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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 1, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, live from the conserative party conference in manchester, with dan walker. our headlines today: plans to avoid a hard irish border. government sources say a new brexit deal is just days away, and that it is preparing to put it to the eu. while the prime minister focuses on policy, questions still remain over whether he groped a female journalist at a private lunch 20 years ago. we will have borisjohnson live on the programme later this morning. in other news, is red meat back on the menu? new research suggests cutting down on sausages and steak might be
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a waste of time for most people. the cost of credit. spending on credit cards is at the most expensive in 13 years, even though interest rates are at record lows. i will look at why. mo farah's former coach alberto salazar is found guilty of doping violations and banned from athletics for four years. a court case began behind closed doors in 2017, the year farah stopped working with salazar. good morning. today across scotland and northern ireland, early rain will clear. then mostly dry for you with just a few showers. for england and wales, rain in the north and some heavy, thundery downpours further south which could lead to some issues with localised flooding. will have more later. it is tuesdayi of october. we are based here for much of the
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morning at the conservative party conference in manchester. our top story: proposals to avoid a hard irish border are expected to be published in the coming days as part of the government's revised brexit deal. but, with less than a month until the government's brexit deadline of 31 october, ireland's deputy prime minister, simon coveney, has already dismissed the reported plans as a non—starter. our political correspondent iain watson reports. he says he is prepared to leave the eu without a deal, but would prefer to leave with one, and now those close to borisjohnson say he has a plan. soon after the conservative conference concludes on wednesday, the government is expected to send new proposals to brussels. the main sticking point so far has been the northern irish backstop. this would avoid a hard border in ireland while a new trade deal is being hammered out after brexit. but many brexiteers believe it would also keep the uk too closely in step with eu rules, and the prime minister said it is antidemocratic.
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so what is the alternative? well, the bbc understands the government will propose new customs checks on the island of ireland after brexit, but these would be done well away from the border, mostly either where goods originate or at their final destination. the government hopes this will be enough to kick start a new, intensive round of talks by the end of the week. but the irish government says it still hasn't seen a credible alternative to the backstop. the prime minister is likely to say that the new proposals prove he is determined to get a deal. we should know by the weekend if the eu will see them as a serious step forward. iain watson, bbc news, at the conservative conference in manchester. i'm joined now by our political correspondent chris mason. good morning to you, chris. like to see you in the flesh. we will be putting those questions and trying to find out exactly what the plan is to find out exactly what the plan is to the prime minister later on brea kfast, to the prime minister later on breakfast, but it seems it has
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already been given a bit of a knockback. yes, pretty brutal knockback. yes, pretty brutal knockback pretty instantaneously. it hit contact with reality and was immediately pooh—poohed by the irish government, and we should be aware of how tight the timeframe is. we are into october, we are due to leave the european union at the end of this month. now, the government say within the next couple of days it will publish these ideas. trying to wrestle with this age—old problem we have talked about so often on brea kfast. we have talked about so often on breakfast. how do you keep that water open between northern ireland and the republic, while respecting the fact that it will be the frontier between the uk and the european union. so the idea of these customs clea ra nce european union. so the idea of these customs clearance zone is the latest to be floated, pretty much gone down universally badly. and another question we will ask the prime minister later is, is this a deal to get through, or a deal being proposed simply to get knocked back? every time we have got to the point in this process where you think this
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could be it, precedent has suggested that it won't quite yet. in other words, when it is 11:55 p.m., people say let's wait until 11:59 p.m., and there is a sense of this because this idea has been floated around before. it was talked about in brussels a couple of weeks ago when some papers, or brussels a couple of weeks ago when some papers, 01’ non— brussels a couple of weeks ago when some papers, or non— papers, to use the ludicrous terminology, were submitted by the uk to the eu. you wonder what else might be in the locker, though, given how tight the timeframe is. there is that summit ina timeframe is. there is that summit in a couple of weeks. at the time we get to that will have to be the outline of a deal, if there is going to bea outline of a deal, if there is going to be a deal at that point, or the prospect of no deal or potentially another collision in the supreme court, or one of the courts, if there is a challenge under that act meant to prevent us leaving without a deal by the end of this month. you can easily forget that we're here at the conservative party conference, and today will be another day of announcements. so we and today will be another day of announcements. so we will have home affa i rs announcements. so we will have home affairs secretary, priti pael hill
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-- priti affairs secretary, priti pael hill —— priti patel later. as things stand in england and wales, you are released at the halfway point of your sentence, unless a judge when your sentence, unless a judge when you are sentenced suggests it should be higher. that will be bumped up to two—thirds. you will have to serve two—thirds. you will have to serve two—thirds of your sentence before there is any prospect of release. that will come at a cost and will increase the prison population, but it isa increase the prison population, but it is a reminder that governing continues beyond this ever present noise of brexit, and people here are desperate, you can see it with the banners in the hall here, to return to other stuff. there is no prospect of it anytime soon, though. chris will be with us throughout the morning, and adam fleming is with us later, so we have half the brexitcast with us. and we will be interviewing the prime minister at 7:45am. all of that will be coming from our base, and louise, the rest of the news in the studio. eating red meat, sausages and bacon makes little difference to the risk
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of contracting cancer, according to a new study, which contradicts the advice of most of the world's major health organisations. here is our medical correspondent fergus walsh. there have been repeated studies linking red and especially processed meat with heart disease and cancer. the current guidance from the government advises people to eat no more than 70g of red and processed meat a day, equivalent to two rashers of bacon or 1.5 pork sausages. now, a team of international experts has reviewed existing data and found only weak evidence that it is worth trying to cut back. it is worth stressing that they did not find there was no evidence of harm, but simply that it was very weak. the argument here is not so much about the evidence, but how it is interpreted. there is agreement on the evidence linking processed meat to cancer risk, it is a small effect, but it is there. what is different here is that the researchers are recommending that it doesn't matter
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that much on an individual level. it doesn't matter that much on an individual level, but when you look at it across a lot of people, those effects can really add up. in 2015, the world health organization said eating 50g of processed meat a day, less than two slices of bacon, increased the chances of getting bowel cancer by 18%. in the uk, six out of every 100 people will get bowel cancer at some point. if we all ate an extra 50g of bacon a day for the rest of our lives, one more person per 100 would get bowel cancer. so cutting back on the amount of bacon or burgers you eat may make very little difference to your individual risk of getting bowel cancer, but across a whole population, it could mean preventing thousands of cases per year. fergus walsh, bbc news. a series of spectacular events to mark 70 years since the founding of the people's republic of china are taking place in beijing today, but major protests are also expected in hong kong. our correspondent robin brant joins
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us from now from beijing. robin, the images coming out of china are spectacular. tell us a little bit about what china is planning on the likely reaction in hong kong. china's ruling communist party don't do things by halves when it comes to these big significant birthday celebrations. it is 70 years to the day since mao zedong founded the people's republic in 19119, and we have had a sizeable military parade followed by a party like carnival, with up to 100,000 people involved in tiananmen square in the heart of the city. it was xi jinping, the country's president, who took centre stage, making a brief speech. he talked about unity, he talked about struggle, these are familiar themes,
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and he talked about the inexorable rise of china, progress that he said no force can possibly stop. it is no mistake that he looks very similar to mao zedong, wearing a very similarsuit as he to mao zedong, wearing a very similar suit as he stood in the same spot where mao zedong declared the prc founded, 70 years ago. there has been much progress since then, turmoil as well, but there are significant challenges facing this country as it goes forward. we have a trade war in the us, no sign of that improving, we have an economy where the rate of growth is starting to slow, and look at the skies as we saw the parade in beijing today. it is pretty smoggy here, and that is yet continued evidence of the pollution, significant pollution, this country continues to face, something xijinping really is trying to solve, that as a consequence of the decades of industrial progress we have seen here in this country. president trump's personal lawyer has become the latest target of the democrat—led impeachment investigation. rudy giuliani, the former mayor of new york, has been sent a legal demand for documents relating to ukraine. the investigation is seeking to establish whether mr trump asked ukraine's leader to investigate joe biden, his likely rival in next year's presidential election.
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an iceberg large enough to fit 250,000 football pitches onto its surface has broken away from the antarctic ice shelf. it's the biggest iceberg to break off in two years and is slightly smaller than the isle of skye. its size means it could pose a hazard to shipping, so scientists will track its movement. but they stress it has nothing to do with climate change. and sally, you are trying to make out where the iceberg is. we will look back closely later. sally's here with the sport, and some news which has broken overnight about mo salah's former coach. he isa he is a man whose name you might recognise, but you might not quite know why, alberto salazar. he was mo salah's coach for a certain length
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of time, and overnight the news we can bring you is that alberto salazar has been banned from athletics for four years after being found guilty of doping violations. there has been a four—year investigation by the us anti doping agency and a two—year court battle behind closed doors. farah left salazar‘s training camp in oregon in 2017, but he denied his was connected to doping claims. fresh from winning her first major global medal, dina asher—smith runs the fastest time of the day to reach the semi—finals of the 200 metres at the world athletics championships in doha. manchester united suffer their worst start to a league season in 30 years. a 1—1 draw at home to arsenal leaves them tenth in the table after seven games. and scotland can still make it into the knockout stage of the rugby world cup after a commanding win over samoa. they're third in their pool after two games.
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commandingi commanding i think a little bit of an understatement there. they walloped them. and thank you for joining us in the studio today. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. you have been warning us about what is going on, and some flooding as well. that's right, good morning, everybody. at the moment the environment agency has 88 flood warnings and 223 alerts. now, those are updated all the time, and today once again we are looking at further heavy downpours. the rain that crossed us yesterday has produced some heavy bursts across cumbria overnight. more to come across parts of dumfries and galloway, and the weather front sinks southwards. at the same time we also have a lot of showers coming in across wales and south—west england. on the other side of that weather front, mostly dry, with some sunny spells across scotland, but cold with some showers coming in on the northerly breeze. so this afternoon you can see the plethora of showers that we have got. some parts of england and wales
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could see between 20 and a0 millimetres of rainfall in a very short amount of time. not all of us will. there will be frequent lightning, the yellow triangle indicating the met office has a yellow weather warnings out for us until 8pm tonight. so problems with localised flooding quite likely. there will be a lot of standing water, surface water as well, if you are travelling, do take extra care. through the day weather front as it sinks southwards will start to fragments, and behind it, for northern ireland, northern england and southern scotland it will dry up and southern scotland it will dry up and should also brighten up. cool in the north, especially if you are exposed to the wind, with some snow on the mountains of the grampians and highlands, whereas further south we still are in the mild air. as we head onto the evening and overnight period, the showers push southwards. the rain fragments, not much more than a band of rain in some showers, and the cold air feeds further south under clear skies. still a few showers, still wintry on the mountains in the north. so these are
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the kinds of temperature values you can expect in towns and cities. it will be colder than it has been. in rural areas it will be around about freezing, and some of us will wake up freezing, and some of us will wake up tomorrow morning to a frost. so we will know all about it tomorrow, but tomorrow at is going to be drier than today. there will also be a fair bit of sunshine around. still a few showers, wintry in nature for the mountains and scotland, coming in on that northerly wind, and we're looking at temperatures tomorrow between about ten and 1a degrees in the towns and cities. you heard talking yesterday about hurricane lorenzo, still a category 2. this is it here. it is firming up a little bit, it looks like it is coming in to the west of the uk, but one thing we are positive about is, because of its tropical elements, look at the amber colour is returning, so it is going to turn that little bit milder thanit going to turn that little bit milder than it is going to be in the next few days. on thursday it will become wet later on in the day and into friday, and temperature ways, we are back up to about 17. so all to psy—tu rvy back up to about 17. so all topsy—turvy once again.
