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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  September 30, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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you're watching bbc newsroom live — it's11am and these are the main stories this morning: the chancellor sajid javid promises "a significant economic policy response" — in the event of a no—deal brexit. we are working incredibly hard in getting a deal. i'm very much involved in that myself. in the number of meetings i've had, we are making good progress. and mrjavid said he had "full faith" in borisjohnson — over allegations he squeezed the thigh of a female journalist at a lunch 20 years ago. children could be made to have compulsory vaccinations before starting school — the government considers tough new measures after a surge in measles. thousands of women are dying from heart attacks because their symptoms go undiagnosed. customers hit by the collapse
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of thomas cook might have to wait up to two months to get a refund, say officials. and the funeral of the former french presidentjacques chirac — world leaders gather in paris — as france says farewell. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. i'm joanna gosling. the chancellor, sajid javid, has insisted the uk can still leave the eu without a deal despite a law which says the prime minister must ask for an extension if no agreement is reached. he said the government would obey the law, but that the policy set out by boris johnson of leaving with or without an agreement in october had not changed. he promised a significant economic policy response in the event of a
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no—deal brexit. at the conservative party conference, mrjavid is promising what he calls an "infrastructure revolution" with a £25 billion upgrade of england's roads, a national bus strategy and £5 billion for ultrafast broadband internet in the uk. but it's been a stormy week for boris johnson, culminating in number ten denying newspaper accusations that the prime minister squeezed a journalist's thigh under the table at a private lunch 20 years ago. away from manchester, opposition parties are expected to meet to discuss their next steps to try to halt a no—deal brexit. our assistant political editor norman smith is in manchester for us this morning. where do you want to start, norman? well, you can't escape from brexit, really. one of the striking things about this conference is, you just sense minds here are beginning to shift or perhaps the likelihood of no deal rather than some sort of agreement being reached at the last moment ahead of that october 17th and 18th summit. it was interesting
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listening to a sajid javed this morning sketching out some of the measures he would put in place in the event of no deal, suggesting for example that there could be tax cuts, that the bank of england could cuts, that the bank of england could cut interest rates just to try and smooth things out. also, standing by other ministers who have insisted, whatever the legislation in parliament, the act designed to thwart no deal, he and other ministers remain confident they can get round it. he was asked if he knew what the plan was, what was the bit of the law that the government was hoping to rely on — did you know? i think i do. you was hoping to rely on — did you know? i thinkl do. you know there isa know? i thinkl do. you know there is a way round this law? the intention of the law is clear, and i do think it has absolutely made it harder for the government to get a deal that we all want to see, but that said, it can still be done.
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elsewhere, he said he had spoken to the prime minister about the charlotte edwards allegations. this is the journalist who alleges that some 20 years ago at a lunch at the spectator, where she was working on borisjohnson was editor, that he squeezed her thigh. downing street have denied that. sajid javed said he had sought reassurances from him and was satisfied by what he had been told. not so, it would seem, justine greening, who thought it did raise significant issues. justine greening, who thought it did raise significant issueslj justine greening, who thought it did raise significant issues. i can't comment on those accusations, but they are deeply concerning, and in a sense, they go to the heart of this question about character and integrity of people in public life and what standards the electorate have a right to expect. of course, denied very firmly by number ten. it's up to them how they respond to them. i'm saying i do think there is a question of character and
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integrity. and that also goes as far as the prime minister being straight with the british public about what he is asking europe for on their behalf. joining me now is the former conservative leader iain duncan smith. let's just start with no deal. my assertion that people here are beginning to think that is perhaps the likely outcome. are beginning to think that is perhaps the likely outcomelj are beginning to think that is perhaps the likely outcome. i think that's not a bad view. i think generally the mood of the party right now is that they are happy to see boris take the lead in all this. they stand by his position, which is to negotiate and hope to get an arrangement, but they are now beginning to solidify around the idea that if we don't, then the nation and everybody is ready to go with our withdrawal agreement. there will be lots of mini deals in place, butjust will be lots of mini deals in place, but just know withdrawal agreement. ministers say they hope to get a deal, but realistically, are we
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running out of time, because we would need a few days to look at firm proposals before the summit and there really isn't much time left? the team that is doing this, i am convinced that they are genuinely trying to go through options at the moment with the eu with their own ideas as well. it is when they kind of get close to a mark, that is when unofficial proposal will go on the table. no one is in any doubt. the surrender bill that we talk about, that has made life a lot more difficult because it has allowed the eu to sit back and say, maybe just maybe we can hang around and they will have to extend. and are you confident that boris johnson will have to extend. and are you confident that borisjohnson does have some sort of plan, some sort of legal mechanism to override the benn act, because he has not been
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specific beyond saying that we will leave on the 31st of october regardless of the outcome? you would expect borisjohnson not to explain how he will do it, but i can guarantee that the government will not sign that letter. as a government, they will not ask for that extension. it will become clear why or how they will do that, but the reality is, we can bank on the fa ct the reality is, we can bank on the fact that they will not sign this. from the eu standpoint, this is completely bonkers, because do you wa nt completely bonkers, because do you want the uk in the eu on an extension when they do not want it? evenif extension when they do not want it? even if you force it on them, then the government gets tough on them, the government gets tough on them, the government gets tough on them, the government says, we will veto just about everything, not pay any money into the budget. you people have colluded with opponents. there isa have colluded with opponents. there is a pretty strong sense that a numberof my is a pretty strong sense that a number of my erstwhile colleagues have been up to their eyebrows in discussing with all the legal authorities in the eu what is going
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on, and that i believe is an astonishing sense. it would be astonishing, but do you have any evidence? i'm not going to lay it out now but i have to tell you i am pretty certain that some of those individuals have been genuinely discussing in advance of that act going through what would happen and how the eu would react. we are getting into a peculiar phase now where there seems to be a complete breakdown of any sense of loyalty to the nature of the government from some members of my party, and i'm sorry about that, so you talked aboutjustine sorry about that, so you talked about justine greening just a sorry about that, so you talked aboutjustine greening just a second ago, but now she takes almost every opportunity to criticise the prime minister, no matter what the charge is, and some of my colleagues at the same. dominic grieve was on this morning. are the allegations
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damaging for the prime minister in terms of female voters?” damaging for the prime minister in terms of female voters? i don't know the ins and outs of that. the prime minister says none of this happened, and this is the opinion of two separate people. will we spend our lives when anyone makes an accusation, you take it seriously? an accusation has to be proven, otherwise it should be dismissed. the answer is, whilst any attempt to do any sexual assaults on women is absolutely abhorrent, i do say that we need to take a deep breath and say, right now i thought we were getting over the idea that all somebody has to do is to say he did this or that and he has proven guilty. the answer is, he says no, and that is where i am happy to take it. we heard from the chancellor on the radio this morning, but we will hear from the radio this morning, but we will hearfrom him in the conference the radio this morning, but we will hear from him in the conference call this afternoon too. thanks, norman.
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the chancellor sajid javid will be delivering a speech at the conservative party conference this afternoon, and we'll be going to that live at 2.45, so do stay with us for that. the health secretary, matt hancock, says he's "looking very seriously" at making vaccinations compulsory for all school children in england. there's been a rise in the number of measles cases — and the latest figures show a fall in the take—up of all routine jabs for under—fives in the last year. simonjones reports. so we just do about there. a massive drive is needed, according to the health secretary, to get more children vaccinated. he told an event at the conservative party conference that he is very worried. when we, the state, provide services to people, then it's a two—way street. you've got to take your responsibilities too, so i think there's a very strong argument for having compulsory vaccinations for children, for when they go to school, because otherwise they're putting other children at risk. measles is a serious illness that can lead to an infection
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in the brain. just over 90% of children aged two were vaccinated against measles, mumps and rubella last year in england. that's a drop from 91.2% in the previous year. the world health organization's target is 95%, which scotland and northern ireland already achieve. here at the department of health, there has been much discussion about what can be done to increase vaccination rates. the health secretary believes the public would back his idea and he says he has already taken legal advice from within government about how they might go about it. the british medical association has previously stopped short of calling for compulsory vaccinations. this it wants adequate resources to make sure vaccination programmes reach those most in need, and a crackdown on social media companies who fail to stop the spread of false and misleading information. simon jones, bbc news. let's speak to shirley cramer, chief executive of the royal society for public health.
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welcome. do you think vaccinations should be compulsory?” welcome. do you think vaccinations should be compulsory? i understand why matt hancock would be considering compulsory vaccination prior to school. it's a good policy response. however, it really depends on the context, so if you take somewhere like italy, compulsory vaccination has increased uptake, but in serbia, mandatory vaccination has seen decline. why is that, do you think? we think it is a people versus government narrative, which is obviously not a good one. in a way, it is great he is considering it, but there are a couple of other things that need to be done first, and one is to really look at uptake and one is to really look at uptake and target particular communities in areas where uptake is low, recall people if they haven't been for their vaccines. the other thing we know from our research, and our
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report came out injanuary, is that people really trust their health ca re people really trust their health care professionals, and what parents are telling us is that they don't have enough time to have their questions answered. so, we need to really give the capacity and the time for all health care professionals to be able to answer those questions around efficacy and safety a nd those questions around efficacy and safety and long—term issues. so, those are the things, along with a better public information campaign around the benefits of vaccination. break done for us more —— breakdown for us the reasons why people are not taking up the vaccine. does it still go back to the arguments from a long time ago that there was a link with autism? we think there was a bit of that around, for sure, and we know that social media, for example, and matt hancock is right to say this, has had a negative effect. in our research, 50% of pa rents effect. in our research, 50% of parents with children under five had
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seen negative messages about vaccination, more negative than positive, on social media, so we need to shore up information around vaccines to get those questions answered. and the social media companies should be taken to task around this. the secretary of state, i know, has been doing this. how is it their responsibility? are you saying that they should not allow these messages to be posted? the anti—vaccine messages should be stopped. he has told the social media companies in no uncertain terms that that needs to happen. and we know that facebook and instagram are doing something about that right now. going back to the point you made about the reduction in vaccination rates where there was an attempt to force it in serbia, where you said it was a people versus government narrative. if the government narrative. if the government goes down that path, does it not leap potentially to that
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narrative exactly, feeling that debate is being stifled? element that would be a concern. we have to have compulsory vaccination on the table. we have seen a persistent decline in uptake, but i really think we should be investing in the delivery programmes, the uptake targeting specific communities, really giving health care professionals a lot more time to focus on vaccinations. thank you very much indeed, shirley kramer. the headlines on bbc news: the chancellor sajid javid promises "a significant economic policy response" — in the event of a no—deal brexit. children could be made to have compulsory vaccinations before starting school — the government considers tough new measures after a surge in measles. customers hit by the collapse of thomas cook might have to wait up to two months to get a refund, say officials.
