which have highlighted some of the concerns which have been featured in the report. so, my intention now going private is to work with the chief co nsta ble to private is to work with the chief constable to give him time and space as your police said, to make those changes that are necessary and make sure they are delivered. the last time cleveland was inspected was two yea rs time cleveland was inspected was two years ago and the first was deemed as good. so, yes, it has slipped and yes, there are some serious matters we re yes, there are some serious matters were concerned, but i am to clevela nd were concerned, but i am to cleveland back to being a good voice as soon as possible. it has failed on all counts, hasn‘t it? and you have been a commissioner in those two years, while those problems have occurred. how can you keep the trust
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of the public, had their competence, after a ll of the public, had their competence, after all you are paid £80,000 a year to do thatjob? after all you are paid £80,000 a year to do that job? i am not paid £80,000 a year. i do a lot of community engagement. i have done by the hundreds that the digg community meetings, i do a lot of engagement with partner agencies, as well. i know very about the concerns of the public and they are generally supportive of the work the four stars. invites, what they are saying is that we need more police officers, something which i would wholeheartedly agree with. you have got to bear in mind, in cleveland it is not just about the got to bear in mind, in cleveland it is notjust about the performance of the force, but all the other public services are also struggling and up its additional pressure on the police. if we had cuts in health and health are in special measures, if the fire service is really worried about its ability to put out on the fire service is really worried about its ability to put out other buyers, if we have got probation service, prison service, children and adult service all under pressure and
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facing cuts, the cumulative effect if that is much more pressure on the police. cleveland is a metropolitan area, but it is tracked as a shire cou nty area, but it is tracked as a shire county in terms of its funding waiting for so, yes, county in terms of its funding waiting forso, yes, i meant county in terms of its funding waiting for so, yes, i meant the boys to work much harder and do much better and i will be redundant not. it also, i think we also need to work at the cleveland area... under the leadership of the cleveland police and crime commissioner, you, thatis police and crime commissioner, you, that is the tees meier talking, we have had journalist phones being hacked, we have had accusations of institutional racism, millions of pounds without compensation paid out and more chief constables than i have hot dinners, says the mayor. how can you really think that you have the confidence of people in clevela nd have the confidence of people in cleveland to be the person to oversee a change in the performance of the porsche? well, in terms of some of those historical issues that you have referred to, i had taken
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action around the surveillance issue. i took an in—depth scrutiny of the force when those issues first emerge and i have commissioned an independent study, which are left at six years of surveillance arrangements in cleveland to verify and test those as the weather they have been done properly. that report to be published in the very near future. i have introduced a new transformative professional standards regime in partnership at the bourse, we have brought in somebody from outside policing to look at professional standards and she is doing is classic work. other isa she is doing is classic work. other is a lot more work to be done. i have also introduced and everyone matters programme looking at diversity and inclusion. i not been complacent, there are certain of a lot of work to be done. but i do not accept those comments, he has been invited to take part in the appointment of the chief consul in the past and said he has nothing to do the policing, so it is a bit late for him to turn up now with these comments. sounds like there has been
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a lot of reports commissioned, but still the inspectorate has said that things are still bad at cleveland that the public eye being put at risk. you have talked about a strategic plan, telus white on the nuts and bolts of that? well, personable, i am very concerned about bond ability and that is something that is borne out in the report, as well. i put a lot of time, effort and resources into supporting victims of domestic abuse, sexual this, trafficking and slavery, broad, violence and other forms of victims of crime and i put a lot of effort into that. we didn‘t in—depth scrutiny injuly of this year it effect on‘s services and the chief constable is under no illusion that there has to be much more work done around the victim agenda. he is doing that, he has a performance port which is meeting on a weekly basis, i think, port which is meeting on a weekly basis, ithink, to port which is meeting on a weekly basis, i think, to look at those issues. i will be receiving regular
