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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 29, 2019 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines. borisjohnson insists he's a "model of restraint" as he defends his conduct in the row about language in the brexit debate. i certainly think everybody should calm down. and i certainly think... including you? i think i've been a model of restraint. but i think everybody should calm down. the conservative party conference is underway in manchester. earlier, tory mps were warned against backing jeremy corbyn as a caretaker prime minister. ijust say this. history would never forgive you. parents are urged to have conversations with their children about organ donation in the hope that more young people willjoin the donor register. exit polls suggest austria's former chancellor, sebastian kurz, will win the general election just four months since he
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was ousted from power. hong kong sees further clashes between police and pro—democracy protesters ahead of the 70th anniversary of communist rule in china. lewis hamilton wins after sebastian vettel ignores team orders in the russian grand prix. good afternoon. the foreign secretary, dominic raab, has told the conservative party conference in manchester that the government will strive in faith for a good brexit deal. but he said if the eu "spurned the opportunity" for what he called a "win—win" agreement, the uk would leave at the end of october, "no ifs, no buts". earlier borisjohnson insisted he'd
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been a "model of restraint" when speaking about brexit. the prime minister refused to apologise for words such as "surrender" when describing the legislation designed to stop the uk leaving the european union without a deal. this report from our political correspondent jonathan blake at the conservative party conference in manchester and it does contains some flash photography. despite the weather, manchester might be a welcome change of scene for the prime minister, after a week in westminster he may want to forget. why did you lie to parliament, boris? why did you lie to the queen? when are you going to resign, boris? and accusations have followed him here that his use of language about brexit is dangerous, that downing street is exploiting divisions, even inciting violence. labour say boris johnson should be ashamed. his response? it's an overreaction. well, i certainly think everybody should calm down and i certainly think... including you? i think i've been a model of restraint. my use of the word "humbug" was in the context of people trying to prevent me, us from using the word "surrender". my intention... so you can say sorry for the misunderstanding at least?
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i can certainly say sorry for the misunderstanding, because my... 0k. from the moment he arrived last night, and at every turn throughout this conference, borisjohnson‘s message will be clear, despite warnings about the consequences coming out of the eu by the end of october, with or without a deal is what people want and need. i think that the best thing for the country, and the best thing for people's overall psychological health, would be to get brexit done. the prime minister, we are told, will speak to other eu leaders over the next few days and he says there is a good chance of doing a deal. but, if he cannot get an agreement over the line, will he step aside? i have undertaken to lead the party, and my country, at a difficult time and i am going to continue to do that. i believe it is my responsibility. questions, too, for the prime minister, about his friendship with the businesswoman, jennifer arcuri, and whether she received special treatment on trade visits, while mrjohnson was mayor of london. an emphatic denial
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he did anything wrong. everything was done in accordance with all... i asked you a very specific question. you have to declare an interest, did you declare it? there was no interest to declare. well, she was a friend of yours, she got public money... let's be absolutely clear, i'm very, very proud of everything we did and, certainly, everything i did, as the mayor of london. and with that, the prime minister was off to north manchester general hospital, to highlight the government's pledge to fund new nhs facilities and rebuild existing ones. this is the biggest ever investment... six hospital trusts will get a share of £2.7 billion, with more promised in the future, if the tories can hold onto power. jonathan blake, bbc news, manchester. our chief political correspondent vicki young is in manchester. thousands of people took part in a march protesting about the prime minister # brexit agenda outside of
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the conference. let's hearfrom lindsay smith. the first of two protest marches through manchester city centre has just finished and as you say, thousands of people have, for this march. greater manchester police say they expected 100,000 protesters and that they were well placed to manage such a scale of protest. indeed, we've seen coaches arrive from across the country today and greater manchester police are being assisted by forces from across the country. now, borisjohnson is not unfamiliar with protests at the moment that these have been timed to coincide perfectly with the conservative party conference which is happening here in the city of manchester today and certainly as the protesters passed the conference venue, they slowed down and tried to make their voices heard. now, this first march has been organised by the people's assembly against austerity. there's a second march expected to be of a similar size later on this afternoon and that's organised by reject brexit and defend 0ur democracy group. so far, the atmosphere here has been
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very calm and peaceful. there's lots of families and greater manchester police are asking for that peaceful protest to continue. there's lots of families and greater manchester police are asking for that peaceful protest to continue. we will be talking about ted young who is at the conference during the course of this half—hour. in other political news today that labour mps have rallied to support dame margaret hodge, who is facing a re—selection battle after her constituency voted for the chance to pick a new candidate. the former labour deputy leader harriet harman said she was dismayed by the move, saying "surely this cannot stand". the former foreign secretary david miliband said it was "mad, truly crazy," and that, "any constituency would be lucky to have margaret as their mp." and the deputy leader of the labour party tom watson said he had "no doubt margaret will win a full selection" but that the process was an unnecessary distraction on the cusp of a general election.
