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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  October 1, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at two... the worst violence in four months — police clash with protestors in hong kong as china celebrates 70 years of communist rule. if you look at this amount of tear gas that is being fired all through the streets here, moving up there to where the police are. itjust gives you an idea of how things are escalating today. irish scepticism — as borisjohnson says the uk is preparing to make a "very good offer" to the eu about how to deal with the border after brexit". i think that we will be making a very good offer and clearly i have seen some briefing already — i don't know where it came from, possibly from brussels — which is not quite right.
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sir mo farah‘s former coach alberto salazar has been given a four—year ban from athletics, after being found guilty of doping violations. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. that is with jane dougal. we hope will have all the details on the fast developing story on mo farah‘s former coach has been given a foul year ban from athletics. mo farah has never failed a year ban from athletics. mo farah has neverfailed a drug year ban from athletics. mo farah has never failed a drug test and that he has no tolerance for anyone that he has no tolerance for anyone that breaks the rules. thanks, jane. it is lively out there, darren, we will have a look at the flooding on the isle of man, the rain will ease off but there is a high tide along the east coast at the moment. tomorrow looks drier everywhere, but there is an old hurricane going close by towards the end of the week. thank you, darren. also coming up — is red meat back on the menu? the controversial study that says cutting down on sausage, mince, steak and other forms of red or processed meat could be a waste
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of time for most people. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. iam simon i am simon mccoy. there have been violent clashes in hong kong between police and protestors as china celebrates the 70th anniversary of communist rule. one protestor has been shot in the chest with live ammunition and at least 15 people are in hospital. thousands of demonstrators took to the streets in defiance of a ban on protests and were met with police firing tear gas and live rounds. the demonstrations took place as the chinese government staged a huge military parade in beijing. a warning that this report from our diplomatic correspondent, paul adams, contains scenes some viewers might find upsetting. one anniversary, two reactions. while beijing celebrated, hong kong was once again full of defiance.
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it began peacefully enough, protesters filling the streets to mark what they see as a black day, rejecting the communist party and its leadership. appealing to the international community to support their calls for democracy. official slogans were torn down. set alight. organisers have called this a day of grief. gunshots it was a day of violence too and rage — among the worst so far. all over the city, hardcore protesters confronted the police. the response — volleys of tear gas and rubber bullets. one clash outside government offices witnessed by bbc correspondent stephen mcdonell. they're moving up the stairs to try and reach where the police are.
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charging forward. the protesters are hoping that they have the numbers, but the police are continually firing at them, round after round of rubber bullets and tear gas. and now the protesters are retreating. there's been too many rubber bullets fired, too much tear gas. and there was worse — in the market town of tsuen wan, a policeman pulled out a pistol and shot an 18—year—old protester at point—blank range. it's thought to be the first time live ammunition has been used in this way. the protester is now in hospital in critical condition. this was always going to be a day of high emotion, but as the authorities in beijing spoke of peaceful reunification, the reality on the streets of hong kong was very different.
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let's go to hong kong now where those renewed protests by pro—democracy demonstrators have been taking place. our correspondent there is stephen mcdonell. the concern must be that as it appears at the moment to be a stand—off, that at some point the patience of one side is going to snap. clashes are still continuing here, we are into sunday night, this is the causeway bay shopping district, people who have visited here will know it and a little while ago, the riot police were here and protest still are, they left because they are fighting on so many fronts at the moment and on the kowloon side, it seems to be where the most serious clashes have just erupted. you mentioned... where it could lead. it has just been up
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you mentioned... where it could lead. it hasjust been up on you mentioned... where it could lead. it has just been up on both sides and we saw the activist shot in the chest, we have been waiting for the possibility that someone would be shot with a live round, it is nearly happen several times and today we finally saw it. i am not sure what impact it will have on demonstrators, the more of hardline activists, rather than making their more wary, it may make them more angry and some may want to escalate further. we have seen many scenes of violence today, fires in the street, barricades on the entrance to a underground train station on fire, and the response from the authorities has been tear gas, water cannons, rubber bullets and they have been ruthlessly efficient in their pursuit of the activists, they have raced in quickly, pinned them to the ground and we have seen them grabbing protesters by the dozen and this is an attempt by the authorities to limit the extent to
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which hong kong protesters could upstage beijing and because my big party, because that is the point. tens of thousands of people turned out in defiance of warnings that they should not gather first up they wa nted they should not gather first up they wanted this to be a day of calling for democratic reforms rather than celebrating the achievements of china under the communist party. whether they have achieved that are not well be for others to judge. but certainly we have seen another dramatic escalation and the crisis now and its fourth month is showing now and its fourth month is showing no sign of petering out. thank you very much for that update. in a speech in beijing to mark 70 years since the chinese communist party took control, president xi jinping said no force could stop china's onward march. crowds cheered as thousands of soldiers marched through tiananmen square in a display of military might. robin brant sent this report from the capital. for big birthdays, china's ruling
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communist party doesn't do things by halves. lined up perfectly and ready to go, 15,000 military personnel prepare to parade past the country's top political leaders. president xi, unhindered by limits on his term in office, took centre stage. beside him, two predecessors, one of them so old and frail now that he needed help to his seat. looking on too, the country's most senior party officials, all of them men. surprise, surprise, security is very tight here ahead of the parade. the police just moving a few people down from the main thoroughfare, where we will see the tanks later. make no mistake, china does want the world to look in at this event. the military leadership have said this is not about the show of force, but this is definitely about china showing off on its 70th birthday about how far it has come. translation: it was today 70 years
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ago that chairman mao stood at this very place and announced solemnly the founding of the people's republic of china. before today, military leaders said it wasn't supposed to be a flexing of muscle. but make no mistake, this was, more than anything, a military display by a nation that after 70 years is once again taking its place at the top table. borisjohnson has said there will need to be customs checks on the island of ireland after the uk leaves the eu. in an interview with the bbc, the prime minister denied suggestions this would mean a series of customs posts set five or ten miles back from the border. the government has said it will publish details of a new brexit plan in the coming days, but the eu has always insisted it will not agree to new customs checks in ireland, and time is running out to find an agreement. our political correspondent, chris mason, reports from the conservative party conference in manchester.
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a morning with the media for the prime minister looks something like this. cameras everywhere — even stylistic help on offer. but after the comb, a quick ruffle of the hair. and straightaway, to the crux of the brexit conundrum — keeping the irish border open when the uk and ireland are following different rules after brexit. the difficulty really is going to be around the customs union and to what extent northern ireland can be retained within eu bodies at all. and we have made a very good offer, we are going to make a very good offer, we are going to be tabling it formally very soon. there is a difficulty if you try to keep northern ireland in the customs union. because one of the basic things about being a country is you have a single customs... with... 7 the prime minister accepts the reality, as he puts it, of custom cheques being necessary
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on the island of ireland after brexit, but is still not providing details of how he thinks this could happen in a way that doesn't amount to moving the border somewhere else. but borisjohnson says he is compromising, with agriculture in northern ireland effectively being regulated by the european union. the uk government has already made a very considerable offer, and if you look at what we are saying on the sanitary and phytosanitary arrangements, that is that we are already accepting that you could have, in the famous words attributed to ian paisley the elder, you could have a situation where it is, as it were, in northern ireland, the people are british but the cattle are irish. and that is a big concession by the uk government. the government says an earlier idea it had submitted to brussels, a so—called non—paper, which suggested customs clearance zones in ireland or in northern ireland, is not the same as the legal text that they are going to submit in the next few days.