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reports from him on the performance around victims. it is important to recognise that once i have overall responsibility for community safety and policing in the cleveland area, the day—to—day responsibility for policing in cleveland, the organisation and deployment of police resources as a response ability of the chief constable. we have appointed a new chief constable and april this year, he is doing an excellent job, but he and april this year, he is doing an excellentjob, but he needs time and space to mako gas. i will be watching very carefully and holding him to account. but i had given him that strategic direction, i have asked him to drop this plans are to be looking very closely and i hope we will get cleveland back to where it was a couple of years ago, when it was a couple of years ago, when it was a couple of years ago, when it was last with ease by hm icy who determined it was a good voice. and if it is not a good voice and is not significant improve at its next inspection, will you then resign? sorry, i am struggling... sorry, inspection, will you then resign? sorry, iam struggling... sorry, can you repeat that? if it does not
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improve, but you then resign? well, that‘ll depend on what the timing of those inspections are and what the outcome of those are. anticipate that we will see progress, we are already seeing progress, actually does operation for next of the summer period has made major progress in transit outstanding works, in terms of dealing with vulnerability and in terms of making more arrests and tackling organised criminals. we are recruiting, the force recruiting another 100 neighbourhood police officers and that will make a difference and there is more work going on in terms of reorganising and restructuring. so, i‘d very much hope that that will improve and i will be taking a very close interest, i can assure you of that. cleveland's police and crime commissioner, thank you very much for talking to us. the home office is giving police forces £10 million in additionalfunding
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to significantly increase the number of officers carrying taser. the funding could mean over 10,000 more police officers in england and wales will be able to carry the devices. a recent police federation of england and wales survey found 94% of officers think tasers should be issued to more frontline staff. a mother has pleaded guilty to the murder of her two teenage sons at sheffield crown court. sarah barrass is charged with the murder of 14—year—old blake and 13—year—old tristan after an incident in the shiregreen in may. herfamily member brandon machin also admitted to the murder of the two boys. well, earlier i spoke to our correspondent phil bodmer who is in sheffield. as you mentioned, the emergency services recall to an address of a semi house in shire green on may the 20 point that year, at about 7:30am brea kfast 20 point that year, at about 7:30am breakfast either stop to teenage boys, trusts and he was 13 and 14—year—old blake died. —— triston
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was 13. the police had never gone into exactly the circumstances of how the two boys died. today, at sheffield crown court, as you mentioned, 35—year—old sarah barras and afamily mentioned, 35—year—old sarah barras and a family friend, who is 39, blanked by security staff as the edge at sheffield crown court, each pleaded guilty to two counts of murder. —— blanked by security staff. and one count of is conspiracy to murder all six children. barras sought as she entered her guilty pleas. herfamily friend remained impassive throughout the 20 minute hearing. what did the judge say in court? thejudge the 20 minute hearing. what did the judge say in court? the judge warned both defendants that they could be sentenced to spend the rest of their lives behind bars. he said no words of mine could ever fully reflect the enormity of what you both have done,
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he said. the crime she have committed, quite frankly, speak for themselves. he told them both that he had little doubt they would be sentenced to several terms of life imprisonment. now, they were both remanded to appear before sheffield crown court for another hearing in november to 12. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. very blustery day, lots of heavy showers around, one batch of torrential showers clearing off into the north seat later in the day, and then this evening and overnight another batch of sabbath smoothing intimate central and western areas was a breeze and only charge around, most was a breeze and only charge around, m ost pla ces was a breeze and only charge around, most places should hold into double figures. new chilis spots across the clear skies central scotland. we are in between weather systems for saturday, a brief edge of high—pressure building and that will squeeze out all the shoppers. it should turn a little bit try, in fa ct, should turn a little bit try, in fact, for many into afternoon. it‘s not been that bad attempted around
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16 to 19 degrees. the next weather system arrives across the south—west later in the day, the supping a swathe of pretty heavy and flooding rains potentially across england and wales. ballad by strong gale force pens as this area of low pressure continues to move out into the north—east during sunday. very wild weekend, the spell of heavy rain, billed by gales keep tuned to the bbc local radio. this is bbc news. our latest headlines... the prime minister is accused of using aggressive language that "incites violence" in the debate over brexit. former cabinet minister amber rudd criticises some of number 10‘s tactics as "immoral" but borisjohnson has rejected the criticism. can you use words like surrender to describe a certain act, a certain bill, and quite frankly, i think that you can. in brussels for talks with eu negotiator michel barnier, the brexit secretary says he‘s doing his best to strike a new deal.