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dame margaret, who'sjewish and has been critical ofjeremy corbyn‘s handling of anti—semitism in the party, said she was "disappointed" but would fight to keep her seat in east london. ina suit in a suit she has elected —— representatives wanting a by 1994. polls have just closed in austria's general election, with the former chancellor sebastian kurz looking to return to powerjust four months after he was ousted from office. a no confidence vote brought down his government when a video surfaced showing his coalition partner offering government contracts in exchange for campaign support. from a russian businesswoman. 0ur correspondent bethany bell is following developments in austria. this is quite a turnaround isn't it because in part of the apparent colla pse because in part of the apparent collapse and support for that party
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that was mired in the scandal, the far right freedom party. by 1096 according to the first projected results and exit polls. they have really seemed to have been punished by the voters for that rather spectacular scandal that emerged in may when the former leader of the party was caught in a secret video staying in a villa in beats a when he was posing as the needs of a russian auger. —— a villa in ibiza. it was picked up by sebastian kurz of the conservatives. it was interesting, mr kurz was chancellor when the government fell apart in may. he has emerged relatively unscathed from that scandal and now has had this strong result but he
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has had this strong result but he has now the difficult task of trying to put together a coalition. as he tried to go back into a packed again with the far right freedom party or will he try something different? will he try to go into a coalition with the resurgent green party or even try a three—way coalition with the and the liberal party? interesting rebuff to those critics of mr kurz‘s decision to form a coalition in the first place. they said he would be tainted by them and cause conservative support because judging by this result he has not been damaged and innocence he has been damaged and innocence he has been revitalised but what has happened. after the scandal there has become a much stronger position for his party and an endorsement of a career that's relatively in the early stages. he is relatively young to be the chancellor of austria? yes
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he is 33 years old but he is in a delicate position now. his next coalition partner is a very big decision for him because it would be... the easiest option would be to possibly in terms of content to try and renew a coalition with the far right freedom party. they share a lot of policies in common when it comes to things like anti—migration. however, that is very risky because the freedom party is very unstable at the moment and one coalition has already fallen apart. if mr kurz is thinking about his legacy, he may well prefer a pact with the green party, the resurgent green party. and one of the things this election has shown in austria is that green issues are increasingly important to people here in austria. but that is difficult too because the greens have a lot of left—wing supporters, they are very pro—migration and
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integration and that also could be quite difficult for mr kurz. it was interesting, the other day the head of the green party suggested that mr kurz was perhaps ideologically flexible and that it could be a possibility to try and do some sort of pa ct possibility to try and do some sort of pact with him interesting prospects ahead austria. bethany bell there in vienna. let's cross to vicki young. she is at the conservative party conference in manchester. vicki. hear the messages increased extremely clear. we have borisjohnson on the airwaves saying get brexit done. and it is been reiterated in the hall during speeches as well. and really framing this whole argument as parliament trying to block brexit against the will of the people boris johnson trying to say that he is on the side of those who voted to get brexit done. and his view is that
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people are fed up with that. they wa nt to people are fed up with that. they want to move on, they want to leave at the and of october come what may alter without a deal. there's also been the political attacks that you would imagine on opponents. this was michael gove talking about the labour leaderjeremy corbyn. soft on terrorism, supine on security, bankrupt economically and a danger to minorities, jeremy corbyn is totally unfit to be prime minister of our country. and there has been a lot of discussion about the use of language around this whole brexit debate. remember those very angry scenes in the house of commons last week. borisjohnson scenes in the house of commons last week. boris johnson singh scenes in the house of commons last week. borisjohnson singh everyone needs to calm down and that he has been a moderate in linda's language. not how his opponents see it but a lot of talk about coups and betrayal and this was the leader of the house of commons jacob rees—mogg in his speech earlier. it is as steve was intimating not
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unity at all. it is a remainer coup to try to frustrate and stop was 17.4 million people voted for. and the comeuppance they will get if they defy the electorate will come in the ballot box when we come to a general election. so fear nothing that they tried to do, if you're nothing of their scree —— schemes and stratagems. because we will have and stratagems. because we will have a general election and parties that denied democracy get into great trouble when people have the chance to vote. and i would have thought the liberal democrats after their experience of coalition would be wa ry experience of coalition would be wary of going into coalition with jeremy corbyn. the last two times they try to, they got wiped out in ensuing general elections. how sad that would be. the liberal democrats and some former conservatives are saying they're not prepared to back jeremy corbyn as an interim ca reta ker jeremy corbyn as an interim caretaker or prime minister even to get that brexit delay which some of them want. there's been a lot of talk about a vote of no—confidence