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but there is a sense that there are some in these negotiations who are just desperate to trash anything the uk suggests. who could they be thinking of? well, here was the irish deputy prime minister last night. nothing cryptic about his view on this floated idea. so what happens if there isn't a deal? mrjohnson later suggested that if the eu delayed exit again against the government's will, it would regret it. i wish you all the very best. brexit is due to happen, remember, at the end of this month. how it happens and whether it happens remains farfrom clear. our chief political correspondent vicki young is at the conservative party conference in manchester. these uk proposals, it is not exactly going well so far, is it? it is difficult because no one has
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seen them so we it is difficult because no one has seen them so we are it is difficult because no one has seen them so we are as ever it is difficult because no one has seen them so we are as ever in this brexit are story in the dark a little bit because the uk government is saying they are going to table formally some proposals, there seem to have been leaks from one side, but the prime minister suggesting that it but the prime minister suggesting thatitis but the prime minister suggesting that it is not actually what he's going to be proposing. it sounds as though there will be some kind of custom clea ra nce though there will be some kind of custom clearance zones, we don't know where they will be or what they will be called. obviously it is saying there are going to have to be some sort of checks and the eu wanting to protect the integrity of their single market and all to do with the fact that northern ireland and ireland will be in different economic zones. how and ireland will be in different economic zones. how they start all this out, as we know, is is the sticking point to getting a deal for borisjohnson. he sticking point to getting a deal for boris johnson. he is sticking point to getting a deal for borisjohnson. he is serious about getting a deal. to discuss this i'm am dined by the deputy chairman of the conservative party. brexit, as
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ever, is dominating everything. borisjohnson ever, is dominating everything. boris johnson today was put to him that he is not serious about getting a deal and he is putting forward things the eu have already rejected? the eu have started to change their language, the meetings he have had with various leaders of eu member states is really encouraging in terms of the stuff, thatjust states is really encouraging in terms of the stuff, that just a year ago, just a few months ago that the withdrawal agreement was sacrosanct, now they are starting to change their language shows so we can look at it. we are serious about getting out with a deal, that is the absolute default preference of the government and we need to make sure we can have substantive talks to get the deal done by the 18th october which is the end of the eu council that we can debate in parliament and hopefully parliament can come round to something that they agree with thatis to something that they agree with that is good for the country. and that will be the big issue. as deputy chairman of the party, how concerned you about bringing the party together? there are the conservative mps that have been
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booted out. most of them probably would have voted for a deal and you have problems on the other side of the party with people saying this a new deal will not be... what people have got to do, they have to come round, it is not about personalities or own self interest, it's about what's best for the country. the guys that lasted party whip at the moment, many that once come back will have the opportunity to show they are behind the government in getting brexit done by october 31. i would appeal to anyone on the other side of the argument that first of all we need to be consistent as a party, it is not a purge of one side or another, to make sure people are going against what the country needs that we are consistent in instilling discipline first up we need to get this done, we need to get it done so we leave by october 31 and get under everything that people want us to dad about rather than brexit forever. but it won't be the end, even if we get a deal, then we move on to the
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other tricky bit about the future relationship. the other target is of a borisjohnson saying he is not going to break the law, but also we are going to leave at the end of october and there is an act of parliament in placing if there is no deal he has to ask for a delay to brexit. how can you square that circle? boris is right to call that the surrender act, the fact there is a backbencher that has written a letter for the prime minister to give to you to give them permission to tell us when we are allowed to leave, it is patiently ridiculous. the default position is we get the deal, so we want to make sure we are out by the 315t, but the best way to do that is the parliament, round and circle around something they agree with and is a sensible deal that will be good for the uk, good of the eu and moves on. it is complicated, to future relationship with the eu, but it is the exciting bit and looking at the opportunities of brexit and the trade deals, market access around the world.
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thank you very much indeed. we do expect that there could be even this week some kind of statement in the house of commons laying out in more detailed the proposals from the uk government. and a quick look ahead to this afternoon, priti patel is the main speaker? and she is a real darling of this conference was that i think she will getan conference was that i think she will get an incredibly warm reception. it has been interesting in previous yea rs, has been interesting in previous years, all has been interesting in previous yea rs, all eyes have has been interesting in previous years, all eyes have been on boris johnson when he has been on the fringes of these kind of events causing quite a stir. he is not doing that now, so there has been a lack of excitement in the hall, but i will change with priti patel because they do really like her and i think they were like her message which will be all about really being much tougher on crime and criminals must obligate that at about 2:45pm. we will see you at 2:45pm, whether she is there are not. thank you very much.
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let's speak to our ireland correspondent chris page who's in belfast. that optimism we heard from a conservative there, it does seem a little misplaced when you hear from simon coveney but as far as he's concerned, it is all a nonstarter. that is right, in relation to the prospect of the customs context, there has been a allowed chorus of disapprovalfrom nationalist politicians and from the irish government in dublin. really there is to make dimensions to this. the economic cities one, business is the taken for granted, the open border with the irish republic, they say they can't afford any new bureaucracy, any new costs, any new hassle that any kind of customs checks would bring. then when you look at the politics, the irish government have been really emphasising once again the point they have been stressing repeatedly over the last few weeks that when it
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comes to brexit, in particular the irish by the backstop, the insurance policy to make sure that the body remains open under any circumstances, they are willing to consider alternatives, but the bottom line is any alternatives must respect the terms of the good friday peace agreement and the main element of that in this respect is a cooperation between northern ireland and the irish republic and protecting the all ireland economy. for the irish government, removing the need for any new customs checkpoints is important, but it is also part of the problem, they want the problem, they want to preserve the problem, they want to preserve the status quo, they want trades to continue seamlessly and simply as it is at the moment. any notion of customs checks, you can figure out it is completely unacceptable to dublin and dublin have said once again in reaction to the latest reports over what may constitute new british proposals that britain is bringing an alternative to the backstop that ireland says it hasn't
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seen backstop that ireland says it hasn't seen yet any credible proposals in written form from the uk. chris page, thank you very much for that. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines... there've been more clashes in hong kong, where a pro—democracy protestor is in a critical condition after being shot in the chest by police during protests there — 15 people have been taken 15 people have been taken to hospital. borisjohnson has rejected leaked claims that the government has proposed "customs clearance zones" to tackle the irish border issue. a new study has concluded there's little evidence that eating red meat, sausages and bacon increases the risk of cancer. and in sport... mo farah's former coach alberto salazar has been banned for four years after being found guilty of doping violations. it's the result of a two—year court case — salazar says he's shocked and will appeal. farah left salazar's training group in 2017. and training group in 2017. he has neverfailed a drugs test. andy murray is ceelbrating his biggest win since returning
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to the singles tour. he's though the second round at the china open after being the world number 13 matteo berrettini. and johnny sexton will captain ireland for the first time when they face russia at the rugby world cup on thursday — he's one of 11 changes to the side that lost to the hosts japan at the weekend. i'll be back with more on those stories. for years, we've been told to eat less red or processed meat to reduce our chance of developing cancer, but now a new study has cast doubt on that advice. an international team of experts has concluded there's little evidence to support it and the risks from eating bacon, sausages or steak has been overstated. but the study has caused widespread controversy, with one scientist condemning it as "dangerously misguided". our medical correspondent, fergus walsh, reports. there have been repeated studies linking red and especially processed meat with heart disease and cancer.
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the current guidance from the government advises people to eat no more than 70g of red and processed meat a day, equivalent to two rashers of bacon or 1.5 pork sausages. now, a team of international experts has reviewed existing data and found only weak evidence that it is worth trying to cut back. it's worth stressing that they did not find there was no evidence of harm, but simply that it was very weak. the argument here is not so much about the evidence, but how it's interpreted. there's agreement on the evidence linking processed meat to cancer risk. it's a small effect, but it is there. what's different here is that the researchers are recommending that it doesn't matter that much on an individual level. it doesn't matter that much on an individual level, but when you look at it across a lot of people, those effects can really add up. in 2015, the world health organization said eating 50g of processed meat a day, less than two slices of bacon, increased the chances of getting
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bowel cancer by 18%. in the uk, six out of every 100 people will get bowel cancer at some point. if we all ate an extra 50g of bacon a day for the rest of our lives, one more person per 100 would get bowel cancer. so what did customers at this cafe in central london make of the latest research? i laughed. something like this is always coming out in the news. "you can't eat this, you can eat this. "you shouldn't eat this, you should eat this. "have milk, don't have milk. "have meat, don't have meat." i mean, i'm lost. the job i do, so active anyway that i can pretty much eat anything ilike. yeah, i don't think it's a problem in moderation. i'd rather stay away from processed, because i don't know exactly what goes into that. as far as red meats are concerned, straight off the cow, hasn't done me any harm. so cutting back on the amount
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of bacon or burgers you eat may make very little difference to your individual risk of getting bowel cancer, but across a whole population, it could mean preventing thousands of cases per year. fergus walsh, bbc news. joining me now isjessica kirby from cancer research uk. the lady put it as clearly as i can see this, she was lost, i'm lost. people are going to be very confused. it is confusing, but the most important thing that the evidence hasn't changed today. there is agreement about the fact that processed meat is linked to a higher rate of bowel cancer, it is small risk and increase, it is there. whilst it may not make much difference on an individual level, when you look at it at across a whole population, it does add up. i'm still a bit confused. what you are saying is any single person what you now who is thinking of cutting down probably won't make any difference. but when we look at the figures en masse, there seems to be
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a passing? it makes a small difference to each person, there are lots of people in this country and when you look at it is around 5500 cases of bowel cancer that could be prevented every year if people cut down on processed meats. it is not the biggest thing they can do to reduce their risk. being a nonsmoker and keeping to a healthy weight are by far the biggest things people can do the stuff that is common sense, we know the danger of those. red meat, we are lead, we all decide what to eat and then we have been told be careful, if you have too much, it will cause problems. now, with the same evidence and facts, we have been told, you don't need to worry quite so much. who do we believe? the evidence for red meat is not as strong, so that it doesn't seem to be strongly linked to cancer risk at the moment. it is justly processed meat the consistent evidence of base increased risk of cancer. we recommend if people are eating a lot of processed meat and are interested