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i think there is still a long way to go. i think we are coming to the moment of truth in these negotiations. a mother has admitted murdering her two teenage sons in sheffield — and hatching a plot to murderfour more of her own children. cleveland — a police force so bad it‘s putting the public at risk, according to inspectors. and why the conker tree — or horse chestnut — has jumped onto the extinction list. sport now on afternoon live withjohn watson. the world athletics championshiups are underweay in doha, and already disappointment for a british medal. yes, a significant one. a day one of ten days. dissapointment though for former european champion lynsey sharp who failed to qualify in the 800 metres she finished fourth, not fast enough to secure a spot in the semi finals,
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alex bell and shelayna oskan—clarke are through. shejust got her she just got her strategy a little bit wrong. sharp touted as a medal contender in a depleted field this year, in the absence of the defending champion caster semenya. men‘s 100 metre heats under way, adam gemilli qualified in third in his heat, won by american sprinterjustin gatlin. zharnel hughes also through after winning his heat. the semi finals are tomorrow. well, these are live pictures from doha. this is the wrapping up of the men‘s heat. this is their long—term qualification is under way as well. plenty of other events also including the women‘s paul vote. which is out on the track at that moment. as i say, day one and days. we will be staying across over the
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coming days. so plenty of talking points, but better disappointment for britain and certainly fort lindsay sharp on day one. i thought we would see that paul vote. did she make it? we cheated you out of that. she did. she made it. i would have hate to her —— that she did make it. cricket, a surprise retirement? yes, this is a sad story, being a. england wicketkeeper sarah taylor has retired from international cricket because of her ongoing battle with anxiety. she previously took a break from the game three years ago because of the same issue. she returned to win the world cup with england in 2017 and has been named the best women‘s t20 player she‘s also second on the england women‘s list of run—scorers. here she is talking to the bbc three years ago. the nerves would hit me, but it
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would be nerves plus something else andi would be nerves plus something else and i was always confused as to what it was. but now i know. it is a genuine kind of panic and the heart races, i feel faint. those genuine kind of panic and the heart races, ifeel faint. those arejust little things that i go through. there have been times where had to run off the changing rooms and be sick. because of sheer panic sometimes. that is where it has gone to in terms of my cricket. and then it affects my performance and that had to be addressed. formula one moves to russia this weekend, and there was a surprise pace—setter in second practice. red bull‘s max verstappen leading the way in sochi — ahead of ferrari‘s charles leclerc. verstappen‘s got a five place grid penalty for this grand prix so needs to finish well in qualifying. lewis hamilton finished practice fourth fastest for mercedes. some rugby world cup news that england had been expecting, their centre piers francis has been cited for a high tackle
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in yesterday‘s world cup win over the united states. he‘s facing a likely suspension of three matches. it‘s a rest day at the world cup today, but some big matches coming up over the weekend. wales coach warren gatland has named an unchanged side to play australia on sunday in tokyo. there‘s just one change to the replacements — owen watkin coming in for leigh halfpenny. captain alun wyn jones will win his 130th cap, making him the most capped wales player of all time. he had been level with gethinjenkins wales beat georgia in their first match of the tournament. and there‘s live cycling going on right now... this the men‘s u23 road race. it is an action on the roads of yorkshire. it is an action on the roads of yorkshire. 173km from dioncaster in south yorkshire right up to harrogate in north yorkshire. there is british interest in stuart balfour, tom pidcock, jake stewart, matt wall and fred wright. they are all in action.