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in the house of commons although that seems unlikely to happen this week. we will have to wait and what's because —— discusses with ben bradley. jacob rees—mogg saying it's a remainer coup. this is democracy, isn't it? there has been a lot of that kind of language. no party has been calling... the other party has been calling... the other party has been calling... the other party has been calling it coups and betrayal. a lot of blame in last week's speech in the commons. we know that that kind of language and much worse has been around for a long time. to be honest, there is a lot of growing up that needs to be done. we can'tjust go around saying he said she said. there is stuff to be done that is quite important. get brexit done is the motto here. we can see it very clearly behind you there. another problem is for borisjohnson saying that if he doesn't get a deal by the end of october he must ask for an extension to article 50, a delay to brexit. do you think you should
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break the law and not do it? we need to abide by the law and we have said that we agree or disagree with the supreme court and whatever has come forward we have to comply with that andl forward we have to comply with that and i am sure we will. we also need to deliver brexit. how do square that circle? i think the narrative and the conversation has shifted and in recent weeks. and other elements. the prime minister has seen it is increasing positive and the best way would be to get a deal back to comments. what is your message to labour mps comments. what is your message to labourmps and comments. what is your message to labour mps and former colleagues have been booted out of the parliament tripathi? we except the prime minister potts idea was not good enough. public and views are atrocious. it needs to better... is just a backs up your unhappy with? it makes the other problems temporary problems, but there are more changes to be had there i am
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sure. for me, we are increasingly any situation where it will be a case of an improved or the prospect of lib dems and weber and snp and scrapping brexit altogether. a stark choice for us to make. some of your former car to macro colleagues here, david gore, algebra, where their right to turn appear?|j david gore, algebra, where their right to turn appear? i think they are conserved to members and they have not been booted out from our perspective. would join to see them come back? we need to get brexit done. and if that is not something they are entirely committed to the government delivering that... a lot of people over it but no deal and even some people who voted for brexit will be worried by the process of nokia because we hear from people like michael gove who are in charge of the no deal planning that there will be short—term disruption and problems stop with no one is trying to say that it... that the beautiful green grass on the other side, it will be challenging. but a lot of money has gone into
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mitigating those challenges. whether it is with a deal or without a deal, andl it is with a deal or without a deal, and i think the most damaging thing is this continued delay and uncertainties so many businesses in my constituency or same for god sake and we decide so that we know what out and we decide so that we know what our field will look like? thank you very much indeed. i talking to one inside earlier that the problem with the hillary vent act is that they fear the message it is sending to businesses is that you don't have to be paired for the end of october. they are trying to get everyone ready for leaving the eu. —— the benn act. come what may. and vicki young at the conservative party conference in manchester. let's look at the headlines at 17 it's past borisjohnson insists he's a "model of restraint" as he defends his conduct in the row about language in the brexit debate. parents are urged to have conversations with their children
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about organ donation in the hope that more young people willjoin the donor register. exit polls suggest austria's former chancellor, sebastian kurz, will win the general election — just four months since he was ousted from power. picking up on one of those stories and our headlines parents should include children in conversations about organ donation, according to the organisation that oversees transplants in the uk. nhs blood and transplant says young patients are waiting on average more than two and a half times longer than adults for similar transplants. 0ur reporter geraint thomas has been following the story of lilly who had a double transplant at the age of 11. my name is lilly kendall. i am 11 years old, and i am waiting for a heart and lung double transplant. at one stage, it looked likely lilly wouldn't even reach the age of 11. she spent herfirst three months in hospital with heart complications. medics advised her family to switch off her life—support machine. they managed to control her condition for nine years,
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but then, she needed a lung and heart transplant. fewer than five children, across the uk, were on the double transplant waiting list at the time. hearts and lungs, in particular, need to be matched by size, so lilly was relying on a child organ donor. we've had a lot of difficult conversations, talking about her funerals, what she would like. this is my daughter's life. this will change her life, and give me my daughter back. a week after we filmed with lilly, she got the call. she was taken to great 0rmond street hospital, where the double transplant operation took over seven hours to complete. these were lilly's first breaths, with her new lungs. i feel very amazing, very happy. i didn't think i would survive without these new heart and lungs. getting more donors to help patients, like lilly, is the challenge.