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thank you very much. we are the manchester conference centre and we will be speaking to the prime minister later at 7:a5am. let's look at the paper headlined... "bacon's safe no ifs or butties" says the sun's headline. the paper reports research from canada which suggests bacon and other processed meat is safe to eat, following previous warnings that they could can cancer, diabetes or heart disease. the daily mail reports that the justice secretary will unveil longerjail terms, for sexual predators and the most violent criminals, and plans to make "drunken yobs" and drink drivers wear electronic sobriety bracelets. and tony hall overturning the decision with regards to naga munchetty and bbc breakfast and
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ministers support the prime minister. an end of the softer prison sentence with violent criminals to serve two—thirds of their sentence. here to help us delve into some of it are journalists, polly toynbee, from the guardian, and matt chorley, of the times. the customs clearance zones —— centres which seems to have gone down pretty badly from both ireland and brussels. it has been proposed before and it is not new, to have a broader set ten miles back. the irish say it is still a security freight. the eu says it is an open invitation to smuggling which is what they are worried about. if you have a single market, you need a border around it. ithink have a single market, you need a border around it. i think it is going to be quite a problem to get
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it agreed. the issue has been one of the keys for months now. it agreed. the issue has been one of the keys for months nowlj it agreed. the issue has been one of the keys for months now. i think lots of people have heard all this jargon and think it is complicated but it is straightforward. if we are leaving the eu we are outside the eu which means we are outside a border so which means we are outside a border so you cannot make up a border. you would just be moving at a few miles from the border but it means that it is still there. many of the papers dealing with these allegations in his private lives which he staunchly says he will not talk about but it will be interesting to see if he ta kes will be interesting to see if he takes them seriously. essentially, when you are in the top job, it comes down to trust. he is the prime ministerand comes down to trust. he is the prime minister and that changes the
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questions he has to answer. he has a long—standing position of not answering about his private life but answering about his private life but a prime minister has to. in manchester, most people say it is prized and, a bit like the donald trump thing. more than anything he is the prime minister, he is the only option left to get a deal and they cannot change prime minister i'iow they cannot change prime minister now so they cannot change prime minister now so they are sort of shrugging it off and pretend it is not happening. for people who are absolute boris adora ‘s, it will not make a difference. very much like trump talking about pussy grabbing. remember the old days when the sleaze breakdown john remember the old days when the sleaze breakdownjohn major's government, this is something much
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wilder and more to come out of the woodwork as well. the possible permutations we were looking. where will we be on october 31? part of me still thinks they will be a deal but this is more like hope over experience. it is difficult to see what the alternative is. boris johnson could bring back anything to parliament and they would vote for it. but getting something that boris and brussels can agree with is difficult. nigel farage would shut betrayal, i think it is very difficult to get a deal because it relies on a chunk of labour mps and he offended them so mortally, deliberately and rudely last week that i do not think they will be willing to say we will step forward and support boris johnson's willing to say we will step forward and support borisjohnson's plan. it
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does not mean one vote but going on voting other legislation and they will balk at that. thank you for joining us. the prime minister will be live on a bbc breakfast at 7:a5am. i love this from one of the papers. i expect given the hours you work, have you lost your car? yes. a teenager went to a music festival two weeks ago. he parked his car on a residential street and could he find it? i love his description of where he thought he parked it. he spent some hours looking for it. he continued the hunt for 12 hours with his mother afterwards. she contacted
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the bristol post and offered a £100 rewired and finally somebody founded. it was next to some bushes. definitely done that. a couple of stories for you. in the daily mail, pep guardiola talking about manchester city fans, i don't know why they have chosen that picture of him that he says they want to seduce the fans. but it is not a sell—out tonight. they have reduced the prices of tickets, starting at 20 quid which is really good, hundreds of tickets to local schools. the fa ns of tickets to local schools. the fans said quite simply, the premier league is so important, they are not so league is so important, they are not so bothered about european football but they have a huge fantastic stadium and as we know empty seats do not look great. we know all about
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that this week. basically here you can renta that this week. basically here you can rent a desk if you freelance stop it was originally valued at $47 billion but they have pulled the floatation. loads of questions about how it makes money, whether it owns any assets. the chief executive has stepped down so a big question over the future of wework. jamie oliver in the headlines lately because of the collapse of his restaurants. it cost about a thousand jobs. congratulations to angela white, the old est congratulations to angela white, the oldest woman to run this race. 18 days, 12 hours and three minutes. she is 60 and she was filled by lots
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of courage. thank you both. a treadmill and a large screen might be the key to helping victims of post—traumatic stress disorder, including war veterans, to heal their mental scars. that's according to the researchers behind a new "virtual reality" treatment which has been trialled in wales. the bbc‘s tomos morgan went to take a look. i attempted to take my life. he joined the raf at 16. two years later he was in iraq as a driver transporting injured and dead soldiers from the conflict. you have all these emotions flow through you, fear, upset, you know, anxiety it can all hit you in one way because you don't really know what is going on and it took its toll on me. just a year later, matt was medically discharged. he began having
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flashbacks, drinking heavily and prone to angry outbursts. those symptoms began taking a toll on his family. at the time i did not know why his behaviour wasn't like that because he didn't tell me what he had seen or been through in iraq. it made me think, did i want to be with that person? 12 years later, after speaking to other veterans at the invicta ‘s games, he looked for treatment but nothing helped. ——in victor's. recently he has been taking part in a two—year trial by cardiff university and health board. virtual reality exposure therapy involves patients walking on a treadmill in front of a large cinema style screen showing images of the traumatic experience they may have witness. alongside a concurrent
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study in the netherlands, this is the only other study in the world looking to use 3d to treat ptsd. you are looking at these images, they are looking at these images, they are taking you right back there. you're back in that place you do not wa nt to you're back in that place you do not want to be. at times, he wanted to quit. the risk with the treatment is that relapses could occur and no improvement seen. but many veterans saw an average of almost a0% improvement in symptoms. and the belief is, it is notjust veterans that could benefit from this treatment. we can see no reason why this could not be applied to individuals with other ptsd disorders. we apply for funding to doa disorders. we apply for funding to do a much larger study across england, scotland and wales to look at its effectiveness in the national health service. three mdr is the
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only treatment that has managed to help matt's symptoms. although the night tremors remain, his daytime flashbacks have finished completely in the future is looking better than ever. the recovery is still ongoing but we have recently gone away as a family and that is something we would not have done before. that report by tomos morgan. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. a new branch of a virtual gp surgery is opening today in wimbledon. the contraversial gp at hand service gives people access to a doctor via a mobile phone app, normally by a video call. but it has seven physical centres in london to help people with complex or serious symptoms.
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the growing service now has 60,000 patients, and there's been concern about how quickly nhs funding has moved around the system to pay for them. london zoo conservation charity is helping the number of wild tigers on the other side of the world. there are fewer than a,000 tigers left in the wild across asia, but in nepal the numbers are now increasing, from only 121 in 2008 to 235 in 2018. the zoological society of london plans to boost nepal's tiger population, with the help of local people there and the nepali government. making shopping more accessible in reading — that's the aim of a new quiet hour launching at the oracle shopping centre today. every tuesday, between 09:30 and 10:30, the ambient lighting, music and tannoy announcements in the centre will be either turned off or down to a minimum. the general manager says it's part of ongoing efforts to improve
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things for shoppers. let's take a look at the travel situation now... on the tubes there's no service between white city and ealing broadway because of a signalling problems. minor because of a signalling problems. delays on other i lots of traffic news in central london this morning. gloucester place is closed because of roadworks from rossmore road to the marlybone road. also, piccadilly underpass remains closed westbound because of gas works. in westminster, there's still no access from parliament square to westminster bridge — that's for security works and the bridge is only open to busses and taxis. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning, another mild start out there this morning. worth bearing in mind this time tomorrow it will feel much different. today, heavy thundery showers arriving and the met office has issued a yellow
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weather warning for heavy rain. slow—moving so they will produce quite a lot of rain in a short space of time. not so many this morning but further through the afternoon, they will be coming thick and fast producing a lot of rain in a short space of time. risk of localised flooding, temperatures managing to reach 19 celsius. overnight the rain sinking south, piling in behind it is cooler air, clear skies and the temperature drops to single figures tonight. you really will notice the difference in temperature especially through wednesday. plenty of sunshine around tomorrow. a cold, crisp and really the first touch of autumn. similar conditions at least temperature wise on thursday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now.
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hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin. it is 6:30am. we will bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment. but also on breakfast this morning: the prime minister, borisjohnson, will be live on this programme injust over an hour. we will be asking how he plans to break the brexit deadlock while facing allegations of improper behaviour. there is another day of action in store at the world championships, but is a lack of crowds ruining the party? denise lewis will be giving us the latest from doha. and the best—selling author jojo moyes went to the wilds of kentucky to research her latest book. she is also going the extra mile to improve adult literacy. jojo joins us after 9:00am. good morning. the conservative partyjust down the road, and we have sent down there this morning. —— dan. and the prime
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minister will be with us for a good chunk of time, in the meantime we have chris mason and adam fleming. good morning. 50% of brexitcast in the building. a big day ahead, let's talk about these proposals overnight. we are hoping for more detail in the next 2a hours about the government's withdrawal agreement, the one that everyone is waiting for. talk us through the changes and what might potentially happen. so we have been hearing that borisjohnson happen. so we have been hearing that boris johnson wants to happen. so we have been hearing that borisjohnson wants to rip out pages from the theresa may withdrawal agreement that has been rejected all those times in the house of commons. it was hinted we would get more details this week. we are getting a stronger hint that they will be. this is this idea to try and get around this problem we have talked about so much around the irish border. how do you keep that border pretty much as it is when it becomes
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the frontier between the uk and the european union? and the idea that is in the either right now is this plan that you have some customs clearance zones or centres, in other words, customers are cleared away from the border rather than on the board itself, the idea that that keeps the border open but allows you to do the necessary checks to ensure that as a more significant international frontier after brexit than it is now. the irish deputy prime ministers said that was a nonstarter. how has that gone down in brussels, that potential change? the surprising thing is that this is not a surprise in brussels, because david frost has been going backwards and forwards on the train for the last few weeks presenting papers with these ideas, and these ideas have been on the table for a couple of weeks. the eu are hoping they will either be some new ideas, a final flourish at the tory party conference here, and they are now thinking that is not going to happen and this is it from the uk. but it is worth remembering what the three
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tests are, that the eu has. other infrastructure tests at or near the border, and it sounds like there will be near, if not at it. does it protect the single market? in other words, can things be smuggled in, whether it is products or dodgy foodstuffs ? whether it is products or dodgy foodstuffs? that doesn't seem to address that problem in these plans. in the third thing is what is the extra burden placed on people and businesses in northern ireland and ireland? businesses in northern ireland and ireland ? this sounds businesses in northern ireland and ireland? this sounds like a lot of extra burdens. from what you are saying, it doesn't seem like... and what some of reacting to this morning, it sounds like this is a deal being proposed in order to be rejected. just to be rejected. all along there are people in brussels saying hang on, are we being played here, and borisjohnson wants to look like, so he can say at the end it is not my fault there is no deal?
