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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  September 30, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm. the chancellor promises "a significant economic policy "response" in the event of a no—deal brexit — he's about to set out plans for infrastructure investment at the conservative party conference. we are working incredibly hard on getting a deal. i'm very much involved in that myself. in the number of meetings i've had, we are making good progress. and the chancellor will be on his feet here in manchester in the next hour. meanwhile, is this the final word from the prime minister about allegations that he touched a woman's five? allegations that he touched a woman's ——thigh? prime minister, it has been alleged that you touched the thigh
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of a woman at a lunch without her permission. did you? no and what the public want to hear is what we are going to do to unite the country. in westminster a meeting of opposition party leaders gets under way — one of their questions. if there was to be a caretaker prime minister — who should it be? thousands of women are dying needlessly from heart attacks because they fail to recognise their symptoms, and receive poorer care than men. saudi arabia's crown prince says he takes some responsibility for the murder of the journalist, jamal khashoggi, but denies personally ordering it. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport — jane... hi, simon. scotland have boosted their hopes of progressing to the knockout stages of the rugby world cup — they've earned a 3a—0 bonus point victory over samoa and are up to third in the pool a group. and darren, it is wet? it certainly is. flood warnings and more warnings
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of heavy rain today and into tomorrow. later on in the week we could have an ex hurricane on our doorstep. i'll see you later, darren. thank you for that. also coming up... world leaders — past and present — gather at a memorial service in paris to pay tribute to former presidentjacques chirac. as france observes a day of national mourning. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. the chancellor of the exchequer has insisted the uk can still leave the eu without a deal — despite a law which says the prime minister must ask for an extension if no agreement is reached. he said the government would obey the law, but that the policy set out by borisjohnson — of leaving with or without an agreement in october — had not changed. so just how that circle will be
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squared remains a mystery — but sajid javid promised "a significant economic "policy response" — in the event of a no—deal brexit. at the conservative party conference, mrjavid is promising what he calls an "infrastructu re revolution" with a £25 billion upgrade of england's roads, a national bus strategy and five billion pounds for ultrafast broadband internet in the uk. but it's already a stormy week for boris johnson — only monday! — culminating in number ten denying newspaper accusations that the prime minister squeezed a journalist's thigh under the table at a private lunch 20 years ago. and away from manchester — in westminster — opposition parties are expected to meet to discuss their next steps to try to halt a a no—deal brexit. our political correspondent jonathan blake reports. prime minister, what do you say about the groping allegations? waving away questions about his conduct, the prime minister left his hotel... do you have a problem with women? trying to cut through the noise and stick to the script. prime minister it has been alleged that you touched the thigh of a woman without her permission. did you?
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no and i think what the public want to hear is what we are doing to unite the country. before the chancellor set out how the government wants to do that, he was in a generous mood, spending his own money, before explaining how he will spend ours. the latest of £50 billion worth of announcements the party has made in manchester so far. get brexit done, focus on the things that matter to people and they want to see much more investment in our roads, in rail, in buses, in digital connectivity. but there is uncertainty about what brexit could bring for the economy. the government admits leaving the eu with no deal would bring challenges. so a hint that tax cuts and lower interest rates could soften the blow. if it was no deal, there would be a significant economic policy response and obviously you have the independent bank of england that will think
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about a monetary policy response and that is for them. i will be thinking about fiscal and other economic policy response. here they want to talk about brexit and spending commitments, but there is no doubt that claim by a female journalist that boris johnson squeezed her thigh under a lunch table, which downing street says is untrue, is an unwelcome distraction for the party and the prime minister. does the prime minister have a problem with women? absolutely not. one former minister sees it differently. i can't comment on those accusations but they are concerning and in ——deeply concerning and a sense go to the heart of the question about character and integrity of people in public life and what standards the electorate have a right to expect. back in westminster, opposition parties are meeting, their next move could determine the course of brexit, the timing of an election and see conservative mps back there sooner than planned.
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let's go to the conference now and speak to our chief political correspondent, vicki young. they are talking about what is going on there but they have one eye back in london. that is right. parliament is sitting during this conference. that is very unusual. opposition parties are meeting again today to work out their tactics for the next couple of days. the big unknown is whether they try and force some kind of folks. lots of tory mps up here. whether they try and seize the order paperagain, whether they try and seize the order paper again, trying to change the law. it is unclear whether they can do that and if they bring a vote of the snp wants to but the problem for them is as they have been all along there is no clear unanimous
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direction about what they would do if they were to win that votes because it is all very well voting down borisjohnson because it is all very well voting down boris johnson but because it is all very well voting down borisjohnson but you need to have someone to take his place. so can they get behind one candidate? former conservative mps, about 20 of them, all of them saying they would never backjeremy corbyn and would back borisjohnson never backjeremy corbyn and would back boris johnson in never backjeremy corbyn and would back borisjohnson in those circumstances. and the liberal democrats saying the numbers just aren't there forjeremy corbyn. so where we go from here we may find out later on today. meanwhile all eyes weren't sajid javid, the chancellor. this is big day. yes, the big thing is if there is any more details about what he means about the mitigation of an ideal brexit. does that mean a cut in the vat, cutting taxes? encouraging the bank of england to reduce interest rates even further back all of these
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things but the big picture is that they do expect there to be a downside to an ideal brexit. we hear ministers all the time talking about bumps in the road, it could be tricky in the short term. how explicit will he be about all of that? the fact he thinks there would need to be an emergency budget in those circumstances suggest they are concerned about what might happen and there is not very long to go. we have heard from michael gove about no deal preparations and cabinet ministers involved in those meetings have said there has been a very clear change since boris johnson became prime minister. they can never mitigate against everything and the unknown elements is still obviously troubling for ministers. thank you very much indeed. and opposition parties are meeting in westminster.
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to discuss their next steps as they try to prevent a no—deal brexit. some mps remain concerned that boris johnson could get round the law passed in the commons forcing him to request an extension from the eu — if no agreement is reached by the end of next month. the government says it will abide by the legislation, but still intends to deliver brexit on october the 31st. our political correspondent nick eardley is in westminster. quite a lot for them to talk about but they are not by any means talking as one voice, are they? they are not, simon. it took a lot for the opposition parties to get together and pass that legislation in the first place. as you say there is an increasing nervousness among some parts of the opposition that they have not done enough to stop and no—deal brexit on the 31st of october. the heard the chance saying that he thought downing street had a plan to get round the legislation but he hasn't been clear what that is. so at the moment they are in the building behind me trying to figure out what their next step is. i've got to say there is a whole
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smorgasbord of options there. they are not on the same page. the snp wa nt to are not on the same page. the snp want to bring down the government and putan want to bring down the government and put an emergency prime minister in. the lib dems have talked about forcing an extension to the brexit process in the next few days. bride comrie wants two they have been in that meeting for about 45 minutes and should be breaking up soon. one of the options i've heard this morning is to try and ambushed a government in parliament where all the tories are up parliament where all the tories are up in manchester, trying to get some emergency debate in the commons that would allow them to discuss things like brexit papers and try and get some more of them made public. also trying to censure the government over the supreme court decision but whether they can all get on the same
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page and agree, not that sure. we should know in the next half an hour or $0. should know in the next half an hour or so. one of those options is a vote of confidence and manchester will be watching their telly screens just so they know what is going on. yes man, anyone who's ever tried to get a last—minute train manchester will know it can be a precarious prospect. the chances of a confidence vote have receded but over the weekend of key figures in the snp were really ramping up the rhetoric on that. speaking to senior sources this morning i am not sure they think they've won that argument. they are worried that if they were to go ahead with a confidence vote now and bring down the government they might end up falling into a no—deal brexit by not being able to get their cards in a i’ow being able to get their cards in a row and getting an emergency prime minister. 21 tories who were kicked out of the party for refusing to
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back borisjohnson are extremely relu cta nt to back borisjohnson are extremely reluctant to go along with the idea of putting jeremy corbyn in number ten even if it was for a matter of a few days. so nicholas soames —— sir nicholas soames says that he would not be on board and he doesn't think the other 21 well. so another option is another caretaker, like an elder statesman or woman, like ken clarke 01’ statesman or woman, like ken clarke or harriet harman or margaret beckett, all names that have been bandied about but they can't agree on that at the moment. i would be surprised if they come up with a plan like that in the meeting now. it is not impossible but i'm not sure they are quite there yet. the big dangerfor them sure they are quite there yet. the big danger for them is sure they are quite there yet. the big dangerfor them is having brought parliament back and overturned prorogation, that they just can't do anything with the time
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they've got back. impeachment, and emergency prime minister, these new phrases really are brightening up the afternoon for all of us. you're watching afternoon live and bbc news. something else being discussed at the conference is whether vaccinations for all school children in england should be made compulsory.. something the health secretary, matt hancock, says he's "looking at very seriously". there's been a rise in the number of measles cases — and the latest figures show a fall in the take—up of all routine jabs for under—fives in the last year. simonjones reports. so we just do about there. a massive drive is needed, according to the health secretary, to get more children vaccinated. he told an event at the conservative party conference that he is very worried. when we, the state, provide services to people, then it's a two—way street. you've got to take your responsibilities too, so i think there's a very strong argument for having compulsory vaccinations for children,
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for when they go to school, because otherwise they're putting other children at risk. measles is a serious illness that can lead to an infection in the brain. just over 90% of children aged two were vaccinated against measles, mumps and rubella last year in england. that's a drop from 91.2% in the previous year. the world health organization's target is 95%, which scotland and northern ireland already achieve. here at the department of health, there has been much discussion about what can be done to increase vaccination rates. the health secretary believes the public would back his idea and he says he has already taken legal advice from within government about how they might go about it. the british medical association has previously stopped short of calling for compulsory vaccinations. it wants adequate resources to make sure vaccination programmes reach those most in need, and a crackdown on social media companies who fail
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to stop the spread of false and misleading information. simon jones, bbc news. let's speak to dr doug brown, chief executive of the british society for immunology. thank you for coming onto the programme. only 87.2% in england receive the mmr vaccine by the age of five. why? the reasons are complex and varied. for the fifth yearin complex and varied. for the fifth year ina complex and varied. for the fifth year in a row we are seeing these childhood vaccine stats going down. vaccine confidence is high in the uk but that not necessarily as translating... not high enough, is it? the confidence is high but pa rents it? the confidence is high but parents aren't recognising the value and importance of vaccine. so go back 20 or 30 years, you would put on the telly and there were all of the adverts in the health warnings. absolutely. we have seen a cut in funding for public health awareness
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programme so if we can see an increase in awareness and that would bea increase in awareness and that would be a positive step in the right direction. if you had compulsory immunisation that would solve it, wouldn't it? there is no evidence that would work in the uk. there is plenty of other things we need to do before we implement an extreme policy. if it saves lives that would extreme pales into significance because we are talking about life. it does but as confidence is high there are things we need to do in terms of investing in the immunisation services themselves and the community. if we implement a policy of compulsory vaccination, which we are not in favour of at the moment, we could see an increase in health inequalities in our society. what does that mean? we are seeing the uptake of childhood vaccinations not hitting 95% and a lot of proportions of our community
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socioeconomically disadvantaged communities and hard to reach communities and hard to reach communities are not choosing to access these vaccinations. if we are able to increase the awareness of how important these vaccines are and remove the complacency that might be up remove the complacency that might be up there because for a generation or so people haven't seen these diseases. you think people should turn up on the doorstep and say you're getting faxing now. well, we used to do that. for some communities we need to be getting out there and providing better training to deliver the positive message and physically deliver the vaccination so that children are protected. you know better than anybody watching that one person with measles is essentially a risk to 90 people around them. the risks of
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non—vaccination. .. around them. the risks of non—vaccination... it is a very simple message but they are just not getting it. we know vaccines save lives. they are a miracle of modern medicine and they are the best way to be preventing these very dangerous if not deadly diseases in our community. so we need to open us up our community. so we need to open us up and say to parents that it is ok to have questions, health care professionals a re to have questions, health care professionals are the most trusted source of information in the uk, go to your health care professional ask a question about vaccines and you will get the right answers to make the right decision to then protect your children. doctor doug brown, good to talk to you, thank you for coming in. thank you. thousands of women who suffer heart attacks are dying needlessly because they fail to recognise their symptoms, and receive poorer care than men — that's according to a new study. the report by the british heart foundation found inequalities in diagnosis, treatment and aftercare. it says the myth that heart attacks only affect men , has left many women unaware of the risks.
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our health correspondent, dominic hughes, has this report. oh, no! it was terrifying. i knew there was something wrong, but ijust didn't know what. ijust knew i needed that ambulance. two years ago, louise mcgill had a heart attack. it came out of the blue — a few days of feeling tired, a slight pain in her chest, and then overnight she was suddenly fighting for her life. the paramedic was running some results and i think it was an ecg he was doing and he said, "louise, i think you're having a heart attack." what did you think then? i thought, "this is it, i'm not going to make it." i couldn't believe it. i was just shell—shocked. louise was lucky, she got fast, appropriate care, but many women who suffer a heart attack are dying unnecessarily.