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children can sign the organ donor register, and if they are competent to make that decision, then that should be given the same weight as if an adult had signed it. but obviously the final decision, as with adults, is with families, and, therefore, we need families to talk together about what those wishes are. geraint thomas, bbc news. hundreds of people have been protesting outside a church in antrim in northern ireland, which received millions of pounds in donations from the parent company of wrightbus. the bus—making firm went into administration, earlier this week, following financial problems leaving 1200 people redundant. a short time agojohn campbell, who's the bbc‘s northern ireland economics and business editor, told me just how significant this company is to the local economy. it was one of the most successful manufacturing employers, its most famous product was the new london route master that red double—decker but in recent years had been under
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increasing financial pressure and into administration at the end of last week costing more than 1,000 people at theirjobs. the reason that some of those workers were protesting outside that church today was to do with donations which that church received from wrightbus. this church received from wrightbus. this church is called green pastures, the leader is called jeff wright. he was also the controlling shareholder of wrightbus and in the years between 2012 and 2017, wrightbus donated more than £15 million to the green pastors church. what they were asking was did these donations we can the company and hasten the job losses quiz that they want answers about how the company was run in recent yea rs. about how the company was run in recent years. the right family who controlled it and said that they we re controlled it and said that they were not responsible for the fall of the business because the majority of the business because the majority of the £50 million was donated at a time that wrightbus was returning
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good profits. what sink the comedy was a deep downturn in the uk bus market, demand for buses in the uk has been falling for the past few yea rs. has been falling for the past few years. —— what did sink the company. many of the workers were angry and that they do not fully have an expedition how this business was run in the last two years. it is interesting that some of the reports of these protests say that despite the anger there is about these donations and whether or not they might have contributed to the financial problems that subsequently hurt them, sir william wright helped found the company, he received quite a warm response to talk to the protesters outside. there is a big diss —— difference in how william wright who is perceived and jeff wright who is perceived and jeff wright who is perceived and jeff wright who has controlled the company and how he is perceived. sir william wright received a round of applause from many of those protesters today. on the day the company went bust, william wright
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came out to address some of the staff and was appointed at that time. but if you look at some of the posters which have been around bellamy in recent days, some of the slogans which have been scrawled on work shirts and hung from the factory gates, there are more questions and anger directed towards jeff wright the man in control of the company in recent years and the man who is also the pastor at that church. geoff three did not come at the street to the workers or media, but he made a cheer type macro tea rful but he made a cheer type macro tearful address to congregation stu d e nts tearful address to congregation students in the church and he said he did all he could to help those workers on site find newjobs and asked his congregation to pray for those redundant workers. and john campbell there in belfast. there are almost 60 flood warnings in place across england and 13 for walesafter heavy rain caused travel disruption for parts of the uk. persistent downpours led to localised flooding and difficult driving conditions in parts of north east scotland. elsewhere a mudslide forced rail services in lancashire to be cancelled. there've been more violent clashes in hong kong's main shopping district —
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after the latest pro—democracy protests. thousands of people have been taking part in the unauthorised rallies, and riot police used tear gas to try to break up the crowds. it comes as china prepares to mark the 70th anniversary of communist rule. 0ur correspondent stephen mcdonell is in hong kong. ina sign in a sign of master sent thousands of residents of hong kong to susa say despite they found —— were told to do so, despite tear gas rubber bullets use against them, they marched through the streets and we had everything from peaceful protesters marching, singing, and chanting and at the other end of the spectrum, barricades being set on fire, molotov cocktails, bricks being thrown at police headquarters. the police have come in with a tough response and for both sides this is really a dress rehearsal for tuesday. both the activists and the authorities are getting ready for
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this 70th anniversary of communist rule in china. beijing once said to bea rule in china. beijing once said to be a celebration of everything that is great about the country or the achievements over seven decades of rule. the protesters are determined to crash the party and instead they wa nt to to crash the party and instead they want to draw attention to the claims that there should be democratic reforms in hong kong. for that reason, we are looking at a very big showdown in the coming days and both the activists and the police have shown what they are prepared to do when that day comes around. steven mcdonnell in hong kong. the us retailer, cvs pharmacy, is the latest to suspend the sale of a heartburn drug which is being investigated for links to cancer. it follows concern in several countries over zantac and other similiar products. canada and france have already announced recalls. the us and the european union are investigating. two people have died and several others have been injured at a theme park in mexico city. all the victims
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were passengers on a roller—coaster when one of the carriages fell off the track at the la feria amusement park. an investigation is under way to establish the cause of the accident. the government, campaign groups and the police have been warning about the rise of far—right extremism across the uk. but the bbc‘s countryfile programme reports on how a new belief called "eco—fascism" is taking extremism into the countryside. here's charlotte smith. far—right extremism is on the rise, not just in cities but in the countryside. neo—nazis have even been holding night time gatherings at english heritage and national trust sites, such as this one here in avebury, in wiltshire. there is a strand of nazism which goes back to heinrich himmler... professor roger griffin says far right extremists are now interested in rural and environmental issues. what modern fascists are happily doing is making a link between what they consider to be the pollution of the race
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through such things as mass migration and cosmopolitanism and pollution of the countryside, what this leads to is this term, eco—fascism. but it is feared such extreme views are becoming easier to access. and that's thanks to a new breed of radical for great activists, far right activists, who are using social media to reach a younger audience. this group is called british revival. it portrays itself as a patriotic alternative to extinction rebellion. but we did a little more digging, and we found it was set up by a man called michael wrenn, this is him with a group called generation identity, a group the government says promotes damaging and extreme views. michael wrenn ran their rural division in the south—west. so, is british revival simply a front for the same extreme views on immigration that generation identity has?