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you can follow it live via the bbc sport website and app. if you are not watching. the women and men‘s road race to come over the coming days. that is all from us for now. john, thank you very much. more than 40 presenters, actors and broadcasters have signed an open letter calling on the bbc to reverse a ruling against breakfast host naga munchetty. she was found to have breached bbc guidelines by criticising president donald trump after he said four female politicians should "go back" to "places from which they came". david sillito reports. bbc breakfast and a question to naga munchetty about president trent. he had called forfor women munchetty about president trent. he had called for for women of colour to go back to where they came from. every time i have been told that it
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is embedded in racism, i am not accusing anyone of anything here, but you know what certain phrases mean. she was then called to... i am sure that there are lots of people will be feeling that it is not ok for a will be feeling that it is not ok fora man to will be feeling that it is not ok for a man to be skirting lines like that. do you think it legitimises other people to do the same thing? as the guest was saying it's feels like a thought out strategy. as the guest was saying it's feels like a thought out strategym as the guest was saying it's feels like a thought out strategy. it is not enough to do itjust to get attention. she has now been reprimanded for those comments. she was allowed to say the words were racist, but not comment about donald trump. describing a remark as racist is not the issue, the question is it wasn‘t ok to go on and ascribe motive? bbc is not impartial on
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crime, if crime happens, we call people a criminal. what we have to be impartial on is why those remarks we re be impartial on is why those remarks were made. we cannot do that whether it is president trump or anybody else we are assessing in that way. might not but many disagree. a number of bbc journalists have signed a letter backed by many others that say the decision must be overturned. it's ludicrous to say that it's fine for a presenter to express that it's fine for a presenter to express her own experiences of racism, but not castjudgement on the people being racist. the bbc complaint unit says it will not change its mind over a decision that has been described as having wide—ranging consequences for the whole of the media and how it treats
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racism. the whistleblower at the heart of impeachment investigations against president trump is reported to be a cia officer. he says the white house tried to cover up details of a phone call between mr trump and the president of ukraine, where mr trump asked the ukrainian government to help smearjoe biden, political rival in next year‘s presidential election. david willis reports. a beleaguered president trump returned to the white house last night. even by the breathless standards of his administration, the last few days have been particularly tumultuous. a whistle—blower‘s report maintains not only that mr trump misused the office of the president for personal gain, but that white house officials, alarmed by his request for dirt on democratic rivaljoe biden, then sought to bury the evidence. president trump, seen here with mr zelensky earlier in the week, lashed out publicly and privately at a closed—door event in new york. he suggested that white house staff who spoke about the telephone conversation should be seen as traitors. who is the person who gave
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the whistle—blower the information? laughter. democrats in the house of representatives launched a formal impeachment inquiry earlier this week. on capitol hill, the battle lines are being drawn along party lines. this phone call is a nothing burger in terms of a quid pro quo. the president of the united states did not remotely suggest to the ukraine that if you do not do my political bidding against biden, i‘m going to cut your off. the president of the united states in his actions on a telephone call with a head of state betrayed his oath of office, our national security and the integrity of our elections. trump: my call was perfect. last night, trump renewed the attack