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in reducing... but we're talking about bacon? sausages, anything done to it that has had something done to it to be preserved that isn't freezing. when you have to put forward an argument, representing a point of view from scientists, and it is a big study, who say one thing, when you were probably in exactly the same chairarguing you were probably in exactly the same chair arguing against something different? we are trying to make it as clear as we can for people. it is hard to do because this is complicated and the fa ct because this is complicated and the fact is there are challenges in interpreting this evidence. this is based on looking at across a population of people who eat more or less processed meat, and we can see those eating more processed meats, there are the higher incidences of bowel cancer. you seem to be dishoom differentiating between processed and, say, steaks,. should we be more
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concerned? let's and, say, steaks,. should we be more concerned ? let's pick and, say, steaks,. should we be more concerned? let's pick and stick, is it less of a concern? there is in evidence in the past linking red meat to cancer, but that evidence has weakened and now it doesn't look like there is that much evidence there. but with processed meat, the evidence of a link has remained consistent and it is not the biggest thing people can do, but it does add up when people do a lot of small things. thank you. one person has died after a violent incident at a vocational college in finland, police said. ten people are said to have been injured, two seriously, in town of kuopio. the attacker — who eye—witnesses say was carrying a sword — has been apprehended. police said they opened fire to subdue him. he is among those injured. the canal and river trust has been accused of covering up information about the maintenance of a dam which partially collapsed in derbyshire. residents in whaley bridge were evacuated in august amid fears toddbrook reservoir would burst
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and flood the town. the trust released heavily—censored inspection reports with large sections blacked out — blaming "national security". but some residents said they believed it was just an excuse. coming up, we'll be bringing you more from the conservative party conference, including that speech from priti patel — that's expected in just over an hourat 3:16. i will not save vicky wrong was wrong. let's have a look at the weather. lots going on. darren, particularly on the isle of man, there has been a state of emergency declared. this is the rain we have had over the past week or so and heavy rain overnight and into this morning. this is a sims footage of the high street in laxity in the eastern side of the isle of man. the river lexi has burst its bank and they have
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been rushing down the street and trapping people in their houses which is why they have had to send out a helicopter. you can see how high the water is in someone's back garden there. is that a digger? looks like that was washed away as well. we still have the amber warning for the isle of man weather service, they issue their own warnings. that continues until five o'clock this afternoon but it looks like the rain will start to ease. the problem is there has been a high tide in the last half an hour or so thatis tide in the last half an hour or so that is potentially going to make things worse for a while, even though the rain is easy enough, you have the water coming back up the river rather than going away from land. pretty nasty. we have a corresponded on their way. it is notjust the isle of man because we are looking at the north west of england which has been hammered. it looks like the north of laxey there has been up to many millimetres of rain over the hills
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which has come down into the town itself. focusing on carlisle as well because we have had a huge amount of rain here, notjust over the last month, but probably during the holy year. that was a picture taken by the fire service. we have had a record september rainfall in carlisle, 166 millimetres of rain. it follows the second wettest august ever and so far this year, nine months into the year, there has been over 900 millimetres of rain. but more than you would expect for the whole of the year in carlisle. this is why we are seeing the problem is not just here but is why we are seeing the problem is notjust here but across many parts of the uk with flooding, high river levels, but also some coastal flooding because of the stronger winds and high tides. and it is only the first october. we are not even into winter yet. tell us what to expect for the rest of us. we are seeing things calm down a
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little bit as we head into tomorrow. this is the rainfall radar over the past few hours. the rain beginning to push its way further south, but south of that there is lots of heavy and thundery downpours. the rain eases off in the next few hours in isle of man and northern england, pretty windy with the rain. some slow—moving thundery downpours across wales, midlands and southern england. they will continue into this evening, bringing the threat of some localised flooding before things calm down overnight. the rain head out to the near continent. a northerly wind will bring the colder airwe northerly wind will bring the colder air we have across the now than half of the uk, september temperatures will be lower everywhere, may be a touch of frost in central scotland and northern england. sunshine tomorrow, try a day, some showers, most coming in on the cold wind across northern scotland, some early showers. these will not amount to much, so most places will be dry in
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the afternoon, some sunshine, but it will feel colder everywhere, temperatures up to 1a degrees. northerly winds bringing down the cold air across the uk. looking out the atlantic, a much warmer air. as a tropical air that we won't get by the end of the week. it comes courtesy of this deep area of low pressure which is x hurricane lorenzo. more confidence on the track it will take on thursday, heading to the west of the uk, the west of the weather could be on the western parts of ireland. we are going to find that the winds will pick up across western areas of the uk and through the day we will find the rain coming in. the further east it will be much quieter after another cold start with temperatures on the low side. gale is picking up later in westernmost parts of scotland, seen across northern ireland through the no sea and the western approaches. further east, still cold and temperatures up to 14. still cold and temperatures up to 1a. after this, a bit more and
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certain because the deep area of low pressure slows down, it may bring wet and windy weather overnight into northern ireland, is a more rain that northern england and wales, and then the low weakens, the winds become lighter, the rain petered out, by the end of friday, most places dry and we will see an end to the cold snap we were expecting during the middle part of the week.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines: there've been more clashes in hong kong, where a pro—democracy protestor is in a critical condition after being shot in the chest by police during protests there — meanwhile in china, a huge military parade has taken place in beijing as part of celebrations of the seventieth anniversary of the chinese communist state. borisjohnson has rejected leaked claims that the government has proposed "customs clearance zones" to tackle the irish border issue. a new study has concluded there's little evidence that eating red meat, sausages and bacon increases the risk of cancer. mo farah's former coach, alberto salazar, has been banned from athletics for four years, after being found guilty of doping violations. coming up: how a treadmill and a large screen might be the key to helping victims of post—traumatic stress disorder heal their mental scars. sport now on afternoon live
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with jane dougall. the banning of mo farah's former coach? jane:this has been described as sizemic in the world of athletics. salazar is such a huge name, but after a four year investigation by the us anti—doping agency and a bbc panorama programme in 2015 — plus a two—year court case — the coach has been banned from athletics for four years. salazar is best known for being the former coach of sir mo farah. farah has never failed a drugs test and has released a statement saying he left salazar's oregon project in 2017 and that he has, "no tolerance for anyone who breaks the rules." salazar says he's "shocked" and will appeal. but the findings are extremely disturbing. an independent panel found salazar and a doctor in his employ —
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drjeffrey brown — possessed and trafficked a banned performance—enhancing substance and administered or attempted to administer a prohibited method to multiple track and field athletes. it added that salazar "tampered and/or attempted to tamper with the doping control process". there are no allegations against sirmo farah, who spent six years working under salazar at the nike oregon project before leaving in 2017. and former olympic champion, denise lewis, says farah will be very disappointed by the situation. i think now has been very vocal that he has always operated within the lines of what is right. it is innocent until proven guilty. all i can say is that i think mo will have a tough time, just because people
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will get those performances with a question mark. but he hasn't failed a drugs test. i think you will be bitterly disappointed because he will have put his trust into salazar for so many years. a lot more reaction on the bb spot website. and, on to tennis and encouraging news for british tennis? jane: yes, some good news — andy murray has his second win on the main tour since returning to singles after the hip surgery that he had injanuary. he beat the world number 13, matteo berrettini, in two tie—break sets. he came from behind to do it — showing again that he is one of the mentally toughest on the tour. because murray has been out for so long he's currently ranked 503 in the world but he will now climb at least 100 places. provisionally, he will climb to roughly world number 370. still a far cry from being world number one in 2016. he's through to the second
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round of the china open in beijing, he will now meet british number 3, cameron norrie. the important thing is — he enjoyed the match. just not being in pain now is making tennis a little bit more fun. the practice and the preparation of tournaments as a about easier —— a lot easier. that uk is the last few yea rs, lot easier. that uk is the last few years, i was finding it all very stressful, not much enjoyment out of it. it is a little bit different now which nice. johnny sexton will captain ireland for the first time in their rugby world cup pool match against russia on thursday. the returning fly—half is one of 11 changes to the side that lost to the hosts japan on saturday. seven of the forwards will start their first game of the tournament. ireland's fate is still in their own hands, but they'll be sure
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of a quarter—final place with a bonus—point win against the russians. they then have samoa in their final pool game. it's something that i have thought about since i was a kid. i have made about since i was a kid. i have made a lot of decisions, in or around, trying to get that one day. it has taken a while. i feel incredibly proud. i want to be captain, of a good performance and a good win in a world cup game. that is my main focus. the question of how to avoid customs checks on the island of ireland after brexit has proved to be among the most difficult challenges thrown up by brexit. our reality check correspondent, chris morris, explains why it has proved so intractable. the irish border — it's the main reason why theresa may's efforts to negotiate an orderly withdrawal from the european union were rejected in the house of commons three times. uk and eu negotiators became known as what is now the backstop
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but borisjohnson insists it has to go. here is a reminder of exactly what it is. the backstop is key to talks over the future of the irish border after brexit. why? because this line between the irish republic and northern ireland will be the only land border between the uk and the european union. that matters for trade because in theory there should be checks on stuff crossing the border after brexit. but no—one wants new inspections at the border. they bring back memories of 30 years of conflict in northern ireland. checkpoints could become a target. that is where the backstop comes in. it is a legal guarantee to avoid a hard border under all circumstances. it is part of the agreement that sets out the uk withdrawal from the eu. an agreement the british government is now seeking to renegotiate. the backstop would come into effect only if the uk and the eu can't agree a future trade
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deal after brexit. it would mean the whole of the uk would stay in the same customs territory as the eu. northern ireland would be even more closely tied to eu rules than the rest of the uk. and that's just not acceptable to the current government. it wants trade across the border to continue, but insists that uk sovereignty must be respected. some checks on goods can certainly take place away from the border in warehouses or business premises. but whether you talk of customs posts, clearance centres or whatever, there would be checks of some kind and an end to frictionless trade. that's not getting a warm reception in dublin or among business groups in northern ireland. it is of deep concern. this is contradictory to a lot of the advice that both myself and the freight transport association, and pretty much every business organisation in northern ireland, have given the government in the last two and a half years. talks will intensify in brussels but unless the eu has a big change of heart it looks likely to reject the kind of solution the government is suggesting.