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british people are slowly becoming a minority in their own country. it's the way generation identity may choose to portray it that i don't agree with. are they markedly different though, if we are honest? we are in the same general ballpark, but that could be said about a lot of groups. the government's advisers, the commission for countering extremism, says british revival is a frightening example of hateful extremism. when countryfile approached facebook with its finding, they closed british revival and the michael wrenn's pages. charlotte smith, bbc news. and you can see charlotte's full report on countryfile on bbc one tonight at 6.15pm now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. all that heavy rain, the water running down the river catchments. we have a number of flood warnings in force across england and wales. with more heavy rain and the forecast the next couple of days the
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situation could get worse before it gets better. the area of low pressure responsible for the wet weather will bring strong winds across east anglia and southeast england before it clears away taking the rain with it. the skies clear, it will turn out to be a chilly naive and near towns and cities temperatures get down to single figures. we could have mist and fog patches around and also showers which should continue to affect northern scotland. that will be there first thing monday as well. the rest of us otherwise having a fine start to the day but it will not stay like that. the next area of low pressure moves in. that will bring in another bout of heavy rain across england and wales and with another 70 mm across england and wales and with another70 mm rain across england and wales and with another 70 mm rain forecasts in the high ground, that could lead to further localised flooding problems. that's your weather.
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hello, this is bbc
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news with shaun ley. the headlines: the prime minister insists he's been a "model of restraint" in his use of language about brexit. i certainly think everybody should calm down. including you? i think i've been a model of restraint, but i think everybody should calm down. at the conservative party conference in manchester tory mps have been warned against backing jeremy corbyn as a caretaker prime minister. to any of our colleagues or former colleagues who mayjust be tempted i'd just say this — history would never forgive you. hundreds of people have taken part in a protest outside a ballymena church which received millions of pounds in donations from wrightbus, where over 1,000 people lost their jobs. exit polls suggest austria's former chancellor, sebastian kurz, will win the general election just four months since he was ousted from power, after a video emerged showing his coalition partner offering government contracts
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in exchange for campaign support. parents are urged to have conversations with their children about organ donation in the hope that more young people willjoin the donor register. hong kong saw further clashes between police and pro—democracy protesters ahead of the 70th anniversary of communist rule in china. breaking news about an earthquake which has struck in chile on the coast. it is recorded as 7.2 magnitude by the geological survey which monitors earthquake activity. the quake was centred 83 miles west and had a shallow depth of 6.1
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miles. shallow quakes are potentially more dangerous than deeper ones. i wouldn't claim to understand why that is but if we are talking to an expert about this in the next couple of hours i'm sure they will explain that one. we are waiting to see what damage has been caused by this earthquake. it is a relatively large sized town in chile but it is near the coast, about 83 miles, 134 kilometres west of the town of talca. no soon army warning has been issued although it is on the coast. we will keep across that over the course of the next few minutes. sport and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here'sjohn. good afternoon. many are calling it one of wales's
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greatest world cup victories, their 29—25 win over australia in their second pool game, leaves them favourites to finish top of the group and a more favourable draw in the knockout stages. katie gornall is in tokyo. this was a game that these fans will remember for a very long time. one that more than lived up to its box office billing. it was exciting and exhilarating. despite the hot and humid conditions here in tokyo, wales burst out of the blocks early on with that try. australia hit back in the first half, when gareth davies broke free to, you sensed all the momentum was with wales. you have to give full credit to assure you further
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the way they surged back into this match, scoring two tries and a penalty in the second half to get to within a point of wales. the tension at that point was written all over the face of the welsh coach. what they needed at that point where cool heads and they had that in the replacement fly—half who was on for dan biggar who went off at half—time. wales were able to hold on and secure a memorable victory to mark them out as real contenders to win the whole world cup. a memorable day for wales captain alun wyn jones who received his record 130th cap, understandably he is in good mood. i'm pretty happy with the character we showed, particularly in the second half. at times it was dodgy, we had a great first half then we we re we had a great first half then we were tentative in the second half, but pleased with the result. it's a lwa ys but pleased with the result. it's always easiest to defend a lead, which we did in the second half, but credit to the guys, they came at us with everything in the second half.