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on his political rivals. ijust watched a little bit of this on television. it is a disgrace to our country, it is another witchhunt, here we go again. it is adam schiff and his crew making up stories and sitting there like pious...whatever you want to call it. it is just really disgrace. cheering the president is not without his supporters, however. sheriffs from across the us converged on the white house looking to raise his spirits at the end of a brutal week. seven days ago, most people in america had yet to hear of mr trump‘s fatal conversation with the president of the ukraine. david willis, bbc news, los angeles. 22 years after his mother‘s iconic walk through an angolan minefield, prince harry has retraced her footsteps. the duke of sussex wore body armour as he walked through an area partially cleared by the same landmine charity supported by princess diana. the prince said the halo trust
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was helping communities to find peace, by eliminating the ‘unhealed scar of war‘. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell is following the royal couple‘s tour of africa and sent this report. it‘s 17 years now since the civil war here in angola ended. yet, there are still more than 1,000 minefields just like this one scattered across the country. the task of clearing these minefields, of course, is an immense one. it is being led by britain‘s halo trust. it is an issue in which prince harry has taken a particular interest, following the lead set by his mother, who visited angola shortly before her death in 1997. harry was shown the painstaking work of clearing the minefields, he watched the de—miners moving metre—by—metre through the minefields. and he detonated one of the mines which was found in this particular minefield. by clearing the landmines, we can
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help this community find peace, and with peace comes opportunity. later today, harry will go on to the city of huambo. that was the city that princess diana visited in 1997. you will remember those famous images of her walking through a minefield. and it was that visit, her interest, which did so much to bring this whole issue to the attention of the world, and which led then to the passing of the ottawa convention, which finally outlawed the use of antipersonnel land mines. nicholas witchell, bbc news. in a moment, james is going to bring us the latest business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live... the prime minister is accused of using aggressive language that "incites violence" in the debate over brexit. a mother admits murdering her two teenage sons in sheffield — and plotting to murderfour more of her own children. cleveland police are found failing
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in all areas by inspectors — after mistakes left children at risk of abuse. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live... more than 100 former thomas cook staff are taking legal action after losing jobs at the collapsed travel giant. they believe the firm acted unlawfully in the way they were dismissed and have appointed lawyers to seek redress through an employment tribunal. one of the policy makers at the bank of england who help set interest rates has said the bank may need to cut interest rates the uncertainty around brexit continues. michael saunders said even if the uk avoids a no—deal brexit, rates may still need to be cut, interest rates have been on hold at 0.75% since august 2018, when they were raised from 0.5%. the falling house prices across the uk is a adjustment
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to more realistic prices according to the property website zoopla. the biggest house price fall in august was in aberdeen, where house prices were 4% lower than a year earlier. not a single one of the uk‘s biggest cities saw annual property growth edge above 5% in august — the first time since 2012 that this has happened. it is friday, would you like to reflect on things? i mean business things. life in general. the biggest story was thomas cook and that has been simmering all week and will continue to do so. it has preoccupied people, not the market so much. it was a major collapse, but on the other hand it was seen very far collapse, but on the other hand it was seen very far in advance and people were predicting it. i think the thing that has been on the mind
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of people is the political earthquakes going on. we had two constitutional event happening on the same day. the ruling of the supreme court saying that the british prime minister had acted unlawfully and you had in the us the start of impeachment inquiry into the united states presidents. that is pretty big news. what is so odd is pretty big news. what is so odd is that the markets did not react hugely. i think the context of how it adds to a gradually growing rather negative economic environment. you have all the trade wa rs environment. you have all the trade wars going on between china and united states and then you have brexit over here and you gradually slowing global economy. is another brick in the wall rather than a particular event that is going to cause an eruption. that is how i look at it.