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in sport, scotland can't afford to lose their second match at the rugby world cup in japan. lose their second match at the rugby world cup injapan. they are about to kick off against samoa. the scots must win their remaining three matches to keep quarterfinal qualification in their own hands. dina asher smith runs today after winning 100 metres silver. surely winning100 metres silver. surely and price claimed a fourth world title. steve bruce accused his newcastle players of a complete surrender against leicester. they are in the premier league relegation zone. a full update in 15 minutes. austria's conservative people's party — led by the former chancellor sebastian kurz — has topped the poll in the country's snap general election. with nearly all ballots counted, the party has won more than 38 % of the vote,
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up from 31 % the last time round. the process of building a coalition is getting under way. bethany bell can join me live from vienna now. tell us what the factors have been in this election, bethany. well, it has been gains for sebastian kurz. this election was called early because his previous coalition with the far right freedom party fell apart quite spectacularly when the head of the freedom party was involved in a corruption scandal, a video sting where he was caught on a secret camera promising lucrative government contracts to a woman posing as the niece of a russian oligarch. the interesting thing is that the far right freedom party seems to have paid for that scandal. it has seen big losses in this election, about 10% or so, but sebastian kurz‘s conservatives have
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emerged better, stronger than they we re emerged better, stronger than they were before, so the question now is, what kind of coalition will sebastian kurz seek to put together? will he try and look again to the far right freedom party, who have suggested they may want to go into opposition, or will he look to the left? will he look to the resurgent green party? what is looking more likely at the moment, because obviously it will mean a very different type of government, whichever way he goes? whichever way he goes, it's likely to be very complicated, and nobody expects this process to be short. traditionally, coalition negotiations in austria go on for weeks. people here are saying it could take weeks if not months before austria has a new government, because sebastian kurz, the easiest thing to do content —wise would be to try to renew his coalition with the far right, but that could be
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very unstable, and they may not want to come back into a coalition with him. they may want to stay in opposition. for the greens, him. they may want to stay in opposition. forthe greens, it's complicated, because sebastian kurz campaigned ona complicated, because sebastian kurz campaigned on a very anti—migrant platform. the greens are the most pro—migrant party in austria. they would also want to see co2 tax is implemented, and it could be hard to square conservative policies of sebastian kurz with left—wing ones of the greens. a centre—left coalition is mathematically possible but less likely because of bad feeling between sebastian kurz and the social democrat leadership. complicated, difficult, and likely to ta ke complicated, difficult, and likely to take a lot of haggling. what were the key issues that came through in the key issues that came through in the election in terms of photo concerns? clearly, there was a lot
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of support for sebastian kurz‘s branding of his party as the way forward for austria — reform, the anti—migrant issue. but interestingly, another policy which seems to have been very close to voters' hearts is the question of climate change and the environment. that really emerged this time round as one of the top concerns for voters, and that helped bring the greens back into parliament with a good result. it could lead them to a place in the next government. so, quite a polarised situation here in austria, although a better result for the conservatives than they have seen for quite a long time. thank you, bethany. thousands of women are "needlessly" dying after having a heart attack because they fail to recognise the symptoms, and receive poorer care than men. that's according to the british heart foundation. the charity says that women are disadvantaged at every stage including diagnosis,
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treatment and after—care. our health correspondent, dominic hughes, has been finding out why. oh, no! it was terrifying. i knew there was something wrong, but i just didn't know what. ijust knew i needed that ambulance. two years ago, louise mcgill had a heart attack. it came out of the blue — a few days of feeling tired, a slight pain in her chest and then overnight she was suddenly fighting for her life. the paramedic was running some results and i think it was an ecg he was doing and he said, "louise, i think you're having a heart attack." what did you think then? i thought, "this is it, i'm not going to make it." i couldn't believe it. i was just shell—shocked.
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louise was lucky, she got fast, appropriate care, but many women who suffer a heart attack are dying unnecessarily. researchers found that over a 10—year period more than 8,000 women may have survived with better treatment. i think there's a combination of bias and biology. so whilst there are biological factors that are different between men and women, i think there is a bias as well and this is a societal bias. there is a misperception that men only have heart attacks and this is not true. today's report said that one of the problems that women face is many of the treatments are designed around men — so a quick way to diagnose a heart attack is to look for the presence of a protein called troponin that's released into the blood when someone suffers a heart attack, but many women, when they come into hospital, have lower levels of troponin than men, so they go undiagnosed. now at this lab here in edinburgh, they are using a high sensitivity test that should allow more women to be diagnosed quickly. a lower threshold has been suggested for women, which certainly picks up more women with heart
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attacks than previously and that clearly is important because those women get identified as heart attacks and get treated as such. and that is clearly an important factor that plays a role in the underdiagnosis of heart attacks in women. two years on from her heart attack, louise is on the road to recovery and she says women need to know they can also be at risk. there's no set person that is classed as a prime example of somebody that may unfortunately have a heart attack, it doesn't discriminate, women need to just be aware. saudi arabia's crown prince has said he takes "full responsibility" for the murder of saudi journalist jamal khashoggi — but denies allegations that he ordered the killing. in an interview with cbs's 60 minutes, mohammed bin salman said
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that mr khashoggi's death was a "mistake" by agents of the saudi government. he was killed in saudi arabia's consulate in turkey in october last year. the crown prince was speaking to norah o'donnell, who began by asking him outright whether he ordered the death of jamal khashoggi. translation: absolutely not. this was a heinous crime. but i take full responsibility as a leader in saudi arabia, especially since it was committed by individuals working for the saudi government. what does that mean, that you take responsibility? when a crime is committed by officials working for the saudi government, as a leader i must take responsibility. this was a mistake andi responsibility. this was a mistake and i must take all actions to avoid such a thing in the future. how did you not know about this operation? something that i should know, with 3
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million people working for the saudi government. it is unlikely that 3 million people would send their reports to the leader of the second highest person in the government. the cia has concluded with medium to high confidence that you personally targeted first night, and you probably ordered his death.” targeted first night, and you probably ordered his death. i hope this information to be brought forward. if there is any such information, i hope it is brought forward publicly. what kind of threat is a newspaper columnist to the kingdom of saudi arabia that he would deserve to be brutally murdered? there is no threat from any journalist. the murdered? there is no threat from anyjournalist. the threat to saudi arabia is from such actions against the journalist. this arabia is from such actions against thejournalist. this keenness crime that took place in a saudi consulate. mohammed bin salman talking to cbs news. the bbc panorama programme has been investigating the death ofjamal khashoggi.
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two people who've listened to covert recordings of the killing of mr khashoggi have described to the bbc what they heard. jane corbin has this special report. a year ago, on the 2nd of october, jamal khashoggi vanished after entering the saudi consulate in istanbul. we only know what happened next because the consulate was bugged by turkish intelligence. you could hear them laughing. it's a sort of chilling business, they are waiting there knowing that this man is going to come in and he's going to be murdered. british barrister helena kennedy is one of the very few people who have listened to the audio recordings of the journalist's death. the horror of listening to somebody‘s voice and the fear in someone's voice makes a shiver go through your body. baroness kennedy was invited to join a team headed by agnes callamard, the un special rapporteur for extrajudicial killing, who negotiated access to the crucial tapes. the recordings reveal what happened to the journalist
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inside the consulate. he says, "am i being kidnapped?" "how could this happen in an embassy?" the sounds that are heard after that point indicate that he's suffocated, probably with a plastic bag. callamard's report concluded that the saudi state was responsible for the murder. the saudi government declined to give an interview to panorama but said it condemned the abhorrent killing, and it was committed to holding the perpetrators accountable. it said that the crown prince had absolutely nothing to do with what it called "a heinous crime". jane corbin, bbc news. you can watch panorama: the khashoggi murder tapes tonight on bbc one, at 8.30pm. prince harry will visit anti—poaching troops in malawi today as he continues his tour of southern africa. the duchess of sussex has stayed in south africa with their baby son archie,
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but she was still able to make an appearance at another of harry's engagements, via videolink. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell has this report from malawi. welcome to malawi, one of the poorest countries in africa, but a country which is committed to improving the education of its young women. prince harry took part in a discussion with a group supported by the queen's commonwealth trust — the objective, to empower women. the debate was joined by harry's wife, meghan, on a video link from johannesburg. we cannot begin to express how valuable and vital that work is. we're just incredibly proud to be a part of it. already, the initiative, the campaign for female education, is working in five african countries. better education has many benefits. for one thing, it means fewer child marriages. today the focus shifts to another issue in this part of africa, the battle against the poachers.