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i also suspect the eu will want to keep talking to him until the last minute, because they don't want to get any blame in case this goes horribly wrong and ends in a no—deal. horribly wrong and ends in a no-deal. what about the reaction within the party? you both have your ea rs very within the party? you both have your ears very much to the ground. what is interesting, when you mingle among the activists who will be teaming here lateron, among the activists who will be teaming here later on, of course there are people here who have long been advocates of brexit from way before brexit was even a word that we we re before brexit was even a word that we were regularly using, but for a lot of people here there is a kind of pragmatism that says we teed up this idea of a referendum, and it is our duty to deliver it. and we're getting to the crunch point, and we have to do it, with or without a deal. the thing we should be thinking about and remembering this morning, it being first of october, and all of that, is that the timeframe now is incredibly tight. it is due to happen this month, or at the end of this month. we are a couple of weeks away from that big summit in brussels where, if there is going to be a deal, that is where it would be signed off, and that
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doesn't look like, at the moment, there is anything that is likely to be either good enough for the european union to sign on the dotted line on, or necessarily for them to be able to be certain that you could bring it back to the westminster parliament and get it through. and chris has laid out the chronology of it, so let's say those other proposals, which david frost has been running by the eu for a while and they say we're not having any of this. happens then? that is a really good question. i have been texting one eu official and they say hopefully downing street will see the front pages today, listen to conversations like this, the prime minister will then have calls with other eu leaders and briefed them, this official saying hopefully there will be enough pushback in the next 2a hours that may be downing street will rethink and try and come back with a bigger, better rabbit to pull out of a hat when the prime minister does his conference speech tomorrow. iam does his conference speech tomorrow. i am sceptical that there is a bigger, better rabbit to be had, and
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thenit bigger, better rabbit to be had, and then it will be a case in the eu side of how do they manage saying no, potentially, but in a way that doesn't look like they are blowing up doesn't look like they are blowing up this whole process. and the ball has been tossed to and fro, and currently we are so tight for time, as you mentioned. there is no wriggle room. there is no wriggle room, and the prospect of a rabbit anywhere in this postcode after three years of looking for a rabbit, finding one in the next 24 hours, assuming as looks likely this morning that this plan is roundly rejected the eu and the irish government and others, seems remote. but we have to be used to surprises in this process. president would suggest don't go looking for rabbits. but they have been times in this process when, once the stars have aligned, things have happened very quickly. but it doesn't look like there is a lot of alignment at the moment. that is the problem. and a round of applause for adam fleming, having turned up a minute before hand, having no idea he was on tv, and appearing and looking marvellous anyway. and if you are just turning on, the prime minister
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will be live on bbc breakfast with us will be live on bbc breakfast with us at 7:a5am this morning. will be live on bbc breakfast with us at 7:45am this morning. good advice, always be prepared. thank you very much. eating red meat, sausages and bacon makes little difference to the risk of contracting cancer, according to a new study, which contradicts the advice of most of the world's major health organisations. an international team of experts say the current evidence of the dangers of red and processed meat was very week. the world health organization says the findings undermine sensible eating advice. a series of spectacular events to mark 70 years since the founding of the people's republic of china are taking place in beijing today, but major protests are also expected in hong kong. 15,000 troops filled tiananmen square in central beijing, with the nation's newest military technology on display. tight security is in place in hong kong following four months of demonstrations against chinese rule. president trump's personal lawyer has become the latest target
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of the democrat—led impeachment investigation. rudy giuliani, the former mayor of new york, has been sent a legal demand for documents relating to ukraine. the investigation is seeking to establish whether mr trump asked ukraine's leader to investigate joe biden, his likely rival in next year's presidential election. the us opera singerjessye norman, who was one of the most renowned sopranos of the 20th century, has died at the age of 7a. a native of augusta, georgia, she was one ofjust a few black singers to reach fame in the opera world. she sang at the presidential inaugurations of ronald reagan and bill clinton, and at the 60th birthday celebrations of queen elizabeth in 1986. lovely to hear some of her singing, as well. a little bit later. some news has broken overnight about mo salah's coach. we are talking about
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alberto salazar, and he has been a hugely significant figure in athletics for many years. mo farah's former coach alberto salazar has been banned from athletics for four years, after being found guilty of doping violations. salazar runs the nike oregon project, which was home to farah for six years until he left in 2017. farah denied his decision was linked to allegations of doping and unethical practices at the training base which the us anti—doping agency were investigating. manchester united have made their worst start to a season for 30 years after being held to a 1—1 draw by arsenal at old trafford. it was a pretty grim affair, scott mctominay putting united ahead just before half—time. and var played a part again, overturning an offside decision so pierre—emerick aubameyang's equaliser stood. arsenal are now in the top four, but united are tenth.
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you wanted to take three points tonight, and we had a great opportunity to get them three points, ‘cause i thought we had the game where we wanted. but that's sometimes — you know, or how many times this season have we been 1—0 up, and we haven't managed to get the second goal. cardiff city have been told they must pay the first instalment of £5.3 million to nantes for striker emiliano sala. sala died in a plane crash in january while travelling from france tojoin his new club. cardiff have argued they were not liable for any of the £15 million fee because sala was not officially their player when he died. scotland's head coach, gregor townsend, said their win over samoa in the rugby world cup was a true reflection of what they are capable of. they won 3a—0 in kobe to keep their cmpaign alive, greg laidlaw amongst the try scorers in a bonus point victory. their last two pool games are against russia and japan.
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that was a true reflection of who we are and what we're capable of, and what playing for scotland means for these players. that was a tough challenge that they had to rise up and face, knowing that if we underperformed tonight we were out of the world cup. and we are playing a very dangerous team, so to see the effort, the togetherness, was excellent. a day after winning her first global medal, britain's dina asher—smith made it through to the semi—finals of the 200 metres at the world athletics championships in doha. she collected the silver medal she won in sunday's100 metres. and she showed no sign of fatigue on the track, running the fastest time in the heats. the semis take place tonight. adam gemili inisted there is more to come, after he ran a season's best time to qualify for the men's 200 metre final tonight. he was fourth—quickest in the semis.
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in the big event of the evening, norway's karsten warholm took gold in the men's a00 metre hurdles. he was the defending champion, and many thought the world record might be under threat. he just missed it, but he took his unbeaten streak to 1a races. warholm is a bit of a character. this was a very tough race. you know, i actually felt my heart was going to stop, it's nojoke. i actually had pain in my chest, thinking, "i am going to die, but it will be worth it". and here i am, world champion, and i am not dead either. we reported yesterday that northern ireland'sjonathan rea had become the first man to win five world superbikes titles. well, let's hearfrom him now. he says it will take a while for it to sink in after he secured this season's championship with two rounds to spare. i think it'll be... you know, when i retire or look back on my career,
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may be, that i will realise what i have achieved. but, when i start to compare guys i looked up to like fogarty, first to be mentioned in the same breath as him when i was winning some world titles was amazing, and to surpass four world championships and have five on the bounce is mad. british number one kyle edmund has been beaten by a wildcard player at the china open, his fifth straight defeat. he lost to zhizhen zhang in the first round. edumund hasn't won a match since beating nick kyrgios in august. dan evans and cameron norrie are both through, though. norrie could play andy murray in the second round. novak djokovic returns to tennis this week at the japan open. we've see rugby players from all over the world embracing the japanese culture. well, here's djokovic getting involved in some sumo wrestling. if you remember, he pulled out of the us open last month with a bad shoulder, so thankfully these wrestlers looked to be going easy on him.
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iam not i am not sure that is going to make his shoulder much better, is it?|j don't think they were going that ha rd don't think they were going that hard on him. do you think they gave him an easy time? i also know for a fa ct him an easy time? i also know for a fact that his diet is significantly different to assume a wrestler. he is gluten—free. no fat, no anything. good morning everyone. we start off with a flood warnings for england and wales. currently, 89 flood warnings and 22a flood alerts. for scotland, one flood warning and free flood alerts. further heavy downpours to come today. this is the weather front that brought the rain north. heavy rain in cumbria and around the borders. further south, across south—west of england and
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wales, heavy showers. through the day, this band of rain will sink southwards and start to foment. further downpours develop and behind it, in scotland and northern ireland, drying out withjust it, in scotland and northern ireland, drying out with just a few showers. a weather warning out, a yellow one, for those heavy, thundery downpours are valid till eight o'clock tonight and we could have between 20 and a0 millimetres of rainfall in a short amount of time in some places, not everywhere. we also some frequent lightning. brightening up in northern england later. still showers coming in on a brisk northerly breeze. some wintry. tonight, what you will find is a weather front sinking south as a weakening feature. the northerly wind penetrating further south and you will see a lot of clear skies and that is telling you it will be a
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cold night, colder than what we have been used to lately. the temperatures also indicating freezing or below. in rural areas, it will be colder, cold enough for the touch of frost. tomorrow, a dry and bright start with a fair bit of sunshine stop we hang on to that for much of the day but it will feel colder. showers are still wintry on the top of the scottish mountains. temperatures down on today. between ten and 13 degrees. hurricane lorenzo, which is in the atlantic, is heading north, weakening. we think it will be to the west of the uk bringing some strengthening winds and also wet weather coming in. it will not be a hurricane when it reaches our shores but it will bring
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some milder conditions. it still has a tropical element attached to it. thank you very much, carol. are you putting more on your credit card? well, it could mean you're paying more than ever — with rates at their most expensive in 13 years. ben is looking at why. this seems strange doesn't it. the bank of england interest rate is at a record low so it means things like mortgages and loans are cheaper than ever, and you're not getting much interest on any savings, but new figures show that the cost of credit cards at their highest since they began keeping records in 2006. the average annual interest rate — what's known as the apr — is nearly 25%. now that's not a problem if you're paying off your balance every month but according to moneyfacts only around half of us do that. becky o'connor is with me, she's a personal finance specialist from royal london.
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good morning. this is really weird because mortgages have never been cheaper, trying to get alone never been yet credit cards super expensive. on what you have described, the lender can always get that money back, they can repossess your house, take your carpet on a credit card it is unsecured so it is more of a risk of losing their money so more of a risk of losing their money so rates tend to be higher. with a credit card as well, they do risk based pricing so the greater the risk of them not getting their money back the higher the rate of interest. it is slightly riskier so it will cost more and banks may be wa ry it will cost more and banks may be wary but such a difference is astonishing. 25% compared to 1% or 296. astonishing. 25% compared to 1% or 2%. they can charge what they like ona 2%. they can charge what they like on a credit card. perhaps the
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regulator can start looking at those rates and is a fact they have been doing over the last couple of years. lenders, we are very competitive on credit cards for a long time and there was a lot of commotion of rates and 0% deals, to get people using the cards and transferring balances. those days look to be over, really. the number of deals on the market has shrunk massively. over, really. the number of deals on the market has shrunk massivelym this a case of the banks saying we're not much on mortgages. that is not very lucrative for them and loa ns not very lucrative for them and loans with interest rates, they are not making much that other cashing in on credit cards? the thing to say is a6% of people do not pay interest but the majority view. so the lenders are making money on of those customers and, if we use our cards responsibly, if we pay off the debt and don't give them a chance to
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profit from us, but clearly if you are in persistent that and you have are in persistent that and you have a big balance and spending at the higher rate, perhaps not paying attention to the rates you're paying and end up paying more than you realise, then you are making money for the lenders. let's talk top tips. if you are one of those people that do not pay it off every month. what can you do? the most important thing is to try and pay off the balance every month and be aware of the rate you are paying. there are different things, the fees, the balance transfer. if you're spending on yourcard, it balance transfer. if you're spending on your card, it is the purchase rate which catches people out. the not % is not exactly right the purchase rate can be more. if you cannot pay off the balance, try and find the 0% deal and reduce spending
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so find the 0% deal and reduce spending so you find the 0% deal and reduce spending so you can find the 0% deal and reduce spending so you can make find the 0% deal and reduce spending so you can make more find the 0% deal and reduce spending so you can make more than the minimum repayment otherwise it could be with you for years. that is something people cannot worry about. if you are clever you can jump around balance transfers, but it is around balance transfers, but it is a dangerous game if you're not on top of it because you can find a big interest charged coming down the road at you. you have to make a note when it is otherwise when it does and, you can be stung by a higher rate than you were previously. if you do not want to keep playing that game, you have to get your credit ca rd game, you have to get your credit card balance as low as possible and you need headroom and life happens and you do not want to be in a situation where you need the head room and do not have it and then the debt spirals. really good advice. thank you. top tips, good stuff. more from me after seven o'clock.
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most people who donate blood will never know who has received it. but, in a bid to increase blood donations within the black community, brea kfast‘s jayne mccubbin was given the chance to introduce one donor to the recipient of her life—saving gift. the result was rather special. take a look. these are two people have never met before but one owes her life to the other. i have a genitive disorder. without blood transfusions, life is so without blood transfusions, life is so hard. i am from manchester and i donate is often as i can. i am in and out within 45 minutes and continue with the rest of my day.
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the potential to help somebody's life. potentially life-saving. but where it has ended up, it has been a vague concept until now. we have been able to track down gift giver with gift receiver and one who knows the gift keeps it alive because without transfusions, her mother died aged 2a. without transfusions, her mother died aged 24. life looked terrible andi died aged 24. life looked terrible and i knew the clock was ticking. died aged 24. life looked terrible and i knew the clock was tickinglj knew it. you are about to meet a woman who has your blood through her veins. i am very nervous about that. you gave me your blood. you are all heroes, the unsung heroes, the heroes, the unsung heroes, the heroes we do not see in uniform. they are god sent angels. hello.