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scotland are the next home nation in action. they play their second match against samoa tomorrow. they of course lost their first to ireland but following their defeat to japan yesterday, it leaves the group wide open. paul barnes has been following the scotland squad. after several days of fierce criticism in the wake of the dreadful display against ireland, gregor townsend has had his say on the team and has made a few big selection calls for monday's match against samoa. he is change the entire back row withjohn barclay and brian wilson missing out on a starting place. there are also changes on the back line with darcy graham coming in on the wing and chris harris makes a start to in centre. several changes for gregor townsend, five in total, but that is the team he thinks can do the job and what is a must win match against samoa. a point to prove in all of
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that, we want the responsibility to get involved with the national team to give our best. players are aware you may not get another opportunity. for those that haven't been selected this week, they have given that opportunity and someone else now has that opportunity to perform so points to prove, but we have a big performance, to give against russia andjapan and performance, to give against russia and japan and see where that takes us. one line from the england camp today. piers francis has been cleared to play after a disciplinary panel decided not to uphold his citing for a red card after a high tackle during england's win over the usa on thursday. the panel said the tackle ought to have resulted in a yellow card on the field. lewis hamilton won the russian grand prix to inch closer to a sixth world title. ferrari's race unravelled after sebastien vettel disobeyed team orders by refusing to let team—mate charles leclerc through, the german eventually retiring with engine problems as leclerc finished third, having started from pole. nick parrott reports.
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it is a victory lewis hamilton will savour because it was so unexpected. for the fourth race in a row, charles leclerc started at pole but his team—mate thought the. platt of the plan was to let vettel hand back the wind to laclerc but he refused. after much moaning on the radio, ferrari got charles leclerc back on in front. engine problems ended their hopes of victory. when racing resumed, lewis hamilton surged into an unassailable lead on the way to his ninth win of the season. what should have been a one—two finish for ferrari became a one—two finish for mercedes, strengthening their grip on the championships while leaving ferrari
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questioning their way forward. elsewhere in motorsport, northern ireland'sjonathan rea secured a fifth straight world superbike title with two he took victory in race two at magny—cours and becomes the first rider to win five world superbikes titles. leicester are hoping to continue their impressive start to the season as they feature in this afternoon's kick off in the premier league, they're hosting newcastle at the king power stadium. they made a brilliant start thanks to riccardo perriera's opener in the first half. newcastle have had midfielder issac hayden sent off for a straight red card. a hatrick of headers from 0llie watkins gave brentford all three point against barnsley in the chammpionship, despite going 1—0 down after just 59 seconds. watkins is on a brilliant run having scored seven of his side's eight championship goals this season, they remain though in the bottom half of the table. arsenal have been impressive
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as they continued the defece of their women's suerleague title with another win that keeps them top of the tabel on goal difference from manchester city women. it's now three from three after victory over brighton. and a special moment for england's jordan nobbs, who scored her first goal since returning from the lengthy injury which ruled her out of the world cup. and what was arsenal's fourth in a 4—0 win. manchester city maintained their 100% start thanks to steph horton's early free kick against everton. totte na hm beat westha m 2—0 while chelsea won easily at bristol city. it's day three of the world athletics championships in doha. five gold medals up for grabs this evening and one of those could go to dina asher smith who's hoping to become the first british woman to win a world championship sprint
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medal when in the 100 metres. she's doubling up in the 200 meters as well, and could feasibly walk away with three golds from the championships. but she will face tough competition from 0lympic champion shelly anne fraser pryce and elaine thompson who've both run the fastest times in the event this year. the semifinals get underway at 7:20. the final is at 9:20. you can follow the action live from doha on bbc2 from 5:30. full coverage on the bbc sport website, mobile app and bbc radio 5 live too, of course. the world marathon record was almost broken in berlin today. ethiopia's kenenisa bekele fell just two seconds short, the record was set by eliud kipchoge in last year's race. kipchoge was absent this time as he prepares for his sub—two—hour marathon attempt in vienna on 12 0ctober. the men's road race title was won
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by mads pedersen as wet conditions saw the race shortened in yorkshire. he becomes the first dane to win the title, teo geoghen hart was the highest finishing brit, but was way down the field outside the top twenty. patrick gearey reports. this was no day for a bike ride. relentless rain meant this would be a road race with a difference, the route shortened and diverted, the writer is battling through miles of treacherous waterlogged country —— riders. spectators were on the hillside. a test of technique and tenacity. the race bottlenecked as it entered had a town built around spa water, covered in rainwater. 0ne of the favourites philip gilbert could recover the ground lost. 0thers fell away including the defending champion. adam yates and ben swift fought hard to stay in it but the race was being stretched by
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a series of exhausting attacks. the final duel was against the italian and danish mads pedersen. the riveting race had a final twist. what a race and what a victory for mads pedersen, the new world champion roared home in the rain. the weather has been awful but the enthusiasm of the crowd right along the route has made this a day of celebration as well as saturation. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. leicester are now 2—0 up thanks to jamie vardy.