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harry will visit the liwonde national park. he will pay tribute to guardsman matthew talbot of the coldstream guards. he was killed on an anti—poaching patrol earlier this year. harry will also see the work which is supported by the british military to combat the poaching gangs. nicholas witchell, bbc news, lilongwe, malawi. now it's time for a look at the weather. we have some sunshine out there in northern and eastern parts of the uk at the moment, but it doesn't really tell the story of the weather over the next couple of days or so. at the next couple of days or so. at the moment, quite sunny, but more rain in the forecast, and it is moving through south—west england and into wales. ahead of that, the cloud will start to increase across northern areas. quite cloudy for northern ireland and scotland this afternoon, a few showers in the far
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north. maximum temperatures, it is quite chilly across northern parts, 11 or12, quite chilly across northern parts, 11 or 12, further south, 16 or 17 celsius. the rain could well give an atrocious rush hour this evening. heavy rain for wales in the midlands. heavy rain warnings in effect. heavy thundery showers across southern areas tomorrow. there are flood warnings in force, with more to come over the next couple of days. hello, this is bbc newsroom live. i'm joanna gosling. the headlines... the chancellor sajid javid promises "a significant economic policy response" — in the event of a no—deal brexit — on day two of the conservative party conference. and mrjavid said he had "full faith" in borisjohnson — over allegations he squeezed the thigh of a female journalist at a lunch 20 years ago.
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children could be made to get compulsory vaccinations before they start school — the government is considering tough new measures after a surge in measles. and why thousands of women are dying because their heart attack symptoms are missed. customers face a wait of up to two months to get their money back from the collapsed company thomas cook. more than a third of a million holiday—makers are affected. in paris, the funeral of former presidentjacques chirac. president macron leads the mourners as france pays its respects. sport now. the latest from oli foster. after their thrashing by ireland, scotland have to beat samoa
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at the rugby world cupjapan to keep their hopes of qualification for the quarterfinals in their own hands. they kicked off in kobe in the last 15 minutes this is the very latest. scotla nd scotland with an early lead, greig laidlaw has got an early penalty, 3-0 laidlaw has got an early penalty, 3—0 up. you can follow that on the bbc sport website. england are in tokyo, where they are preparing for saturday's match against argentina. plenty of time to recover from the tight turnaround between their first two matches, the bonus point wins against tonga and the usa. another win would guarantee eddie jones's team a place in the quarters. the england number eight billy vunipola says they have really enjoyed the world cup experience injapan so far, especially watching the hosts beat ireland over the weekend we don't take it for granted, that you're playing in the world cup. watching other teams competing makes you more expired in, expressly
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yourself —— makes it more exciting. watching the south africa game and the japan game. what did you make of that game? it was awesome, probably the best crowd i've seen all tournament. but obviously their home nations, they played unbelievably well. and there's a lesson in that for us. we are pumped after these two games, but we know argentina will come in hot. they have already lost one, we don't want to be in the position where we are scrapping and fighting next week. this week is massively important for us as a group. dina asher—smith is back on the track this afternoon, at the world athletics championships in doha, with the 200—metres heats starting atjust after three this afternoon she took silver in the 100—metres last night — the first by a british woman at a world champs, it's her first outdoor medal on the global stage — running a personal best and breaking the british record as she finished behind jamaica's shelly—ann fraser—pryce.
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i have worked so hard for this, so ha rd i have worked so hard for this, so hard for the championships. at this point in my career. hopefully i will go on to do bigger things. i thought it was my time to go on the line and i was really happy when i came home with apb, a national record, that's what you can ever ask for in a world final. i would love to win today, anybody would but shelly—ann fraser—pryce had a fantastic performance and that is why she has so many titles and is a legend but yeah, i'm happy. spectator numbers have been really poor in doha so far. by the time asher—smith ran last night, at about 11.20 local time, the stadium looked to have barely two or three thousand spectators, and the stands were almost empty by the time she did her lap of honour. it is poor, it isn't respecting the
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athletes. the moment that i always loved the most was the opportunity to go round the stadium. don't get me wrong, you want a medal, but part of winning that medal is to go and doa lap of winning that medal is to go and do a lap of honour. yeah, that moment, ifeel, has been taken away from dina asher—smith. but when she arrives back on these shores, with intentionally three medals? she will be ok! newcastle manager steve bruce says there's no need to panic, despite their 5—0 thrashing at leicester yesterday. ricardo ran through most of the newcastle team for leicester's first goal — a brilliant finish. newcastle had a man sent off by half—time and the foxes scored four more, two forjamie vardy as they moved back up to third in the table, leaving newcastle second from bottom. bruce accused his players of a complete surrender. we need to give them something to shout about. and see a team player
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with a little bit of determination and passion in their heart before we talk about tactics and footballing ability. that needs to be a given and unfortunately today, i cannot defend it. being the manager or the coach, whatever you are, ultimately i accept responsibility because it is as bad an afternoon as i can remember. scotland are still leading samoa 3—0 in kobe mackay will have an update in the next hour. studio: oli foster, thank you. let's return to the conservative party conference — where the chancellor sajid javid has promised "a significant economic policy response" in the event of a no—deal brexit. it comes as he sets out plans for what he calls an "infrastructure revolution" — on the second day of the conference in manchester. let's take a closer look at those spending pledges: so far, the tories have made spending vows of more than 50 billion pounds
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at their conference. that includes a 25 billion pounds upgrade of england's roads. as well as five billion pounds for ultrafast broadband internet in the uk. there was the pledge for spending on hospitals too. we can speak now to pauljohnson, the director of the institute for fiscal studies. he joins me from the conservative party conference in manchester. good morning, thank you forjoining us. let's try and break it down. how much of what is being talked about is new money? let's start with road spending, £25 billion, what is your assessment of that? i think it is worth remembering the government has already pledged some genuinely significant increases on infrastructure spending, starting with the last chancellor and going through the next several years. how much of this is new, in addition, to the total pledged? we just don't know at the moment but it is the
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case that spending on roads, rail and other infrastructure has been rising quite fast over the next couple of years and is planned to continue rising in the next few yea rs continue rising in the next few years to what is a historically high level by uk standards. how safe are those sorts of pledges? when it comes to meeting spending targets and needing money elsewhere, are they the sorts of projects that can be guaranteed to get them the money that was talked about initially? well, it is difficult to know how much the guarantee is. do not forget that in the 1990s and then after the financial crash into thousand and eight, the then government immediately pulled the plug on spending —— into thousand and eight. infrastructure was hit particularly ha rd infrastructure was hit particularly hard following the labour party and the conservative party plans in that direction. so, if the economy continues to grow, and we do not need another dose of cuts, probably,
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because there clearly is a lot of need for this kind of spending, it will be protected. but if we enter another downturn and need to get spending down again, that is quite possible if the economy does badly after a no—deal brexit, we could end up after a no—deal brexit, we could end up with a short upward shift in spending as we saw in 2008—09 followed by a cut. and in terms of other spending announced, i mentioned the total tally for the spending announced since the start of the conference is £50 billion. what are your headline thoughts when you look at a figure like that? well, the headline thoughts is that is, in a sense, not a very useful, interesting or informative number. i don't know what is exactly made up of that. it
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is certainly spending over quite a lot of years. the thing that we do know is that spending next year is set to grow by 13 or £14 billion, a big increase in spending announced in the spending review. it has moved away from the period of austerity and spending cuts and we've got the two main parties competing with one another for the scale of spending promises there that they are making. but i would not take that £50 billion and compare it directly with any annual increase. i think it is just an indication that we are moving towards probably a relatively gradual increase in spending under this government and some genuine focus on infrastructure. and you said the two main parties are competing with each other over spending money. we've been asking this question for a long time but is austerity over? are the two main parties inhabiting the same ground in terms of what they say about spending going forward?”
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in terms of what they say about spending going forward? i do not think the parties are inhabiting the same ground, it is pretty clear the scale of promises by the labour party on tax and spending are very much greater than they are from the conservatives, that is in a sense what you would generally expect. i think we can say that, for now, austerity is over in the sense we do not see any additional spending cuts across public services or social security, we are seeing big increases in the next two years. we had those announcements to three weeks ago but it doesn't mean that all of the cuts that we have seen since 2010 are being undone. since the last manifesto they have undone those cuts. it would be a long time for spending in some areas is back to where it was in 2010. will be affordable in the event of a no—deal
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brexit? that is the million dollar question. if we get a no deal, we will see spending rising even faster in the short run as the government aim to protect the economy from the negative consequences. but whatever the effect of a no deal, we will end up the effect of a no deal, we will end up with lower growth over the medium—term then we would have expected otherwise there would be less money around to pay for the public services and infrastructure. the danger with a no deal is not that we get a big cut in spending immediately but we do have a short miniboom in spending and then another period of austerity as we adapt to being a smaller economy than we otherwise would have been. thank you. the chancellor sajid javid will be delivering a speech at the conservative party conference this afternoon and we'll be going to that live at 2.45, so do stay with us for that.