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rachel made you a card. thank you for saving our mother, thank you from the bottom of our hearts. because of that blood i have managed to live to see them reach their age. my to live to see them reach their age. my daughter is 12 today and i did not know it would happen. my daughter is 12 today and i did not know it would happenlj my daughter is 12 today and i did not know it would happen. i cannot thank people enough. although the overall need for donors has a decreased with medical advances like keyhole surgery, there is a desperate shortage of donors within the black community. desperate shortage of donors within the black communitylj desperate shortage of donors within the black community. i am a clinical nurse at the donor centre. all the recent evidence and clinical trials have demonstrated that the best treatment and outcome come from a full transfusion. salome needs that
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every six week to avoid pain, stroke, organ failure or even death. the blood she needed was only available on 55% of the time it was required this year. whoever can donate, please, go and donate. whoever has donated, thank you so much, you are a life saver. thank you. ido i do not think she will be alone in that. the message was really clear. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm tara welsh. a new branch of a virtual gp surgery is opening today in wimbledon. the contraversial gp at hand service gives people access to a doctor via a mobile phone app,
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normally by a video call. but it has seven physical centres in london to help people with complex or serious symptoms. the growing service now has 60,000 patients, and there's been concern about how quickly nhs funding has moved around the system to pay for them. london zoo's conservation charity is helping double the number of wild tigers on the other side of the world. there are fewer than 4,000 tigers left in the wild across asia, but in nepal the numbers are now increasing, from only 121 in 2008 to 235 in 2018. the zoological society of london plans to boost nepal's tiger population, with the help of local people there and the nepali government. making shopping more accessible in reading — that's the aim of a new quiet hour launching at the oracle shopping centre today. every tuesday, between 09:30 and 10:30,
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the ambient lighting, music and tannoy announcements in the centre will be either turned off or down to a minimum. the general manager says it's part of ongoing efforts to improve things for shoppers. let's take a look at the travel situation now... lots of traffic news in central london this morning. gloucester place is closed because of roadworks from rossmore road to the marlybone road. also, piccadilly underpass remains closed westbound because of gas works. in westminster, there's still no access from parliament square to westminster bridge — that's for security works and the bridge is only open to busses and taxis. in mitcham, london road is closed from wandle road to riverside drive for roadworks. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning, another mild start
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out there this morning. worth bearing in mind this time tomorrow it will feel much different. today, heavy thundery showers arriving and the met office has issued a yellow weather warning for heavy rain. slow—moving so they will produce quite a lot of rain in a short space of time. not so many this morning but further through the afternoon, they will be coming thick and fast producing a lot of rain in a short space of time. risk of localised flooding, temperatures managing to reach 19 celsius. overnight the rain sinking south, piling in behind it is cooler air, clear skies and the temperature drops to single figures tonight. you really will notice the difference in temperature especially through wednesday. plenty of sunshine around tomorrow. a cold, crisp and really the first touch of autumn. similar conditions at least temperature wise on thursday.
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i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast, live from the conserative party conference in manchester, with dan walker. our headlines today: plans to avoid a hard irish border. government sources say a new brexit proposal is just days away, and that its preparing to put it to the eu. while the prime minister focuses on policy, questions still remain over whether he groped a female journalist at a private lunch 20 years ago. we'll have borisjohnson live on the the programme later this morning. in other news, is red meat back on the menu? new research suggests cutting down on sausages and steak might be a waste of time for most people.
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a pay rise for a million workers. the chancellor announces plans to raise the living wage to £10.50 an hour. i'll look at at what it means for staff, and how much it could cost. mo farah's former coach alberto salazar is found guilty of doping violations and banned for four years. a court case began in 2017, the year farah stopped working with salazar. good morning. for england and wales today, some further heavy, thundery downpours, with the risk of some localised flooding for scotland and northern ireland. a brighter and sunnier day for you, but cool. it is tuesday1 october. if you have just switched on, if you havejust switched on, we will bejoined by
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if you havejust switched on, we will be joined by the if you havejust switched on, we will bejoined by the prime minister in 45 minutes live on bbc breakfast. our top story: proposals to avoid a hard irish border are expected to be published in the coming days as part of the government's revised brexit deal. but, with less than a month until the government's brexit deadline of 31 october, ireland's deputy prime minister, simon coveney, has already dismissed the reported plans as a non—starter. our political correspondent iain watson reports. he says he is prepared to leave the eu without a deal, but would prefer to leave with one, and now those close to borisjohnson say he has a plan. soon after the conservative conference concludes on wednesday, the government is expected to send new proposals to brussels. the main sticking point so far has been the northern irish backstop. this would avoid a hard border in ireland while a new trade deal is being hammered out after brexit. but many brexiteers believe it would also keep the uk too closely in step with eu rules, and the prime minister said
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it is antidemocratic. so what is the alternative? well, the bbc understands the government will propose new customs checks on the island of ireland after brexit, but these would be done well away from the border, mostly either where goods originate or at their final destination. the government hopes this will be enough to kick start a new, intensive round of talks by the end of the week. but the irish government says it still hasn't seen a credible alternative to the backstop. the prime minister is likely to say that the new proposals prove he is determined to get a deal. we should know by the weekend if the eu will see them as a serious step forward. iain watson, bbc news, at the conservative conference in manchester. i'm joined now by our political correspondent chris mason. good morning to you, thank you for
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being with us. today we have the detail of potentially the changes to the withdrawal agreement and what they might look like. run us through exactly what they are. so we are in the month of brexit, aren't we, in theory. it is meant to be happening at the end of this month. so they had to be detail coming, and here is some detail, albeit detail that we have kind of heard elements of before. this idea of how do you square the circle, that brexit is all about orders, all about having a border, ultimately, between the uk and the european union. there is that land border, 310 miles, between northern ireland and the republic. you have to keep that open because of the good friday agreement. how do you do it? that has been the fundamental conundrum of the last three years. the latest solution suggested by the british government is this idea that you look at customs checks not at the border but at places away from the border. the problem from the government's perspective is roughly 30 seconds after this emerged last night it was pretty roundly rejected, in the most uncompromising terms, by the irish
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government and from the european union as well. they simply don't think this adds up to a solution to keeping that border open, but also maintaining the integrity of the single market, which was one of the big fundamental projects of the european union. so it looks like pretty much an instant contact with reality, this borisjohnson plan has been rejected. and so one wonders if, somewhere in his jacket pocket or whatever, there is a rabbit he can pull out. because if he can't do it now, there isn't going to be a deal. all good questions to put to the prime minister later on this morning. in terms of what happens here, yesterday sajid javid was speaking and had an announcement about sentencing. yes, so priti patel will be on her feet, we also have the justice secretary. patel will be on her feet, we also have thejustice secretary. an governing continues beyond brexit,
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this is a government that wants to do other stuff and be known for doing other stuff. priti patel will talk about the importance of law and order and the party being seen to be champions of that over their rivals at the coming general election. and at the coming general election. and a specific policy announcement from mr butland about toughening sentences for some serious sexual offences. as things stand, you can be let out halfway through the sentence. the halfway point is the usual point of release —— mr buckland. that will be bumped up to two—thirds, so quite a significant toughening of sentencing practices. it will come at a cost and it will mean more present places are needed, but the government's argument will be that they don't want to be seen to be soft, and you hear in the news of somebody getting a sentence of a certain duration and actually it is much less than that. and you will come back and speak to us after the prime minister has been on the programme. we will speak to dominic grieve shortly, and the prime minister will be with us later —— dominic grieve.
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eating red meat, sausages and bacon makes little difference to the risk of contracting cancer, according to a new study, which contradicts the advice of most of the world's major health organisations. here is our medical correspondent fergus walsh. there have been repeated studies linking red and especially processed meat with heart disease and cancer. the current guidance from the government advises people to eat no more than 70g of red and processed meat a day, equivalent to two rashers of bacon or 1.5 pork sausages. now, a team of international experts has reviewed existing data and found only weak evidence that it is worth trying to cut back. it is worth stressing that they did not find there was no evidence of harm, but simply that it was very weak. the argument here is not so much about the evidence, but how it is interpreted. there's agreement on the evidence linking processed meat to cancer risk. it's a small effect, but it is there. what's different here is that the researchers
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are recommending that it doesn't matter that much on an individual level. it doesn't matter that much on an individual level, but when you look at it across a lot of people, those effects can really add up. in 2015, the world health organization said eating 50g of processed meat a day, less than two slices of bacon, increased the chances of getting bowel cancer by 18%. in the uk, six out of every 100 people will get bowel cancer at some point. if we all ate an extra 50g of bacon a day for the rest of our lives, one more person per 100 would get bowel cancer. so cutting back on the amount of bacon or burgers you eat may make very little difference to your individual risk of getting bowel cancer, but across a whole population, it could mean preventing thousands of cases per year. fergus walsh, bbc news. alberto salazar, mo farah's former athletics coach, has been banned from the sport
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for four years after being found guilty of doping violations. he has just released a statement. sally has more. just back us up a little bit, tell us just back us up a little bit, tell us about the story and then we can talk about the statement. alberto salazar, a former athlete himself, a distance runner, has worked with various high—profile athletes. we can see him there. he worked for approximately six years with mo salah up until 2017, when mo salah left him when these allegations came to light. that is when the us drugs agency started to kind of proceed with charges. actually, back in 2015, the bbc did a panorama programme investigating alberto salazar. alberto salazar has released a statement in the last few minutes because he has been banned for the next four years by the us drugs agency, and he is basically saying i have always ensured the
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wada codes are strictly followed. the oregon project will not permit doping. i will appeal. the oregon project will not permit doping. iwillappeal. i look forward to this unfair and protracted process reaching the conclusion i know to be true. i will not be commenting further at this time. i should say there are no allegations against mo salah in any of this but his former coach, alberto salazar, overnight, we have heard has been banned for the next four years from working in athletics after being found guilty of doping violations. we will talk about it again throughout the programme. thank you very much. a series of spectacular events to mark 70 years since the founding of the people's republic of china are taking place in beijing today, but major protests are also expected in hong kong. 15,000 troops filled tiananmen square in central beijing, with the nation's newest military technology on display. tight security is in place in hong kong following four months of demonstrations against chinese rule. president trump's personal lawyer has become the latest target
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of the democrat—led impeachment investigation. rudy giuliani, the former mayor of new york, has been sent a legal demand for documents relating to ukraine. the investigation is seeking to establish whether mr trump asked ukraine's leader to investigate joe biden, his likely rival in next year's presidential election. dozens of flood warnings are in place across england, along with alerts for 160 coastal areas from cornwall to northumberland. one of the places under threat is hunstanton in norfolk. alex dunlop is there for us this morning. good morning to you, and just tell us, what is the latest there? absolutely, when i was here at midnight last night it was a good deal rougher. looking at the seascape, it does seem deceptively calm, but perhaps this is the lull before the storm. the environment agency say they expect winds to pick up agency say they expect winds to pick up to force four or five in the next hour or so. the wind will be coming straight in from the north onto this
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coastline, and if you combine that with a high tide expected over the next 1.5 hours, at 8:40 a.m., you have the risk of serious flooding. as you can see, the floodgates have been firmly locked since last night. they should offer some degree of protection, but still 3000 homes behind the seawall here and down the coast towards snetterton, are at serious risk of flooding. i have to stress that this is from the environment agency a precautionary evacuation notice. at a safe than sorry, they say, however they do wa nt sorry, they say, however they do want people to go to a local emergency centrejust to want people to go to a local emergency centre just to be safe until 10am this morning. the good news is, of those 3000 properties, the majority of them are caravans and most are unoccupied at this time of year. but all eyes on this seafront for the next 1.5 hours. manufacturers will be forced to make appliances like washing machines and dishwashers easier to repair under new eu rules. from 2021, firms will have to make spare parts available for their white goods,
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so they can be repaired instead of replaced. consumer groups say manufacturers will still retain a stranglehold on the repair process. an iceberg large enough to fit 250,000 football pitches onto its surface has broken away from the antarctic ice shelf. it is the biggest iceberg to break off in two years, and is slightly smaller than the isle of skye. its size means it could pose a hazard to shipping, so scientists will track its movement. but they stress it has nothing to do with climate change. the us opera singerjessye norman, who was one of the most renowned sopranos of the 20th century, has died at the age of 7a. a native of augusta, georgia, she was one ofjust a few black singers to reach fame in the opera world. she sang at the presidential inaugurations of ronald reagan and bill clinton, and at the 60th birthday celebrations of queen elizabeth in 1986.