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as a youth climate movement led by the activist greta thunberg sweeps the globe the issue of america's use of fossil fuels looks set to be a battleground topic in next year's us presidential election. but in some of the president's stronghold states the interests of the coal industry and concerns about climate change have already come head to head, as our correspondent james cook reports. it was the day the uk voted to leave the european union. but nobody cared about that in white sulphur springs. they were fighting to survive the worst flood anyone here could remember. 23 people did not. three years on, the creek is silent, but the horror remains. that's the tree that my wife was in... belinda scott was found clinging to this tree, badly burned. her husband, ronnie, had been scrambling to rescue herfrom their home, when the house exploded. i got stuck, right on the edge
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of the water, in mud. i was praying to god. my wife ended up at the burns centre... it was really nasty. i ended up on the floor, crying. so, we're headed up to a couple of our research plots, where we have induced an artificial drought experiment... this scientist says the trees have a tale to tell. longer droughts, and more intense storms, driven by climate change. they seem to be occurring more frequently, and the magnitude or the size of those storms appear to be greater. but the critical thing to understand is that the entire system as a whole is becoming more variable.
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we saw that most notably, i think, in 2016 with those catastrophic floods. yes, the 2016 flood in the greenbrier valley was absolutely catastrophic. and incidentally, we have had very large storms, floods, almost every year since 2016, as well. and so, students are taking action. protesting outside university, even in coal—rich west virginia. just like we had acid in here, we're increasing the acid level in this vial right here. nasa funds 0livia young, to demonstrate climate science in schools. most of the time, i talk to little kids, and so sometimes i will get questions like, "oh, but my mommy and daddy said this." i don't try to step on parents' toes. i try really hard not to do that. with the older students, we do try to engage more in active conversation. but some coal miners are scornful. you have to have consistent, reliable electric power. that doesn't come from windmills, doesn't come from solar panels,
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doesn't come from pixie dust, doesn't come from unicorns and doesn't come from well—wishes. that comes from fossil fuel. so, president trump has been a relief to us. he has been a breath of fresh air. we think he shares our values. there is not much evidence of a coal boom undeertrump, but the fuel still holds a strong pull. coal runs through this state in more ways than one. for many west virginians, for many years, it's put bread on the table. but it's also been part and parcel of their family identity. even here, though, deep in coal country, that may now be changing. and, for ronnie, the issue is as personal as his grief. all right. i want to thank y'all. thank you. man, i want to know what we're to do about this global warming. it's terrible. like i said, people need to change. it is a powerful plea.
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borisjohnson defends his language in the brexit debate on the opening day of the conservative party conference. speaking in manchester, the prime minister said "tempers on both sides have become enflamed." i certainly think everybody should calm down. including you? i think i've been a model of restraint. at the conference, new funding for hospitals in england has been announced. we'll have the details. also on the programme... running street battles in hong kong mark some of the worst violence in more than three months of anti—government protests. a bbc investigation uncovers suffering and abuse at licensed puppy farms in west wales. parkes is there...
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and it's a thriller at the rugby world cup, as wales hold on to beat australia. good evening. borisjohnson says he's been "a model of restraint" when it comes to his use of language in the brexit debate. he was speaking on the opening day of the conservative party conference in manchester. the prime minister refused to apologise for using words such as "surrender" when describing the legislation designed to stop the uk leaving the european union without a deal. this report from our political correspondent jonathan blake contains some flash photography. you can't miss the message the conservatives want to hammer home here — get brexit done might be a simple slogan, but the reality has
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been farfrom simple slogan, but the reality has been far from easy for the prime minister so far. and he has arrived here facing questions about how he has tried to argue his case, accusations that his language has got out of hand. he should be ashamed, say labour, but boris johnson says all sides need to pause for breath. well, i certainly think everybody should calm down. including you? i thinki everybody should calm down. including you? i think i have everybody should calm down. including you? i thinki have been a model of restraint. my use of the word humbug was in the context of people trying to prevent me, us, from using the word surrender. so you can say sorry for the misunderstanding at least?|j you can say sorry for the misunderstanding at least? i can certainly say sorry for the misunderstanding. whatever words he uses, from the moment he set foot in manchester, boris johnson's uses, from the moment he set foot in manchester, borisjohnson's message won't change, that brexit should happen by the end of october, come what may. and it's in the country's interests to make sure of it.|j think the best thing for the country, and the best thing for peoples overall psychological health
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would be to get brexit done. no detail on how, given that parliament has passed a law forcing him to ask foran has passed a law forcing him to ask for an extension if a deal can't be done. but would he step aside, allowing someone else to do that?” have undertaken to lead the party and my country is a difficult time and my country is a difficult time andi and my country is a difficult time and i am going to continue to do that. i believe it's my responsibility. and inside the conference hall, you wouldn't know there was any attempt to delay brexit. key figures double down on the promise to leave by the end of 0ctober. the promise to leave by the end of october. if the eu spurned the opportunity for a win—win deal, we will leave at the end of october. no ifs, no buts. and if we don't get a deal by october the 31st, then we will have to leave without a deal. away from brexit, questions remain for the prime minister about his friendship with the business woman jennifer arcuri and whether she received special treatment on trade visits while mrjohnson was mayor of
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london, an emphatic denial he did anything wrong. everything was done in accordance... did you collect interest? there was no interest to declare. for all the questions facing the prime minister, it is brexit which will drown out everything else. jonathan blake, bbc news, manchester. the government's key announcement at the start of the conservative party conference was on funding for hospital projects in england. our health editor, hugh pym, takes a look at the details. new money for old hospitals, that's what today's announcement adds up to. here at the epsom and st helier trust in south—west london, they admit some of the buildings aren't fit for modern healthcare. now they have the green light for a new acute hospital, covering a&e and urgent care. it's likely to be built here, partly on this car park, one of the projects highlighted by ministers. what we're putting in place today is a ten year programme of hospital
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building and rebuilding. six of the projects will start immediately. the rest of them will develop the plans, but they are getting the go—ahead. so what are the details of the plan? £2.7 billion will be invested over five years at six trusts for new hospitals or upgrades. there's £100 million for another 34 to start planning for further projects over the next decade. following the announcement today, the prime minister visited north manchester general hospital. health leaders welcomed the news, but say it's just is still a backlog of repairs. it's good news for the six hospitals concerned, but they're just the tip of the iceberg. we know we have a £6 billion maintenance backlog. we know we have to invest in digital and how we transform care to provide a 21st century health service.