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today is a national day of mourning in france following the death of former president jacques chirac who died on thursday aged 86. a memorial service is being held this morning. lucy williamsonjoins me now from paris. tell us about this memorial service today? well, jacques chirac's coffin was taken this morning from invalides where a small family ceremony was taken, through the streets, to the saint—sulpice where there is a public service under way, a lot of world leaders there, including the italian and german presidents and former world leaders including bill clinton, in power around the same time he was. the variety of services, and the number of people who have come out to pay their respects, that is really a sign of the almost unique place jacques chirac seems to occupy in french politics these days, a sense
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that he was somehow unifying, even as president macron said, that he embodied france and belonged to everybody. is that his legacy? what is the overview of his legacy?” think that sense of almost nostalgia, if you like them is quite keen with jacques chirac, when you remember that he was part of the life of france. a long time, he was president for 12 years and the mayor of paris for almost 20 years. when you listen to the words of people who have been queueing up to pay their last respects, a lot have said that he was a huge part of my youth and my life. that, coupled with the sense he had a very human touch and an easy charm, as his former prime minister has said, he was very sensitive to the heartbeat of the french. i think when you look at the presidents who have come after jacques chirac, they have been
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somewhat more divisive. there is a bit of nostalgia here where a man, for all of his political and personalfaults, for all of his political and personal faults, was seen as deeply french and had the special touch which made people feel they belong with him. thank you. firefighters have called for more protection after research found they are being exposed to dangerously high levels of toxins which may be linked to cancer. it comes as the uk's chief fire officer has — for the first time — acknowledged the high rate of cancer among his colleagues. tracy gee has been investigating. firefighters need to stop having their lives totally turned upside—down with cancer. he died on the 4th of february this year. he went too soon, he just went too soon. the faces of just a handful of the many firefighters battling cancer, and for some, the treatment is taking its toll. michael copplestone, 15.09.66.
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mitch has two forms of leukaemia and is in need of a bone marrow transplant. the bad side will be that i won't quite make it to as old as i should have been. you just think, don't let it be me. and mitch isn't alone with facing cancer, but sadly for some firefighters, they've already lost their battle. stewart fish, lincolnshire firefighter, died at the age of 60 from blood cancer. i know in stewart's early years, breathing apparatus was not worn for open—air fires and when you understand its carcinogens and toxins that people are breathing in, if you want my personal opinion and honesty, i do think it was a contributing factor. in my opinion there is a direct link between firefighter‘s occupation and cancer. scientists believe that firefighters are twice as likely to die
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from cancer compared to the general population. if you take firefighters in their clothing in a hot environment, they start sweating. and thermal intake, or absorption via skin, is automatically increasing is kind of working as a sponge for all of the fire toxins. as tests continue, fire chiefs are coming under pressure to do more to protect their firefighters, and acknowledge a potential link to cancer. firefighters are contracting certain types of cancer above the population norm. i accept that, and that is a concern. shouldn't something be done now? why are we waiting for more conclusive evidence to come out when that evidence is already out there? the assurance i want to give is there's an incredible amount of work going on in the background to make this happen as quickly as possible, but i do acknowledge that is not quick enough for some people. i feel cheated, and so did stewart. i can't bring him back. ijust hope a positive comes out of, you know, this tragedy that's happened. i think it is an occupational hazard, yeah, definitely. firefighters need to stop having their lives totally turned upside—down with cancer.
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tracey gee, bbc news. you can hear more on this story on inside out across england at 7.30 tonight on bbc one. and viewers everywhere can catch the full report on the bbc iplayer. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news... the chancellor sajid javid promises "a significant economic policy response" — in the event of a no—deal brexit. children could be made to have compulsory vaccinations before starting school — the government considers tough new measures after a surge in measles. customers hit by the collapse of thomas cook might have to wait up to two months to get a refund, say officials. i'm alex baxter with all of their business needs. us fashion retailer forever 21 has filed for chapter 11
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bankruptcy protection. in a statement, the company said it planned to "exit most international locations in asia and europe". the conservative party is in manchester for its annual conference. chancellor sajid javid is expected to announce his plans to provide £5 billion pounds for ultrafast broadband across the uk, as well as £25 billion for england's roads. but first, we're entering the second week of operation matterhorn — that's the name given by the civil aviation authority for the repatriation efforts of stranded thomas cook customers. it's the largest peacetime effort of its kind — aimed at bringing more than 150,000 people back to the uk. and today also marks the caa launch of a new refund process for people who booked thomas cook holidays protected by atol — that's the air travel organiser‘s licence. again, this will be the biggest ever atol refund
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programme ever undertaken. dame deirdre hutton, the chair of the civil aviation authorityjoins me now. thank you forjoining me on the programme. you are launching this new refund system today, in previous cases where a holiday firm has collapsed, the refund process typically takes between 20 and 30 days. should thomas cook customers expect the process to take a bit longer considering the size of the operation? i'm afraid they should. we are very conscious people will wa nt we are very conscious people will want their money back as soon as possible but the last equivalent of monarch was 30,000 bookings. here, we have 360,000 forward bookings which encompass 800,000 people. it isa which encompass 800,000 people. it is a huge task. i am particularly pleased we have developed a new system which means anyone who paid by direct debit, director thomas cook, get their money back automatically within the next two
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weeks from today. so, that is good news for those people but it leaves a lot of others who will be wanting their money back. we are building a new online system which we believe welcome in the end, be quicker must smoother and more efficient. information for that will go up on our website on monday the 7th of october. all of the details will be up october. all of the details will be up next monday, together with the instructions as to what you need and how to fill it in. that new online system going online on the 7th of october. what should customers affected do prior to that being launched? affected do prior to that being launched ? the affected do prior to that being launched? the details will be on the website, but can you tell people what to expect and any changes after the launch of that new it system? the online form will be clear to fill in and there will be instructions on the website as to how to fill it in and what you need.
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and of course, by way of proof. there's also a call centre number on the website so if you need advice or if you are anxious, ring that call centre. but do not expect to see anything on the website before next monday. the people who should keep at the website are the 44,000 people still abroad, who need bringing back. i am still abroad, who need bringing back. iam pleased still abroad, who need bringing back. i am pleased there to say that about 94%, 95% have come back on the day their holiday ended anyway. i hope that will give confidence to people that they can enjoy the rest of their holiday and they will be brought back on the right day. that is operation matterhorn. there are over 43,000 people due to return on or before the sex of october. how confident are you in achieving on the 6th of october, how confident are you in achieving that? we are
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pretty confident, there will be people left abroad after that you had longer holidays that where people were at all protected, we will make individual adjustments for those flying home. and the details will be on the website?” those flying home. and the details will be on the website? i would say that we are seeing fraudsters entering this arena, people should be aware and try, if they need advice and if they are worried, please contact the website. the caa and expert companies we are using to manage the refunds will never ask people for money. if they are asking for money, be careful. get in touch with the website. it is interesting, really good advice there. a quick look at the markets now. the ftse100 in london, reacting to
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news that gdp contracted. the office for national statistics say that this was partly due to changes in the timing of the uk's original planned exit date from the eu in late march. the ftse100 was rising narrowly, still fairly flat. sterling remaining flat against the dollar. a mixed picture across europe. us and china talks there looming large. the national trust has launched a project to make its 500 historic sites dementia—friendly. working with the alzheimer's society charity, thousands of staff and volunteers will be given training in how to make their sites more welcoming to people with dementia. the project also aims to improve accessibility at national trust properties. earlier tiger de souza,
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who's the director of volunteering participation and inclusion at the national trust, explained how sites are being made dementia friendly... we have a fantastic project here in cambridgeshire, where people from farming backgrounds and agricultural backgrounds are able to participate in the farming memories project and that helps them in terms of stimulating them in terms of regaining what they had in the past and living with the condition. but also, there are other projects around the country but what we have noticed is we have not done as much as we could do and there are other places we could do more. we are working with the alzheimer's society in training ourstaff working with the alzheimer's society in training our staff and volunteers, looking at our styling and accessibility of parts and places. in thinking about the activities we run on and off site to benefit those living with dementia. where we have the variety of places we have, we have the opportunity to reach different individuals with different backgrounds and perspectives and things they can
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ta ke perspectives and things they can take in coming back to those places and experiencing them. it is important to recognise the fact that for people living with dementia, having the chance to come and experience some of these opportunities can be a tremendous help in terms of conversations they have with their families or helping them reconnect with the past. i look at the weather now with simon. good morning. we had some really high rainfall totals this weekend across the uk. that has led to some flooding issues. our weather watcher in york has sent us this photo, this is the river is which burst its banks this morning. sunshine ahead, but it is quite sunny in north—eastern areas at the moment. low pressure moves in from the west. that brings in some weather fronts and with it more rainfall. the rain becomes heavy in
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wales and the south—west of england during the afternoon. ahead, the cloud increases. brighter skies in northern and eastern england. in scotla nd northern and eastern england. in scotland and northern ireland perhaps. northern temperatures of 11 to 15 degrees. 16 or 17 degrees further south. the travel home this evening, the roads can be treacherous this evening. a number of met office warnings this evening and up until midnight. there is further rain which will move further north. eventually into southern scotla nd north. eventually into southern scotland and northern ireland. it stays there until tuesday morning. clear skies north of that, quite chilly, and to the south temperatures in double figures. the rain continues in northern ireland and northern england. sunshine in the north of the uk but further south, heavy showers getting going early on on tuesday. in the afternoon, torrential downpours. the
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met office warnings are enforced, a lot of rainfall in a short space of time. that could lead to issues with flooding. there are quite a lot of flooding. there are quite a lot of flood warnings and that number could increase by tomorrow. then, a northerly wind, have a look at those isobars, all the way from the arctic, this colder air moving in across the south of the uk into wednesday. a chilly start on wednesday. a chilly start on wednesday morning. thrust in northern england and scotland, many of those temperatures in single figures —— mike frost in northern england. a crisp day on wednesday. a bit of cloud in northern areas. some cloud in the south on wednesday afternoon. close temperatures of 10-14d afternoon. close temperatures of 10—14d on wednesday. at the end of the week, it gets warmer again but there is some uncertainty with the re m na nts of there is some uncertainty with the rem na nts of ex there is some uncertainty with the remnants of ex hurricane lorenzo. that could bring in wet and windy
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weather into the north—west. stay tuned.