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researchers found that over a 10—year period more than 8,000 women may have survived with better treatment. i think there's a combination of bias and biology. so, whilst there are biological factors that are different between men and women, i think there is a bias as well, and this is a societal bias. there is a misperception that men only have heart attacks, and this is not true. today's report said that one of the problems that women face is that many of the treatments are designed around men — so a quick way to diagnose a heart attack is to look for the presence of a protein called troponin, that's released into the blood when someone suffers a heart attack, but many women, when they come into hospital, have lower levels of troponin than men, so they go undiagnosed. now, at this lab here in edinburgh, they are using a high sensitivity test that should allow more women to be diagnosed quickly. a lower threshold has been suggested for women, which certainly picks up more women with heart attacks than previously and that clearly is important because those women get identified as heart attacks and get treated as such. and that is clearly an important
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factor that plays a role in the underdiagnosis of heart attacks in women. two years on from her heart attack, louise is on the road to recovery and she says women need to know they can also be at risk. there's no set person that is classed as a prime example of somebody that may unfortunately have a heart attack. it doesn't discriminate. women need to just be aware. yay! i'm the winner. dominic hughes, bbc news. joining me now is nicki shears who had a heart attack back in 2016 but didn't show the usual signs or symptoms. nice to see you, thank you for coming in. he didn't know what was happening to you. just talk me through the hours before. was anything to give it away? not at all
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up anything to give it away? not at all up until it was starting to happen. i had had a normal night out and met up i had had a normal night out and met up with a friend. we were having dinner. ifelt up with a friend. we were having dinner. i felt perfectly normal. up with a friend. we were having dinner. ifelt perfectly normal. i do recall while she was talking to mea do recall while she was talking to me a sense of a screen almost ascending and me losing her voice and seeing her mouth moving and not hearing anything but then feeling very unwell, slightly sick, thought imight very unwell, slightly sick, thought i might have had food poisoning. i went home which was just around the corner, fortunately, when i got home i felt progressively worse and my symptoms as i recognise them now. i started to rub my arm a lot. i was feeling very out of sorts, sort of sick and just unwell. i thought maybe i'd eaten something. i was
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rubbing my arm and holding it to my chest like this and then i felt a lot of restriction around my chest area, almost like on garden hose those clips that you twist. it was like a vice across my chest. you actually joked with like a vice across my chest. you actuallyjoked with your husband, didn't you? i did. actuallyjoked with your husband, didn't you? idid. i actuallyjoked with your husband, didn't you? i did. isaid, actuallyjoked with your husband, didn't you? idid. isaid, "i actuallyjoked with your husband, didn't you? i did. isaid, "i know this sounds ridiculous but you don't think i could be having a heart attack? they both laughed and said, "of course you aren't, look at you." looking back now they both need to 90, looking back now they both need to go, "if you think you have then you need to do something now." absolutely. i was still feeling very u nwell absolutely. i was still feeling very unwell so i went and lay down. it was quite a short period of time. if i had been standing up i would have passed out at that point but i didn't because i was lying down. i was then violently sick with a very
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bad headache and then was very emotional. i cried and remembered sitting on the bed and feeling really sad and then i was told that this feeling of an impending sense of doom which is such an accurate description of how you feel. you feel you're potentially going to die. there is a real sense of overwhelming, "what is happening to me?" at that point i woke my husband up. he was asleep? everyone was asleep. it made me aware how this is asleep. it made me aware how this is a creeping thing that could happen to you. if i hadn't woken him up on not sure what i would have done. i probably would have just gone back to bed and not done anything. i woke him up and he at that point was aware that i was very distressed. luckily, we are so fortunate, we live in an area where we have great hospitals enclosed proximity and
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whizzed down to uch and as soon as i describe to them how i felt at the triage point they wished me in very rapidly and started to do blood tests. why won't you aware of the symptoms. was it something because you are a woman orjust didn't come to your mind? definitely being a woman was a big factor. it is a bit sexist but i always thought that heart attacks happened to overweight, smoking, drinking men who are in their mid—60s and now i realised that that is definitely not the case and tell vulnerable women are. i had no awareness that this was something that could happen to me at my age. i was 50 at the time. ididn't me at my age. i was 50 at the time. i didn't have high blood pressure. i wasn't overweight. i don't smoke. i have the odd drink. really i didn't
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present any of those symptoms that you would associate with having a heart attack. and your attitude, is that one that is shared by many around you ? that one that is shared by many around you? when you say you've had around you? when you say you've had a heart attack. people don't believe me. to this day i sometimes wonder if my father actually believed i had a heart attack. i think the overwhelming reaction was one of total shock. most women didn't believe me and actually i felt that i was on believe me and actually i felt that iwas ona believe me and actually i felt that i was on a bit of believe me and actually i felt that iwas on a bit ofa believe me and actually i felt that i was on a bit of a crusade to try and educate people and to make people aware of the fact that it can happen to you. you have an audience right now. what would you say to women watching you? if you have any symptoms of pain in the arms, any symptoms of pain in the arms, any symptom around your chest which might feel like indigestion possibly, just act on it straightaway. the hospital made me really realise that you are never scaremongering. just take it
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seriously, get yourself in as quickly as you can to have yourself checked out and don't discount any of these symptoms at all because women slightly soldier on and say, "i've got to get up, i've got to ta ke "i've got to get up, i've got to take the kids to school and i've got work." we put ourselves down on the priority list but please take any of those symptoms very seriously and act on them. it is your birthday today. it is, yes. it is a birthday message and i'm glad to be here. thank you so much for coming in. pleasure. you're watching afternoon live. saudi arabia's crown prince has warned that oil prices could rise steeply if the world does not act to counter iran. speaking after the attack on its oil facilities earlier this month, which the kingdom blames on tehran, mohammed bin salman said a failure to deal with iran could lead to war.
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in an interview with cbs news, the prince also accepted some responsibility for the murder of the journalist, jamal khashoggi, but denied personally ordering it. our security correspondent, frank gardner, who's just come back from the kingdom, has this report. the moment of impact. shocking footage of the incident missiles and drones hit saudi arabia's critical oil infrastructure. the saudis and the us blames iran which denies it. now the crown prince of saudi arabia warns prices if something happens again/=. translation: if the world does not deter iran, we will see further escalations, oil supplies will be disrupted and prices jump to unimaginably high levels. the war in yemen has embroiled rivals saudi arabia and iran, which backs the houthi rebels. they have released there pictures after a major attack on the
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border they say has resulted in thousands of troops captures. including saudi officers. the saudi crown prince committed his troops to this war four years ago. but they have failed to defeat the who sees. but they have failed to defeat the ——houthis. it was the murder of this man, the saudi journalist, jamal khashoggi, which has cast the bigger shadow over his rule. he was asked if he ordered it. translation: absolutely not. this was a heinous crime, but i take full responsibility as a leader in saudi arabia. especially since it was committed by individuals working for the saudi government. saudi arabia has become a more relaxed, less austere place under crown prince mohammed bin salman. but critics say there is a darker side to his rule and the stain of the jamal khashoggi murder
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will not be easily erased. the image of saudi arabia took a hit from the jamal khashoggi murder. much of the leadership was slow to realise the extent of the damage. here there was little coverage about the incident. for most saudis the negative impact of the event has been overshadowed by the huge social reforms sweeping the country. for now, the population is largely with him, but saudi arabia's problems are mounting, with iran, with yemen and with an ever more sceptical west. time for a look at the weather. darren has his eye on lorenzo which isa darren has his eye on lorenzo which is a hurricane. he told me not to say it was unpredictable but it is unpredictable. they often are especially when they
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are large and powerful hurricane such as this one. this was a category five hurricane, the second of the season. when it was a category five over the weekend, we have never had a category five major hurricane this far east across the atla ntic hurricane this far east across the atlantic so it is already breaking records. it is heading northwards and it is weakening but we need to look at where it is going to go. this is the forecast track from the national hurricane centre. obviously it could change. dorian was a very difficult tractor forecast. we've got the azores on their and normally our fine weather at this time of year comes from the azores with high pressure but this time round that is going to be hitting the azores on tuesday night. it could be winds gusting in excess of 100 miles an hour. then the track takes it up towards the uk and where does it go when it gets to the uk? that is the tricky bit. that is what you are meant to be telling us. i'm going to
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try. this is our preferred forecast from the normal model that we use. the ec model. the european centre model. this is one we usually show on our forecast. the low pressure still a very deep area takes this track to the north—west of the uk. that forecast track was changed enormously from yesterday. still the same model but the track has changed. it is coming more in line with other computer models. we have to look at all of the range to get your best estimate is where the forecast will go. that is the best track we have at the moment however the orange track is the uk met office model which is very different as it heads towards the uk, not as deep but it could have more of an impact. this is what we are expecting to happen. and that may just bring some wet and windy weather. and we could miss the worst of it.
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friday, this is thursday. in the meantime, what are we looking at? we have had some torrential rains. we have had some torrential rains. we have had some torrential rains. we have had a lot of flooding over the past few days in the north west of england, parts of wales as well. a lot of flood warnings across england and wales. these are river warnings but they are also tidal warnings as well. this was the scene a little while ago in chorley in lancashire stop we had some flooding over the weekend there. rain is starting to move in later this afternoon. already a very moody picture here in cornwall. wetter weather pushing into the south—west, further across wales, up into northern ireland and eventually through the midlands, towards the south—east. before then,
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17, 18 degrees. northern parts missing out on all the fun but we will find heavy bursts of rain over the hills of wales and into the midlands. a weather warning here. dries off later in the night but the rain more lighter and patchy as it moves rain more lighter and patchy as it m oves a cross rain more lighter and patchy as it moves across northern england and the far south of scotland. in the south, warmer, heavy showers not far away. north of hour rain ban, the air is much colder and that is the air is much colder and that is the airwe will air is much colder and that is the air we will get air is much colder and that is the airwe will get in air is much colder and that is the air we will get in the middle part of the week. the rain should clear, it will brighten up. patchy rain for northern england, more widespread, potentially thundery down spores across southern parts of england and wales. temperatures outside the shower is 18 degrees, much colder for scotland and northern ireland despite that sunshine with some showers in the north. the wettest weather is across some parts of england and wales. that clears tuesday evening and then i will come all the way from the north. a northerly wind sweeping that colder
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air across scotland and northern ireland right across the uk. by the time we get to tuesday night, wednesday morning, there may be a touch of frost in scotland and northern ireland. some try to start the day here but there will be a band of showers pushing down across scotla nd band of showers pushing down across scotland into the north—east. a bit more cloud for northern ireland, wales and then in the south it could bring one or two light showers. not com pletely bring one or two light showers. not completely dry. not very warm. temperatures 12 — 1a degrees. below parfor temperatures 12 — 1a degrees. below par for some temperatures 12 — 1a degrees. below parfor some parts of temperatures 12 — 1a degrees. below par for some parts of the temperatures 12 — 1a degrees. below parfor some parts of the uk. we have ex—hurricane lorenzo. that is the forecast track of that, heading towards the north—west. rain heading our way, the wind is picking up across western parts but at the moment we may miss the rest of it although that forecast track could change.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines: the chancellor says he's planning for a no—deal brexit — as he gets ready to announce investment in transport and broadband at the conservative party conference. meanwhile, borisjohnson has denied allegations of misconduct against a female journalist. in westminster, opposition party leaders meet to decide their next steps, including who might challenge borisjohnson to be a caretaker prime minister. thousands of women are dying needlessly from heart attacks because they fail to recognise their symptoms, and get poorer care than men. saudi arabia's crown prince says he takes responsibility
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for the murder of the journalist, jamal khashoggi, but denies personally ordering it. and coming up — prince harry honours a british soldier killed while trying to stop poachers in malawi. sport in a moment, first, let's go back to westminster where opposition parties have been meeting to discuss their next steps as they try to prevent a no—deal brexit. that meeting has just finished and we can speak to our political correspondent nick eardley. what has happened? not a lot by the sounds of it. there was a lot of speculation over the weekend about plans to try and force a brexit extension this week, about potentially impeaching the prime minister but after that meeting, it doesn't sound like they have agreed on any of it. the opposition parties will push for some emergency debates in the next few days, they tried for
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one today, the speaker said no. i'm not too sure we are that much further forward. is that a fair summary? i am gratefulthe parties have supported the snp in a missionary put down today to compel the government to release papers relating to a deal. we will try again tomorrow. i am worried about the situation we are in. boris johnson is talking about the being ona no johnson is talking about the being on a no deal basis, he is talking about ignoring the law. i have said on behalf of the snp the best way to stop borisjohnson is to on behalf of the snp the best way to stop boris johnson is to take the keys away from him. there is that option that the opposition have and i'm grateful no one is ruling this out. you have been speaking about it the last few days, we had nicola sturgeon saying it was a possibility, the snp mp saying it will happen. it is not from what i
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have heard. i want a motion of no confidence. i want the other parties to come with us. not ruling anything out at this stage but those who voted to stop no deal at the end of october, if they come together and recognise the responsibilities of leadership then we can stop boris johnson. we will carry on talking, eating over the course of the rest of the week. i will be putting the case that the best way to stop this is to stop boris johnson case that the best way to stop this is to stop borisjohnson by removing him from numberten. is to stop borisjohnson by removing him from number ten. there will be some at home wondering why make such a big fuss about prorogation when you guys have agreed to do anything with the time you got back. we are here trying to help the government to account. it is regrettable having got that emergency debate that i was asking for today because that would compel the government to release papers that are in the public interest, papers the government says they have delivered for the european union on the basis of a new deal and the european union saying there are
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no meaningful negotiations going place. we will push for that debate tomorrow. i'm sorry that has not been the case we are getting it today but we will not give up that. we are going to help the government to account and will continue to do so. to account and will continue to do so. do you accept the government will survive the week? you will not bring down boris johnson will survive the week? you will not bring down borisjohnson in the next few days? i am not making any promises. the snp will accept its responsibilities. we want a motion of no confidence as soon as possible. we want to take boris johnson, this man is behaving in such a reprehensible manner, the way he has behaved in parliament, the use of language, the fact he is talking openly about ignoring an act of parliament that stops him taking us of parliament that stops him taking us out on a no deal basis. we had to stop him and the snp are prepared to do our bit. the message to people watching is we need to get out of this mess. if we can't force other parliamentarians to come with us in the uk, we need to recognise that we
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must protect scotland's interests by becoming an independent country. that is the only way we can guarantee our european future. the snp not giving up on the idea of bringing down the government but other parties are not on board. we will have a word with them later. not much of a coordinated strategy over the next few days. sport now on afternoon live with jane dougall. hello, jane — we'll start injapan at the rugby world cup where scotland have picked up a vital win? scotland could have just saved their rugby world cup campaign. they've beaten samoa 3a points to nil injapan in a must win match. the scots you might remember, played pretty dismally against ireland, losing their first game. however, they were far more assured against samoa and ran in two first half tries through sean maitland and greg laidlaw. they knew that defeat would have left qualification for the quarterfinals out of their hands. a huge drop—goalfrom stuart hogg
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saw them lead 20—nil at half time. then two penalty tries in their favour in the second half saw them pick up what could a very important bonus point. you get a bonus point for scoring four tries in a match. contentious issue through towards full—time when maitland was illegally stopped from going over. that means that scotland are now third in their group behind ireland and japan who are top. scotland's remaining games are against russia and japan. let's talk about the world athletics championships because anybody watching, there are more people down on the ground than there are in the stands. it was an incredible final last night — dina asher smith running so well to come second in the world behind jamaica's shelley—ann fraser—pryce at the world athletics championships in doha. asher—smith is the first british woman to win a global individual sprint medal since kathy cook in the 200m at the 1983 world championships. the 23—year—old will be back
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on the track in the next half an hour or so. she's in the heats of the 200—metres. hopefully there will be more spectators than last night. this was her completing a lap of honour after taking silver in the 100—metres behind jamaica's shelly—ann fraser—pryce. the few thousand that actually watched the race had all but gone. the iaaf is expected to address the issue of empty seats later today, but asher—smith's team—mate martyn rooney has spoken to the bbc about the issue. i think when you get into the stadium and you see the pinnacle, no one is there, that is a bad sign. when they are picking where meats are, be it diamond league, while challenge meets, it needs to be in places where they will sell tickets and at least make the sport look as good as it can be. it is still an entertaining sport, it has a lot to
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offer and we are shooting ourselves in the foot a bit. manchester city women have been drawn against atletico madrid in the last 16 of the champions league. city won the league cup and fa cup last season, but they were knocked out of europe in the last 32 — by atletico madrid. city will play the first leg at home on the 16th or 17th october. wsl champions arsenal were drawn against slavia prague and scottish champions glasgow city will take on brondby. west ham's goalkeeper lukas fabianski could be out for the next 2 months because of a torn hip muscle. he picked up the injury taking a goalkick during their 2—all draw with bournemouth on saturday. it's a big blow for the hammers who have made a strong start to the season, they are 11th in the table. northern ireland'sjonathan rea has won a record fifth world superbikes title. it was also his fifth championship in a row. he won it with victory at magny cours in france with two rounds to spare.