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simon french is chief economist at panmure. let‘s talk about the uk. one person said that rates are going to have to come down, this general negativity thatis come down, this general negativity that is going on in the uk market.” think that is correct. the pound took a bit of a shot. michael saunders was expected to be someone who would vote for an increase in rates, but he said that data had deteriorated sufficiently and he would probably vote for a production rate. that took the heat out of the pound. and traders did not need an excuse pound. and traders did not need an excuse to be short on the pound given all the political news. we will talk about the united states in a moment, but in the uk we had this major ruling that the prime minister had acted unlawfully, you would have thought it would have caused
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something in the markets but they have been pretty calm. investors looking at shares are saying that giving that government that is yielding such low interest rates and my savings as well, you are actually looking at share markets and saying where else will i put my money right now? that is why things haven't been very affected by the political turmoil. many reasons not to sell, but not very many to buy anything else. in the united states we have the impeachment, flirtations —— there is this negativity around everything. it is notjust the impeachment. now, there is a plurality in stories. a number of companies have come to market to raise money in the us and they have
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come without having made a profit. the latest one is peloton which is a home gymnasium cycle with a productivity function which is valued at $8 billion, yet it has not made any money. that is hardly unusual. uber has said they are never going to make any money. that is not unusual, but if you are going to bring a company to market, you've got to have investors bullish about the future. than the rest of the story comes an inch impeachment in the background, potentially growth slowing down to less than 2% in the third quarter, you put that altogether and investment back investors are less interested in getting involved. we can have a look at the markets now. well acrobat we do not have
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them. roger says no. you‘ve got to listen to roger. all i can say is the ftse is up a little bit. the poundis the ftse is up a little bit. the pound is bound, it recovered a little bit. there you go. who needs them on the screen? sony and walt disney have reached a deal to continue the spider—man movie series. the companies have said that marvel studios will produce a third film in spider—man: homecoming series. sony — which owns the film rights to the spider—man character — and disney — which owns marvel studios — had previously said an agreement could not be reached for the future of the character, so it would no longer feature in its own marvel franchise or movies like the avengers. as new arrivals at universities across the country settle in to student life, the bbc has learned that some universities have opened foodbanks on campuses for students living in poverty. staffordshire university is one of them. more than a quarter of students there are from deprived areas. as part of a week of reports from stoke—on—trent, digitaljournalist ben moore
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and reporter lucas yeomans have been to see how the university is adapting to the needs of students. welcome to the first week of the rest of your life. yet despite all the clubs to join, societies to sign up for, and all the new friends to be made at freshers‘ week, students are only thinking about one thing. i think every student‘s got money and finance on the mind. money is always going to be a problem because i get the lowest amount of maintenance loan. i mean, it's been difficult, so, yes, i've got to save up and everything. with tuition fees, accommodation and living costs, students in stoke need to find an average of about £17,500 a year before they can even start lectures. i left school with no qualifications and ended up getting kicked out and then after that... i got made homeless. ben is not your typical student. i know it‘s going to be a struggle,
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with student loans and stuff, i know i‘m going to have to, what spare time i have got, i‘m going to have to work and stuff and get that extra money. stoke takes more than one quarter of its students from deprived areas, many from the local area, which creates a particular set of problems. according to the latest figures from staffordshire university, 38 first—year students dropped out entirely in the 2016 to 2017 academic year, citing money problems as the reason why. what that basically means is that one in 25 students had to stop studying because they couldn‘t afford to. that may be why staffordshire is one of only a handful of campuses with a food bank on site. yeah, so we‘ve got everything. we‘ve got all the pasta and stuff here, the dried ingredients. it comes through an adviser, either through the university or ourselves. they assess what the best route is to help that student, so it‘s never abused and because of the stigma of using food banks anyway, you wouldn‘t want to use it unless you have to.
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ben is about to move into student accommodation. he‘s been at stoke‘s ymca for five years, since he came off the streets, but now he‘s at university, someone else needs his room. my standard charge is £15 a week to live here. the house i‘m going to be staying in costs £75 a week to live in. i haven‘t really been thinking about it, as of yet. this is kind of make or break for me. and that‘s how i look at it. it‘s not an option. i‘m not going to drop out. that‘s it. the conker tree has been put on the official extinction list. ravaged by moths and disease, the horse chestnut is now classified as vulnerable to extinction. the tree is among 454 native european tree species, which were assessed for their risk of extinction by the international union for the conservation of nature.
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of those, 42% are threatened with extinction. and 58% of europe‘s endemic trees — those that don‘t exist anywhere else on earth — are threatened. david allen is from the international union for conservation of nature, who is one of the authors behind the report. many of the widespread species are still in quite good condition, but the main reason for this high level of threat is that many of the threatened species have very small populations. they are often island endemics or they are small things occur in quite small and discrete populations and that is the reason for them being threatened. they are endemic trees. what do we do to replace them if they are dying out? one of the key things is that we need a lot more research. we need to preserve some of the species in conservation like botanical gardens to ensure that if they do become extinct we can at least
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reintroduce them. how do you make sure that they are healthy? that they are going to be able to resist the diseases that are putting them at risk now. well... that is a big problem. we need more research into the impacts of introduced species and pathogens and pests. and we also need much better bio—security. we need to prevent them from coming in the first place. how do we do that? it is checking material before it comes into the continent. it is making sure that we have... that we test the material when it is here to make sure that when it comes to our local garden centre, that it does not carry these diseases.