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you're watching bbc newsroom live — it's midday and these are the main stories: the chancellor sajid javid promises "a significant economic policy response" — in the event of a no—deal brexit. we are working incredibly hard on getting a deal. i'm very much involved in that myself. in the number of meetings i've had, we are making good progress. and mrjavid said he had "full faith" in borisjohnson — over allegations he squeezed the thigh of a female journalist at a lunch 20 years ago. children could be made to have compulsory vaccinations before starting school — the government considers tough new measures after a surge in measles. thousands of women are dying from heart attacks because their symptoms go undiagnosed. the funeral is taking place of the former french president jacques chirac, with world leaders gathered in paris.
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and scotland power ahead against samoa in the rugby world cup — they're leading ten—nil so far. ——they‘re leading 15—0 so far. good afternoon. welcome to bbc newsroom live. i'm joanna gosling. the chancellor, sajid javid, has insisted the uk can still leave the eu without a deal, despite a law which says the prime minister must ask for an extension if no agreement is reached. this he said the government would obey the law, but that the policy set out by borisjohnson — of leaving with or without an agreement in october — had not changed. but he promised "a significant economic policy response" — in the event of a no—deal brexit. at the conservative party conference, mrjavid is promising what he calls an "infrastructu re revolution" with a 25 billion pounds upgrade of england's roads, a national bus strategy
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and five billion pounds for ultrafast broadband internet in the uk. but it's been a stormy week for boris johnson — culminating in number ten denying newspaper accusations that the prime minister squeezed a journalist's thigh under the table at a private lunch 20 years ago. away from manchester, opposition parties are expected to meet to discuss their next steps to try to halt a no—deal brexit. our assistant political editor norman smith is in manchester for us this morning. as usual, lots of different elements to talk about. over to you. a conference which you have to say is really dominated by this one thing — brexit. senior ministers are sticking to the line that they do wa nt to sticking to the line that they do want to try and secure some sort of brexit deal, but you just wonder if the focus is now beginning to shift to no deal, with the chancel of this
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morning sketching out the sort of emergency measures he might take to avert some of the worst economic consequences of no deal, suggesting for example that he might cut taxes, or the bank of england might cut interest rates as part of the significant economic policy response he has talked about. also insisting that despite that legislation passed by mps, the so—called benn act, the government will still leave on the 3ist government will still leave on the 31st of october. dominic grieve joins us. do you believe them?” find it very difficult to know what to believe coming out from the government forced stop the trouble is, the government now seems to be putting out disinformation. my view is that the benn act is fit for purpose and that the prime minister will be obliged to apply for an extension. if he doesn't want to do that, he will have to resign and be replaced by a prime minister willing
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to do it. i'm left with a slight impression that the government is trying to destabilise the house of commons, encourage it to move to other things like votes of no confidence, which in my view are not going to be productive or useful. i think that whilst we need to be vigilant, i acknowledge that any piece of legislation, sometimes you can find loopholes in it. i think it is there, it does what it says it does, and the prime minister will be obliged if he does not have a deal to bring to parliament to write a letter to get an extension so we can have an opportunity as a country under parliament to see where we are going next. can you reallyjust sit and wait for the next two or three weeks and do nothing? we won't be doing nothing. in the house of commons, the usual scrutiny of government for preparation or the lack of it for a no—deal brexit will continue. it is a legitimate part of
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the commons's work. the idea that we will be goaded into taking more draconian steps against the government when we really want the government when we really want the government to stop behaving in this rather wild and reckless fashion and acce pt rather wild and reckless fashion and accept that if there isn't a deal, we need to think again what we are doing and how we get ourselves out of the current crisis. we are not going to be deflected from what seems to me to be a moderate and sensible course of action. if it is boris johnson's tactic sensible course of action. if it is borisjohnson's tactic of sensible course of action. if it is boris johnson's tactic of trying sensible course of action. if it is borisjohnson's tactic of trying to splinter the opposition parties, is it gaining traction? we hearfrom the snp saying they would like a vote of confidence. we hear from clyde vote of confidence. we hear from clyd e ca m ry vote of confidence. we hear from clyde camry about talking about impeachment. are your ranks beginning to creak?” impeachment. are your ranks beginning to creak? i realise there may be muttering around the edges, but my view is that we are
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absolutely consistent in our desire to see the extension secured if the prime minister doesn't have a deal to present to parliament on the 19th. that will be our focus. obviously, if there were to be an extension, then there are issues which may be divisive in parliament, because one possibility is that we end up with a general election at the end of november or early december. that is a democratic event. if jeremy corbyn december. that is a democratic event. ifjeremy corbyn wants to support the prime minister in doing that, it will happen. the only point i would make to everybody is that the likelihood is, whatever the fate may be of individual mps, we will find ourselves in mid december with a hung parliament and with exactly the same issues to confront before a departure date on the 315t of january, and the crisis will simply start up again, and there will be no parliamentary majority for anything. my strong recommendation to my parliamentary colleagues, whatever their views on brexit, will be that it will be better if we can't get in
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a deal and we can't get an extension, to make use of that extension, to make use of that extension to have a second referendum and offer the choices available to the public. it is the only way i can see that this is going to be resolved. another spiral of debate and dispute is not going to be very helpful. do you think borisjohnson could survive an extension, given that he has made do ordie extension, given that he has made do or die his central mantra? if there was an extension, could he continue? i have no idea. it is a matter for him. he has decided to adopt this intensely confrontational position which has led him to make, i think, a numberof errors, which has led him to make, i think, a number of errors, the first one proroguing parliament, which was a very foolish and wrong—headed thing to do, and i worry about some of the language coming out of downing street. i worry that at the weekend some official said to the mail on sunday, for example, that we were in the pay of foreign governments. this is crazy stuff. it's untrue, there is crazy stuff. it's untrue, there is no substance for it. and then
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claiming the government was going to investigate it. it has no power to carry out such an investigation anyway. it is time we got away from these wild and very improper utterances coming from somewhere in government, and which the prime minister seems to be unable to control. dominic grieve, thank you for your time. the clock is ticking, because we are getting to the start of october, and we have probably got a fortnight to try and put down on papera a fortnight to try and put down on paper a proposal to put to the eu which they will then consider at the summit. boris johnson has which they will then consider at the summit. borisjohnson has been speaking in the last few minutes here in manchester. let's have a listen to what he had to say. here in manchester. let's have a listen to what he had to saym here in manchester. let's have a listen to what he had to say. it has been alleged that you touch the thigh of a woman at a lunch without her permission. did you? know, and i think what the public want to hear is about what we are doing to level up is about what we are doing to level up and unite the country. and the announcements we are making today, that the chancellor will be making, are all about infrastructure,
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fantastic roads programme, 25 billion going into the roads, loads of road investment around the country, i think perhaps even more revolutionary is what we are doing with buses. when i was running london, we drove up ridership on buses massively by improving the service and having automatic contactless payment, oyster cards. we are working with councils so that they improve the roots and bring on new routes, and we are going to have low—carbon electric buses wherever we can, a super bus system. some towns will now be zero carbon buses only. i know that buses, if you talk to transport for london, bosses transform people's lives. if you have a good bus route, it gives you access to employment in a way that hardly any other transport mode can.
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buses are crucial. the final thing is broadband. connectivity is not good enough in this country. it is an absolute disgrace that gigabit broadband is available in spain to the majority of the population and we only have about 7% of the uk fully wired up and plugged in. we are going to do that now by 2025. if you take all these things together, what we are trying to do and what i have said repeatedly is, i want to level up and unite the country. well, that long answer was actually an answer to the question, did he squeeze a journalist's thi 20 years ago? instead, we got borisjohnson talking at some length about buses, infrastructure and roads. what do we ta ke infrastructure and roads. what do we take from that? that borisjohnson absolutely wants to avoid any further questions or controversy
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over those claims. he was asked a series of follow—up questions in a similarvein, again disappearing into a lengthy discussion about the merits of buses. i think we can take it that boris johnson really merits of buses. i think we can take it that borisjohnson really does not want to date to be dominated by the continuing saga of whether he squeezed or did not squeeze the leg ofa squeezed or did not squeeze the leg of a female journalist 20 years ago. that is a textbook example of talking about what you want to talk about, but will his approach actually mean that the other issue, the charlotte edwards allegations, go away? i think it rather depends whether there is any more that comes to light, to be honest. as they stand, we have had the denialfrom downing street, and it is hard to see where it goes from there, unless charlotte edwards is going to speak, or whether someone else is going to speak. the very fact that number ten put out a denial last night suggests to me that they are aware of the
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potential damage it could do mr johnson, given thejennifer arcuri issue. they just want to douse johnson, given thejennifer arcuri issue. theyjust want to douse the attitude to women down as much as possible. that is why borisjohnson went off on that rather circuitous a nswer went off on that rather circuitous answer about buses. he likes buses, we know that. he likes to make models of them too. the health secretary, matt hancock, says he's "looking very seriously" at making vaccinations compulsory for all school children in england. there's been a rise in the number of measles cases — and the latest figures show a fall in the take—up of all routine jabs for under—fives in the last year. simonjones reports. so we just do about there. a massive drive is needed, according to the health secretary, to get more children vaccinated. he told an event at the conservative party conference that he is very worried. when we, the state,
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provide services to people, then it's a two—way street. you've got to take your responsibilities too, so i think there's a very strong argument for having compulsory vaccinations for children, for when they go to school, because otherwise they're putting other children at risk. measles is a serious illness that can lead to an infection in the brain. just over 90% of children aged two were vaccinated against measles, mumps and rubella last year in england. that's a drop from 91.2% in the previous year. the world health organization's target is 95%, which scotland and northern ireland already achieve. here at the department of health, there has been much discussion about what can be done to increase vaccination rates. the health secretary believes the public would back his idea and he says he has already taken legal advice from within government about how they might go about it. the british medical association has previously stopped short of calling for compulsory vaccinations.