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the spaniard alvaro bautista, who had won every race in the first three rounds, was his nearest rival. speaking to the bbc this morning, he compared this title with his other four. i think the greatest is always your first because i dreamt of it since being a kid and the rest have come asa being a kid and the rest have come as a huge bonus but this one was after may, it really felt like it wasn't going to happen, it wasn't on and there was no light at the end of the tunnel but we kept believing and never giving up and believe that our opportunity would come whether it was at the next round or another round. that is all the sport for now, back to you, simon. we arejust we are just hearing from a number of sources that opposition leaders will not vote for a vote on no confidence
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in borisjohnson this week. anna soubry among those. she had a meeting with jeremy soubry among those. she had a meeting withjeremy corbyn and others and said there is no vote of no confidence this week. she also set a plan by the parties opposing a no deal was not accepted by the commons speaker. this country will not crash out of the eu without a deal and that result is paramount. we are getting details coming from that meeting and we will go back to nick later. let's get more on on the conservative party conference —— the chancellor sajid javid is due to speak very shortly. let's head to manchester now and speak to our chief political correspondent, vicki young. we have a rough idea of what he's going to be saying? that is right. a lot of it is about extra spending on things like 5g, role and —— road and
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rail improvements. a lot of money around after all those years when there didn't seem to be any at all. interesting that such a jab it will talk about mitigating the effects of a no—deal brexit. that does suggest that ministers are worried about a hit to the economy. i disagree. i think i know deal brexit should we get to that stage is not the preferred outcome but it will not be the catastrophe that some opponents to brexit will portrait as. we won't be paying the £39 billion, that can be paying the £39 billion, that can be ploughed back into various sectors which might be affected by tariffs or investment into our infrastructure. we won't be paying, we will have freedom on our trade policies and we will have freedom on setting out new rules and regulations that make our export environment more beneficial for new markets. there are benefits as well.
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there will be some challenges and thatis there will be some challenges and that is why the challenger has rightly said he will invest appropriately to mitigate those challenges. do you think the public are aware of those challenges? when people talk about bumps in the road, challenges, a period of uncertainty, do they know what it will mean for them? i believe overall there will be some challenges form a no—deal brexit but they are surmountable. even though this mightjust be four weeks away? we know already the government has hugely accelerated and stepped up its no deal planning and stepped up its no deal planning and contingency planning and when i was a minister in government, i saw that and that was a year ago. these plans are far advanced, there has been huge engagement with the private sector and individuals, organisations directly affected and i think we are in a reasonable position to manage any of these challenges that may occur. is your
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preference to leave with a deal or are you now one of those who things actually it would be better to leave without a deal? my preference all along has been to leave with a deal but i stand by the manifesto pledge upon which i was elected which is no deal is better than a bad deal and therefore if we have a bad deal, we have to be ready to leave on wto terms. we have the capacity within our country, with an our people, businesses, innovators, our government to overcome any of those challenges and thrive outside of the eu and free of the constraints of eu regulations, economic constraints and with the ability to forge a new future outside of the eu. is itjust the so called that you are happy about in the original withdrawal agreement or do your concerns go wider than that? the deal as a whole is dead. borisjohnson has said
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that. realistically he will not have a complete renegotiation of it in the next few weeks. it's really difficult to predict. i don't want to pre—empt what their negotiating teams are going to produce. i voted against this deal because it didn't know that the referendum result. it locked the uk into an indefinite customs union. it hived off northern ireland and threatened the integrity of our union. there are fundamental flaws with the current deal, they need to be changed and i hope they will be so i can support a deal to get through parliament and therefore leave in a smooth and orderly manner in october. a bill has been passed, the ben act which makes the prime minister ask for a delay to brexit. should he break the law and ignore that? i am a former lawyer so of course i'm not going to condone breaking the law. the government and prime minister are not above the law
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so prime minister are not above the law so the government will comply with the law. all government ministers have made that clear, however there are testing the law is something courts around the country do every day through legal disputes and to establish the precise limits of a statute is always an arguable point. i anticipate that if we were in that scenario, that may be something that occurs but of course the government doesn't plan as a first option to break the law. this conference has been dominated by questions about boris johnson's been dominated by questions about borisjohnson's behaviour. he has had to deny he groped a woman 20 yea rs had to deny he groped a woman 20 years ago. are you appalled, upset, worried this is dominating the news here? i feel the worried this is dominating the news here? i feelthe dominant worried this is dominating the news here? i feel the dominant stories are the excellent policy announcement we have heard from the government. every day now we are hearing positive, exciting, productive... the prime minister is being asked about this constantly. that is a real shame. i wasn't
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there, i don't know anything about this apart from the hearsay evidence and asa this apart from the hearsay evidence and as a lawyer, hearsay evidence is always something to be treated with caution. this is something that allegedly happened 20 years ago and it is one person's word against another. i trust the prime minister andl another. i trust the prime minister and i don't think they should have any bearing on the policy announcements we are making to make our country better and a more prosperous place to leave live —— live. all eyes will be on the chancellor in the next few moments. i have seen a cutaway shot from inside the hall and borisjohnson is sitting there next to his girlfriend. there is clearly a message. we arejust girlfriend. there is clearly a message. we are just showing it now. clearly there is a subliminal message with that. she arrived with him here when they came on saturday, and she is obviously a former employee of the conservative party so not a big surprise that she is
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here sitting next to him. this is not idealfor the prime minister to be asked these questions. cabinet ministers are saying that some of them have spoken to borisjohnson about this, he has denied it took place and what they are saying is that there is unlikely to be more evidence coming forward and they are trusting the prime minister when he says that it didn't happen. it is clearly not the headlines that they wa nt to clearly not the headlines that they want to have and i think they will be hoping that today's speech moves them onto areas of policy rather than talking about these other matters. there are rather a lot of policy elements to this speech. quite a lot of headline grabbing bits in it. what is interesting is how now spending seems to be the thing that both parties are talking about, both labour and the conservatives. we saw last week some big spending commitments from the labour party and now we are hearing similar things from the
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conservatives and it is in stark contrast to all those years when austerity was the watchword. what they say is was there was enough physical headroom that they can spend some of this money but it does of course feel like a pre—election giveaway. it feels as if that is where we are, heading towards a general election. the other side of this is this no deal preparation and the idea that the chancellor suggesting if it is a no—deal brexit that he will have to hold an emergency budget and bring in may be cut in vat, cuts and other taxes in order to mitigate against the negative consequences and how long those go on for, will be crucial. notjust to those go on for, will be crucial. not just to everyone's those go on for, will be crucial. notjust to everyone's lives but of course to the fortunes of the conservative party. they pride themselves on saying they are the best stewards of the economy. if things were to start going wrong, then many of them feared that could
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dent their electoral chances. we are just keeping an eye on what is happening in the conference hall. sajid javid is about to come to the lectern. there is a short video so while we await his arrival on the stage, can you talk about the atmosphere there? this is very unusual given that the house is sitting as this conference gets under way. what is interesting is that there are lots of mps here, lots of the cabinet are here. what they are doing is keeping some back at base in parliamentjust to cover what is going on there but this news coming out from the opposition ‘s pa rty‘s coming out from the opposition ‘s party's meeting, that they are not planning to disrupt this and spring a vote of no confidence in the house of commons, that will be a relief to the people organising this. it is not possible to cancel, you can see behind me all the companies here,
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the exhibition hall, all the delegates who have booked accommodation, you can't just abandon these things, they are planned months if not he in advance. they are pleased they can carry on with it but they will want lots of mps to be in the hall... let's hear from sajid javid now. thank you. thank you so much. thank you for that welcome. and can i welcome my mum. you saw her in that video. and she is here today for her first conference. 20 years ago, mum thought it was a big deal when she watched her first asians thought it was a big deal when she watched herfirst asians move into coronation street here in manchester. now she has watched the
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first asians moving to downing street! applause once again we are living above the shop. but i am so happy to make her proud. sorry, that is between us, forgot you were there. it might be my mum's first tory conference but i have been now coming for over 30 yea rs have been now coming for over 30 years and every year, we talk about what is at stake for our country. but never in my lifetime has there been a political moment like this. we will be remembered for how we respond. and we will do our duty responsibly, firmly and
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democratically. applause . that starts with getting brexit done. we are leaving the european union. it's not a matter of if, it's a matter of days. 31 days, deal or no deal. applause .we applause . we understand that preparing to leave without a deal is not only the responsible thing to do but also the best way of leaving with a deal. in all my years of negotiating multi—billion pound international deals, i never once walked into a room without being able to walk away. and that is why... applause
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. that is why on my very first day as chancellor i gave a speech to the treasury about making no deal preparation is my top priority. and a few days later, i doubled funding for it, taking our brexit spending toa for it, taking our brexit spending to a total of £4 billion this year. and to give organisations and devolved administrations certainty for the year ahead, in the event of ano for the year ahead, in the event of a no deal, i have now agreed to guarantee all £4.3 billion of eu directed funding that they would have been expecting. that doesn't mean that a new deal would be without significant challenges. i know that some businesses and households, they are concerned about what a no deal outcome might mean for them. i recognise that. and i
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understand the uncertainty around brexit can be challenging. but our step change in preparations has made a deal outcome more likely and a no deal outcome more manageable. every department now has the resources available to prepare for no deal. that means more border force staff, better transport infrastructure at our ports, more support for business readiness. i have tossed the treasury with preparing a comprehensive economic response to support the economy, working closely with the bank of england, we are ready to draw on the four armoury of economic policy if needed. and the bank has already revised its assessments because of the actions that we have already taken. so deal or no deal, we will be ready.