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chris morris, bbc news. more now on our top story: there have been violent clashes in hong kong between police and protestors as china celebrates the 70th anniversary of communist rule. thousands of demonstrators took to the streets in defiance of a ban on protests, and were met with police firing tear gas and live rounds. one protestor — thought to be a teenager was shot — and is in a critical condition in hospital. 51 people so far — including an 11—year—old and a 75 —year—old — have been hospitalised and in the last few moments we've had this statement from the foreign secretary dominic raab saying that, "whilst there is no excuse for violence, the use of live ammunition is disproportionate, and only risks inflaming the situation. this incident underlines the need for a constructive dialogue to address the legitimate concerns of the people of hong kong. we need to see restraint and a de—escalation from both protestors and the hong kong authorities." matthew henderson is the director of the asia studies centre at the henry jackson society — a think tank that advocates the robust spreading
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of liberal democracy. thank you forjoining us. i want to pick up on that last point, at some point, something has got together? something must give, because at the moment the two sides are talking and acting past one another. what is clearly needed as dialogue. a dialogue between parties who are credible and won another‘s eyes, thatis credible and won another‘s eyes, that is what has been lacking. i feel matters will get worse without that. given that the celebrations in beijing and what xijinping that. given that the celebrations in beijing and what xi jinping was saying they are, how likely is that they give a dam about what the protesters in hong kong want? the fa ct protesters in hong kong want? the fact that president g or the eve of this great event, particularly referring to upholding the principles whereby one country, two systems operate important and
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interesting to stop the problem is that it interesting to stop the problem is thatitis interesting to stop the problem is that it is notjust a question of principle but practice. the reason that those people are on the streets todayis that those people are on the streets today is because of that practice has broken down. what you're saying is that at some point, patience is going to give? either patient is going to give? either patient is going to give? either patient is going to give, or one country two systems a re going to give, or one country two systems are really has to be put into practice. restored to the level which it was intended to operate. there is not about economics or housing prices, it is a matter of justice, and accountable judiciary and the rule of law. that has to be restored. are you surprised that we are still talking in these terms of four months after it started? are still talking in these terms of four months after it started ?|j feared four months after it started?” feared that things would come to it was passed sooner. feared that things would come to it was passed sooner. today is a very sad day, the firing of that short is greatly to be regretted. one can only hope this will be a wake—up
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call to everybody, and it is a great error at best. for some perspective, given that we are used to seeing these sort of pictures, just how widespread is that this push for democracy in hong kong? the people of hong kong have woken up over the last year to the fact that the thing that makes hong kong special, the place that i remember 30 years after i live and work there with great affection, has been undermined. this isa affection, has been undermined. this is a process that has had in earlier iterations but nothing like this level of violence. the violent success because nothing was in place to prevent it from expanding and worsening. the police response has been to meet violence with violence u nfortu nately, been to meet violence with violence unfortunately, sometimes of islands greatly in excess of what is needed. that is not a good way forward. the problem for the demonstrators, their fate is not in their hands over this, is it? no, it is in the hands
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ofa this, is it? no, it is in the hands of a state and system which agreed to the principle of one country two systems, i was there when it was being negotiated and i recognised that hong kong was my continued stability and prosperity is a very good thing and of itself. you must have had if you had back then of how it will be in ten years? now here we are, 20 years, how china will eventually react? wasn't it inevitable that china would eventually say, why are we backing down to this? you are talking about a risk again equation, made by people it is very difficult to second—guess. that risking equation has changed and a rather fundamental way. i hope not. the fact that hong kong has all the makings of a strategic bridgehead for china and for china's trading partners,
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allies, friends, and china'sjournal place in the world. the loss of that must be seen as something not greatly to china's benefit. are you angry about what you see? greatly to china's benefit. are you angry about what you see ?m greatly to china's benefit. are you angry about what you see? it is not my place to be angry, i feel deeply for the people of hong kong and china. i'm sure they would not wish for any young person person fighting for any young person person fighting for their right to freedom to be shot down needlessly at point—blank range by people who claim to be there to represent the forces of law order. this! could virtual reality help in unlocking the trauma experienced by members of the armed forces? researchers in wales are working with former soldiers to develop a new treatment for post traumatic stress disorder. the technology allows the soldiers to experience simulated warzones, as a way of confronting the pain of the past. the early signs are promising, as tomos morgan reports. at its worst, i... i attempted to take my own life. matt neve joined the raf at 16.
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two years later he was in iraq, as a driver transporting injured and dead soldiers from the conflict. you have all these emotions flowing through you, you know? fear, upset, you know, anxiety and it all kind of hits you in one wave, because you don't really know what's going on. that took its toll on me, the constant... just seeing that on a daily basis. just a year later, and matt was medically discharged. he began having night terrors, flashbacks, drinking heavily and prone to angry outbursts, and those symptoms began taking a toll on his family. at the time, i did not know why matt's behaviour was like that because he didn't actually tell me what he had seen or he had been through, or about he'd even been in iraq. it made me think, "did i particularly want to be with that person," at the time. 12 years later, after speaking to other veterans whilst competing at the invictus games, matt started looking for his own treatment, but nothing helped.
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we're going to walk back towards that time of your deployment... recently, though, he's been taking part in a two—year vr trial by cardiff university and cardiff university health board. virtual reality exposure therapy — or 3mdr — involves patients walking on a treadmill in front of a large cinema—style screen, showing images of the traumatic experiences they may have witnessed. i see boots on the ground. blood. two thirds of the 42 veterans with treatment—resistant ptsd saw on average almost a 40% improvement in symptoms. and the belief is, that it is not just veterans that could benefit from this treatment. we can see no reason why this could not be applied to individuals with ptsd following other traumatic events, and so what we are doing now is applying for funding to do a much larger study across england, scotland and wales to look at its effectiveness in the national health service.
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3mdr is the only treatment that's managed to help matt's symptoms. although the night terrors remain, his daytime flashbacks have diminished completely, and the future's now looking brighter than ever. the recovery journey is still ongoing, it'll never end but, planning—wise, we are going away as a family, and that is something we would not have done before, really, so it's just little things like that, little steps going forward, that will make the bigger difference. in a moment, the latest business news. first — a look at the headlines on afternoon live: in hong kong, police have shot a protester with live ammunition, during violent clashes — the demonstrator thought to be a teenager is in a critical condition. 51 people — including an 11—year—old and a 75—year—old have been taken to hospital. borisjohnson has rejected leaked claims that the government has proposed "customs clearance zones" to tackle the irish border issue. a new study has concluded there's little evidence that eating red meat, sausages and bacon increases the risk of cancer.