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it wants adequate resources to make sure vaccination programmes reach those most in need, and a crackdown on social media companies who fail to stop the spread of false and misleading information. simon jones, bbc news. more on today's main stories coming up on newsroom live here on the bbc news channel, but now we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two. saudi arabia's crown prince has said he takes "full responsibility" for the murder of saudi journalist jamal khashoggi — but denies allegations that he ordered the killing. in an interview with cbs's 60 minutes, mohammed bin salman said that mr khashoggi's death was a "mistake" by agents of the saudi government. he was killed in saudi arabia's consulate in turkey in october last year.
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translation: absolutely not, this was a heinous crime that i take full responsibility as a leader in saudi arabia, especially as it was committed by individuals working for the saudi government. what does that mean, that you take responsibility? when a crime is committed against a saudi citizen by officials working for the saudi government, as a leader i must take responsibility. this was a mistake and i must take all actions to avoid such a thing in the future. and after half past twelve, we'll be speaking to jane corbin, who's been lookung into mr khashoggi's death for a special bbc panorama investigation. the headlines on bbc news: the chancellor sajid javid promises "a significant economic policy response" — in the event of a no—deal brexit. children could be made to have compulsory vaccinations before starting school — the government considers tough new measures after a surge in measles.
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thousands of women are dying from heart attacks because their symptoms go undiagnosed. sport now. scotla nd scotland have to beat samoa at the rugby world cup injapan to keep their hopes of qualification for the quarterfinals in their own hands. it is half—time and it is going very well for the scots. they lead 20—0. sean maitland and greg laidlaw with the tries, laidlaw converted both and kicked a penalty. stuart hogg kicked a monster drop goal. you can listen to commentary on radio five live, or follow it all across the
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bbc sport website. england are in tokyo, where they are preparing for saturday's match against argentina. plenty of time to recover from the very tight turnaround between the first two matches. the bonus point wins against tonga and the usa. another win would guarantee eddie jones's team a place in the quarterfinals. billy vunipola says they have really enjoyed their world cup experience in japan they have really enjoyed their world cup experience injapan so far, especially watching the hosts beat ireland over the weekend. you take it for granted that you are playing in the world cup, but to watch other teams competing makes you more excited, especially me, because it is our turn this weekend. i watch the south africa game and the japan game. what did you think of the japan game because my awesome. probably the best crowd i have seen all tournament. it is the home nation, obviously, and they played unbelievably well. i think there is
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a lesson in that for us. we are pumped after these two games, but we know argentina are going to come in hot. they have already lost one, so we don't want to be in a position where we are scrapping and fighting next week. this week is massively important for us as a group. dina asher smith is back on the track this afternoon at the world athletics championships, with the 200 metres heat starting just after 3pm. she took silver in the 100 metres last night betweenjamaica's shelly ann fraser pryce. this is her lap of honour, and it was mostly empty in the stadium, as you can see. she tried to be generous. when you come to different parts of the world, you know that different events will be so popular. i watched the 10k yesterday, and it was so full in the atmosphere was electric. you get different bits of the world
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that are biased towards different events. we are used to seeing things really hyped up for the final, but you have to understand the culture around different events. in germany, they would go crazy for the throwing. when i come to the line, i come to perform to the best of my ability. we should hear from the iaaf later today as they address that issue of empty seats. i will be back at about 1:30pm. see you then. let's get more now on the news that the health secretary, matt hancock, says he's "looking very seriously" at making vaccinations compulsory for all school children in england. let's speak to professor helen stokes—lampard, chair of the royal college of gps. thank you forjoining us. do you think vaccinations should be compulsory? not yet, is the short a nswer to compulsory? not yet, is the short answer to that question. making anything mandatory has an instinct
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of appeal, but there is a complexity about this. in the uk, we have a lwa ys about this. in the uk, we have always been proud of the fact that we give people choice over their health decisions, and choice about what they do for their children's well—being. rushing into mandating vaccination could have unintended consequences, notably that it might drive a wedge between doctors and their patients. however, we have to be realistic. if the trend for falling vaccination rates continues and everything else has been tried and everything else has been tried and failed, we may need to go there, and failed, we may need to go there, and it is good that we are having an open conversation about it. it is important to get the evidence right before leaping into big decisions that would fundamentally change the relationship between doctors and patients. what would be the to pick —— the tipping point that would make us decide to make them compulsory? 95% is the target for immunity, and currently the figure in england and
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wales is 87.2%, children having both doses of mmr by their fifth birthday? this downward trend is concerning. it is looking at the reasons why we concerning. it is looking at the reasons why we are concerning. it is looking at the reasons why we are having this trend. we have seen a massive rise in the social media voice for the anti—vaccination movement, and we need to call that out and give patients excellent single sources of truth that they can trust. give people the opportunity to talk to health care professionals if they have anxieties, and make it as easy as possible for people to get their children vaccinated. that second dose of mmr is happening when you are sending your child to school, a busy time in people's lives, so we need to make it as easy as possible for people to get their child vaccinated. we send reminders and do everything we can at the moment, but if the whole system got behind us and supported us to do more, we could increase the vaccination rates. sorry to interrupt, but if that doesn't happen, what would be
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the percentage where a decision would be taken for it to become compulsory? it is currently 87.2%. there isn't a good evidence—based position on what the percentage would be. if we have to go there, as other countries have had to, and they are much lower than our rate — they are much lower than our rate — the united states, parts of france and italy, they have gone this route, but they started from a lower base. we need to get back to where we can be, get our measles free status back in the uk. only three yea rs status back in the uk. only three years ago, we were measles free as a nation. then we can move on. matt hancock has previously said that anti—vaccination campaigners are morally reprehensible and deeply irresponsible and have blood on their hands. how would you describe them? would their hands. how would you describe them ? would you their hands. how would you describe them? would you agree with that?” would agree with that absolutely. we need to stand behind the science here. this isn't an area where we
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are lacking evidence. the science is clear cut. vaccination has saved hundreds of thousands if not millions of lives around the world already. we cannot go back to a world where people are distrusting the most basic of scientific principles. there are a small number of people who cannot be vaccinated because their immune systems are so immature, children with leukaemia, for example. it is beholden on all the rest of us to make decision to get our children vaccinated to protect the few vulnerable who cannot be vaccinated. the science is clear. those perpetuating anti—vaccination messages are reprehensible, and we all need to call it out. thank you. thousands of women are "needlessly" dying after having a heart attack because they fail to recognise the symptoms, and receive poorer care than men. that's according to the british heart foundation. the charity says that women are disadvantaged at every stage including diagnosis, treatment and after—care. our health correspondent, dominic hughes, has been finding out why.
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oh, no! it was terrifying. i knew there was something wrong, but i just didn't know what. ijust knew i needed that ambulance. two years ago, louise mcgill had a heart attack. it came out of the blue — a few days of feeling tired, a slight pain in her chest, and then overnight she was suddenly fighting for her life. the paramedic was running some results and i think it was an ecg he was doing and he said, "louise, i think you're having a heart attack." what did you think then? i thought, "this is it, i'm not going to make it." i couldn't believe it. it with i just shellshocked. louise was lucky, she got fast, appropriate care, but many women who suffer a heart attack are dying unnecessarily. researchers found that over a 10—year period
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more than 8,000 women may have survived with better treatment. i think there's a combination of bias and biology. so whilst there are biological factors that are different between men and women, i think there is a bias as well and this is a societal bias. there is a misperception that men only have heart attacks and this is not true. today's report said that one of the problems that women face is many of the treatments are designed around men — so a quick way to diagnose a heart attack is to look for the presence of a protein called troponin, that that's released into the blood when someone suffers a heart attack, but many women, when they come into hospital, have lower levels of troponin than men, so they go undiagnosed. now at this lab here in edinburgh, they are using a high sensitivity test that should allow more women to be diagnosed quickly. a lower threshold has been suggested for women, which certainly picks up more women with heart attacks than previously and that clearly is important because those women get identified as heart attacks and get treated as such.
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and that is clearly an important factor that plays a role in the underdiagnosis of heart attacks in women. two years on from her heart attack, louise is on the road to recovery and she says women need to know they can also be at risk. there's no set person that is classed as a prime example of somebody that may unfortunately have a heart attack, it doesn't discriminate, women need to just be aware. earlier professor nilesh samani, the medical director of the british heart foundation, told us that heart attacks are still seen as a male disease — when this is not the case.
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the research that we have funded has shown that there are subtle differences. not all of them are very great, but there are certainly differences in making the diagnosis. when somebody presents with a very big heart attack, the diagnosis is simple to make in men and women. but when the heart attack is more subtle, often because it is perceived to be a more male disease, then the diagnosis may be delayed. then, of course, women are sometimes not offered the optimum treatment as a consequence. we have got research showing that perhaps they leave the hospital with less of the number of drugs than we normally give to men with heart attacks, or patients receive for heart attacks. and also, in the after—care, in terms of cardiac rehabilitation, women are often perhaps not receiving as much of it as they should. at each stage, there's not perhaps a big difference in each of the stages but when you put them all together that is perhaps where lives are needlessly lost, as the report shows. prince harry will visit anti—poaching troops in malawi today as he continues his tour of southern africa. the duchess of sussex has stayed in south africa with their baby son archie — but she was still able to make an appearance at another of harry's engagements, via videolink. our royal correspondent nicholas witchell has this report from malawi.
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welcome to malawi, one of the poorest countries in africa, but a country which is committed to improving the education of its young women. prince harry took part in a discussion with a group supported by the queen's commonwealth trust — the objective? to empower women. the debate was joined by harry's wife, meghan, on a video link from johannesburg. we cannot begin to express how valuable and vital that work is. we're just incredibly proud to be a part of it. already the initiative, the campaign for female education, is working in five african countries. better education has many benefits. for one thing, it means fewer child marriages. today the focus shifts to another issue in this part of africa, the battle against the poachers. harry will visit the liwonde national park. he will pay tribute to guardsman matthew talbot of the coldstream guards. he was killed on an anti—poaching patrol earlier this year.