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all that is important but brexit isn't something to manage or to mitigate. we understand this is ultimately a question about trust in our democracy. a strong economy can only be built on the foundations of a successful democracy and by definition democracy isn'tjust a successful democracy and by definition democracy isn't just for when it suits you. like the lib dems who called for a referendum four yea rs who called for a referendum four years and then sort of change their mind. then they said they would respect the results. then they sort of didn't. then they called for a second vote, then change their mind again and now they want to somehow pretend that the whole thing never
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happened, going back on your promises to the british people isn't liberal and it certainly isn't democratic. and then there is the labour party. they are so split down the middle that's not even their leader and their shadow chancellor can agree on whether they support brexit or not. so guess what they are going to hold another referendum with two options, perhaps and maybe. what a leader, a man for the many brexit positions, not the few. what they don't seem to
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understand is that millions of people voted in good faith over three years ago. it was the biggest exercise in democracy our country has ever seen. they always forget one has ever seen. they always forget u has ever seen. they always forget one group of voters and that's the millions who voted not to leave the eu is now completely respect the results and want us to get on with the brexit. yes, there are splits of opinion and strong views on all sides. i get that. but i passionately believe that we need to heal the divisions in our society. the way to do that isn't to carry on arguing about brexit for ever and ever and ever. it is to finally
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deliver on the original decision and move the whole country forward. people talk a lot about the risks of brexit. some are understandable, some not. the truth is this, i don't think it is acknowledged as often as it should be. the most reckless course of all would be to not deliver brexit at all. if we fail to deliver brexit at all. if we fail to deliver on the instruction of the british people we are in danger of tearing the very fabric of our democracy, a fabric that has been carefully woven together over centuries. if we do that then i fear that we may not be able to stitch it up that we may not be able to stitch it
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up again. if people are going to have faith in the ballot box then we absolutely have to follow through on that vote. no more second—guessing, no best—of—3. one votes, one mandate and one nation moving forward together. as we get brexit done and leave the eu, it is the right time to ask ourselves some big questions. who are we as a country? how do we see ourselves in the years ahead? how will we shape the economy for the future? last week we saw labour's a nswe rs future? last week we saw labour's a nswers to future? last week we saw labour's answers to this. jeremy corbyn sees this as an opportunity to bring in nationalisation, protectionism and
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state control. let's be in no doubt about the biggest threat to the uk economy. whenever i speak to businesses and international investors the number one concern they always raise is not the form of our exit from the eu, the real projects to be fearful about is the agenda of the labour party. if they had their way whole sectors of our economy would be renationalised, people's taxes would rise to the crippling levels of the past, people's jobs would be crippling levels of the past, people'sjobs would be put crippling levels of the past, people's jobs would be put at risk because of sectorial pay bargaining, the return of trade union militancy would once again hold the government to ransom, wasting hundreds of
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billions of pounds and hitting families and businesses up and down the country. the british chambers of commerce said just last week about labour's plans, they said they would send an icy chill up the spines of businesses and owners everywhere and it is no wonder we have a shadow chancellor who says that businesses are the real enemy and openly admits that he wants to overthrow capitalism. now, given how much damage they would do every single day they are in office, i'm glad they say they would only be working for days a week. —— four days a week. when i arrived to the treasury idid week. when i arrived to the treasury i did have a letter waiting for me on my desk but it didn't say that
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there was no money left, that is because we took the difficult decisions needed to get the deficit down by four fifths. decisions needed to get the deficit down by fourfifths. we decisions needed to get the deficit down by four fifths. we have now taken back control of our financial destiny just as we take taken back control of our financial destinyjust as we take back control of our laws and our borders. it is easy to forget just how bad of our laws and our borders. it is easy to forgetjust how bad things we re easy to forgetjust how bad things were when we first came in. labour lost control of our public finances as they always do and that is when they still believed in the basics of capitalism. our country borrowed 150 billion pounds in their last year in office. the highest level in our peacetime history. and it fell to the conservatives once again to wipe up the conservatives once again to wipe up their mess. i'd like to pay tribute to both my immediate predecessors for their role in that. we may disagree on our approach to
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brexit but as conservatives we can be very proud of what they helped us achieve. labour left behind a bankrupt britain and we fixed it. now, they don't like to hear it but when the opposition stop hiding from that election, i promise you it won't be like last time. we won't shy away from talking about are hard and record on the economy and we won't shy away from telling everyone about the threat that their divisive, backwards, bankrupt, immoral, incompetence, ideological experiments will impose on everyone's way of life. they tried
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to claim that the only alternative isa to claim that the only alternative is a race to the bottom. that is what they say. they say, "let's let eve ryo ne what they say. they say, "let's let everyone fend for themselves. " that is not conservatism. i'm not sure thatis is not conservatism. i'm not sure that is anyone's conservatism. if we are going to be forging ahead with our positive one nation vision for our positive one nation vision for our country's future we believe in levelling up, skilling up and opening up, embracing talent from around the world. as we look towards our future outside the eu around the world. as we look towards ourfuture outside the eu i am around the world. as we look towards our future outside the eu i am very optimistic that we can build on our extraordinary economic strengths and reshape the british economy to seize the opportunities that this new chapter has to offer. we will be able to pursue a genuinely independent trade policy. we will be able to replace inefficient eu
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programmes with better home—grown alternatives and from retail to green tech will have the opportunity to design smarter, more flexible regulation. to help us do that i will launch a brexit red tape challenge to help identify eu regulations that we can improve or remove. doing what a good pro—business government always does. after the decade of recovery from the last labour government we are now bringing in a decade of renewal with this government because my new leadership we have the opportunity to hit fast forward. it is an
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opportunity the prime minister and i are seizing. we are notjust neighbours or even dog sitters sometimes, we are partners. we share the same determination on brexit. the same vision of one nation conservatism and we both spend about the same amount of time brushing our hair. our vision is based on the people's priorities and these are based on conservative principles. conservatives understand that a dynamic free market is the only way you can fund world—class public services. for me, like so many people around our country, public services were my lifelines. the teachers who made my career
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possible, the police officers who kept us safe when the street i grew up kept us safe when the street i grew up on became a centre for drug dealers. the nhs that cared for my father in his final days. these aren't just numbers on father in his final days. these aren'tjust numbers on a spreadsheet, they are the beating heart of our country. that is why public services are at the heart of this government's agenda. earlier this month i announced our spending plans for britain's first year outside the eu, a new economic plan for a new era. thanks to the ha rd plan for a new era. thanks to the hard work of the british people and are responsible economic management we are able to invest an extra £13.4
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billion in public services. the spending will make a real difference to people's lives and that includes recruiting 20,000 new police officers, restoring our rightful reputation as the party of law and order. increased funding for every school in the country and a renaissance in further education continuing our record investment in the nhs and making a large down payment on social care. these are the people's priorities and these are our priorities. it is our conservative government that is delivering them. brexit was a
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wake—up call that we needed to be better connected, both across our country and beyond our shores. one of the things i remember most about my international career is the energy you can feel in places like southeast asia, the quick turnaround from vision to implementation, from new homes to airports. it echoes our industrial revolution of the victorian area which lay the foundations for over a century from the railway network to the telegraph. that is a spirit we need to rekindle in britain but the truth is successive governments have failed to invest enough for the long term. we have started to put that right. we can do more. a lot more. this government is going to build britain's future and bring in an infrastructure revolution.
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you see, infrastructure is the foundation of everything. it is the new roads that connect our local communities. the bus that you need to ta ke communities. the bus that you need to take to school and the broadband that helps small businesses trade with others around the world. the full benefits of our infrastructure revolution may not be felt for some time but the work must start here and now. so today i can announce the first wave of this revolution. it's a good kind of revolution. our roads are the arteries of our country. we will soon launch the new roads investment strategy with £29 billion committed to strategic and local roads over the next five years. today we are getting the shovels out early on several important road
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projects, including upgrading the nearby m60. during the a66 trans—pennine. and starting work on the a428 from cambridge to milton keynes. now buses. they haven't been given the attention they deserve from politicians, that's what i think, but they are still the backbone of the public transport in most of our country. now you have a chancellor with a well—known family connection to buses. right, mum? and apm connection to buses. right, mum? and a pm who likes to paint them. at the
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spending round we allocated £220 million to buses alone. this will form part of a national bus strategy next year, rolling out new super bus networks, expanding low emission buses and delivering better value for money for passengers. last but not least connecting us to the modern, global, digital economy with gigabit broadband, we have rolled out superfast broadband but we have fallen behind many european countries in the next generation technology. as we catch up i don't wa nt technology. as we catch up i don't want any part of our country to feel left behind. so i can announce today that we are committing £5 billion to support full fibre roll—out to the ha rd est to reach support full fibre roll—out to the hardest to reach 20% of our country.
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all of these measures will level up areas of our country which feel left out. there will be three principles that will underpin our approach to the infrastructure revolution. first, we will be smart and responsible in the way we invest for the long term. we can do this by taking advantage of incredibly low interest rates and borrowing to build not borrowing to waste. second, we will have a bias towards anything that brings our country together. for a start that means protecting our united kingdom. i would like to pay tribute to ruth for all that she did to prevent a
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socialist separatist alliance from running and ruining our country. thank you, ruth. bringing our country together also means rebalancing our economy and thatis means rebalancing our economy and that is why the first policy decision of this government was to support the development of northern powerhouse rail. we know it is no good decreeing from on high what local areas need. too many people already feel that power is distant to them, whether coming from brussels or westminster. so i can announce today that we will bring forward a white paper on further devolution in england, giving more local powers to local people and what areas around the country. the drive investments and infrastructure
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in services that they know that they need. we already have four brilliant conservative metro mayors as well. let's get one in manchester too. and third, we will take a dynamic market—driven approach to driving down our carbon emissions. not only are we the first large economy to commit to net zero by 2050, last week at the un general assembly our prime minister committed to doubling britain's funding for global environmental and climate change programmes. they are the approaches that we will be taking to building britain's future. with so much at sta ke for britain's future. with so much at stake for our country right now i am impatient to get on with it. we have achieved so much injust ten impatient to get on with it. we have achieved so much in just ten weeks andi achieved so much in just ten weeks and i would like to thank my
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brilliant ministerial team in the treasury and our parliamentary team for all that they do. thank you very much. the conservative principle that i want to talk about today is this, we believe in a society where everyone knows that if they work hard and play by the rules then they will have every opportunity to succeed. they are our values. it is our ambition to help people to get a job, to get a home and to get ahead. but we do have to acknowledge that not everyone in every part of our country feels that they have all the opportunities they should have. not all pa rents opportunities they should have. not all parents feel that their children
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will have it better than they did. we need to do more to level the playing field between regions and generations and give all young people the very best start in life. last year i announced the youth endowment fund, helping at—risk young people get off the conveyor belt to crime. i can announce today a new youth investment funds. this ambitious £500 million programme will roll out youth centres and services right across the country helping millions more young people get on the conveyor belt to a better life and a better career. of course one of the biggest concerns for the next generation is being able to buy a home, to claim
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their stake in society. we are on track to increase housing supply to its highest level since 1970. i know as my time from being housing secretary we need to do so much more. the proposals that robert has announced the date is just the start. so getting ahead, getting a home, the best way to achieve both of those things is getting a good job. on our watch 1000 extra people has gone into work every day since 2010 and this applies to all corners of the country with most of those newjobs being of the country with most of those new jobs being created of the country with most of those newjobs being created outside london and the south—east. this 150,000 more people are in
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employment in greater manchester alone. whenever i meet my cou nterpa rts alone. whenever i meet my counterparts in europe they all asked me how are we doing it. real wages and household incomes are rising putting more money in people's pocket. with full employment and strong finances we are now in a position to see what more we can do to help workers and reduce the cost of living. in 2016, we introduced the national living wage, giving britain's workers the biggest pay rise into decades. in april we increased the rates again making 1.8 million workers better off, putting the number of low—paid workers at its lowest level in four decades. today i am delighted to announce
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that we will be taking this much further. over the next five years we will make the uk one of the first major economies in the world to end low pay altogether. to do that i'm setting a new target for the national living wage, raising it to match two thirds of median earnings. that means on current forecasts this ambitious plan will bring the national living wage up to £10 50, giving 4 million people are well and pay rise. —— the living wage up to £10 50 p. and to help the next generation of go—getters get ahead we will reward the hard work of millennials too by
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bringing down the age threshold of the national minimum wage to cover all workers over the age of 21. the ha rd all workers over the age of 21. the hard work of the british people really is paying off and it is clear that it really is paying off and it is clear thatitis really is paying off and it is clear that it is the conservatives who are the real party of labour, we are the work of‘s party. delivering brexit, boosting public services, backing enterprise and ha rd services, backing enterprise and hard work and bringing our country together by levelling up across the nation and across generations, that is the direction we will be setting for our country. that is what will be on offer at the next election, a decade of renewal or a decade of
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reversal. we in this room are today's representatives of the most successful party in the western world. an institution that has helped to build britain for over two centuries and now in 2019 we have a duty to see the country through the challenges ahead. we are the only party that can get brexit done. we are the only party that can call ourselves democrats and we are the only party that will truly deliver for workers. we are the conservative and unionist party and we will unite this country. we area we are a responsible one nation party that focuses on what we have in common not what divides us. we
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believe in building on the very best of the past. notjust putting up with modern britain but embracing it, saying loud and clear that we love our country. we are a welcoming and tolerant society. the most successful multiracial democracy in the world. we are an open, global, trading nation. one of the most prosperous in the world and we are a compassionate and caring country, not just for those who are compassionate and caring country, notjust for those who are close to home but for some of the poorest people in the world. that is who we are as a party. that is who we are asa are as a party. that is who we are as a country and that is what we are delivering for our great country. thank you. thank you all very much. applause surgeon -- sajid —— sajid javid there watched by
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borisjohnson. concentrating on what he had to say, a couple of eye—catching announcements particularly on the national living wage. he says he has a plan to bring the national living wage up to £10.50. it is currently only available to those 25 and over but he wants to bring it down to cover all workers over the age of 21. let's go to our chief political correspondence who has been listening. he has got his cheque out hasn't he? he hasn't got his cheque—book out for the national living wage. this isa for the national living wage. this is a great one for chancellors because they don't have to fund it. this is companies who will help to find the money for the national living wage. we will hopefully hear from the business community this afternoon to see what their reaction is to read. similar to the announcement made by labour last
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week. they talked about bringing the living wage up to £10 but by 2020, whereas sajid javid is talking about bringing up to £10 50 within the next five years and probably more significantly, bringing down that age threshold so it doesn't apply just to those over 25. labour said they would now bring it down to 18. a bit ofa they would now bring it down to 18. a bit of a bidding war going on here, it really does feel like pre—election days with money being spent on all sorts of things. a lot of the stuff talked about has been announced before. he is talking about road building, other infrastructure, about buses, supplying broadband. we had announcement yesterday about hospitals, nhs spending as well and i think the other interesting element from his speech is the no deal preparations, saying they are ina much deal preparations, saying they are in a much better place. but also
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saying we are ready to draw on the full armoury of economic policy, so suggesting they do believe there will be an economic hit if there is a no—deal brexit, but saying they are ready to act presumably with some kind of emergency budget to try and mitigate the consequences of that. i looked there from sajid javid talking about people's priorities, that is the new slogan for the government. there was an element of cheque—book the with roads, buses and his family connections. he is wanting to say that austerity is over. we had that we re that austerity is over. we had that were dominating the political scene for so many years. he is now saying there is enough for school headroom, bringing the deficit down and the
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point here is that both labour and the conservatives are funding this by extra borrowing. that is the key difference. in the past the conservatives have talked about funding things by raising taxes, making sure it is all paid for. on this occasion we are talking about extra borrowing. that cannot go on for ever. what the future plan is about all of that we will have to wait and see. this feels like heading into a general election and the conservatives are very keen, alongside the slogan of getting brexit done, to talk about other things they think voters care about. labour talked a lot more about their other priorities and it seemed to resonate with many posters and the tories don't want to be caught out on that another time. —— voters.|j
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identified it as the prime minister's girlfriend and it wasn't. we will leave it there. someone with his eyes on the skies is darren. the weather forecast. warnings of heavy rain today and into tomorrow and still lots of flood warnings in england and wales. notjust on the rivers but around coastal areas. yet again we have another area of low pressure bringing in this wet and perhaps some breezy weather from the south—west. it is the rain that will be the bigger issue, rain into the south—west, developing across wales, northern ireland later in the afternoon, heading towards the south—east of england. temperature 17 or 18 degrees, further north, there will be spells of sunshine. that rain turning heavy later today across the hills of wales. heavy rain pushing through the midlands.