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you are up—to—date with all the latest news. let's go back to dan at the conservative party conference this morning. just a reminder we have the prime minister coming up at 7:45am. we are based here this morning. this place will be buzzing later, as chris mason was telling us, full of not only mps but party members as well. significantly fewer mps attending than last year. 21 of them were kicked out of the party for rebelling against boris johnson over the possibility of a no—deal brexit. among them is dominic grieve, who is now 200 miles away in westminster. good morning, mr grieve. thank you very much for speaking to us on thank you very much for speaking to us on bbc breakfast this morning.
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cani us on bbc breakfast this morning. can i come to that issue first of all? as someone who is still a conservative but no longer a conservative but no longer a conservative mp, how does it feel to have all of this going on and to feel as though, i imagine, you are not really pa rt feel as though, i imagine, you are not really part of it at the moment? a lot of people came up saying they agreed with me and one or two people muttered implications under their breath as they passed but very few of those. how much of the discussion was about this potential withdrawal agreement? the changes with regards to the irish border? what happens next? the prime minister is fully entitled to put forward ideas to try to resolve the issue of the irish backstop but i must say to suggest effectively they are going to solve
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the border problem by having a hard border moved ten miles back from where the border is on each side is in facta where the border is on each side is in fact a creation, is it not, creation of a hard border with a no man's land in between and i am not surprised the irish government may find that difficult. if i understand, they are talking about having border post and checks and that may present difficulties. i have always recognised the prime minister is entitled to carry out his negotiations i am just rather pessimistic as to their outcomes. we will put that point to the prime minister. having been here this week, get brexit done is very much the mantra of the conference and the prime minister is adamant we will be leaving the uk on the 31st of october, deal or no deal. do you think the ben act, trying to prevent
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that, do you think that remains watertight? i do believe it is fit for purpose. it was a clear expression of view passed into statute law by the majority of the house of commons and supported by the house. he must apply for an an extension if that happens. that is all of the facts. the vast majority of members of parliament believe that leaving without a deal would be very damaging, so damaging it is something we have got to prevent it from happening and the difficulty is the prime minister keeps ramping up the prime minister keeps ramping up the rhetoric. if he does, he boxes himself in as well. it is difficult to see how he will get himself out of it. at that stage, to come back to the house of commons and have a dialogue after extending the deal rather than driving a bulldozer
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through at about getting ourselves out of the current crisis. my view is that a second referendum provides a way out that would enable members of the public, the electorate to express their opinion and to determine this in a way that could be immediately operated. it may come toa be immediately operated. it may come to a decision i do not like but that is that. otherwise we may go up round and round in circles. i think the prime minister risks causing real damage to our constitution. he keeps on effectively denouncing, saying he is in some way above the law which he clearly is not so he clearly has to work within the syste m clearly has to work within the system as it is and that includes parliament, the house of commons and the law of the land. it seems from what you are suggesting, there is chaos around plans the prime minister has made but is that, if
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you follow it through, a plan which would involve having talked about a no—deal a lot and that possibility of pushing through with that that if he does come back to parliament with a deal, with the timeframe being so limited, that will get pulled through so in fact talking up no deal will mean something gets through parliament. that is quite a high risk strategy. let's say he comes back with a deal on the 19th. parliament will want an opportunity to look at that and to decide whether it is a good one or not and buried my bluster we had a deal from theresa may, it was rejected the first time she prodded by a large majority and may be the prime minister will come up with something so wonderful that parliament thinks they should accept it but then we have to enact a major piece of primary constitutional legislation withdrawal agreement act in order to implement it and a transitional
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provision. the idea that this is going to be possible to do in a ten days does not seem to me to be reasonable and this is where the bulldozer element comes in. even if the prime minister gets his deal he will have to extend article 50 a nyway will have to extend article 50 anyway and i am sure the eu will agree to do that so we can do this properly. this idea that you can just crash your way through all this is what is contributing in part to the tension between the prime ministerand the tension between the prime minister and the house of commons. one more thing i wanted to ask you and anybody who has been reading the papers, the investigation concerning about the ben act and you were named in that. did you collude with the eu? that is the most astonishing statement i ever read. firstly i did not collude with the eu and secondly numberio has no not collude with the eu and secondly number 10 has no part in launching such an investigation of any kind a nyway such an investigation of any kind anyway so what on earth is going on?
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how can an official in number 10 downing st, are paid civil servant, make such an announcement to a newspaper that leads directly to my getting a death threat when it is based on complete fallacy and secondly, in any case, it is suggesting number 10 has a totalitarian palette that it does not have at all. what is happening to our government that it —— totalitarian power. thus the head of cabinet secretary say this is improper? nothing. this is a sign of real chaos. it really worries me to see the uk government reduced in this way to a propaganda machine spewing nonsense. we will put some of those points to the prime minister. dominic grieve thank you for your time. the prime minister due at 745 but we cannot interrupt
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carol. a bit of rain in the forecast once again. a lot of flood warnings in force. 87 in fact across england and wales and 220 loads. in scotland, one flood warning and three flood alerts and it is because we have had this weather front that has moved northwards, depositing heavy rain across southern scotland, northern england and equally heavy showers coming in across parts of southern england and also wales. these heavy downpours will develop further through the day. meanwhile a rain event starts to slide south. to the north, drier and brighter. event starts to slide south. to the north, drierand brighter. heavy, thundery downpours through the afternoon. the met office has a yellow warning out indicated by those triangles and it is valid until eight o'clock tonight.
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frequent lightning and the risk of localised flooding. between 20 and 50 millimetres, two inches of rain, ina very 50 millimetres, two inches of rain, in a very short amount of time but not all of us will see this. meanwhile, it brightens up across northern england, northern ireland and southern scotland where we currently have the rain. the sun will come out and a cold day with a northerly risk breeze from the north of scotla nd northerly risk breeze from the north of scotland bringing in showers which will be wintry above 900 metres. through the evening and overnight, the weather front continues to slide southwards. we're looking at clear generally and still those showers, wintry in the mountain tops and a cold night. watch how those colours change through the night. the colder colours through the south and those other temperatures in towns and cities, in a rural areas it will be colder with pockets of frost. 1.8, making it the coldest night of this
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autumn so far. tomorrow, starting with a cold note and dry weather around, afairamount with a cold note and dry weather around, a fair amount of sunshine in showers coming in across north of scotla nd showers coming in across north of scotland and driven in on this winter. wintry on the hills and a cool field compared to today. looking at ten in the north. thank you so much and we will keep you up—to—date with all the flood warnings. a treadmill and a large screen might be the key to helping victims of post—traumatic stress disorder, including war veterans, to heal their mental scars. that's according to the researchers behind a new "virtual reality" treatment which has been tested in wales. the bbc‘s tomos morgan went to take a look. at its worst, i...i attempted to take me own life. matt neve joined the raf at 16. two years later he was in iraq, as a driver transporting injured and dead soldiers
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from the conflict. you have all these emotions flowing through you, you know, fear, upset, you know, anxiety and it all can hit you in one wave, ‘cause you don't really know what's going on and that took its toll on me, just seeing that on a daily basis. just a year later and matt was medically discharged. he began having night terrors, flashbacks, drinking heavily and prone to angry outbursts. those symptoms began taking a toll on his family. at the time, i did not know why matt's behaviour was like that because he didn't actually tell me what he had seen or he had been through about eve nbeing in iraq. it made me think, did i particularly want to be with that person, at the time. 12 years later, after speaking to other veterans while competing at the invictus games, matt started looking for his own treatment but nothing helped. we are going to walk back towards that time of your deployment... recently though, he has been taking part in a two—year vr trial
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by cardiff university and cardiff university health board. virtual reality exposure therapy or 3mdr, involves patients walking on a treadmill in front of a large cinema—style screen, showing images of the traumatic experiences they may have witnessed. i see boots on the ground. blood. alongside a concurrent study in the netherlands, this is the only other study in the world looking into using 3mdr to treat ptsd. you're having them thoughts because you're looking at these images which are taking you right back there. and you're back in that place you don't want to be. at times, matt wanted to quit. the risk with this treatment being that relapses could occur, with some not seeing and improvements. with some not seeing any improvements. but two thirds of the a2 veterans with treatment—resistant ptsd saw an average of almost a ao% improvement in symptoms. even with the eveidence available now... and the belief is, that it is notjust veterans
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that could benefit from this treatment. we can see no reason why this could not be applied to individuals with ptsd following other traumatic events as so what we are doing now is applying for funding to do a much larger study across england, scotland and wales to look at its effectiveness in the national health service. 3mdr is the only treatment that has managed to help matt's symptoms. although the night terros remain, his daytime flashbacks have diminished completely and the future is now looking brighter than ever. the recovery journey is still ongoing but on the other hand we have gone away as a family and that is something we would not have done before really so it's just little things like that that will make a difference. very good luck to him with the rest of his recovery. that report by tomos morgan. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: the prime minister borisjohnson will be live on this programme
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injust over 15 minutes. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tarah welsh. a new branch of a virtual gp surgery is opening today in wimbledon. the contraversial gp at hand service, gives people access to a doctor via a mobile phone app — normally by a video call. but it also has seven physical centres in london to help people with complex symptoms. the growing service now has 60,000 patients, but there's been concern about how quickly nhs funding has moved around the system to pay for them. london zoo's conservation charity is helping to double the number of wild tigers on the other side of the world. there are fewer than four thousand tigers left in the wild across asia, but in nepal the numbers are now increasing, from only 121 in 2008 to 235 in 2018. the zoological society of london plans to boost nepal's tiger
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population, with the help of local people there. dartford sprinter adam gemili will take part in the 200 metres final, an the world championships in doha tonight. he had a spectacular win yesterday, cruising home in first place with a seasons best, at 20.03 seconds. my my coach was like, get a good lane and once you are in the final, you have a chance of paddling. i feel good, fit and healthy so no complaints. let's take a look at the travel situation now... on the tubes there are minor delays on the bakerloo line. there are also minor delays on the overground. lots of traffic news in central london this morning. gloucester place is closed because of roadworks from rossmore road to the marlybone road. also, piccadilly underpass remains closed westbound because of gas works. in westminster, there's still no
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access from parliament square to westminster bridge — that's for security works and the bridge is only open to busses and taxis. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's another mild start out there this morning. worth bearing in mind though, this time tomorrow it is going to feel much different. now, for today, heavy thundery showers arriving and the met office has issued a yellow weather warning for heavy rain. slow—moving thundery showers so they are gonig to produce quite a lot of rain in a short space of time. not so many this morning but further through the afternoon, they will be coming thick and fast, producing quite a lot of rain in a short space of time. risk of localised flooding, temperatures though still managing to reach around 19 celsius. overnight or this evening, that rain will sink south. piling in behind it is much cooler air, clear skies and the temperature drops. single figures tonight — four or five celsius in the suburbs. you really will notice the difference in temperature, especially through wednesday.