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so a good start, but we need a lot more. it's significant that the investment at this trust and others will come direct from the treasury and not from the controversial private finance initiative which imposed long—term cost burdens. but it remains to be seen precisely how the government intends to raise the money. the conservatives hope that in the long term, dozens more hospital facilities will be built, but that will be subject to who is in power and what is affordable at the time. hugh pym, bbc news. let's go back to manchester and the conservative party conference. 0ur political editor laura kuenssberg is there. laura, the prime minister has been robust in his defence of his language, and his party equally robust in its handling of brexit? yes, there is no sign whatsoever of borisjohnson somehow retreating from his strategy, the approach he has taken since he moved into downing street at the end ofjuly. as far as many people inside his tea m as far as many people inside his team and in the wider conservative party are concerned, their only real path to success is to stick to getting brexit done, as they suggest, by the end of the month. but the tricky thing is that in
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reality, that is looking extremely unlikely. there are plenty of people in westminster who think that it may be impossible and plenty more who are determined to do all they can to try to stop borisjohnson doing what he says he would be willing to do, which is taking us out of the eu without a deal if he hasn't been able to seal anything with european leaders. party conferences are pretty much always a bit like being ina pretty much always a bit like being in a parallel universe, but this time, this week, it is something else. parliament will still be sitting this week while the conservatives are gathering here in manchester, and it may be a pretty surreal and bumpy few days. laura kuenssberg there, in manchester. there have been running street battles in hong kong in some of the worst violence in more than three months of anti—government unrest. protesters threw molotov cocktails, and the police fired round after round of tear gas and rubber bullets. there were multiple arrests, as the authorities try to assert control, in the run up to the 70th anniversary of communist party rule in china, on tuesday. from hong kong,
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here'sjohn sudworth. they are determined to spoil the party. with just two days to go before china's big anniversary, hong kong is decidedly off message. while in beijing, rehearsals are in full swing for a celebration of 70 years of communist rule and a message of unity and strength, in hong kong, there is division. uncertainty, and fear. it's a faultline that cuts across classes and generations. 73—year—old mr chen is me the protective gear he wears when supporting the protesters. translation: for 17 years, the ruling party has subdued its people.
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do you think we are in the mood to celebrate? -- for 70 years. this lady is in favour of chinese rule and says the protests are scaring off mainland chinese tourists. translation: i still have business, but not as much as before. i have lost at least half of my revenue. with more protests planned on tuesday, the authorities are not taking chances. you can still taste the tear gas in the air. hong kong finds itself at the centre of a global clash of values, authoritarianism against freedom. on the streets of the city, china's vision of its future has run into a crisis of legitimacy. the chaos continued into the night. for some, it's a principled fight. for others, a doomed strategy that risks provoking an ever more powerful china to sweep this city's freedoms
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away for good. john sudworth, bbc news, hong kong. flood warnings are in place across england and wales and events have been cancelled due to heavy rain. persistent downpours have led to some rivers bursting their banks and roads overflowing. the heavy showers are expected early in the week. a bbc investigation into licensed puppy farming in west wales has found widespread suffering and abuse of dogs, despite regular checks by vets and council inspectors. the year—long investigation found dogs in filthy and unfit conditions, in premises that were meant to be inspected at least once a year. wyre davies has this special report. west wales has been called the capital of puppy farming, worth more than £12 million each year in wales alone, and which produces around 24,000 puppies annually. but in a year—long investigation, we found appalling conditions in farm after
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farm, all council approved

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