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it does tend to ease off as the night goes on. the patchy rain continuing across northern england, perhaps into southern scotland and northern ireland. the south of that clearer skies. teen mod for southern parts of the uk, north of our rain band, the air is much colder. we have got some rain to move away from southern scotland tomorrow morning. the rain should ease off in northern ireland but will continue for northern england and south of that, those heavy and fun to will develop more widely. localised flooding, temperatures outside of the showers, 18 degrees. further north, quite cold in scotland and northern ireland but there will be some sunshine and showers. the wetter weather across southern parts of england and wales is away on tuesday evening and then we are getting these northerly breezes coming down, pushing that colder air we are getting across scotland right down across the whole of the country. by tuesday night into wednesday morning, we may have a touch of
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frost in scotland and northern england. a chilly day on wednesday. some sunshine around but those colder wins will push a few showers down across scotland into north—east england. this cloud in northern ireland may bring the odd shower, likewise across wales and southern parts of england. a chilly old day, temperatures of 12—14d. after that, this is a deep area of low pressure, ex—hurricane lorenzo. at the moment it looks like we could miss the rest of the wind and rain as it tracks towards the north—west but that forecast is possibly going to change.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines: the chancellor announces an increase to the national living wage at the conservative party conference — as he says he is preparing the country for a no—deal brexit. this ambitious plan will bring the national living wage up to £10 50, giving 4 million people a well earned pay rise. meanwhile, borisjohnson has denied allegations of misconduct with a female journalist. in westminster, opposition party leaders have decided not to call a vote of confidence in the prime minister this week. they have yet to decide on who could be a caretaker prime minister.
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there are a variety of mps who it could be and i put forward some suggestions. what i would love to hear is from jeremy corbyn himself who he thinks. saudi arabia's crown prince says he takes responsibility for the murder of the journalist jamal khashoggi, but denies personally ordering the killing. and a day of national mourning in france, as the country says farewell to former president jacques chirac. we'lljoin our correspondent in paris. sport now on afternoon live. talking about the rugby world cup and scotland, a sigh of relief. it was a must win match for scotland but win they did. and it means they could have just saved their rugby world cup campaign. they've beaten samoa 34 points to nil injapan. the scots you might remember, played pretty dismally against ireland, losing their first game.
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however, they were far more assured against samoa and ran in two first half tries through sean maitland and greg laidlaw. they knew that defeat would have left qualification for the quarterfinals out of their hands. a huge drop—goalfrom stuart hogg saw them lead 20—nil at half time. then two penalty tries in their favour in the second half saw them pick up what could a very important bonus point. you get a bonus point for scoring four tries in a match. contentious issue through towards full—time when maitland was illegally stopped from going over. that means that scotland are now third in their group behind ireland and japan who are top. scotland's remaining games are against russia and japan. let's talk about the world athletics championships. the size of the crowds is a real concern. dina asher smith has been back in action this afternoon in the world athletics championships. she's been running in
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the heats of the 200—metres. still the same problem — no crowds in the stands. asher smith is the world number one over the distance this season and will be one of the favourites for the gold medal. less than 24 hours after winning silver in the hundred metres — she cruised home, crossing the line in first place — that puts her through to the semi—finals. well, last night, asher smith ran so well to win silver behind jamaica's shelley—ann fraser—pryce in the 100 metres. here she is completing a lap of honour and look at the stands. nobody watching. it was really quite upsetting. hopefully there will be more spectators than last night. the few thousand that actually watched the race had all but gone. the iaaf will address the issue of empty seats later today, but asher—smith's team—mate martyn rooney has spoken to the bbc about the wide open spaces. i think when you get into the stadium and you see at the pinnacle there is no one there, that is a bad
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sign. when they are picking where meets are, be it diamond league, world challenge meets, it needs to be in places where they will sell tickets and at least make the sport look as good as it can be. it is still an entertaining sport, there is still a lot to offer and we are shooting ourselves in the foot a bit. manchester city women have been drawn against atletico madrid in the last 16 of the champions league. city won the league cup and fa cup last season, but they were knocked out of europe in the last 32 — by atletico madrid. city will play the first leg at home on the 16th or 17th october. wsl champions arsenal were drawn against slavia prague and scottish champions glasgow city will take on brondby. west ham's goalkeeper lukas fabianski could be out for the next 2 months because of a torn hip muscle. he picked up the injury taking a goalkick during their 2—all draw with bournemouth on saturday. it's a big blow for the hammers who have made a strong start to the season,
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they are 4th in the table. british number one kyle edmund has slumped to his fifth straight defeat. he was beaten by a wild card player — zhizhen zhang — in three sets at the china open. edmund has not won a match since beating australian nick kyrgios in montreal in august. dan evans and cameron norrie are both through though. norrie could play andy murray in the second round, that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. opposition parties meeting at westminster have decided not to propose a no—confidence vote this week to try to bring down borisjohnson's government. after discussing how to prevent a no deal brexit, parties including labour, the snp, and the greens said they would instead press for more emergency debates on brexit in parliament while conservative mps are at their party conference in manchester. our political correspondent nick eardley is in westminster. is this because they are all united
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in thinking it is not a good idea or frankly they are not united at all? i think there is a bit of a split on whether it is a good idea just now. the snp were pushing the idea really ha rd over the snp were pushing the idea really hard over the weekend, you could barely turn on the telly without them saying they thought this would happen. other parties in that meeting just not convinced stop spoken to several sources in their meeting, all of them saying it will not this week. the numbers aren't there and they are really worried that if they were to do it too soon, you could end up with a situation where the opposition brings down the government and can't find an alternative and then you end up in a general election in november and so after the break set deadline, meaning they have screwed themselves by bringing down the government. have a listen tojo swinson.
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by bringing down the government. have a listen to jo swinson. what is clear is that this week, it is important we don't go for a separatist vote of no confidence motion. it is understood that if anything that would just increase the risk of a new deal brexit and therefore play into borisjohnson's hands. what is going to happen is that the party whips are going to be meeting to plan out different scenarios, look at different options, including the possibility ofan options, including the possibility of an insurance option of a government of national unity and including who might be able to lead such a government. it is really important with parliament sitting this week that we are trying to use every opportunity to hold this government to account for the disastrous brexit plans. there are various documents that the government is still keeping secret. operation snow bunting on the impact of police on brexit, operation
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kingfisher on how businesses are prepared or how they have not been able to get prepared because of this government's incompetence. operation black swan which sets out the disaster scenario and indeed any other documents that the government is keeping hidden from the public about what their plans would actually mean for people's lives. that is what it is important that through questions and other mechanisms in the house, the liberal democrats will be leading the fight against exit, leading the fight to make sure that people in this country have that information that the government is not able to hide that from them. they really want to know how borisjohnson plans to get round the bend bill because he will not break the law although it will appear on the face of it he would have two. you will notice that the prime minister and his colleagues keep using the same formation of
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words that they are going to obey the law but definitely leave on the 31st of october. in this building behind me where mps have their offices there are 650 people scratching their heads, trying to work out exactly what that means at the moment. the truth is they don't know and that is what is concerning opposition parties. they are increasingly worried that the act that they passed earlier in the month designed to stop a no—deal brexit next month, that that won't be enough and they might need to do something else. jo swinson saying a government of national unity were all the opposition get together and put someone in powerfor a short period of time to stop no deal, that has been floated. got to say i don't think labour is on board with that. they still think it should bejeremy corbyn as a short—term interim prime minister if that happened but it will not happen this week. the opposition parties are on different pages when it comes to the timescale
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for that. if you sources have said to me that after that meeting, don't rule it out completely. when we get to mid to late october if it still looks like the prime minister might get round that law, they might need to go for that then. one called the nuclear option, they are keeping it on the table. just looking at some comments from jeremy corbyn who says, they want to prevent the country crashing out on october 30. they are clearly as baffled as many of us are as to how we leave on the 31st without something. absolutely but the thing you constantly hear from opposition parties at the moment is, we will do anything to stop a new deal brexit, but not quite that, sojeremy corbyn's problem is at some point, if other parties won't get on board, does he have to consider standing aside for
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that idea of an emergency government happening. also that interview with jeremy corbyn, he said the timing still has to be right. they are not going to try and bring down the government until they are really confident it will work. i think if you look at what the conservatives have been saying over the last few days, it is quite possible if there was a confidence vote that they would vote against their own prime minister if that doesn't sound too crazy, they would bring down boris johnson to bring that election but the big fear they have and the fear raised in that meeting and it still hasn't been sorted is who they put in to replace borisjohnson. there isa14 in to replace borisjohnson. there is a 14 day period after you bring down a government or you vote no confidence in a government, a 14 day period to try and find another one and if they didn't do that, they would have got themselves in a position where they crash into a general election and can't do anything, so they are biding their
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time. they are going to try some stuff this week, emergency debates, persuade the speaker to have debates on various things to do with releasing brexit documents, trying to get hold of borisjohnson's plan that we think is going to submit to the european union to try and solve the european union to try and solve the backstop issue, but in terms of going for a big, the backstop issue, but in terms of going fora big, bold move the backstop issue, but in terms of going for a big, bold move this week, something like trying to bring down the government, it is not going to happen. something else discussed at the conference is whether vaccinations should be made compulsory, something the health secretary says he is looking at seriously. there's been a rise in the number of measles cases — and the latest figures show a fall in the take—up of all routine jabs for under—fives in the last year. simonjones reports.
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so we just do about there. a massive drive is needed, according to the health secretary, to get more children vaccinated. he told an event at the conservative party conference that he is very worried. when we, the state, provide services to people, then it's a two—way street. you've got to take your responsibilities too, so i think there's a very strong argument for having compulsory vaccinations for children, for when they go to school, because otherwise they're putting other children at risk. measles is a serious illness that can lead to an infection in the brain. just over 90% of children aged two were vaccinated against measles, mumps and rubella last year in england. that's a drop from 91.2% in the previous year. the world health organization's target is 95%, which scotland and northern ireland already achieve. here at the department of health, there has been much discussion about what can be done to increase vaccination rates. the health secretary believes the public would back his idea and he says he has already taken legal advice from within government about how they might go about it. the british medical association has
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previously stopped short of calling for compulsory vaccinations. it wants adequate resources to make sure vaccination programmes reach those most in need, and a crackdown on social media companies who fail to stop the spread of false and misleading information. simon jones, bbc news. the chancellor says he's planning for a no—deal brexit — as he gets ready to announce investment in transport and broadband at the conservative party conference. in westminster, opposition party leaders have decided not to call a vote of confidence in the prime minister this week. thousands of women are dying needlessly from heart attacks because they fail to recognise their symptoms and get worse care than men. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. thomas cook customers may have to wait up to two months to receive
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a refund for holidays they booked with the collapsed travel firm. the civil aviation authority says it "hopes to pay refunds within 60 days" of recieiving a form. over 350,000 customers are due to get their money back, making this operation by far the largest of its kind the financial conduct authority has fined prudential almost £24million for failing to properly advise clients sold annualities between july 2008 and september 2017. the company has apologised to those affected and says it is paying compensation, which could total £250m. the clock is ticking for the hundreds of thousands of people who were misold loans by wonga. administrators for the payday lender, which collapsed in august 2018, says eligable customers have until the end of today to make a claim for historic mis—sold loans via an online portal. the chancellor has
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been talking of an increase in the national living wage — what's in store? it falls on business. it is good news. potentially, it is a target and that is a subtle difference. what it means is an increase of over 20% if it comes to pass on the current national living wage for all of those over 25, it will be £10.50 by2020 of those over 25, it will be £10.50 by 2020 for this could affect quite a high percentage of workers in industries like hospitality, restau ra nts, industries like hospitality, restaurants, places like that. we have to remember that while this might be an appealing thing for particular voters down the lower end of the pay scale, remember, lots of criticism about the tax cuts... we have to remember that this was
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something the previous chancellor had moved to already, saying this is a target he would like to have. this isa a target he would like to have. this is a development of an earlier plan and also we have had lots of conversations amongst the labour conference last week about ending in work poverty. this is this chancellor saying he wants to end the era of low pay. but as you say, it is not the chancellor who picks up it is not the chancellor who picks up the tab for this. it will be companies and they might have plenty to say about this but there has been criticism of the chancellor and his boss about the kind of tax cuts they have been talking about, saying they mainly benefit the higher paid. this appealing to other voters at the other end of the pay scale. this is another cost to businesses. if this comes to pass and we are currently talking of a national living wage somewhere south of £8 20 at the moment, if it goes up to £10 50, we
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are talking of an increase of... around about 25%. that is quite a burden for companies at quite an uncertain time. plenty of uproar but the chancellor saying we are living ina the chancellor saying we are living in a period of record employment, business can afford this. thank you very much. the winner of the royal institute of british architect's most prestigious award, the riba stirling prize, will be announced a week tomorrow. there are six nominations for britain's best new building 2019, which include a railway station, new council housing and a property made entirely of cork. starting today — we will be taking a closer look at each of the nominated buildings over the next week. first up is the macallan distillery on speyside. single malt whisky has been distilled in stills by the company for more than 200 years — the new building has taken three and a half years to build.