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here's your business headlines on afternoon live: thomas cook's auditor, ey is to be investigated. the accountancy watchdog — the frc — has launched a probe into the collapse of the travel firm and the way its accounts were compiled by ey which could potentially lead to the imposition of unlimited fines. thomas cook collapsed last week — putting 9,000 uk staff out of work. thejohn lewis partnership has annonced a major shake up, which will lead to the integration of its department store and waitrose management teams for the first time. the current managing director of waitrose, rob collins, is to step down — and 75jobs will go at the retailer's head office uk house price growth has "almost ground to a halt" in september — that's according to
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the nationwide building society. it said activity in the housing market had been slow, but stable, for two years.and that the average home is now valued atjust over £215,000. let's talk wework. the long and short of it, wework isn't working. they try to go public on the stock market and float it so. they had as huge evaluation which came down, they withdrew it. their chief executive stepped down, a rather colourful character to start with. after that, in the last day, they have confirmed they are pulling this altogether. it has been a bit of a string of troubled ipo food they are called. not just wework string of troubled ipo food they are called. notjust wework either, that mentions to be spreading across the market. we spoke to one of the co—founders of weed transfer, no
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relation. he told us that he wasn't particularly interested in floating on the stock market at the moment. it is not that we have never says no to going public, but i think that is an awful want of attention around some of these big unicorns that have gone public but i think of because an awful lot of tension in the market. i think the product market i don't take will be controversial in the coming years and months. we as a business and as an organisation have villages try to focus on trust and value and creativity first. we have beena very value and creativity first. we have been a very healthy, profitable business since 2014. we don't necessarily need to raise money, and we certainly aren't looking at the moment to go public. that is a trajectory that everybody expects from a tech company, i think. what we have tried to do is about is egging while everyone else was sagging, something we would like to pursue further. over to the new york
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stock exchange. interesting times, we are talking about wework abandoning its flotation. that have been a string of troubled ipo? recently? that has, we are seeing not just pellet recently? that has, we are seeing notjust pellet on. we have previously the above, other companies, all losing value or not the stock market. we have also had a couple of plot to play my kind soul. an entertaining company called endeavour was supposed to list publicly last friday but how shall those plans. we just publicly last friday but how shall those plans. wejust have not publicly last friday but how shall those plans. we just have not seen that match appetite amongst an investor. we talk about tech firms being disruptors, investor. we talk about tech firms being disru ptors, that investor. we talk about tech firms being disruptors, that is anything going on in san francisco of start ups? what exactly are they looking at? this is quite an interesting development, we are seeing this kind
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of war waged by venture capital is on the big investment banks that traditionally have such a big role in the writing companies when the list publicly. this meeting today, venture capital is how the mighty 100 or so start up companies like plan to list publicly in the coming yea rs, plan to list publicly in the coming years, trying to convince them that instead of going down the traditional route and having an initial public offering, they should do something called a direct listings, a different way of selling their shares for a first time. they say that a lot of benefits, you're not playing big investment banks a big fee. these banks also have cosy relationship with investors but they aren't giving them first preference when buying stock. that means issues like fairness and access, there can be better access to retail investors and those big institutional investors don't get such a first preferential go. it's very early in the discussion, there are a lot of views on both sides, so we're still
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waiting to see see how this develops. an interesting twist to the debate. good to talk to you. a quick look at the market. they have just opened the markets. you can see there the dowjones is there, lifting us into positive territory, cheering us all up on this rainy tuesday. the pound how about sinking a little bit. the ftse100 has been a little bit. the ftse100 has been a bit flat during the day, bits and pieces going on. argos is losing its ceo, waitrose is losing its boss, so too is argos. all change in the world of retail. now it's time for a look at the weather. we can cross the newsroom to darren. we have out a lot of rain around in the last week, even more in the last 24 hours, which is why there are still a lot of flood warnings across
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england and wales. more heavy downpours in england and wales over the next few hours. the more persistent rain across northern england and isle of man is easing off, still quite windy and chilly in these areas. further south, winds are lighter, perhaps thundery downpours, and the midlands too. those will continue into the evening before it been blown away into the near continent. cold northerly winds will be drawn down, bring down the colder air that is already in the northern half of the uk, temperatures will be low tonight, even temperatures will be low tonight, eve n a cross temperatures will be low tonight, even across southern areas. temperatures will be low tonight, even across southern areas. the frost is more likely in rural parts of scotla nd frost is more likely in rural parts of scotland and northern england. plenty of sunshine tomorrow, most of the show is coming in that clothed wind across northern scotland. maybe the odd light shower across northern ireland, wales, towards the south—east. in general, it will be diagnosed areas. if you're a bit of sunshine by afternoon but cold
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everywhere, temperatures 12 to 14 associates. if we look out in the atlantic, that is much warmer air, topical areas, we will get some of that by the end of the week. it comes courtesy of a deep area of low pressure, ex hurricane lorenzo. it is heading towards the west of the uk, probably the strongest of the winds are likely to be across western parts of ireland. thursday, winds will pick up in western areas of the uk, of rain comes in as well. further north and east, it may be dry, there may be a bit of sunshine after a while after a chilly start. when is pick—up later across western and was part of scotland, turning very windy in northern ireland. gales are quite likely. cool air ahead of that, temperatures 12 to 14 celsius. that area of the low pressure is a bit uncertain after thursday. a band of rain suites
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free, wet and windy in northern ireland overnight. that could be rain heading to england and wales. winds will drop steadily through the day on friday, by the end of the day, most places will be dry and not as cold as what we are expecting over the next couple of days.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 3... the worst violence in four months — police clash with protestors in hong kong as china celebrates 70 years of communist rule. if you look at this amount of tear gas that is being fired all through the streets here, moving up there to where the police are. itjust gives you an idea of how things are escalating today. irish scepticism as boris johnson says the uk is preparing to make a "very good offer" to the eu about how to deal with the border after brexit. i think that we will be making a very good offer and clearly i have seen some briefing already — i don't know where it came from, possibly from brussels — which is not quite right. no red alert.
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a new study concludes there's little evidence that eating red meat, sausages and bacon increases the risk of cancer. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. we'll have all the details on the developing story that sir mo farah's former coach alberto salazar has been banned for four years for doping violations. mo farah — who's never failed a drugs test — has said he has no tolerance for anyone who breaks the rules. have the weather. more down pours into this evening across parts of england and wales, it looks like the rain is clearing away from the isle of man and tomorrow will be a drier day across the board. to make matters worse, there is a hurricane moving towards the uk in thursday onto friday. also coming up — how a treadmill and virtual reality is helping with post—traumatic stress disorder — unlocking the trauma experienced by members
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of the armed forces. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. there have been violent clashes in hong kong between police and protestors as china celebrates the 70th anniversary of communist rule. one protestor has been shot in the chest with live ammunition and at least 51 people are in hospital. two are in a critical condition. thousands of demonstrators took to the streets in defiance of a ban on protests and were met with police firing tear gas and live rounds. the demonstrations took place as the chinese government staged a huge military parade in beijing. a warning that this report from our diplomatic correspondent, paul adams, contains scenes some viewers might find upsetting. one anniversary, two reactions. while beijing celebrated, hong kong
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was once again full of defiance. it began peacefully enough, protesters filling the streets to mark what they see as a black day, rejecting the communist party and its leadership. appealing to the international community to support their calls for democracy. official slogans were torn down. set alight. organisers have called this a day of grief. gunshots it was a day of violence, too, and rage — among the worst so far. all over the city, hardcore protesters confronted the police. the response — volleys of tear gas and rubber bullets. one clash outside government offices witnessed by bbc correspondent stephen mcdonell.
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they're moving up the stairs to try and reach where the police are. charging forward. the protesters are hoping that they have the numbers, but the police are continually firing at them, round after round of rubber bullets and tear gas. and now the protesters are retreating. there's been too many rubber bullets fired, too much tear gas. and there was worse — in the market town of tsuen wan, a policeman pulled out a pistol and shot an 18—year—old protester at point—blank range. it's thought to be the first time live ammunition has been used in this way. the protester is now in hospital in critical condition. this was always going to be a day of high emotion,
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but as the authorities in beijing spoke of peaceful reunification, the reality on the streets of hong kong was very different. i spoke to our correspondent stephen mcdonnell in hong kong, and asked him if there was a risk of further escalation. clashes are still continuing here, we are into sunday night, this is the causeway bay shopping district. people who have visited here will know it. and a little while ago, the riot police were here and many protesters still are. they left because they are fighting on so many fronts at the moment. and on the kowloon side, it seems to be where the most serious clashes have just erupted. you mentioned the possibility of where it could lead. it has just been upped and upped on both sides, and we saw the activist shot in the chest, we have been waiting
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for the possibility that someone would be shot with a live round — it has nearly happened several times — and today we finally saw it. i am not sure what impact it will have on demonstrators, the more of hardline activists here. rather than making them more wary, it may make them more angry and some may want to escalate further. we have seen many scenes of violence today — fires in the street, barricades on fire, the entrance to an underground train station on fire. and the response from the authorities has been tear gas, water cannons, rubber bullets and they have been ruthlessly efficient in their pursuit of the activists. they have raced in quickly, pinned them to the ground and we have seen them grabbing protesters by the dozen, and this is an attempt by the authorities to limit the extent to which hong kong protesters could upstage beijing's big party, because that's the point. tens of thousands of people turned
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out in defiance of warnings that they should not gather. they wanted this to be a day of calling for democratic reforms rather than celebrating the achievements of china under the communist party. whether they have achieved that or not will be for others to judge. but certainly we have seen yet another dramatic escalation and the crisis now in its fourth month is showing no sign of petering out. i'm joined now by the director of soas china institute, professor steve tsang on webcam. are you so surprise this has lasted so are you so surprise this has lasted so long? iam afraid so long? i am afraid that i was not surprised that it would last until today, the 17th -- 70th that it would last until today, the 17th —— 70th founding of the republic of china. once the original
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issue was not resolved and the protest was widened to become an issue of demanding the democratic rights in hong kong, it was going to last. the original it should be in the extradition agreement. i wonder if you have a view of what china will do next, having got through the day of celebration, the day they may say enough is enough? the police shooting of one of the protesters may potentially be a significant turning point. if the protesters should die, i think we are going to see a major escalation by the protesters in hong kong and the dynamics may well change and we will see an escalation of force being used on both sides. now if the protester should, and i hope you will, survive, then we are probably still going to see some sort of
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escalation, but it will be much bass potentially controllable and therefore the escalation in terms of therefore the escalation in terms of the repression is that the government will use may also be more carefully calibrated. and we will not get there. we are looking at the actions of several thousand pro—democracy demonstrators. our representative are they of the wider population in hong kong? you are right, the actual number of people who are actively protesting and using violence are in the low thousands, but they are mostly young people with very little access to resources and they have been able to sustain that because they are receiving support from the wider population. you have a lot of people in hong kong, for example in the professional classes coming our lawyers and doctors and accountants,
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who will lose their license to practice if they were found to have committed anything that could give them a criminal record. those people would never be able to go out in the front line to support the demonstrators. but we also know that a lot of money has been collected from the general public to support them. so it is a reasonable assumption that a lot of the professional classes are in fact supporting the demonstrators. so the government's calculation that they can arrest the low thousands of activists and it will be all over i think is optimistic. president is using ping promising to make the to make state system work. is hea make the to make state system work. is he a patient man? because there is no sign...? if the president wants to make a one country to make systems work, then
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he will have to work for a political solution in hong kong. this kind of confrontation is another found with the police believe my political solution is not the alternative is using very, very high level force to repress the protesters. the chinese president is talking about implementing the two systems, but he is consistently resorting to an increasing level of oppression. thank you so much forjoining us. you are welcome. in a speech in beijing to mark 70 years since the chinese communist party took control, president xi jinping said no force could stop china's onward march. crowds cheered as thousands of soldiers marched through tiananmen square in a display of military might. robin brant sent this report from the capital. for big birthdays, china's ruling communist party doesn't do things by halves.