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that was david allen. climate change activist greta thunberg, who inspired a "flight—shaming" movement against air travel, has spearheaded a strike in montreal, where un aviation leaders have been gathering to debate plane emission targets. the 16—year—old campaigner has been speaking at the protest. she was asked why she thinks grown men in powerful positions are afraid of her after president trump recently mocked her. ido i do not understand why grown—ups would choose to mock children, teenagers forjust would choose to mock children, teenagers for just communicating would choose to mock children, teenagers forjust communicating and acting on the science when they can do something good instead. but i guess they must... feel like their world view or interests or whatever it is is threatened by us and that is something we should take as a compliment, that we are having so much impact that... people want to
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silence us. we are being too loud for people to handle, so they try to silence us. so we should also take that as a compliment. laughter. she was speaking in montreal. that is all from us on afternoon live. carrie gracie will be here in a few minutes with the news at five. first it‘s time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello there. low—pressure bringing a very unsettled day today. windy for england in the way torrential showers with a risk of some localised flooding. there it is showing up on the pressure chart. this feature would some tropical air mixed into it is going to be deepening low, which will be arriving on our shore during this weekend. but we end the day with plenty of heavy showers pushing off towards into the southeastern areas. some sunshine in between too. temperatures mid to high teens. a little bit cooler than what we have had the last couple of days. and then we see another batch of showers pushing in overnight into central and western areas. some of these will be quite heavy. for most areas again,
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double figures overnight. there will be a few chilli spots across northern scotland under clear skies. perhaps down into the low, single digits out of town. that is today‘s area of low pressure, pushing off into the north sea. this is the new area of low pressure, which means business and it will arrive saturday night and into sunday. it will bring some wet and windy weather. saturday, it does not look too bad. we have got a brief reach of high pressure between these other systems. so it looks like many of the showers will fizzle out through the day, increasing amounts of sunshine. not too bad if you are in that sunshine. temperatures of 16 to 19 degrees. but things go downhill quickly across the southwest of the uk as this low—pressure arrives. it will bring a spell of very heavy and persistent rain to swathes of england and wales. and notice the squeeze in the isobars behind the rain there. it is going to turn very windy with south—westerly gusts reaching 40 to 50 miles an hour, maybe even stronger than that. the heavy rain will continue to pivot and move towards the east during sunday morning. it could be very wet across northern/eastern parts of england for a while,
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but not so wet for scotland and northern ireland here. a few showers around, but also some good sunny spells and it will feel quite cool. the wind is pushing down from the north. generally the high teens for the south. and there is a sting in the tail this area of low pressure as we move through sunday. it will push off into the north sea. we will see another band of strong winds. gusts reaching 50, 60 miles an hour across central and eastern areas and this will coincide with high tides along the east coast. there could be some coastal flooding as well. so it is all happening this weekend. a spell of very heavy rain followed by gales, thanks to this deep area of low pressure. but keep tuned to the weather forecast. a quick peek into next week. it looks like mid week we could see high—pressure settling things down briefly before it turns more unsettled again.
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today at five... a former cabinet minister warns downing street about the danger of inflammatory language. amber rudd accuses number 10 of using words that could incite violence, but borisjohnson defends his description of the law to stop a no—deal brexit. can you use words like surrender to describe a certain act, a certain bill, and quite frankly, i think that you can. nicola sturgeon says the snp could back a caretaker government led byjeremy corbyn to prevent a no—deal brexit. the opposition needs to act to get boris johnson, the most disreputable prime minister in my lifetime, out of office, stop a no deal and then as quickly as possible move to a general election. we‘ll be asking the snp‘s leader at westminster

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