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the idea we are producing a nice shed which produces whiskey and a visitor ‘s experience wasn't what we wish to create. we felt the whole thing should be a duel at every level. this area has lots of visitor ce ntre level. this area has lots of visitor centre facilities and we set out with the intent to make it different and to show the visitors just how a distillery works. graham's great line was that nature oppose a straight line. the roof is a piece of art straight line. the roof is a piece ofart in straight line. the roof is a piece of art in itself. put it to be continually moving and allow the glass to stay in place on the wall, i don't know how it works. there are two parts to this design, there is a
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shell but there is also the process and operational and when these two areas came together, that was a truly astonishing moment. this had to be an operational distillery and had to look iconic and i think it has done it. we did say we would create the most beautifully coordinated distillery in the world. it is actually the very nature of how we vulcanised lease deals, how we approach the building, how we deformed the roof which then takes a wild meadow which replaces the meadow that was there on the site before we began work. everything we have built here in the distillery at macallan is different. it has been designed to look to the future. to have something that looks so different with its individual shapes on the inside, looks so natural outside, it is truly wonderful.
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you can find out more about all of the nominated buildings on the bbc arts website and watch this year's riba stirling prize live here on the bbc news channel next tuesday evening from 8.30. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. it isa it is a wet picture again for many parts of england and wales. more warnings of heavy rain to come on top of what we have had already which is why we have lots of flood warnings at the moment. the wetter weather is continuing to push its way up from the south—west, heading up way up from the south—west, heading up to northern ireland, wales towards the south—east where temperatures could briefly get up to 17, 18 degrees. further north, some shine to end the day. rain further south. heavy across wales and the midlands. the rain continues across
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northern england and southern scotland. south of that, mild, some showers. colder air to the north. sunshine tomorrow across scotland. the rain fades away but continues across northern england and to the south across southern parts of england. temperature is about 18 degrees here, colder weather where we have the sunshine further north.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 4pm. the chancellor has pledged an increase to the national living wage to £10.50 within the next 5 years — this ambitious plan will bring the national living wage up to £10.50, giving 4 million people are well and pay rise. in westminster, opposition party leaders have decided not to call a vote of confidence in the prime minister this week. they have yet to decide on who could be a caretaker prime minister. we'll do all we can within a parliamentary scenario and within we will do a motion of no confidence
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when we take no deal off the table. a man has been found guilty of murdering his ex—girlfriend, who he strangled and buried in a flower bed at her south—west london home. and saudi arabia's crown prince says he takes responsibility for the murder of the journalist jamal khashoggi, but denies he personally ordered the killing. coming up on afternoon live — all the sport... breaking news in the last few minutes, fifa have told cardiff city they must pay for the transfer of emiliano sala. this comes after they could not come to a settlement. this comes could not come to a settlement. this co m es after could not come to a settlement. this comes after the striker died in a plane crash. much more than that. and with the weather for us more rain as we go into october. as we go on so that there is a hurricane that will get close to the uk. will look at that later in the
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programme. also coming up.... a day of national mourning in france, as the country says farewell to former president jacques chirac. this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. the chancellor of the exchequer has pledged to increase the national living wage and expand its reach to cover all workers over the age of 21. he says he intends to increase it to £10.50 an hour within five years, up from £8.21 pounds an hour. on brexit, sajid javid insisted the uk could still leave the eu without a deal — despite a law which says the prime minister must ask for an extension if no agreement is reached. he said the government would obey the law but that the policy set
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out by borisjohnson — of leaving with or without an agreement in october — had not changed. he also promised "a significant economic policy response" — in the event of a no—deal brexit. speaking in the last hour at the conservative party conference, mrjavid promised what he calls an "infrastructu re revolution" with a £25 billion upgrade of england's roads, a national bus strategy and £5 billion for ultrafast broadband internet but it's already a stormy week for boris johnson — culminating in the prime minister denying newspaper accusations that he squeezed a journalist's thigh under the table at a private lunch 20 years ago. and away from manchester — in westminster — opposition parties have met to discuss their next steps to try to halt a a no—deal brexit. let's hear what the chancellor had to say now, when he made that announcement about the national living wage. over the next five years we will make the uk one of the first major economies in the world to end low pay altogether. to do that i am
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setting a new target for the national living wage, raising it to match two thirds of median earnings. that means on current forecasts this ambitious plan will bring the national living wage up to £10.50 giving 4 million people a well earned pay rise. and to help the next generation of go—getters get ahead we will reward the hard work of millennials too by bringing down the age threshold for the national living wage to cover all workers over the age of 21. our chief political correspondent, vicki young was listening. what else caught your eye?m what else caught your eye? it is interesting because it feels like
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there is a bidding war with the labour party who made a similar commitment last week. they want to raise the national living wage by 2020 so they want to do it a bit more quickly but it really does feel like a pre—election promise and pre—election spending after all those years of austerity. clearly the government wants to start talking about something else other than brexit and try to appeal to voters ahead of that election whenever it might come. and joined by the former cabinet minister david gauke. you are in the cabinet that had to deal with austerity. all of that money you saved is now being spent. do you approve of that?“ that money you saved is now being spent. do you approve of that? if we can safely afford to spend more on public services and that is something we should do. underlying all of this is that you can only have high spending on public services if you have a strong economy to deliver it. it is important as conservatives we also make the argument for why the economy needs to be strong and ripe wheat want to have an open and
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competitive economy that attracts investment to the uk. if we can do that we can invest more in public services. the chancellor talks about being ready to draw on the full armour of policy to mitigate the negative impacts of an ideal. how much of this armoury do you think you might have to deploy? first of all if we leave without a deal we shouldn't try to conceal the fact that that will be very damaging to our economy. we won't be able to spend the same amount of money on public services. that will have an impact. in terms of the armoury, the things that can be done, i don't think we can kid ourselves that we can borrow our way out of the difficulties and those deal brexit can create. it creates a real structural problems for the uk economy that would mean we are poorer than we would otherwise be in the public finances will be weaker
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than they would otherwise be. in the long term, maybe not in the first year or two, but long term, maybe not in the first yearortwo, but in long term, maybe not in the first year or two, but in the long term the question that any chancellor will have to face is how do they reduce our deficit. we are talking about spending cuts or tax rises. but i think any of us want to see that. it is white many of us are concerned about the economic implications of a no—deal brexit. you find yourself note longer early conservative mp but you're still a member of the party which is why you are here. what reception have you had from yourformer are here. what reception have you had from your former colleagues?m has been very courteous and friendly. the vast majority of conservative members are decent people and have been very welcoming. i hope that can continue. i have problems with one particular policy that the government is pursuing and ido that the government is pursuing and i do have some of the concerns about the tone that the government has followed in recent weeks in some
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issues. but, look, i'm a conservative, i am an mp, i'm not currently a conservative mp. what is the plan? the opposition parties met in westminster today and couldn't agree on very much in westminster today and couldn't agree on very much about what they will do going forward. do you think another law needs to go through to make sure boris johnson another law needs to go through to make sure borisjohnson does need to ask that delay if it comes to that? i think the benn act works. i think it will achieve its purpose which is if parliament hasn't agreed to a deal hasn't agreed to leave without a deal then the government will have to seek an extension. i don't think it needs to be changed or amended or altered. i think it does work and i don't think there is a need for further legislation. do you think borisjohnson could further legislation. do you think boris johnson could ignore further legislation. do you think borisjohnson could ignore it? ultimately no because the courts will enforce the law and the governments have to abide by the law. cabinet ministers will not
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support a government that failed to abide by the law. in the end we are governed by lord's, that is the nature of what we are as a country and the government will have to abide by it. david gauke, thank you very much indeed. there are some other conservatives here, people like dominic grieve, who has also been turfed out of the parliamentary conservative party but some suspect may be they will be invited back into the fold at some stage. opposition parties meeting at westminster have decided not to propose a no—confidence vote this week to try to bring down borisjohnson's government. after discussing how to prevent a no—deal brexit, parties including labour, the snp, and the greens said they would instead press for more emergency debates on brexit in parliament while conservative mps are at their party conference in manchester. our political correspondent nick eardley is in westminster. how united are they in this? was
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starting to see different priorities, simon. it is not a com plete priorities, simon. it is not a complete script but they have been very much on the same page in the last few weeks when it comes to trying to thwart rogerjohnson's brexit plans but now there are some creek starting to show. —— boris johnson's brexit plans. the idea of bringing down the government in the coming days and putting in emergency prime minister into extended brexit process will get rid of that 31st of october deadline and then call a general election, the other parties just don't agree at the moment. they are just don't agree at the moment. they a re really just don't agree at the moment. they are really worried that if they were to hold that confidence vote at the moment and bring down the government they might not be able to come up with that alternative government and then basically fall into a general election period where the general election period where the general election would be in november and they would build to do anything else to stop and no—deal brexit. you heard david gauke say he was confident that what mps have done
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already, the benn act is enough to stop a no—deal next month but opposition sources aren't as confident and are increasingly worried that the government will be able to get round it. but no agreement on what they do next apart from basically try and do some things in parliament this week to get some documents from the government and to keep talking. have a listen to the lib dems leaderjo swinson. what is going to happen is that the party whips are going to be meeting to plan out different scenarios and different options, including the possibility of an insurance option ofa possibility of an insurance option of a government of national unity and including who might be able to lead such a government. those emergency debates, if they happen, it is down to the speaker, they could be quite important to getting some documents the government has been keen to keep to itself. one of the things that the opposition parties will try hard to get is the prime minister's brexit plan which
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we think is going to europe in the next few days and mps want to see it first. in terms of a big gesture this week which some had been really hoping for it is not happening. have a listen tojeremy corbyn explaining where he thinks this goes next. we discussed the issues of a no—deal brexit and the behaviour and statements of the prime minister and we are absolutely clear we will do all we can within a parliamentary scenario and within our own parties to prevent this country crashing out on the 31st of october without a deal. that is our agreed position. the meeting was fairly long by the standards of meetings that we've had, quite a detailed discussion about the implications of crashing out as well. what more can you do? options presumably include beefing up options presumably include beefing up the benn act and the motion of no in the government, emergency debates and the so—called essay 24s to get
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more information. all of those options are in play and all of those options are in play and all of those options are in play and all of those options are under consideration. our agreed position is to prevent a no—deal brexit and ensure that the prime minister obeys the act, the eu number two act which you refer to as the benn act, which were far —— which requires him to request a extension from the eu. there are no signs that the prime minister has made an application or any proposals to the eu thus far. the snp seem quite keen on a motion of no confidence in the government. what is your view on that? we will do a motion of no confidence at the point where we can win it to be clear that no deal has been taken off the table. our priority is to prevent a no—deal exit and that is a position that all the parties are agreed on.
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that last answer is quite important. some sources who were in the room have suggested it could come back potentially mid october or late october as they brexit deadline gets closer if the prime minister has tried to get round that legislation but any hope of some united front end united breakthrough today to force the government's hand has not happened. saudi arabia's crown prince has warned that oil prices could rise steeply if the world does not act to counter iran. speaking after the attack on its oil facilities earlier this month, which the kingdom blames on tehran, mohammed bin salman said a failure to deal with iran could lead to war. in an interview with cbs news, the prince also accepted some responsibility for the murder of the journalist, jamal khashoggi, but denied personally ordering it. our security correspondent, frank gardner, who's just come back from the kingdom,
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has this report. the moment of impact. shocking footage, previously unseen, of the instant missiles and drones slammed into saudi arabia's critical oil infrastructure — immediately halving its output. the saudis and the us blame iran which denies it. now the saudi crown prince is warning of a catastrophic rise in oil prices if something similar happens again. translation: if the world does not take a strong and firm action to deter iran, we will see further escalations that will threaten world interests. oil supplies will be disrupted and oil prices willjump to unimaginably high numbers that we haven't seen in our lifetime. the on—going war in yemen has already embroiled rivals saudi arabia and iran, which backs the houthi rebels. they have released there pictures after a major attack on the border they say has resulted in thousands of troops captures.