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harry will also see the work which is supported by the british military to combat the poaching gangs. nicholas witchell, bbc news, lilongwe, malawi. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav. good afternoon. we have seen a lot of rainfall across parts of england and wales over the weekend, many areas seeing well over their month average, and a number of flood warnings in force. more heavy rain to come as well, tied to this area of low pressure showing its hand across the far south—west, and spreading east, affecting parts of england and wales and northern ireland in the next 2041 was. in the next few hours, it looks fairly fine and dry across much of scotland and northern ireland, northern and eastern england, a bit of brightness around. some showers in the north of scotland, where it will be chilly.
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further south, 14—18dc. the wrangle spill into wales, the south—west, and it will be heavy and persistent in the first part of the night, leading to further flooding and affecting areas that have already seen a lot of rainfall in the last few weeks. the rain hangs around across northern parts of england and northern ireland.
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hello, this is bbc newsroom live with joanna gosling. the headlines: the chancellor sajid javid promises "a significant economic policy response" — in the event of a no—deal brexit — on day two of the conservative party conference. and mrjavid said he had "full faith" in borisjohnson — over allegations he squeezed the thigh of a female journalist at a lunch 20 years ago. children could be made to get compulsory vaccinations before they start school — the government is considering tough new measures after a surge in measles. why thousands of women are dying because their heart attack symptoms are missed. in paris, the funeral of former presidentjacques chirac. president macron leads the mourners as france pays its respects. and coming up — the heir to the saudi throne admits he played a part in the murder of a journalist. he says he did not order the murder
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but takes full responsibility. let's return to the conservative party conference — where the chancellor sajid javid has promised "a significant economic policy response" in the event of a no—deal brexit. it comes as he sets out plans for what he calls an "infrastructure revolution" — on the second day of the conference in manchester. let's take a closer look at those spending pledges: so far, the tories have made spending vows of more than 50 billion pounds at their conference. that includes a 25 billion pounds upgrade of england's roads. as well as five billion pounds for ultrafast broadband internet in the uk. i asked the director of the institute for fiscal studies, pauljohnson, how much of this was new money. the government has already pledged to some genuinely significant increases on infrastructure spending, starting under the last chancellor and going over the next several years. how much of this is new, in addition to the total
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pledged? am afraid we don't know at the moment but it is the case that spending on roads, rail and other infrastructure has been rising quite fast in the last couple of years and is planned to continue rising over the next few years to what is a historically high level by uk standards. how safe are those sorts of pledges? when it comes to meeting spending targets and needing money elsewhere, evade the sorts of projects which can be guaranteed to get the money initially talked about? well, it is difficult to know just how much the guarantee is. don't forget that in the 1990s and then after the financial crash in 2008, the then government immediately pulled the plug on investment spending. if you look at the austerity spending programme after 2010, infrastructure spending was hit particularly hard following the labour party and the conservative party plans in that direction. so i think if the economy
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does continue to grow and we don't need another dose of cuts, then probably because there is a need for this kind of spending it will be protected but if we enter another downturn and we need to get spending downturn and we need to get spending down again, and that is quite possible if, for example, the economy does badly after a no—deal brexit, where we could end up is a short upward shift in spending as we saw in 2008, 2009, followed by a short reduction. it is these long—term infrastructure projects which tend to get cut when the going gets tough. let in terms of the spending announced, i said the total tally announced since the start of the conference yesterday is £50 billion. what are your headline thoughts when you look at a figure like that? welcome with the headline thoughts is that is, in a sense, not a very useful, interesting or
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informative number. i don't know exactly what is made up of that. it is certainly spending over quite a lot of years. what we do know is that spending next year is set to grow by about 13 billion, £14 billion, a big increase in spending announced in the spending review and has clearly moved away for now, at least, from the period of austerity and spending cuts. we have the two main parties competing with one another for the scale of spending promises they are making that i would not take that £50 billion and compare it indirectly with any annual increase. i would say it is annual increase. i would say it is an indication that we are moving towards a relatively gradual increase in spending under this government and some genuine focus on infrastructure. saudi arabia's crown prince has said he takes ‘full responsibility‘ for the murder of saudi journalist jamal khashoggi — but denies allegations that he ordered the killing. in an interview with cbs's 60 minutes,
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mohammed bin salman said that mr khashoggi's death was a ‘mistake' by agents of the saudi government. he was killed in saudi arabia's consulate in turkey in october last year. now, members of a un investigation team have told the bbc‘s panorama of the ‘horror‘ and shock of listening to his final moments. panorama's jane corbin is with me now. you have made a panorama which will be going out, tell us more about what you have been looking into?m you remember that jamal khashoggi was a prominent critic of the saudi government. he was living in exile in america, writing columns for the washington post. he was in istanbul in the last few weeks of his life, engaged to a turkish lady and they we re engaged to a turkish lady and they were hoping to get married. he needed divorce papers to get married, he was divorced. they went to the saudi consulate, he went inside to get his papers and he was never seen again. we now know,
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effectively, what happened inside. how is that? we know that jamal khashoggi was murdered inside of the consulate but we only know this because turkish intelligence was bugging the consulate and were recording everything. these extraordinary tapes have been shared with very few people, mostly in the intelligence community, the cia and british mi6 have heard them that we have spoken to two of the tiny handful of people outside of that community who have listened to them. that is un special rapporteur agnes callamard and helene kennedy, helene o'kennedy explained the chilling nature of these tapes and the horror she felt when she listened to jamal ‘s voice as he realised what was about to happen to him. the horror of listening to somebody‘s voice, and the fear in someone's voice, makes a shiver go through your body. he says, "am i being kidnapped? how could this happen in an embassy? the sounds that are heard
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after that point indicate that he is suffocated, probably with a plastic bag. what has the response been from the international community? agnes callamard's report came to a definitive conclusion, she decided it was down to the responsibility of the state of the kingdom of saudi arabia who were behind the killing. the saudi government rejected her report and they have consistently denied those responsible for the death were acting on official orders. they have blamed what they call a rogue operation and have put 11 people on trial in saudi for that. what has the response been from saudi arabia? in an interview with cbs in the last 24—hour is, the crown prince mohammed bin salman was asked about the killing of jamal khashoggi and this is what he said.
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did you order the murder ofjamal khashoggi? absolutely not, it was a heinous crime, but i take responsibility as a leader of saudi arabia, especially as it was committed by individuals working for the government. the family of jamal khashoggi one year on our still seeking justice and agnes callamard and helena kennedy who listened to the tapes and describe them on panorama believe there should be an international judicial panorama believe there should be an internationaljudicial enquiry to look at this at the highest levels. jane, thank you. that is on tonight, at 8:30pm on bbc one. firefighters have called for more protection after research found they are being exposed to dangerously high levels of toxins which may be linked to cancer.
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it comes as the uk's chief fire officer has — for the first time — acknowledged the high rate of cancer among his colleagues. tracy gee has been investigating. firefighters need to stop having their lives totally turned upside—down with cancer. he died on the 4th of february this year. he went too soon, he just went too soon. the faces of just a handful of the many firefighters battling cancer, and for some, the treatment is taking its toll. michael copplestone, 15.09.66. mitch has two forms of leukaemia and is in need of a bone marrow transplant. the bad side will be that i won't quite make it to as old as i should have been. you just think, don't let it be me. and mitch isn't alone with facing cancer, but sadly for some firefighters, they've already lost their battle. stewart fish, lincolnshire firefighter, died at the age of 60 from blood cancer. i know in stewart's early years, breathing apparatus was not
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worn for open—air fires and when you understand its carcinogens and toxins that people are breathing in, if you want my personal opinion and honesty, i do think it was a contributing factor. in my opinion there is a direct link between firefighter‘s occupation and cancer. scientists believe that firefighters are twice as likely to die from cancer compared to the general population. if you take firefighters in their clothing in a hot environment, they start sweating. and thermal intake, or absorption via skin, is automatically increasing is kind of working as a sponge for all of the fire toxins. as tests continue, fire chiefs are coming under pressure to do more to protect their firefighters, and acknowledge a potential link to cancer. firefighters are contracting certain types of cancer above the population norm. i accept that, and that is a concern. shouldn't something be done now? why are we waiting for more conclusive evidence to come out when that evidence is already out there?
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the assurance i want to give is there's an incredible amount of work going on in the background to make this happen as quickly as possible, but i do acknowledge that is not quick enough for some people. i feel cheated, and so did stewart. i can't bring him back. ijust hope a positive comes out of, you know, this tragedy that's happened. i think it is an occupational hazard, yeah, definitely. firefighters need to stop having their lives totally turned upside—down with cancer. tracey gee, bbc news. you can hear more on this story on inside out across england at 7.30 tonight on bbc one. and viewers everywhere can catch the full report on the bbc iplayer. today is a national day of mourning in france following the death of former president jacques chirac who died on thursday aged 86. a memorial service has been held this morning. our paris correspondent lucy williamson has more details.