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lined up perfectly and ready to go, 15,000 military personnel prepare to parade past the country's top political leaders. president xi, unhindered by limits on his term in office, took centre stage. beside him, two predecessors, one of them so old and frail now that he needed help to his seat. looking on too, the country's most senior party officials, all of them men. surprise, surprise, security is very tight here ahead of the parade. the police just moving a few people down from the main thoroughfare, where we will see the tanks later. make no mistake, china does want the world to look in at this event. the military leadership have said this is not about the show of force, but this is definitely about china showing off on its 70th birthday about how far it has come. translation: it was today 70 years ago that chairman mao stood at this very place and announced solemnly
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the founding of the people's republic of china. before today, military leaders said it wasn't supposed to be a flexing of muscle. but make no mistake, this was, more than anything, a military display by a nation that after 70 years is once again taking its place at the top table. borisjohnson has said there will need to be customs checks on the island of ireland after the uk leaves the eu. in an interview with the bbc, the prime minister denied suggestions this would mean a series of customs posts set five or ten miles back from the border. the government has said it will publish details of a new brexit plan in the coming days, but the eu has always insisted it will not agree to new customs checks in ireland, and time is running out to find an agreement. our political correspondent, chris mason, reports from the conservative party conference in manchester. a morning with the media for the prime minister looks something like this.
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cameras everywhere — even stylistic help on offer. but after the comb, a quick ruffle of the hair. and straightaway, to the crux of the brexit conundrum — keeping the irish border open when the uk and ireland are following different rules after brexit. the difficulty really is going to be around the customs union and to what extent northern ireland can be retained within eu bodies at all. and we have made a very good offer, we are going to make a very good offer, we are going to be tabling it formally very soon. but there is a difficulty if you try to keep northern ireland in the customs union. because one of the basic things about being a country is you have a single customs... with... ? the prime minister accepts the reality, as he puts it, of custom cheques being necessary on the island of ireland
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of custom checks being necessary on the island of ireland after brexit, but is still not providing details of how he thinks this could happen in a way that doesn't amount to moving the border somewhere else. but borisjohnson says he is compromising, with agriculture in northern ireland effectively being regulated by the european union. the uk government has already made a very considerable offer, and if you look at what we are saying on the sanitary and phytosanitary arrangements, that is that we are already accepting that you could have, in the famous words attributed to ian paisley the elder, you could have a situation where it is, as it were, in northern ireland, the people are british but the cattle are irish. and that is a big concession by the uk government. the government says an earlier idea it had submitted to brussels, a so—called non—paper, which suggested customs clearance zones in ireland or in northern ireland, is not the same as the legal text that they are going to submit in the next few days.
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but there is a sense that there are some in these negotiations who are just desperate to trash anything the uk suggests. who could they be thinking of? well, here was the irish deputy prime minister last night. nothing cryptic about his view on this floated idea. so what happens if there isn't a deal? mrjohnson later suggested that if the eu delayed exit again against the government's will, it would regret it. i wish you all the very best. brexit is due to happen, remember, at the end of this month. how it happens and whether it happens remains farfrom clear. speaking in the irish parliament, the taioseach leo varadkar said he welcomed the prime minister's words when he "disowned and distanced" himself from the leaked proposals. mr varadkar said he expected to honour the british government's 2017 commitment not to have a hard
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border on the island of ireland there is a reason why we came up with the deal that we did after two yea rs of with the deal that we did after two years of negotiations with prime minister mae and her government. by the backstop provides is a single customs territory, it doesn't provide for britain or northern ireland to stay in the customs union, it provides for what is described as the singles did make single customs territory. that satisfied our demand and desire that there might be because some checks north and south but also satisfied many unionists that there would not be any custom checks east and west. it is to meet that need and that is why we ended up with the backstop and that is why the backstop is the best solution, because it avoids custom posts north and west and east and west by having the entire uk within a single customs territory. our chief political correspondent vicki young is at the conservative party conference in manchester.
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this is all based on non—papers that no one seem this is all based on non—papers that no one seem to this is all based on non—papers that no one seem to have this is all based on non—papers that no one seem to have seen, this is all based on non—papers that no one seem to have seen, so we this is all based on non—papers that no one seem to have seen, so we had us going round in circles here. we are going to get the proposals from the uk government and we will get them may be as soon as tomorrow. the next day. i think it is imminent, but we have got to the position where nothing has been published and yet one side is saying they are a nonstarter. there are lots of people saying it does not bode well for borisjohnson who is insisting again today that he is serious about getting a deal. government insiders say particularly the relationship between boris johnson and the overt car, it has been going pretty well to stop the problem is they are stuck because the eu is insisting northern ireland would have to stay in the customs union and that is not something that the uk government will accept. i think there will be more light shed on all of this, perhaps in a speech from the prime minister, but beyond that there are tory mps he had that
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expect a statement in the house of commons on thursday for so we will have to wait to get the detail. but let's talk to the conservative mp julian keegan. boris johnson let's talk to the conservative mp julian keegan. borisjohnson have enter insist he does want a deal, that he is serious for a deal, we know when your party this has caused huge eruptions between those not willing to leave without a deal, but borisjohnson willing to leave without a deal, but boris johnson says willing to leave without a deal, but borisjohnson says he is willing to do that. what is the answer to that for a conservative mp like yourself? logically, it it is to get a deal. it makes no sense for the eu, for us to leave without a deal, it makes no sense to either side of the irish border without a deal. it is no sense at all. looking at what he is doing is trying to get each side to blink a bit. this is quite close to getting over the line, i think. there is a way you can see we cooperation you could get a deal
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across. it has always been about a political will and it still is and i hope that faced with the alternative of no deal, which seems massively disproportionate in comparison to what you are asking people to actually give a better time, it seems massively disproportionate. i hope that when the papers are sent across, every effort will be made to reach a deal. and what about the house of commons? the huge row about the proroguing of parliament, the commons came back and really had a massive row. the atmosphere deteriorated massively. does that feed into a problem for borisjohnson when he is going to need a labour mps if he wants to get a deal across the line? he will need labour mps a deal across the line? he will need labour mp5 for a deal across the line first up is people said, does that day in parliament, when the language was very tense on both sides? i was there for the whole debate, there was screaming and shouting from the labour side
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and shouting from the labour side and he said a few things that obviously is absurd to them on their side. i don't think that will change people's minds. we have various representatives of the constituents, if someone will vote for a deal, it is because it makes sense to them and make sense to their constituents. and some words that have upset them shouldn't make a difference. there is a much bigger picture than people's emotions and one could argue that the reason it is taken three years to get to this point is there has been far too much focus on what people want themselves or what they think they are arguing instead of trying to compromise and get a deal. one of the things i said in parliament and i still very much believe is there is no point in any more time. that tuesday was like a rerun of... we could have put a video on bbc parliament, it was the same arguments come the same people going no further forward. you need a more compromise and not more time is ado more compromise and not more time is a do you think there are labour mps
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that change their minds? yes, mps that change their minds? yes, mp5 for that change their minds? yes, mps fora that change their minds? yes, mp5 for a deal, there are some lib dem mps yes, mp5 for a deal, there are some lib dem mp5 on that and must than 30 labour mps was that it doesn't mean they will all vote, but it means it is where we should be talking to stop those people are serious about trying to pass a deal in parliament. thank you very much indeed. a novel approach. we will stop sitting house of commons and just put on a video link. just remind us, were at what time is priti patel speaking? i got it wrong. she will be speaking in about 25 minutes. back to you then. thank you. for years, we've been told to eat less red or processed meat to reduce our chance of developing cancer , but now a new study has cast doubt on that advice. an international team of experts has concluded there's little evidence to support it and the risks from eating bacon, sausages or steak has been overstated. but the study has caused widespread controversy,
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with one scientist condemning it as "dangerously misguided". our medical correspondent, fergus walsh, reports. there have been repeated studies linking red and especially processed meat with heart disease and cancer. the current guidance from the government advises people to eat no more than 70g of red and processed meat a day, equivalent to two rashers of bacon or 1.5 pork sausages. now, a team of international experts has reviewed existing data and found only weak evidence that it is worth trying to cut back. it's worth stressing that they did not find there was no evidence of harm, but simply that it was very weak. the argument here is not so much about the evidence, but how it's interpreted. there's agreement on the evidence linking processed meat to cancer risk. it's a small effect, but it is there. what's different here is that the researchers are recommending that it doesn't matter that much on an individual level. it doesn't matter that much on an individual level, but when you look at it across a lot of people, those effects can really add up. in 2015, the world health organization said eating 50g
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of processed meat a day, less than two slices of bacon, increased the chances of getting bowel cancer by 18%. in the uk, six out of every 100 people will get bowel cancer at some point. if we all ate an extra 50g of bacon a day for the rest of our lives, one more person per 100 would get bowel cancer. so what did customers at this cafe in central london make of the latest research? i laughed. something like this is always coming out in the news. "you can't eat this, you can eat this. "you shouldn't eat this, you should eat this. "have milk, don't have milk. "have meat, don't have meat." i mean, i'm lost. the job i do, so active anyway that i can pretty much eat anything ilike. yeah, i don't think it's a problem in moderation. i'd rather stay away from processed, because i don't know exactly what goes into that. as far as red meats are concerned, straight off the cow, hasn't done me any harm.