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including saudi officers. the saudi crown prince committed his troops to this war over four years ago. but they have failed to defeat the houthis. yet, it was the murder of this man, the saudi journalist, jamal khashoggi, which has cast the biggest shadow over his rule. the crown prince was asked if he ordered it. translation: absolutely not. this was a heinous crime, but i take full responsibility as a leader in saudi arabia. especially since it was committed by individuals working for the saudi government. saudi arabia has become a more relaxed, less austere place under crown prince mohammed bin salman. there is public entertainment and women can drive. but critics say there is a darker side to his rule and the stain of the jamal khashoggi murder will not be easily erased. the image of saudi arabia took a hit from the jamal
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khashoggi murder. much of the leadership was slow to realise the extent of the damage. here there was little coverage about the incident. for most saudis the negative impact of that event has been overshadowed by the huge social reforms sweeping the country. for now, the population is largely with him, but saudi arabia's problems are mounting, with iran, with yemen and with an ever more sceptical west. and frank is here with me now. let's look at the murder ofjamal khashoggi first. it was an a cce pta nce khashoggi first. it was an acceptance from the crown prince but not much. there is a huge difference and you take responsibility and you ta ke and you take responsibility and you take the blame from it. he and his government have gone to great lengths to distance themselves from this. the man named as the chief suspect by the cia is not on trial
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there, he is still at large. both there, he is still at large. both the cbs interviewer and when i interviewed the saudi ambassador to london, both of them have said there is investigation under way and if he is investigation under way and if he is found guilty and anyway he will be charged but it hasn't happened yet and that is raising eyebrows. in this interview he did the crown prince said that no one is above the law despite their rank and has promised a full investigation but i think people are rather losing patience. this trial has gone on for nine months and we hear almost nothing about it. it is shrouded in secrecy nothing about it. it is shrouded in secrecy which is fairly typical of saudi judicial process. let's talk about the threat to saudi oil and the tone of the interview with the crown prince. to say this is a global problem, what is the aim of that? they are feeling incredibly
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vulnerable. we went round those arms facilities a few days ago and the damage is real. whoever did that and punched those holes with cruise missiles and drones knew exactly what they needed to hit, they understood how oil works. these are called stabilisation towers or separation units which separate out this gunk of the ground to syllable units. ever since the islamic revolution senior saudis have criticised iran but the hyperbole in his language is strong. he is more or less saying if there is another attack along these lines then there isa attack along these lines then there is a risk that oil prices will go through the roof. that will notjust hurt the region but the whole global economy. there is a real reticence amongst the saudi leadership to provoke around. they are convinced
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iran did this. iran denies it. they wa nt to iran did this. iran denies it. they want to punish iran but they are wa ry want to punish iran but they are wary of doing it in case over on counter attacks because they can now see that iran two iran can punch through the defences. is this some sort of charm offensive then to get the western side as far as the jamal khashoggi statements? the issue of yemen hasn't gone away. it's not a charm offensive, i would call it an alarm offensive. he is saying, "this isn'tjust ask, if you don't deal with an irresponsible iran, you too are going to suffer, not just us." iran, you too are going to suffer, notjust us." that this is attitude. there are much bigger issues at state which is
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“ run —— run back is feeling bottled up by american sanctions. when it comes to yemen, the saudis are going nowhere. he committed his air force to that warand he committed his air force to that war and they fought that —— they thought that they would be able to bomb the houthi rebels and it hasn't happened. international humanitarian disasters haven't resulted in victory the saudis. so the houthis you are backed by iran have been able to cling on to the most populated western parts of the country and the saudis are certainly not winning, debatably they are losing. there are unconfirmed reports about these huge captures of men and equipment which the houthis have put on tv. the saudis have denied it but something seems to
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have happened then they are certainly not winning. good to see you. thank you very much. just to update you on the breaking news and the financial fallout of the death of emiliano sala in the plane crash. cardiff city have been told to pay a transfer fee of £5.3 million to the football club nantes. this is a fifa panel that ruled on the dispute between the two clubs who failed to reach an agreement. the argentine he was 28 died in that plane crash injanuary the argentine he was 28 died in that plane crash in january while travelling from france to join his new club and cardiff argued they we re new club and cardiff argued they were not liable for the total fee of £15 million because he was not officially their player when he died. they have been ordered to pay a transfer fee of £5.3 million which amounts to the first instalment of that £15 million fee to the club
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nantes. there will be much more in our sports bulletin but that is to bring it a little more detail to that story we brought you at the top of the hour. a man has been found guilty of murdering his ex—girlfriend, who he strangled and buried in a flower bed at her south—west london home. film producer laureline garcia—bertaux was found naked and wrapped in bin bags in a shallow grave in her kew garden. kirill belorusov denied murder but was found guilty at the old bailey. he will be sentenced on friday. it has taken a jury one hour and three quarters to find kirill belorusov guilty of murder. this man isa liar belorusov guilty of murder. this man is a liar who has tried to portray the victim as a bad person in his evidence. he has lied about having cancer to his friends and family. he lied about his finances and light
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about what happens to laureline earlier in this year. the family who stood behind me have had to endure weeks of hearing his lies. a day of mourning is taking place in france for the former french presidentjacques chirac who died last week at the age of 86. world leaders joined almost 2000 people for a service in paris this morning. his coffin has been lying in state over the weekend. thousands of people queued to file past it. lucy williamson reports. the body ofjacques chirac, his coffin draped in the french flag, was carried into the courtyard by eight of his former bodyguards. the military honours in front of president emmanuel macron the first chapter in today's public remembrance. the coffin was then accompanied
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through the streets of paris on its way to the church of saint—sulpice, where dozens of leaders, both past and present, had gathered to honour him. the crowds outside the church paying their last respects to a man who, for all his perceived flaws, held a special place in a national memory of france. inside, the coffin made its way past a sea of faces, including that of the russian president vladimir putin, and severalformer french leaders. jacques chirac earned the affection of many people here by his easy charm and his strong stance against the us led invasion of iraq in 2003. president macron described him as someone who embodied a certain idea of france. flags are flying at half mast and, later today, a minute's silence will be held across the country. his body has now left saint—sulpice on its way to the cemetery in montparnasse for burial.
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after 12 years as president and almost 20 as mayor of paris, jacques chirac is making his finaljourney through the streets of the french capital. lucy williamson, bbc news, paris. watching afternoon live. and darren is here with the weather. you've got your eye on lorenzo. that is right. over the weekend this was a category five hurricane and has never been a category five hurricane this far east in the atlantic so it was a record breaker. it has weakened. the last category five was dorian that battered the bahamas. this will stay out at sea and at the moment is in the middle of nowhere but that will change because this is the forecast track that we are getting from the national hurricane centre. i've got the azores on there because it is going to get very close to the
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azores on tuesday night. the win could be gusting over 100 miles an hour there. it is going northwards towards the uk and then it slows down a bit. at this from the national hurricane centre which predicts where these hurricanes will go. it gets to the uk and then it sort of stops. this is the preferred forecast so it is no longer hurricane as it gets close to the uk but it is in this case a really deep area. what do you mean by preferred forecast? this is what we are forecasting to happen with the position of this x hurricane. it is a deep area of low pressure. this is where we expected to go. it is heading towards the north—west of the uk. there are some really strong winds around that, gales and severe gales are likely but because the centre of the low is just that bit further from the uk the centre of the low is just that bit furtherfrom the uk the impact centre of the low is just that bit further from the uk the impact may not be that great. however, there
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must be a not so preferred forecast. there is. there is more evidence will get this sort of track with low pressure because more models are going for that. the forecast we intends to use has changed track completely. however, this orange track here is from the met office model which takes an area of low pressure over towards here which will have more impact. the wind won't be a strong, it is not as deep but it is in a different position. so the further ahead you get the more divergence there is. so not entirely sure is a fair way of putting it. how many models do you have? lots of models. you have the american one, the uk met office. there are various different models that they run but most of them tend towards that event. a little bit more confidence but of course things could change as well. we'll need to keep a close eye on this. at the
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moment the impact is probably not quite as bad as they could be and it is just quite as bad as they could be and it isjust a quite as bad as they could be and it is just a continuation of this wet and windy theme that we've been seeing over the past ten or 11 days. so that is your best choice. that is the bbc forecast. shall we move on and see what is happening in the next few days. more flood warnings. this is the river douglas in lancashire yesterday morning. a lot of water there. there are currently over 60 flood warnings, notjust on rivers across england and wales but coastal areas as well. some high tides as well. if we look at the rainfall that we've had so far this month and what we have seen we today. wales has had hundred and —— 184% of normal rainfall. in south—east england and east anglia we have had the amount of rain we would normally get bearing in mind it was only 20% to ten or 11 days
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ago. so this is really filled up the rivers and that is why we have seen the flood warnings. more rain to come pushing its way in from the south—west. across wales and the midlands. before that it tends to push away into southern parts of the north sea. we still got this band of rain lingering across northern england and northern ireland and in the far south of scotland. to the south of that some clearer skies and showers in the south—west later. a lot milder here and it would be north of our bands of rain in scotland. surely fail and some showers on tuesday. it should brighten up in southern scotland and northern ireland as the rain peters out. rain continues in northern england but the potentially thundery downpours a bit more widely in southern parts with flash flooding possible as well. just 18 degrees but much colder air coming down across scotland and northern ireland in the far north of england. the wetter weather does midway on tuesday evening. then we look to
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where our areas are from from the north to north—westerly sweeping down across the uk and bring down the cold air across all areas. wednesday morning that could be a touch of frost in scotland and northern ireland. it certainly is going to be a much chillier day for all of us on wednesday. a few showers and those brisk winds in scotla nd showers and those brisk winds in scotland and the north—east of england but a bit more cloud in ireland and wales and light showers. not a completely bright day and it will be quite chilly. colder air as we head towards the end of the week and then that deep area of low pressure with the x hurricane lorenzo. it gets close to the uk and position could change. stay tuned to the forecast over the next two days.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the chancellor says the conservatives are the only party which will get brexit done as he pledges an increase to the national living wage, to £10.50, within the next five years. this ambitious plan will bring the national living wage up to £10.50, giving 4 million people a well earned pay rise. in westminster, opposition party leaders have decided not to call a vote of confidence in the prime
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minister this week. they have yet to agree on who they would all be prepared to back as a possible caretaker prime minister. we will do a motion of no confidence ata we will do a motion of no confidence at a point when we can win it to be clear that no deal has been taken off the table. our priority is to prevent a no deal exit. cardiff city must pay a transfer fee of more than £5 million to the french club nantes for emiliano sala, who died in a plane crash on the way to join the club. a man is found guilty of murdering his ex—girlfriend, who he strangled and buried in a flower bed at her home sport now on afternoon live with jane dougall. hello, jane. we'll start with news cardiff city that have been told to pay a transfer fee to nantes for emiliano sala who tragically died in a plane accident. fifa have told cardiff city they must pay an initial fee of £5.3 million to fc nantes for the transfer of emiliano sala. if you remember the argentine striker died in a plane crash while travelling from france
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tojoin his new club injanuary. the full fee was £15 million but cardiff had argued that they could not be held liable for the fee because sala had not registered as a premier league player. however, fifa's player status committee met five days ago and decided that cardiff must pay the amount equivalent to the first instalment of that fee. the plane that emiliano sala was travelling in went missing and it was discovered to have crashed in the english channel. toxicology tests on sala's body showed he was exposed to exposed to high levels of carbon monoxide which could have caused a seizure, or a heart attack. the body of pilot david ibbotson has still not been found. the findings of the decision were given to both clubs today. both have a deadline of ten days, in which to appeal the decision if they wish to the court of arbitration for sport. the breaking news this hour that
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cardiff will have to pay an initial fee to fc nantes is. the world athletic championships, a lot of attention on the track but there was no one in the stands. high temperatures in doha have been blamed for poor attendances, despite technology being used to reduce the heat inside the khalifa stadium. it's notjust the spectators affected — over the weekend almost a third of the women's marathon competitors did not finish because of the unbearable condiditions. take a look at those empty seats. we're watching one of the heats for the women's 200 metres. hardly anyone watching. many have questioned the iaaf for awarding doha the rights to stage the competition. the iaaf will address the issue
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of empty seats later today. similar problem for dina asher smith in her heat for the 200—metres. she's the world number one over the distance this season and will be one of the favourites for the gold medal. less than 24 hours after winning silver in the hundred metres — she cruised home, crossing the line in first place — that puts her through to the semi—finals. jodie williams and beth dobbin are also through. it was a must win match for scotland but win they did. and it means they could have just saved their rugby world cup campaign. they knew that defeat to samoa would have left qualification for the quarter—finals out of their hands but they won 34 points to nil injapan. that means that scotland are now third in their group behind ireland and japan who are top. scotland's remaining games are against russia and japan. that was a true reflection of who we are and what we are capable of and what playing for scotland means for
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these players. that was a tough challenge that they had to rise up and face, knowing that how they perform tonight we would be out of the world cup. we were playing a very dangerous team so to see the effort, togetherness was excellent. manchester city women have been drawn against atletico madrid in the last 16 of the champions league. city won the league cup and fa cup last season, but they were knocked out of europe in the last 32 — by atletico madrid. city will play the first leg at home on the 16th or 17th october. wsl champions arsenal were drawn against slavia prague and scottish champions glasgow city will take on brondby. west ham's goalkeeper lukas fabianski could be out for the next two months because of a torn hip muscle. he picked up the injury taking a goalkick during their 2—all draw with bournemouth on saturday. it's a big blow for the hammers who have made a strong start to the season, they are 4th in the table. british number one kyle edmund has
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slumped to his fifth straight defeat. he was beaten by a wildcard player — zhizhen zhang — in three sets at the china open. edmund has not won a match since beating australian nick kyrgios in montreal in august. dan evans and cameron norrie are both through though. norrie could play andy murray in the second round, that's all the sport for now. now on afternoon live — let's go nationwide and see what's happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. tracy gee is in leeds for us this afternoon talking about firefighters living with cancer who are calling for more protection against harmful chemicals — we'll be there in just a moment. paul murphy is in boston — in lincolnshire, giving us an insight into the concequences of heavy rain and high tides on the east coast. back with paul shortly.