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jacques chirac's coffin was taken from invalides this morning were a small family ceremony was held through the streets of paris to the church of saint—sulpice, where the big public services now under way. a lot of world leaders are there, including the russian president vladimir putin, the italian and german presidents, a lot of former world leaders including bill clinton, people in power around the same time as he was. i think the variety of services, the number of people who have come out to sign the book of condolence and pay their respects is really a sign of the almost unique place thatjacques chirac seems to occupy these days in french politics. a sense that he was, somehow, unifying, even as president macron said, that he somehow embodied france and he belonged to everybody. and is that his legacy? what is the overview of his legacy? what is the overview of his legacy? what is the overview of
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his legacy? i think that sense of almost nostalgia, if you like, is quite keen with jacques chirac. when you remember that he was part of the life of france for such a long time, he was president for 12 years and was mayor of paris for almost 20 yea rs. was mayor of paris for almost 20 years. when you listen to the words of people who have been queueing up to pay their last respects, a lot of them have said that he was a huge pa rt them have said that he was a huge part of my youth all my life. that, coupled with the sense that he had this very human touch and easy charm, as his former prime minister has said, he was very sensitive to the heartbeat of the french and i think when you look at the presidents who have come after jacques chirac, they have been somewhat more divisive. there is a bit of nostalgia here for a man, for all of his political and personal faults, was seen as deeply french and had that special touch that made people feel he belonged to them.
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the headlines on bbc news... the chancellor sajid javid promises "a significant economic policy response" — in the event of a no—deal brexit. children could be made to have compulsory vaccinations before starting school — the government considers tough new measures after a surge in measles. thousands of women are dying from heart attacks because their symptoms go undiagnosed. a fire at an overcrowded refugee camp on the greek island of lesbos is reported to have killed two people. an angry crowd at the moria camp complained that firefighters had taken too long to tackle the blaze — extra police were sent to restore order. the bbc‘s tim allman has the story. thick, billowing clouds of smoke as part of this camp burns. somehow, one of the giant shipping containers that house many of the refugees here had caught fire.
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people ran for their lives, men, women and children, eyes burning from the noxious fumes. afterwards, you could see the destroyed remains of the container. some voiced their anger, accusing fire crews of taking too long to respond, but mostly, there was despair. look at the people here, fighting — look at that. look, there's fire, big fire, yeah, big fire — people are going to die. please, please, from everywhere, country, leave the people to go. the moria camp houses around 12,000 refugees, four times the number it was designed for. there has been a spike in numbers in recent months with 9,000 people arriving in august and more than 8,000 refugees coming in september so far. by some estimates, almost a million people, many of them fleeing the syrian civil war, crossed from turkey to greece in 2015.
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then a deal was done between ankara and the european union and the number of refugees dropped dramatically. but now, that figure is ticking up once more and this fire shows the burden being placed on greece can be a heavy one. tim allman, bbc news. vietnam is one of the world's most vulnerable countries to climate change. it's already having a huge impact on the lives of those in the mekong delta, the agricultural heartland of the country and home to 20% of the country's population. ashleyjean—baptiste went to meet the families living on the front lines of climate change. this man lost his house because of climate change. he and other families across the mekong delta of facing an increasingly desperate situation. there used to be two houses where you can see this open space of water. in july, they crumbled into the river due to erosion, and you can see these sandbags that have been put in place to try
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and protect the houses. further down here, the couple have created a temporary home because they are nervous that the house is going to collapse into the river. it's not just houses. livelihoods are being lost in the delta. this is the agricultural heartland of the country, but rising sea levels, coastal erosion and salt water intrusion are making farming increasingly difficult, and so thousands are being displaced. families who feel unable to cope with the changes leave for cities like ho chi minh.
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the government is trying to help. they've created relocation programmes for vulnerable families. they've also put dykes in place to try and help mitigate the impact of flooding. but some local scientists are concerned they are impacting the delta's ecosystem. so what's being done about it? we believe that youth are the agent for change, and it's much easier to impact on the way they think. 21—year—old linh is running a workshop called lens on mekong. she's gathered students from across the country and delta region to learn about the environment and how to film. they hope by educating
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themselves and learning to tell their stories more widely, people both here and internationally will take greater action to protect the region. this is such a big problem, do you feel like you can make a difference? yeah. things start from small changes, but at the same time it requires the whole ecosystem to collaborate, from the governmental sector to the public. what happens here in vietnam isn't unique. the world bank estimates that over 140 million people could be internally displaced by 2050 because of climate change. vietnam is both a warning and an example of how the world will have to adapt and change. ashley jean—ba ptiste, bbc news, vietnam. this story is the final episode in this current series of the bbc‘s digital documentary "the displaced" — a selection of stories exploring the global migrant crisis, and how it is changing our world. you can watch them at bbc.co.uk/news.
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austria's conservative people's party — led by the former chancellor sebastian kurz — has topped the poll in the country's snap general election. with nearly all ballots counted, the party has won more than 38 per cent of the vote — up from 31 per cent the last time round. the process of building a coalition is getting underway. bethany bell reports from vienna. sebastien kurz and his supporters are celebrating. despite the colla pse are celebrating. despite the collapse of his coalition with the far right freedom party in may, his conservative people's party has emerged stronger than before.” would like to thank our voters, it is incredible. it is an amazing day. it isa is incredible. it is an amazing day. it is a historic result for our party and we will try to have good talks before the other parties in the parliament and try to form a government that works for the people
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of austria. also celebrating our the greens. climate change has emerged as one of the top concerns for voters. and the greens could now be a violate —— viable coalition partner for mr a violate —— viable coalition partnerfor mr kurz. a violate —— viable coalition partner for mr kurz. the a violate —— viable coalition partnerfor mr kurz. the biggest loser of the night was the anti—immigrant freedom party, with support for them dropping by 10% following a video sting corruption scandal in may involving its former leader. the social democrats, who came in second, also had a disappointing result. so will mr kurz now look to the left or the right to form a coalition? another pa ct right to form a coalition? another pact with the freedom party could work in terms of content that may be unstable. and the greens say that they want radical change from the right—wing policies of the last government. a coalition with the social democrats is considered less likely.
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prince harry has lady wreath to a former soldier safeguarding wildlife in malawi, he laid a wreath at a simple memorial to guardsman matthew talbot in the national park where he was killed when he was charged by an elephant went on an anti—poaching patrol. we hope to bring you pictures. these are the correct pictures. these are the correct pictures. guardsman talbot was on his first deployment and he was passionate about his work, training malawians to protect animals like elephants and rhinos. there is prince harry with a wreath, he has beenin prince harry with a wreath, he has been in contact with guardsman talbot‘s family and he took a plaque that they commission for the memorial with him when he travelled to africa and in a handwritten message attached to the wreath that he has laid there, he said that guardsman talbot made the ultimate
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sacrifice in service of his country and conservation. rest in peace. the national trust has launched a project to make its 500 historic sites dementia—friendly. working with the alzheimer's society charity, thousands of staff and volunteers will be given training in how to make their sites more welcoming to people with dementia. the project also aims to improve accessibility at national trust properties. earlier tiger de souza, who's the director of volunteering participation and inclusion at the national trust, explained how sites are being made dementia friendly... we have a fantastic project here in cambridgeshire, where people from farming backgrounds and agricultural backgrounds are able to participate in the farming memories project and that helps them in terms of stimulating them in terms of regaining what they had in the past and living
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with the condition. but also, there are other projects around the country but what we have noticed is we have not done as much as we could do and there are other places we could do more. we are working with the alzheimer's society in training ourstaff and volunteers, looking at our styling and accessibility of parts and places. in thinking about the activities we run on and off site to benefit those living with dementia. where we have the variety of places we have, we have the opportunity to reach different individuals with different backgrounds and perspectives and things they can take in coming back to those places and experiencing them. it is important to recognise the fact that for people living with dementia, having the chance to come and experience some of these opportunities can be a tremendous help in terms of conversations they have with their families or helping them reconnect with the past. the one o'clock news is coming up, with sophie raworth.
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now it's time for a look at the weather. hello. this weekend was very wet. mothers. in england and wales, they bore the brunt of heavy and persistent rain and strong winds. there was also flooding. there are dozens of flood warnings across england and wales. they are exacerbated by this next area of low pressure bringing another round of heavy rain. that rain will be showing its hand this afternoon across the south—west of england and into wales. further north, not a bad day after a bright and sunny start. it should stay largely dry through the afternoon. some showers in the north of scotland. cooler pushing down in northern scotland and elsewhere, in the brightness, the mid—teens will not feel bad. in the south—west, rain moving eastwards this evening and overnight. atrocious conditions for the evening commute. this rain will be heavy and
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persistent, affecting areas that have seen flooding already. heading into tuesday morning, that rain persists in northern england. another issue develops with this area of low pressure in the midlands, southern england and the south—east, heavy showers could cause further flooding. warnings south—east, heavy showers could cause furtherflooding. warnings in place for all of this rain. on tuesday afternoon, we hold onto mild air in the south, 18 degrees, cool air in the south, 18 degrees, cool air pushing from the north. low pressure clears and opens the doors to an arctic northerly. these blues on the ems chart on wednesday show it will be notably cooler. but it should be mainly dry. wednesday begins chilly, frost in central and northern areas out of town. because of high pressure, after that she start, it will be a chilly day but it should be largely dry. —— after a chilly start. some showers affecting the north—east coast. temperatures
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of up to 14 degrees. towards the end of up to 14 degrees. towards the end of the week, a lot of uncertainty with what happens because of this, hurricane lorenzo, expected to move closer to our shores, as an ex—hurricane but if it mixes into an area of low pressure it could bring wet and windy weather but it could stay just offshore so wet and windy weather but it could stayjust offshore so you just have to stay tuned to the forecast.
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the chancellor says a no—deal brexit may well happen on october 31st, despite a new law to prevent it. sajid javid will use his party conference speech in manchester today to try to refocus public attention on spending pledges, after further allegations about borisjohnson this weekend. prime minister, it has been alleged that you touched the thigh of a woman at a lunch without her permission. did you? no and what the public want to hear is what we are going to do to unite the country. in westminster opposition parties are expected to meet to discuss their next steps to try to halt a no—deal brexit. also on the programme: thousands of women are dying needlessly from heart attacks, because they fail to recognise their symptoms, and receive poorer care than men.

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