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so cutting back on the amount of bacon or burgers you eat may make very little difference to your individual risk of getting bowel cancer, but across a whole population, it could mean preventing thousands of cases per year. fergus walsh, bbc news. one person has died after a violent incident at a vocational college in finland, police said. ten people are said to have been injured, two seriously, in town of kuopio. the attacker — who eye—witnesses say was carrying a sword — has been apprehended. police said they opened fire to subdue him. he is among those injured. tributes have been paid to bbc journalist hanna yusuf, who has died at the age of 27. hanna, who wrote for the bbc news website and as a tv news producer, recently carried out an investigation into working conditions at costa coffee stores, which led to the company launching an independent audit. her family said they were "deeply saddened and heartbroken" and hoped her legacy "would serve
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as an inspiration". the canal and river trust has been accused of covering up information about the maintenance of a dam which partially collapsed in derbyshire. residents in whaley bridge were evacuated in august amid fears toddbrook reservoir would burst and flood the town. the trust released heavily—censored inspection reports with large sections blacked out — blaming "national security". but some residents said they believed it was just an excuse. playing with black pictures, let us show the skies over london. a fairly forbidding sky. it was pitch black earlier, butjust a stormy forbidding sky. it was pitch black earlier, but just a stormy sense above broadcasting house that would suggest that darren bet must now be in the building. we missed the
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lightning as well. i'm surprised you use the word sense. we have a change in weather. you we re we have a change in weather. you were hoping to see black skies, but the weather keeps moving on. not if you are on the isle of man. it is moving on the isle of man, actually, it is cheering up, the rain has stopped and the high tide is gone, but, of course, this is the scene of flooding we have had today and this is laxey on the eastern side of the isle of man and roads and streets are awash, the river has burst its banks, the water flooding are awash, the river has burst its banks, the waterflooding down are awash, the river has burst its banks, the water flooding down the streets washing away cars and that in the river is a digger which has been washed away as well. pretty bad scenes he ever they have got their own weather centre? theyissue own weather centre? they issue their own weather warnings and there will still is an amber heavy rain warning until five
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o'clock. the rain has gone now so conditions should slowly improve. it will take awhile for the water to drop down. they have declared a major incident there and there have been helicopters enter rescue people trapped in their houses that are pretty bad scenes on the isle of man. we have got a corresponding landing there about now. but is not just the isle of man, the north west of england has had a terrible amount of england has had a terrible amount of rain. probably in 12 hours about 12 inches of rain in laxey, to the north of laxey, but can allow, that is on the map because i want to show you rainfall figures from carlisle. this was a picture taken early run today from the kal el east fire station. there has been lots of rain, it was a record—breaking month. 176 millimetres of rain following argus that was the second wettest august
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ever, 100 and... nine months ago there has been over 900 millimetres of rain which is more than you would expect in colour throughout the whole of the ever stop just gives you an idea of how wet it has been for a long period of time. and it is not winter yet. no. tell us for the rest of us. the weather will quieten down for tomorrow, but i want to show the radar picture, the last few hours. this was the rain affecting northern england and the isle of man. it moves southwards. south of that that is why we get the dark skies across southern parts of england into wales and the midlands across east anglia as well. so moving, heavy potentially thundery downpours. the winds are stronger whether rain is in northern england and north wales but becoming lighter and more patchy and her light will sweep southwards through this evening so it will be wet for a good while longer for some parts of england if it pushes to the
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near continent. then a northerly wind will bring the colder air we have our digger on the northern half of the uk and drop the temperatures, so of the uk and drop the temperatures, so echo the night. northern england and scotland could get a touch of frost. some sunshine tomorrow and a drier day. most showers coming in in scotland, some in the area of clouds further west. many places dry, lots of sunshine, but it will feel cold everywhere, 12 to 14 degrees. 14 in london. should be nearer 17 degrees this time of year because of the colder air on the northerly wind across the middle part of the week, but out in the atlantic, much warmer air, tropical air coming from an area of low pressure which is ex—hurricane lorenzo. this is the track we expected to take, not much confidence and where it is going and it could be the worst of the weather will be across western parts of
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ireland. across the uk, western areas will tend to see the wind picking up, rain sweeping in. further east, likely to be dry, some sunshine around as well. gale is developing through the southwest, through the irish sea into northern ireland and to west in most parts of scotland. the temperatures on the low side at 12—14 across many parts. after thursday is a little more uncertain because the deep area of low pressure, x— hurricane is slowing down. it will bring wet weather into northern ireland and probably north west england and wales. but the low weakens, the winds drop on friday, it sits there for a while, but most places will be dry and it won't be as cold by then as well.
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this is bbc news, our latest headlines. in hong kong, a teenage protester is in a critical condition
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after being shot in the chest at point blank range by police, during violent clashes. 51 people have been hospitalised meanwhile in china, a huge military parade has taken place in beijing as part of celebrations of the seventieth anniversary of the chinese communist state. borisjohnson has rejected leaked claims that the government has proposed "customs clearance zones" to tackle the irish border issue. a new study has concluded there's little evidence that eating red meat, sausages and bacon increases the risk of cancer. mo farah's former coach, alberto salazar, has been banned from athletics for four years, after being found guilty of doping violations. sport now on afternoon live with jane dougall and we will start with athletics and the news that mo farah's former coach has been he has issued a statement to emphasise that this is incredibly
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significant in the world of athletics. such a huge name but after a four—year investigation by the us and doping agency, under bbc panorama programme broadcast in 2015, plus a two year court case, the college has been banned from athletics for four years for doping violations. he's best known for being the former of mo farah, it's important to get the rate he has never failed a important to get the rate he has neverfailed a drug important to get the rate he has never failed a drug test, important to get the rate he has neverfailed a drug test, and in his statement that he released he said that he left the project in 2017 and that he left the project in 2017 and that he left the project in 2017 and that he has no tolerance for anyone who breaks the rules. he has said he is shocked at the findings and that he will appeal, but is extremely in—depth —— the stabbing panel found that he and a doctor and his employee possessed and trafficked a band performance enhancing substance and administered or attempted to administer a prohibited method.