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but first, tracy —— firefighters calling for more protection against harmful chemicals. we started an investigation between the link between being a firefighter and the chance of cancer. looking into whether firefighters would be exposed to high levels of harmful carcinogens. carcinogens are in all fires, whether it is a family barbecue or a blazing fire in a building but scientists say it is down to the level of exposure and how frequently you come into contact with these toxic particles which firefighters do often. in the past it is thought that breathing in smoke may be one of the major contributing factors to exposing yourself to these toxins and that still is the case, but academics believe that dermal absorption, absorbing these toxins into your skin, may also be a factor. how have firefighters reacted to that news?
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they are concerned. many are now calling for action, asking for better protective kit and more guidance on how the uniform should be decontaminated. in the uk there is no national directive telling firefighters how they kit should be cleaned. it is down to individual brigades to make that decision for themselves and it has led to massive discrepancies with some services using low—power hoses to decontaminate, others using wet wipes and others are just cleaning their kit when it looks dirty but having spoken to those many firefighters battling cancer, they wa nt a nswers. firefighters battling cancer, they want answers. mitch copplestone is a retired firefighter from london, want answers. mitch copplestone is a retired firefighterfrom london, he has two forms of leukaemia and is in need of a bone marrow transplant. has two forms of leukaemia and is in need of a bone marrow transplantlj think need of a bone marrow transplant.” think about the bad side. the bad side is i won't be around. the bad side is i won't be around. the bad side is i won't be around. the bad side is that... i won't quite make it to as old as i should have been.
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you took that away and then you think of the positive side and then that creeps back in and gets you again. that is how it is. it is in your mind all the time. 24 hours, seven days. what will your future hold them? fantastic times. it is the positive thing you have to concentrate on and that is all i will do. if the bad times creep in, i had to push them out as soon as possible. you have to think of consequences of what happens if i'm not about, but then you had to get rid of them and think about, actually i'm going to be about and i think that helps. what is the uk fire chief saying? chris davies is the chair of the uk health and safety committee and he passionate about protecting his firefighters. having said that, he is waiting for more evidence to be published before he is willing to acknowledge there may be a potential link between being a firefighter and contracting
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cancer. it was something i questioned him on when i spoke to him. firefighters are contracting certain types types of cancer above the population. iaccept certain types types of cancer above the population. i accept that and thatis the population. i accept that and that is a concern. shouldn't something be done now? why are we waiting for more evidence to come out when that evidence is out there? the assurance i want to give as there is an incredible amount of work going on in the background to make this happen as quickly as possible, but i acknowledge that is not quick enough for some people. more on bbc inside out tonight at 7:30 p:m.. let's go to east yorkshire and lincolnshire. flood warnings are in place because of forecast heavy rain and unusually high tides. it is moving quite fast behind you. yes, it is. this is the river with them. if you look at the
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east coast, the environment agency warning map is littered with these red and yellow triangles. various communities under threat there from flooding. there hasn't been a significant flood yet but all eyes are now on tomorrow morning when we are now on tomorrow morning when we are going to get the highest out of the year and the river here, don't be fooled by appearances. it is very low at the moment but this is a river that has a huge tidal range here in boston and this morning it was actually up to where i am standing now, 15 or 20 feet worth of rice but the key to it is this is not just a storm rice but the key to it is this is notjust a storm surge threatening because of the high tide, it is also the amount of rain we have had in recent weeks that is draining this huge catchment of the river. if we get strong winds as well, that triumvirate of forces will come together and make for quite a potent risk and mean that tomorrow morning, there is going to be the risk of flooding although at the moment the
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environment agency does not believe the water is well over top defences here. they might seep through as they describe it in some places. what has been the reaction of the locals to these warnings?” what has been the reaction of the locals to these warnings? i had to say there isn't really a great sense of urgency here. remember, this is the town that in 2013 was absolutely battered by a storm surge, 600 homes and businesses wrecked when the tide came over the top here. but people here appear to be fairly stoical about the risk, they watch the environment agency website carefully, we spoke to a few of them earlier this morning. just going to try and sort out stuff indoors just in case it does happen. we didn't have an alert yesterday, we came to hear about it through other people. that made us nervous. this area has flooded before but you need three things for the flooding, you need the spring tide, a title search and a depression and i have been assured
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there is no depression so we are fine. tomorrow morning's high tide at 820 is important for this town, about two hours either side of that is when the flood warning exists. people around me putting up flood barriers just people around me putting up flood barriersjust in people around me putting up flood barriers just in case the worst happens. more on look north and east yorkshire and lincolnshire at 630 tonight. tracy is in yorkshire. across the uk at 730 tonight. tracy, welcome to nationwide. we will see you again but for now, both of you, thank you. if you'd like to see more on any of those stories, you can access them via the bbc iplayer and access them via the bbc iplayer and a reminder, we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm.
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let's get more now on the conservative party conference — where the chancellor sajid javid has pledged to raise the national living wage to ten pounds fifty within the next five years. he also said he intends to lower the age threshold for those who qualify from 25 to 21. our chief political correspondent, vicki young in manchester. that was the headline announcement from the chancellor but there is plenty of other elements as well. more spending following on from that announcement about the nhs and hospitals over the weekend. more spending on broadband, roads, infrastructure, so plenty to discuss. let's speak to josh infrastructure, so plenty to discuss. let's speak tojosh hardy. on the national living wage, it seems quite a significant change. he is talking about the target to do it within five years. the burden if you like falls on businesses, doesn't it? businesses will welcome this ambition. businesses really want to
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raise wages across the board. the national living wage has been a real success story and the role of the low pay commission has been critical there. it's an independent body that make sure that ambition is met in a sustainable way, not out of kilter with productivity. lets get there as quickly as we can. you think within five years is reasonable? it does depend on the economic conditions. you can't get too out of kilter. the single most important determinant of whether we will hit that target is getting a deal with the eu. that will help the economy to move forward. if we crash out on a no deal, it will be difficult to get that. he talked about the armoury of different economic weapons he could use if there is a no—deal brexit. what you think you should be looking at if in four weeks' time we are leaving without a deal? the first thing is they need to be putting every ounce of effort into getting that deal because then, every penny
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we spend will move the country forward rather than desperately trying to tread water rounded economic disruption. where are we to end up in that position, it is right to be looking at long—term investment and infrastructure, skills, innovation, things we need to drive the country forward but also what can they do to help businesses struggling day by day to cope, particularly small businesses with. are there ways of enabling the cash to keep flowing, just to keep things as stable as possible but whatever we do it will be a real challenge. what about readiness for a no—deal brexit? we have been hearing adverts, particularly for smaller businesses, given we have been here before, we thought we would leave in march, thenjune and now there is that the act of parliament would suggest it may be delayed again, do you think businesses are thinking, i do have to make a decision about this?l businesses are thinking, i do have to make a decision about this? a lot of larger businesses have done all
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they can to prepare but what they are clear on is that doesn't protect us, it can only prepare for some of the stuff. a lot of that there is nothing we can do about but you are right, further down, smaller businesses, they don't have the time often, the money, the skill to do the preparation is needed. the survey last week showed four out of five smaller businesses have done nothing so they are extremely exposed and very concerned. thank you. that is the view from the cbi. the message that the government wa nts to the message that the government wants to come out of today's speech is that austerity is over. very much mirroring some of the announcements from the labour party and it does feel like a lot of pre—general election promises. in a moment, the latest business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live:
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the chancellor pledges an increase to the national living wage — to ten pounds fifty within the next 5 years. in westminster, opposition party leaders have decided not to call a vote of confidence in the prime minister this week. cardiff city must pay a transfer fee of more than five million pounds to the french club nantes for emiliano sala, who died in a plane crash on the way to the uk. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. chancellor sajid javid has is aiming to raise the national living wage to £10.50 within the next five years. he will also lower the age threshold for those who qualify from 25 to 21. thomas cook customers may have to wait up to two months to receive a refund for holidays they booked with the collapsed travel firm. the civil aviation authority says it "hopes to pay refunds within 60 days" of recieiving a form. over 350,000 customers are due to get their money back, making this operation by far
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the largest of its kind. the clock is ticking for the hundreds of thousands of people who were misold loans by wonga. administrators for the payday lender, which collapsed in august 2018, says eligable customers have until the end of today to make a claim for historic mis—sold loans via an online portal. a surprise from the chancellor — th national lving wage is to rise? we did expect the chancellor to splash some cash in this speech. but this is ultimately, it is great news for 600,000 people between the ages of 21 and 24 who could benefit from this in the national living wage. let's not forget that the national living wage, if this all comes to
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pass, will increase by more than previously expected although this ambition is one that was held by philip hammond, who was sajid javid's predecessor. we are hearing from groups and the thing they are coming out with as they are saying, this is a great idea if it can come to pass but we had to make sure it is affordable. this is a challenging time for business, also you had to make sure it is affordable, increasing wages doesn't come at the cost of hiring fewer workers. as we are hearing, quite a varied speech over the best part of an hour. we had plenty there about infrastructure and this change in direction, the ending of austerity or as the chancellor prefers, and renewal. that will be the new buzz phrase. in the old days they would
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have said spend, spend. we had a bit of prudence, then austerity, now we are talking about renewal but let's find out exactly if the city is in line with all of this. joining us now is gervais williams, senior executive director, at the miton group. the speech today sounded a bit like it might do on budget day. sajid javid saying austerity is at an end, this is a period of renewal, basically meaning he will spend more. as the city nervous about that? what is happening here is he is loosening some of the structure and borrowing rules the government has been following for the last few years which historically has been around 2%. he is looking to spend more notjust in the nhs and hospitals, but releasing the cap on the low paid workers and hopefully an ambition of paying £10 50 p.
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the low paid workers and hopefully an ambition of paying £10 50 pm the city worried about this loosening of the purse strings because they reduce the deficit now they might be talking about increasing the deficit. the good thing about investment is it generates a cash payback and if they do that, investing is a good thing. a lot of government spending doesn't generate cash payback and that leaves debt. a pretty full room where the chancellor was speaking, plenty of activity in westminster also. a debate raging over whether or not certain players in the city might be betting on a no—deal brexit and taking advantage of that. explain how that works. people have been worrying about whether it is a no deal in a slightly chaotic exit ora no deal in a slightly chaotic exit or a smoother exit and things go smoothly. that has been reflected in the currency moves. sterling was writing quite nicely recently as people were expecting it to be a smooth exit although it hasjust picked out in the last day or two. this idea of shorting the pound,
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explain what that means in practice. a huge amount of currency traded every day, about $800 billion worth every day, about $800 billion worth every day, about $800 billion worth every day in london and therefore any changes in expectation are led to differences in the exchange rate. people are putting their currency bets into other things such as the us dollar, the euro and if sterling comes down, effectively they have a save losing money by holding sterling. there are suggestions that perhaps some players might be using this to their advantage, ie a no—deal brexit might be what they are hoping for. it is the end of the quarter today so we are looking at the stock exchange which has hardly changed over the last three months, it has ended up at the same level. a lot of noise going on but not much movement. shall we look at those numbers? noise, movement. barely budging the ftse100. quiet over
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all. you get the picture there. the markets pretty much flat. the pound drifting down against the dollar ever so slightly. the chancellor wanting to allay fears about a no—deal brexit, pointing to the bank of england. thank you very much. and here's something for nigel — well, everyone named nigel. in recent years the name has been on the brink of extinction in england and wales, with fewer than three nigels born in 2016. nigel smith, who runs a pub near evesham in worcestershire, said he wanted to do something to celebrate the "dying breed" and created "nigel night". so more than 400 nigels from across the world gathered at the village pub to "celebrate nigel—ness". in total 432 nigels
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attended the event — from seven months old to 80 — and a dog adopted by nigel too. let's catch up now on the weather. more warnings of heavy rain to come across england and wales through today and into tomorrow. lots of flood warnings out there. the wetter weather is pushing up from the south—west, turning wetter in wales, rain in northern ireland, the midlands and towards the south—east. before then, 17 or 18 degrees. further north, dry with spells of sunshine. that rain heavy over the hills of wales and through the midlands. patchy, lighter rain continues across northern england, southern scotland and northern ireland. to the south, a woman night, clear spells, showers not far
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away. further north in scotland it will be colder, sunshine, showers in the north. the rain will move away, brightening up here, patchy rain continues in northern england with widespread showers further south across england and wales, threatening some localised flooding. 18 degrees here, further north at 10-12dc.
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today at 5, a major economic response is being planned by the government, in the event of a no—deal brexit. the chancellor also tells the conservative conference that brexit will happen on october 31st, with or without a deal. working closely with the bank of england, we are ready to draw on the full armoury of economic policy if needed. and the bank has already revised its assessments, because of the actions that we have already taken. meanwhile, the prime minister, meeting workers in manchester, has again denied allegations of misconduct with a female journalist. policy amount announcements too as

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