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plenty of sunshine around tomorrow. a cold, crisp, a real first touch of autumn. and similar conditions at least temperature—wise on thursday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker, at the conservative party conference in manchester, and louise minchin in the studio. in the next few minutes we will have all the details of the sport and all those weather details from carol. good morning to you, thank you very much. with me now is our political correspondent chris mason. if you are just if you arejustjoining us if you are justjoining us this morning, there is quite a bit of discussion about the suggestions of
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what the withdrawal plan changes might look like from boris johnson. for those who are just tuning in, what are those changes? it is around the irish backstop. it is, and there has been this issue around the irish border. how do you keep that border open when it becomes the frontier between the uk and the european union and we have different rules and regulations that usually would require checks on the border. that has been a conundrum for the last three years, certainly for the last couple of years. the plan from the government, we learned last night, is this idea that you could do some of those customs checks away from the border. so you are still checking the stuff that you need to check, but you are not doing it at the border. now, it has been pretty roundly criticised, almost instantaneously, by the irish government saying it was a nonstarter. government sources are saying, well, hang on a minute, this is not a negotiation. these are what is not a negotiation. these are what is known as non— papers, which sounds ludicrous, but it is saying this isn't the final deal, this is the workings of a discussion in private, and maybe we can find some
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kind of accommodation. nonetheless, the reality of it so far is that it hasn't gone down particularly well, so one wonders if the prime minister about to occupy this seat might have something on the other side of his jacket pocket that he can enlighten us jacket pocket that he can enlighten us with. and we were speaking with dominic grieve, who has been here and is no longer an mp, and dominic grieve, who has been here and is no longeran mp, and he dominic grieve, who has been here and is no longer an mp, and he had and is no longer an mp, and he had an interesting take on those discussions on what might happen next. and it matters, of course, because if the prime minister doesn't come back from brussels with a plan, there is a summit in a couple of weeks' time, if he can convince the european unit of the merits of a deal, he has to get it through the house of commons, so people like dominic grieve matter. let's see what he said to us a few minutes ago. the prime minister is fully entitled to put forward ideas to try to resolve the issue of the irish backstop. i must say that, to suggest effectively that you are going to solve a border problem by having the hard border moved ten
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miles back from where the border is on each side, it is, is it not, the creation of a hard border with a no man's land in between. sol creation of a hard border with a no man's land in between. so i am not surprised the irish government may find that difficult. and that is the point being made by dominic grieve, and we will ask the prime minister about that in more detail. it seems that the border would simply be stretched. so if it is not where it is now but it is somewhere else, does that not put pressure on businesses, additional burdens on businesses, additional burdens on businesses, which the european union is keen to avoid? does it leave open the potential for smuggling across the potential for smuggling across the actual border, because there will be no—one manning the actual border. so there is a huge number of questions here, but the government is desperate to try and find a compromise. and justice is desperate to try and find a compromise. andjustice is is desperate to try and find a compromise. and justice is a is desperate to try and find a compromise. andjustice is a big thing on the agenda, with priti patel among those making a speech today. yes, so the home secretary will be on her feet talking about
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tough policies on law and order. and the justice secretary's tough policies on law and order. and thejustice secretary's big plan is that as opposed to people being let out of their present sentences halfway through, those who have been convicted of sexual offences, two—thirds of the sentence would have to be served before someone was eligible to be released. ok, so detail on that throughout the day on the bbc. the prime minister's people are here, i think he is in the building, so we will be back pretty shortly with boris johnson to building, so we will be back pretty shortly with borisjohnson to speak to us about those irish plans and plenty more this morning as well. thank you very much indeed. in the meantime, let's get you up—to—date with the rest of the news. changes aimed at forcing the most serious offenders in england and wales to serve at least two thirds of their prison sentence will be unveiled byjustice secretary robert buckland today. currently inmates can be released at the halfway point of their sentence. the plan, which forms part of a review ordered by the prime minister, will be announced at the conservative party conference,
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which will today address various issues surrounding law and order. eating red meat, sausages and bacon makes little difference to the risk of contracting cancer, according to a new study, which contradicts the advice of most of the world's major health organisations. an international team of experts say the current evidence of the dangers of red and processed meat was very week. the world health organization says the findings undermine sensible eating advice. a series of spectacular events to mark 70 years since the founding of the people's republic of china are taking place in beijing today, but major protests are also expected in hong kong. 15,000 troops filled tiananmen square in central beijing, with the nation's newest military technology on display. tight security is in place in hong kong following four months of demonstrations against chinese rule. president trump's personal lawyer has become the latest target
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of the democrat—led impeachment investigation. rudy giuliani, the former mayor of new york, has been sent a legal demand for documents relating to ukraine. the investigation is seeking to establish whether mr trump asked ukraine's leader to investigate joe biden, his likely rival in next year's presidential election. manufacturers will be forced to make appliances like washing machines and dishwashers easier to repair under new eu rules. from 2021, firms will have to make spare parts available for their white goods, so they can be repaired instead of replaced. consumer groups say manufacturers will still retain a stranglehold on the repair process. sally is here with an update. and overnight we have had an update in the athletics world. we have, and this news has come out overnight about a man you may have heard of, alberto salazar, who was previously
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mo farah's coach. mo farah's former coach alberto salazar has been banned from athletics for four years after being found guilty of doping violations. there has been a four—year investigation by the us anti—doping agency and a two—year court battle behind closed doors. farah left salazar‘s training camp in oregon in 2017, but he denied this was connected to doping claims. salazar has released a statement in the last hour saying he is shocked by the ban and will appeal. manchester united have made their worst start to a season for 30 years, after being held to a 1—1 draw by arsenal at old trafford. it was a pretty grim affair, scott mctominay putting united ahead just before half—time. and var played a part again, overturning an offside decision so pierre—emerick aubameyang's equaliser stood. arsenal are now in the top four, but united are 10th. you wanted to take three points tonight, and we had a great opportunity to get them three points, ‘cause i thought we had
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the game where we wanted. but that‘s sometimes — you know, or how many times this season have we been 1—0 up, and we haven‘t managed to get the second goal. cardiff city have been told they must pay the first instalment of £5.3 million to nantes for striker emiliano sala. sala died in a plane crash in january while travelling from france tojoin his new club. cardiff have argued they were not liable for any of the £15 million fee because sala was not officially their player when he died. scotland‘s head coach, gregor townsend, said their win over samoa in the rugby world cup was a true reflection of what they are capable of. they won 34—0 in kobe to keep their campaign alive, greg laidlaw amongst the try—scorers in a bonus—point victory. their last two pool games are against russia and japan. that was a true reflection of who we are and what we‘re capable of, and what playing for scotland
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means for these players. that was a tough challenge that they had to rise up and face, knowing that if we underperformed tonight we were out of the world cup. and we‘re playing a very dangerous team, so to see the effort, the togetherness, was excellent. a day after winning her first global medal, britain‘s dina asher—smith made it through to the semi—finals of the 200 metres at the world athletics championships in doha. she collected the silver medal she won in sunday‘s 100 metres before taking to the track, and she showed no sign of fatigue, running the fastest time in the heats. the semis take place tonight. adam gemili inisted there is more to come after he ran a season‘s best time to qualify for the men‘s 200 metre final tonight. he was fourth—quickest in the semis. in the big event of the evening, norway‘s karsten warholm took gold in the men‘s 400 metre hurdles. he was the defending champion and many thought the world record
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might be under threat. he just missed it, but he took his unbeaten streak to 14 races. warholm is a bit of a character. this was a very tough race. you know, i actually felt my heart was going to stop, it‘s nojoke. i actually had pain in my chest, thinking, "i am going to die, but it will be worth it". and here i am, world champion, and i am not dead either. which is really quite a relief. it is one of those things, when he was racing, he said he really genuinely did feel chest pains.|j racing, he said he really genuinely did feel chest pains. i worry. we reported yesterday that northern ireland‘sjonathan rea had become the first man to win five world superbikes titles. well, let‘s hearfrom him now. he says it‘ll take a while for it to sink in. i think it‘ll be — you know, when i retire or look back on my career, maybe, that i will realise what i have achieved. but when i start to compare guys i looked up to,
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like fogarty, first to be mentioned in the same breath as him when i was winning some world titles was amazing, and then to surpass four world championships and have five on the bounce is mad. andy murray is playing his first—round match at the china open in beijing. he has a set—up against matteo berrettini. —— he is a set up against matteo berrettini. if he wins, he will face his fellow briton cameron norrie next. dan evans is through to round two, but british number one kyle edmund is out. he was beaten by wildcard player zhizhen zhang, his fifth straight defeat. edumund hasn‘t won a match since beating nick kyrgios in august, and he recently split from his coach. novak djokovic returns to tennis this week at the japan open. we‘ve see rugby players from all over the world embracing the japanese culture. well, here is djokovic getting involved in some sumo wrestling.
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do you think he is really trying there? if you remember, he pulled out of the us open last month with a bad shoulder. i think he is going a little bit easy there. but he is very good at everything. the national living wage is set to rise to £10.50 within the next five years. ben is taking a look at what that means for workers and employers. it is really important to talk about this. this is about tackling low pay, and there is often confusion between the minimum wage and the living wage. if you are under 25, the minimum wage applies, and there are various rates depending exactly how old you are, or if you‘re on an apprenticeship. that is legally enforceable, you have to pay that. it‘s set by the government with help
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from the low pay commission, made up of employers, trade union leaders and academics. but what we‘re talking about today is the living wage. that applies if you‘re over 25. it‘s currently £8.21 an hour. it was introduced in 2016, and is more of a guideline than a legally enforceable rule. advice to employers about what they might want to pay their staff, and it is higher than the minimum wage. but a,000 businesses have already promised to pay it. yesterday at the conservative party conference in manchester, the chancellor, sajid javid, set a target to raise the national living wage to £10.50 within the next five years. he also said he would lower the age threshold for those who qualify from 25 to 21. labour also pledged to do something similar earlier this year. quite a significant increase from people going from £8.21 to £10.50. what difference could this make?
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well, on average, it‘s thought people will be £1,400 a year better off. so staff will be better off, but of course that is a cost to business as well. and it could affect up to a million workers, particularly those working in the lowest—paid jobs like hospitality and retail. they are the ones that stand to benefit most. and remember, if the lowest—paid get a boost, it often means others, those further up the chain, so their supervisors for example, might also get a rise to keep it all in line. business well really worried when it was introduced in 2016 that it would mean employers would put off hiring new staff or fire staff because they simply couldn‘t afford it. according to the low pay commission, that never happened. it meant employees were being paid a proper rate, and this time they are saying hang fire, leave it all alone and let the low pay commission decide what the best rate is.
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good morning to you and welcome to bbc breakfast and the conservative party conference. if you look at the banners, "get brexit done" is what they are all saying and that is what they are all saying and that is what the prime minister borisjohnson has been saying for quite some time. despite an increasingly parliamentary opposition unified against him and allegations against him. a new proposal now for a hard border in ireland. we have plenty of time to talk about some of these changes to the withdrawal agreement and other things as well. it seems the proposals we hearing this morning with regards to the irish border have not only down badly in ireland but also in brussels. first
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of all, actually, as far as i can make out from what i have seen with the response from brussels and i think dublin, they are not talking about the proposals we are going to be pending but some stuff that went into previously... what are the proposals? but clearly this is the moment when the rubber hits the road. the difficulty really is going to be around the customs union and to be around the customs union and to what extent northern ireland can be retained within eu bodies at all and we have made a very good offer, we will be making a very good offer and tabling it very soon but there isa and tabling it very soon but there is a difficulty, if you try to keep northern ireland anything customs union because one of the basic things about being a country is you have a single customs... in
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fairness, we have been aware of that problem for an awfully long time. this customs clearance zones is that pa rt this customs clearance zones is that part of the plan? no, it is not. with great respect, we‘re going to be producing now the proposals that we will be tabling in brussels because what you have just recited is an example of the kind of ways this thing can get confused and people can get... needlessly distort what we are proposing. and event negotiations can become more difficult. we do think there is a way forward and a good solution and i very much hope that our european friends in brussels, in dublin, in germany as well, will want to move forward. do you know the three conditions with regards to the irish
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border? i do, of course. they either should be no checks on the border, the unity the single market should be respect and the anglo irish good friday peace process should be promoted and respected and that is what we‘re going to do and you can all three of those things while withdrawing the uk whole and entire from the eu and that is what we‘re going to do we do have a solution and there is a very good way forward but what is required now is i think for everybody to come together, to look at it and to think, how can we best progress this for people, for businesses, for communities on both sides of the border and for the whole of the uk economy? and our solution i think we‘ll do all that. you are still not giving us any detail about that solution. when we
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spoke to the brussels respondent, he said they are saying we are waiting for something to change. we had a lot from david frost over the last few weeks and they say unless you have a rabbit pulled out of the hat today or in your speech at the conference tomorrow. . . today or in your speech at the conference tomorrow... hang on, ifi may say so, the uk government has made a considerable offer already and we are saying about the arrangements, we are already accepting that you could have, in the famous words attributed to ian paisley the older, you could have a situation where in northern ireland the people are british but the cattle are irish. that is a big concession by the uk government because, after all, what it means is that, for all those areas and it
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cove rs a that, for all those areas and it covers a great deal of trade north south of the body, the decisions on sanitary rules would still be taken in brussels but with no sake with the uk, with dublin participating in the uk, with dublin participating in the conversations. it is a considerable advance and what you would do by the sanitary area or zone, you would allow the movement of cattle easily across the border and also holds of goods and so a huge proportion of the trade... you wa nted huge proportion of the trade... you wanted some details... you're talking about cattle knowing full well... we could talk about cheese, all manner of things that make you wa nt to all manner of things that make you want to talk about other things. the irish issue is one part of it. what other things will you be changing?
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some are saying it is theresa may with a blonde haircut. the reason why you‘re getting news from your correspondent in brussels that they do not feel it is acceptable is because what we wanted to do is to get rid of the backstop and that is the most important thing... that is the most important thing... that is the only change? changes to the political declaration as well, which sets up the future of the relationship between the uk and the eu by getting we have the backstop is fantastic because it enables the uk genuinely to take back control of our regulatory framework, of out tariffs, of our customs and commercial policies and it allows us to go forward with a new and exciting relationship, notjust with the eu, but also with the rest of the eu, but also with the rest of the world and that is what we want to do. that is one of the major
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points of brexit. there is no point in doing exit if you stay locked in the customs unit and the single market with no say in the constitutions. —— brexit. that was basically what the existing withdrawal agreement... hang on... what the withdrawal agreement committed this country of doing. it is essential to come out of the backstop. you keep saying we're going to get this but the response from brussels and ireland, you need agreement on that otherwise nothing happens and you keep saying we‘re going to get it done, going to get it done but i keep asking you with what is the difference between theresa may‘s the deal and you spent cattle and throw cheese into the mix. what i was saying now is the most important thing is we must out
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of the so—called backstop arrangement which keeps the uk locked in brussels‘s customs union, commercial trade policy and regulatory... all the laws that come from brussels under the backstop, we would have to accept but without any say in the making of those laws. what we‘re doing abolishing the backstop is coming out, taking the freedoms so vital for brexit. that is the objective. this is the crucial thing, i think that, actually, we can do this without european friends and partners, with dublin, ina european friends and partners, with dublin, in a way that protects the good fryman agreement, that protects against that island has one from the single european market and allows the union of the united kingdom of britain and northern ireland. ——
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ireland. a lot are talking about the potential changes and a lot are talking about your private life. you have made a point of not talking about this... you must not be surprised if i continue with that line. you are the prime minister, you hold the top office in the country so your demeanour, and language both past and present are under scrutiny. what you have to say about those allegations regarding charlotte edwardes?” about those allegations regarding charlotte edwardes? i have said all i want to say about those things but what i do want to say is that obviously people are entitled... this is a difficult time and people are thinking for the country in the sense that brexit is about to be done and a lot of people... quite a few people do not want brexit to be done and rightly or wrongly they conceived of me as the person to deliver brexit and it is inevitable
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that i come under a certain amount of shot and shell and i do not mind that in the least. the allegations from charlotte edwardes 20 years ago? they are not true. i... by comparison with what we‘re doing, which is taking forward a very dynamic domestic agenda, they are frankly... you know, i have said what you have to say about this but what you have to say about this but what we need to do, if i may say so, is concentrate on a fantastic, progressive domestic agenda... and i understand that... particularly what we‘re doing on lope... understand that... particularly what we're doing on lope... with... with the greatest respect, i know there
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are other things you want to talk about but i want to come back to this. do you think that behaviour is appropriate? it is not true. but generally? yes, of course. i do not wa nt to generally? yes, of course. i do not want to be... that is all i can say about it. more generally, you say this is not relevant and you‘re trying to get brexit done. but you hold this top office, do you not think all the things that go alongside being a prime minister, linked to the issue of trust, these are things... of course, you are right. building towards a general election, people will take those things seriously... i am trying to tell you about the specific allegation that you made is not true and what i want to talk about is the domestic agenda which i think is very exciting and very creative and,
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when you look at what we are proposing, for instance on low pay, to expand the bus network, i think it is very, very exciting. i do not wa nt to it is very, very exciting. i do not want to minimise the importance of such allegations, if they were true... if you see what i mean. i am not minimising the significance of this as an issue... and you have said that but do you think people trust you? look at what we do. look at what we do. when i stood on the steps of street, i said we would recruit police officers and we are recruiting 20,000 police officers. a big period of investment in the nhs and we are now going through the biggest upgrades of hospitals, the biggest upgrades of hospitals, the biggest hospital building programme ina biggest hospital building programme in a generation. in ten years‘ time asa in a generation. in ten years‘ time as a result of the action this government is taking now, there are going to be 40 new hospitals, including one here in manchester and
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thatis including one here in manchester and that is a very exciting. we‘re going be rolling out... every time i open my mouth to speak... it is true. we are going to be rolling out broadband across the country... all these are policy announcements we had yesterday and more today and we have spoken about what priti patel will be talking about in terms of sentencing. you have dreamt of being a minister your whole life. did you expect the scrutiny you have been under and has any element of the job surprised you? under and has any element of the job surprised you ? it under and has any element of the job surprised you? it has been a wonderful time... surprised you? it has been a wonderfultime... genuinely, it has been a wonderful time?! wonderfultime... genuinely, it has been a wonderful time? !|j wonderfultime... genuinely, it has been a wonderful time?! i have wonderfultime... genuinely, it has been a wonderfultime?! i have been asked to serve the british people in this way and it is all encompassing an aggressive but what excites me and interest me is doing things like tackling low pay and pay has been too low in this country for too long
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and people have not seen the pay rises they deserve but what we‘re doing now is putting £4000 into the pockets of people on the living wage, putting it up and i can tell you, when i was mayor of london, we massively expanded the living wage and it is a fantastic thing notjust for the people who fit from it but also for the companies that pay it because what happens is, actually, they find that employees, if they are better paid, they are more committed to theirjob, they have less stuff turnover, there hr costs actually go down in some cases and thatis actually go down in some cases and that is a wonderful thing. i have absolutely no issue with talking about the things that i think matter to the people of this country and i do not want to minimise the importance in any way of the kind of stuff you‘re talking about. yes, i get it. yes, this kind of thing would be very important if true but as it happens it is not true and
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what i need to focus on are the issues that matter to the people of the uk and that is what i am going to do so when it comes to the conference agenda, one of the issues is, we have been announcing so many things that frankly it has been hard for people to keep up... too much... the hospital upgrades alone is a fantastic thing. the nhs, what we‘re doing with buses is superb. i am a bus fanatic, i love buses and when i was running transport for london, we used to say, there is barely a transport problem you cannot solve with a single backup bus. we will expand the bus depots. we talked about this yesterday, we have headlines to get to. if you put co nta ctless have headlines to get to. if you put contactless payment on all buses, you would drive up the amount of
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riders. if you had clean, green buses like we will have, you will reduce emissions and pollution. wonderful bus news, prime minister. frankie very much for your time this morning. —— thank you very much. let us morning. —— thank you very much. let us know what you thought about that, we will have assessment on that, and we will have assessment on that, and we will have the headlines in just a moment. good morning, welcome to breakfast, live from
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the conserative party conference in manchester, with dan walker. louise‘s back in the studio this as well. our headlines today: plans to avoid a hard irish border — government sources say a new brexit proposal is just days away and that its preparing to put it to the eu. but speaking on breakfast, boris johnson denies plans for new border controls. we will get analysis on that interview shortly on bbc breakfast. in other news, is red meat back on the menu? new research suggests cutting down on sausages and steak might be a waste of time for most people. the right to repair — manufacturers will be forced to make appliances like washing machines and dishwashers easier to repair under new eu rules. mo farah‘s former coach alberto salazar is found guilty of doping violations and banned forfour years — he says he‘s shocked and will appeal.
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good morning, some heavy, thundery downpours for england and wales which could lead to localised flooding in places. rainbow clear for scotland and northern ireland, you will see some sunshine. —— the rain will clear. i will have more later. it‘s tuesday, 1st october. if you had just turned on your tv, where on have you been? we were a bit late for the headlines but we have been speaking to the prime minister exclusively. our political correspondent chris mason is here. there has been discussion about potential changes with regards to the irish backstop on the withdrawal agreement, what did you make about the minister said? there was not a vast amount of detail, what we have heard overnight, the ideas you could have checks for customs away from the border so that the border between northern ireland and the
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republic remains open, but there are still the necessary checks because the uk and eu will follow different rules after brexit and the irish border will be the frontier between the two, he effectively said that what you are hearing bubbling out of ireland and brussels, we have 38 on the table but it is not the same thing we will put on the table in a couple of days. the sense when you speak to people around the prime minister is they see this as a hostile act rather than an opponent, if you like, engaged in negotiation that they are willing to be open and honest about in trying to get to a deal, so there is frustration about how this has emerged. there is a real sense from the prime minister that time is short. it is now october, we are due to be leaving at the end of the month. he spoke about his love of buses, he started the conversation with a motoring analogy as well. as far as i can make out
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from what i have seen from the response from brussels and, i think, dublin, they are not talking about the proposals, they are talking about some stuff that went in previously. what are the proposals? clearly this is the moment when the rubber hits the road and it is where the hard yards are in the course of the hard yards are in the course of the negotiations. that was some of what the prime minister was saying. he spoke a lot about policy and what they are trying to get through. he was asked a lot of questions about trust and those allegations in the papers again this morning. he is quite adamant that his private life is private and, yes, he feels that behaviour is wrong and denies again that he did that, but he also acknowledges that personality and demeanour and behaviour are important for somebody holding his office. i thought what was quite striking was his candour around that. because his character and
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demeanour is so often one of bonner me and being a sentence away from cracking a joke, talking about but or cows or whatever, when you probe tip about the very serious allegations that he has denied, but talking about broader themes that have been so much part of the national conversation, he pointedly came back and said, i get that is the kind of thing that cannot be easily dismissed as insignificant, even though the specific instance, he has said, did not happen. so i think he is conscious of the potential of being seen as being flippant of something in the round away from that specific allegation which really matters and is serious. thanks, chris. we will be getting more analysis in just a few moments on bbc breakfast, but first louise has the rest of the day‘s news. eating red meat, sausages and bacon makes little difference to the risk of contracting cancer, according to a new study,
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which contradicts the advice of most of the world‘s major health organisations. here‘s our medical correspondent fergus walsh. there have been repeated studies linking red and especially processed meat with heart disease and cancer. the current guidance from the government advises people to eat no more than 70g of red and processed meat a day, equivalent to two rashers of bacon or 1.5 pork sausages. here‘s our medical correspondent fergus walsh. —— now, a team of international experts has reviewed existing data and found only weak evidence that it is worth trying to cut back. it is worth stressing that they did not find there was no evidence of harm, but simply that it was very weak. the argument here is not so much about the evidence, but how it is interpreted. there‘s agreement on the evidence linking processed meat to cancer risk. it‘s a small effect, but it is there. what‘s different here is that the researchers are recommending that it doesn‘t matter that much on an individual level.
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it doesn‘t matter that much on an individual level, but when you look at it across a lot of people, those effects can really add up. in 2015, the world health organization said eating 50g of processed meat a day, less than two slices of bacon, increased the chances of getting bowel cancer by 18%. in the uk, six out of every 100 people will get bowel cancer at some point. if we all ate an extra 50g of bacon a day for the rest of our lives, one more person per 100 would get bowel cancer. so cutting back on the amount of bacon or burgers you eat may make very little difference to your individual risk of getting bowel cancer, but across a whole population, it could mean preventing thousands of cases per year. fergus walsh, bbc news. a series of spectacular events to mark 70 years since the founding of the people‘s republic of china are taking place in beijing today, but major protests are also
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expected in hong kong. any moment, we will speak to stephen in hong kong. our correspondent, robin brant, joins us from now from beijing. robin, the images coming out of china are spectacular, what message are the authorities trying to send? china‘s ruling communist party do not do things by halves with the significant birthday celebrations, 70 years to the day since the founding of the people‘s republic of china and what we had seen as a sizeable parade, 15,000 military personnel, dozens of aircraft, hundreds of pieces of military hardware on display, all parading through tiananmen square. present xi jingping, no longer hindered by limits on his term in office, gave a brief speech speaking about unity, struggle and a kind of inexorable progress of china, something that no force can stop. leading into this,
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military leaders have said this is not about the country flexing its muscles but it was very much a military display dominated by the military, we saw new nuclear systems on display, new hypersonic drones. there are challenges for the country, a slowing economy, issues with the trade war with the united states. it is pretty smoggy this morning, it was smoggy and tiananmen square as well and this is a reminder of the industrial progress over the past seven decades but also the pollution, a consequence of that which persists. thank you, robin. the scenes in beijing could not contrast more greatly with what is going in hong kong, stephen?m contrast more greatly with what is going in hong kong, stephen? in an act of mass civil disobedience, protesters in their tens of thousands have marched through the streets of hong kong, defying warnings from the authorities not to turn out. there are scenes like this all over the city. the reason people had stopped now, there is a sign
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upon this building marking officially 70 years since the communist party came to power. somebody is trying to rip it down with a large poll, that is why people have stopped and are watching, waiting for the pole to pull it down. this is an attempt by protesters in hong kong to upstage the march in beijing. the chinese government want this to be everything celebrating the achievements of seven decades of communist party power in china, and these activists have a different message, they are trying to use the occasion to draw attention to their cause for democratic reform here. we could well see more... well, violent scenes later today, we have already had tear gas and rubber bullets fired in other parts of the city. stephen mcdonell in hong kong, thank you.
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manufacturers will be forced to make appliances like washing machines and dishwashers easier to repair under new eu rules. ben‘s here to tell us more. it is problematic, something happens and it is difficult to get repairs? most of the time you can‘t even get to the thing that needs repairing and it is so much hassle you just end up thinking it is easier to buy a new one. these are new eu rules that will come into full from 2021, i will talk about the brexit element of that in a second, but it will basically mean firms need to make appliances much longer lasting and they will be forced to offer spare parts for up to ten years, so this applies to lighting, washing machines, dishwashers and fridges. all well and good so far, but critics have already said this does not quite work because it only applies to professionals who would be repairing them, getting someone to repair the machine, not if the likes of you only wanted to fix it. that is related to warranties and
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guarantees and if we try to do it we might runa guarantees and if we try to do it we might run a risk of electrocuting ourselves all causing more problems, but it means firms will have to make the spare parts, seals, washers and all those things, and they had to be accessible and you need to be able to get at them with normal tools, not special tools. the brexit element is important, these are eu rules that will come into force in 2021, therefore, we are led to believe we will not be a member of the european union then that manufacturers will be making them for the european market, if british manufacturers want to sell to europe they will have to obey these will so, chances are, the rules will still apply. very interesting, ben thank —— ben, thank you. an iceberg large enough to fit 250,000 football pitches onto its surface, has broken away from the antarctic ice shelf. it‘s the biggest iceberg to break off in two years and is slightly smaller than the isle of skye.
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its size means it could pose a hazard to shipping, so scientists will track its movement, but they stress it has nothing to do with climate change. it is exactly quarter past eight. tan has been speaking to the prime minister, and you will get some analysis? good morning, louise. welcome back to the conservative party conference in manchester. we we re party conference in manchester. we were speaking to the prime minister for a good 15 minutes also from 7:45am onwards, we will play out a large chunk afterwards. here to help us analyse what borisjohnson said and how he said it, are two politicaljournalists. sonia sodha is from the observer and camilla tominey is from the telegraph. i know you have been enjoying the conservative party conference, listening into what the prime minister said. what was the overriding feeling, interestingly, what he said about the irish backstop, it seems the plant we were hearing about are not the plans. indeed, andi hearing about are not the plans. indeed, and i think he wants to unveil more plans tomorrow and not show his cards too early because he
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needs to face off the eu 27 at the summit in october. you are trying to pin him down on the details, we have already had crosby take —— cross briefings suggesting some of the detail is wrong and we are in the negotiation game, anything coming out of brussels seems to be no, no. with 30 days to go until brexit day, the landing strip for him to get a deal seems to get narrower and narrower. you are pushing him hard, asking for the solution. he was keen to say what it wasn't an dismissal talk of centres away from the border. he was not able to say what his plan was. he might be waiting to unveil edge, but at the same time this is a serious international negotiation, it is notjust the viewers at home who do not know his plan, the eu do not know. the eu
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would have expected to see something more concrete on the brussels site, the prime minister keep saying he has a magic solution to the irish backstop. these papers leaked last night, solutions put forward in the la st night, solutions put forward in the last couple of weeks, they are exactly what theresa may spoke about two years ago, which was rejected. that was my accusation, this is theresa may‘s deal with a blonde haircut. dominic grieve was answering that question, in talking up answering that question, in talking upa no answering that question, in talking up a no deal on october 31 and keep mentioning that in keeping that in the game, if you can come back with any deal to parliament you can maybe get it through. is it a case of any deal will do? there is a sense that a number of mps, deal will do? there is a sense that a number of mp5, for then it is no longer hard or soft brexit but hard or easy, how can we get this to happen so we can move on with our lives and hopefully when i next
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general election site this is a risky strategy, steve baker was on radio four, he was saying we will not be voting for theresa may‘s deal with a blonde wig. there were a number of conservative brexiteers for whom the backstop was one of the concerns. with 30 days to go, can boris johnson package this deal in a way that will appeal to the public under the mp5. if it is voted on, i think it will be a five to ten np margin. does it appeal to labour mps? that isa does it appeal to labour mps? that is a really big question, and after the rancorous scenes in parliament this week, is borisjohnson's strategy is really to get a deal through and win over labour mps and support, last week it did not seem
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like he was in that mode and it makes it more difficult for labour mps to swing behind a deal, given some of the scenes we saw in parliament. the other big issue is the allegations, we asked him about that and we will play some of that interview. i had said what i will say about that. they are not true. it is obviously very sad somebody should make such allegations, they are not true. i think, should make such allegations, they are not true. ithink, really, by comparison with what we are doing, which is taking forward a very dynamic domestic agenda, they are, frankly... i had said what i have to say about this. if i may say so, we need to concentrate on a fantastic, progressive, domestic agenda. that has been his line, the allegations are there, i deny then, it did not
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happen, cani are there, i deny then, it did not happen, can i talk about my domestic agenda? but when i pressed and he conceded there is a trust issue and to understand the importance. conceded there is a trust issue and to understand the importancelj to understand the importance.” think that it's right and i think there has been a lot of debate about how much these sorts of allegations will really affect boris johnson. how much these sorts of allegations will really affect borisjohnson. i think if you look at his core voters, perhaps they think of boris johnson as somebody who is the sort of character, may it won't effect on too much, but i think if he wants to wina too much, but i think if he wants to win a majority in a general election, he has to appeal to people who might not naturally go for him as prime minister, that is young people and women, his ratings are terrible with women, conservatives are not doing very well with young people and i think these allegations tuckin people and i think these allegations tuck in the interview he looked very uncomfortable when you pressed, he wanted to move straight onto his domestic policy agenda and it looked to me that he was dismissing moving on. i disagree with that, i think he looked quite relaxed, which
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surprised me. previously he has never commented on anything private, the tide turns earlier this week when his spokesman briefed journalists, which is the change, saying we will comment on this and nih, which has seen a to—and—fro on twitter. —— we will comment on this and deny it. he seemed fairly relaxed, which i felt quite surprising. secondly, while i take your point about how that will be viewed by women and younger people, i have spoken to some, notjust delegates at this conference button box pops, i have asked, how much do you care about some of these allegations? leavers double down, they are throwing everything at him, they are throwing everything at him, the law against him, pardon the pun, it is below the belt, they would say. so i think it attracts mixed reactions. if we ever get to a general election it would be fascinating to see how these things play out. thank you, camilla and
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sonia. here‘s carol with a look at this morning‘s weather. we area we are a bit late, carol, apologies. no problem at all, good morning. this is the flooding in york and the environment agency has lots of flood warnings and alerts. we are updated regularly, if you go on the website you will see what i‘m talking about, further heavy downpours exacerbating the situation. a weather front has gone north through the night, it will slip southwards and you can see lots of sundry examples developing ahead of eight through many parts of england and wales. as the band of rain producing heavy rain at the moment slips south, it will fragment, but in scotland we are looking at a dry start with a future was in the far north and a brisk breeze. the met office has a yellow weather warning, the lowest level of warning, valid until 80 m, 40 men
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shall downpours, as much as 40 to 50 millimetres, getting on for two inches. —— valid until 8pm, for torrential downpours. it will brighten up across northern england, northern ireland and southern scotla nd northern ireland and southern scotland later, but a wet stop. some sunshine coming through, a brisk northerly wind bringing in showers, snow in some areas. the weather front pushes southwards as a weak feature, bringing cloud and showers onto the near continent to the channel islands. later we have lots of clear skies, the lighter showers push further south, indicating lower temperatures. these temperatures are what you can expect intense in cities, closer to freezing in rural areas, so pockets of frost. under the clear skies, there will be lots of sunshine around tomorrow. still
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showers on the brisk northerly breeze, still falling as snow on the mountaintops of the grampians and highlands and temperatures 11 to about 15, still feeling cooler. if you were watching yesterday you would have heard me talk about hurricane lorenzo, it is a weakening feature in the atlantic at the moment. we think it will move to the west of the uk and on thursday and friday it will bring us some wet and windy weather from the west. because it isa windy weather from the west. because it is a tropical feature we are looking at temperatures starting to climb once again. all topsy-turvy. studio: it really is. thank you. most people who donate blood will never know who has received it. but, in a bid to increase blood donations within the black community, breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin was given the chance to introduce one donor to the recipient of her life—saving gift. the result was rather special. take a look.
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this is salome. and this is zamzam. they‘ve never met before, but one owes her life to the other. my name is salome. i have sickle—cell disease, which is a degenerative disorder. without blood transfusions, life is so hard. i'm zamzam, i am from manchester and i donate as often as i can. i'm, what, in and out within 45 minutes and then continue with the rest of my day, and potentially helping somebody else's life, really. potentially life—saving. yeah. but where zamzam‘s gift of blood has ended up has always been a bit of a vague concept. until now. thanks to the blood service, we‘ve been able to track down gift giver with gift receiver, and salome knows that gift keeps her alive because,
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without transfusions, her own mother died aged 24. life looked terrible, and i knew the clock was ticking. i knew it. you are about to meet a woman who has your blood coursing through her veins. i'm very nervous about that. zamzam, i just found out you are there, you gave me your blood. oh, i thought that was her. you are all heroes, the unsung heroes, the heroes we don‘t see in uniforms. the god—sent angels. hello! you are zamzam? my children made you a card. 0h... a thank you card. "thank you for saving our mother. "thank you from the bottom of my heart." because of that blood, i‘ve managed to live to see them reach that age. my daughter is 12 today and i didn‘t
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know it would happen, you know? i can‘t thank people enough. although the overall need for donors has decreased with medical advances like keyhole surgery, there is a desperate shortage of donors from within the black community. my name is lynne, i'm the clinical donor centre manager at the leeds city donor centre. what we used to do was give the patients top up donations but, really, all the recent evidence and all the clinical trials have demonstrated that the best treatment and best outcomes comes from a full transfusion, a full exchange transfusion. salome needs that every six weeks to avoid pain, a stroke, organ failure, even death. the ro blood she desperately needs, which is common within the black community, was only available on 55% of the times it was required this year. whoever can donate, please go and donate. whoever has donated, thank you so much, you are a life—saver.
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thank you. i want to cry. what a wonderful piece, with a clear message. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. last night we saw heavy rain moving northwards across the uk. it means there has been a lot of water on the roads and the number of flood warnings already in force and the number of downpours today, that number could change. rain across central and southern scotland, northern england, easing off slightly. further south we have heavy and thundery showers in mid
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and south wales, the midlands and the number of met office warning is in force because with frequent lightning and torrential downpours, there could be some localised flash flooding. further north across northern ireland and scotland, wintry sunshine and showers over the high ground of northern scotland. temperatures here ten to 12 degrees. not as chilly further south. through this evening there are clear away, clear skies means it is a chilly start to wednesday morning but plenty of sunshine and a colder day. goodbye.
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this is business live from bbc news with ben bland and alice baxter. from financial minnow to an economic powerhouse, as china marks its 70th birthday we ask what the future holds for the engin of global growth. live from london, that‘s our top story on tuesday 1st of october. people‘s republic of china is now 70 years old but can the asian powerhouse stay ahead of the pack with slowing growth

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