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it added that salazar "tampered and/or attempted to tamper with the doping control process".there are no allegations against sirmo farah, who spent six years working under salazar at the nike oregon project before leaving in 2017 — and former olympic champion denise lewis says farah will be very disappointed by the situation. i think mel has been very vocal that he has always operated within the lines of what is right. and like you said, it's innocent until proven guilty. i can say is that i think he will have a tough time, he well, just because people will look at those performing physically?. but he has not failed a drug test. i think he will be bitterly disappointed because he would have been putting his trust in salazar for so many yea rs. his trust in salazar for so many years. while his full statement is on the bbc sport website and all the
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reaction to that developing story. let us look at tennis now. means for british tennis. yes, andy murray has his second win on the main tour since returning to singles after the hip resufacing surgery that he had injanuary. he beat the world number 13 matteo berrettini in two tie—break sets. he came from behind to do it — showing again that he is one of the mentally toughest on the tour. because murray has been out for so long he's currently ranked 503 in the world but he will now climb at least 100 places. provisionally, he will climb to roughly world no. 370. still a far cry from being world number one in 2016. he's through to the second round of the china open in beijing, he will now meet british no. three cameron norrie. the important thing is — he enjoyed the match.
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just not being in pain now is making tennis a little bit more fun so the practises and preparation for tournaments is a lot easier. then the last two years that really was not the case, i was finding it all very stressful, was not getting much enjoyment out of it so it's a little bit different now which is nice.” am sure andy is all about the fun. johnny sexton will captain ireland for the first time in their rugby world cup pool match against russia on thursday. the returning fly—half is one of 11 changes to the side that lost to the hosts japan on saturday. seven of the forwards will start their first game of the tournament. ireland's fate is still in their own hands, but they'll be sure of a quarterfinal place if they get a bonus—point win against the russians. they then have samoa in their final pool game. manchester city have confirmed that midfielder kevin de bruyne will miss their champions league match tonight against dinamo zagreb because of a groin injury. he's said to have picked up
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the problem in city's 3—1win over against everton at the weekend. no timeframe has been given yet for de bruyne's return. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. the question of how to avoid customs checks on the island of ireland after brexit has proved to be among the most difficult challenges thrown up by brexit. our reality check correspondent, chris morris, explains why it has proved so intractable. the average border is a main reason why theresa may's efforts to organise an orderly withdrawal from the european union was rejected three times. uk and eu negotiators agreed what became known as the backstop, but now borisjohnson insists that it has to go. here is a reminder of exactly what it is. the backstop is talks of the future of
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the irish border, after brexit. why? because this line between the irish republic and northern ireland will be the only land border between the uk and the european union. and that matters with trade because in theory there should be checked on stuff crossing the border after brexit. but no one wants new inspections at the border, they bring back memories of 30 years of conflict in northern ireland, and checkpoints could become a target. so that's where the backstop comes in, it's a legal guarantee to avoid a hard border under all circumstances. it's part of the agreement which sets out the uk's withdraw from the eu, an agreement the british government is now seeking to renegotiate. the backstop would come into effect only if the uk and the eu can't agree a future trade deal after brexit. it would mean that the whole of the uk would mean that the whole of the uk would stay in the same customs territory of the eu, with northern ireland closely tied to eu rules than the rest of the uk. and that's just not acceptable to the current
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government, it wants trade across the border to continue, but insist uk sovereignty must be respected. some checks on goods can certainly ta ke some checks on goods can certainly take place away from the border, and warehouses are business premises. but whether you talk of customs or clearing centres or whatever, it would be checks of some kind and an end to friction is trade. that's not getting a warm reception in dublin, or among business groups in northern ireland. it's of deep concern, this is contradictory to a lot of the advice both myself and the transport association and pretty much every business organisation in northern ireland have given the government in the last two and a half years. talk soon the last two and a half years. talk soon intensify in brussels but u nless soon intensify in brussels but unless the eu has a big change of heart, it looks likely to reject the kind of solutions the government is suggesting. a man who was on a list of britain's most wanted fugitives has been found guilty of murdering a man at a bar in west london in 2015. shane o'brien, had told a court he felt threatened
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by his "smirking" victim who he said was "ready to attack" him. josh hanson died after his neck was slashed. an iceberg big enough to fit 250—thousand football pitches on its surface, has broken away from the antarctic iceshelf. it's the biggest iceberg to have been calved in two years and contains more than three— hundred— billion tonnes of ice. the berg will have to be tracked because it could pose a hazard to shipping. scientists stress this has nothing to do with climate change. it will be several years before it breaks apart and fully melts. could virtual reality help in unlocking the trauma experienced by members of the armed forces? researchers in wales are working with former soldiers to develop a new treatment for post traumatic stress disorder. the technology allows the soldiers to experience simulated warzones, as a way of confronting the pain of the past. the early signs are promising, as tomos morgan reports.
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i attempted to take my own life. he joined the raf at 16. two years later he was in iraq as a driver transporting injured and dead soldiers from the conflict. you have all these emotions flowing through you, fear, upset, anxiety, and it all hits you in one week because you don't know what's going on i'm back took its toll on me just seeing that ona took its toll on me just seeing that on a daily basis. just a year later and he was medically discharged, he began having nightmares, flashbacks, drinking heavily and prone to angry outbursts. and the symptoms began taking a toll on his family. at the timel taking a toll on his family. at the time i did not know why his behaviour was like that because he did not actually tell me what he had seen or did not actually tell me what he had seen or what he had been through and that he'd even been in iraq that made me think that i want to be with that person at that time. 12 years later after speaking to other vetera ns
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later after speaking to other veterans while competing at the invictus games he started looking at his own treatment but nothing helped. recently, he has been taking pa rt helped. recently, he has been taking part ina helped. recently, he has been taking part in a two—year vr trial by cardiff university and cardiff university health board. virtual reality exposure therapy for three and br involves patients walking on and br involves patients walking on a treadmill in front of a large cinema style screen showing images of that traumatic experiences they may have witnessed. two thirds of the 42 veterans with ptsd saw an average of 40% improvement in symptoms. even with... the belief it's not just veterans that could benefit from this treatment. we can see no reason why benefit from this treatment. we can see no reason why this could not be applied to individuals with post—traumatic stress disorder or any other traumatic events and so what we're doing now is applying for funding to do a much state across
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england, scotland and wales to look at its effectiveness in the national health service. three mvr is the only treatment that is managing to help the symptoms. although the night terrors remain his daytime flashbacks have been and is com pletely flashbacks have been and is completely and the future is now looking brighter than ever. the recovery is still ongoing. it will never end. but planning wise we have gone always as a family. so it's little things like that, little steps going forward will make a difference. a bridge has collapsed in eastern taiwan, crushing fishing boats and launching an oil tanker onto the road below. video footage shows the single arched bridge collapse in the middle, dropping its buckled road and steel arch into the water within seconds. reports suggest ten people were injured. it's not clear what caused the collapse of the bridge, which was completed in 1999. the duchess of sussex has been carrying out solo engagements on the penultimate day of the royal couple's southern africa tour.
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meghan attended the university ofjohannesburg and took part in a discussion about the challenges faced by young women in accessing higher education. the duchess then visited a charity to talk about the problem of gender—based violence. prince harry is in malawi, attending a health outreach programme. the winner of the royal institute of british architect's most prestigious award, the riba stirling prize, will be announced a week today. there are six nominations for britain's best new building of 2019 which include a railway station, new council housing and a property made entirely of cork. we will be taking a closer look at each of the nominated buildings over the next week. today we look at the nevill holt opera building, the 400—seat opera house is tucked away in the leicestershire countryside. it's located in the stable block which is attached to a grade i listed building that dates back to before the year 1300.
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this is originally a stable block courtyard we have converted this beautiful historic building into an exceptional, intimate theatre. you can't see it at all from the outset, you enter the building and this remarkable space is revealed. you enter the building and this remarkable space is revealedm contrast to many opera theatres, which have gold and red velvet seats, we wanted to retain some of the character of the stable yard, we already had these rich stone walls, timberand felt already had these rich stone walls, timber and felt natural material and our first task was to make a new floor and bring the stage at ground level and we created a new roof over the courtyard to make the room but we wanted to keep a memory of the courtyard and reintroduced a large
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roof light over the space. singing. we have a mission to encourage young artists and young performers and we wa nt artists and young performers and we want them to accept and sound accident in this acoustic. the building isa accident in this acoustic. the building is a little like an instrument and we have to tune it to ensure that the young performers can hear their own voices when they are performing and we did this with adjustments to the balcony and ensuring that there were reflective surfaces which bring sound back. and the woody material very carefully designed and selected by the acoustics make sure the sound resonates but also is absorbed by the stone walls so the whole building works in harmony to get
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resident —— resonance and absorption. i can safely say there is not a bad seat to be had in this house and everywhere the music in this building sounds fantastic. you can find out more about all of the nominated buildings on the bbc arts website and watch this year's riba stirling prize live here on the bbc news channel next tuesday evening from 8:30. some breaking news coming in from the tory party conference, that conservative mps said jeffrey clifton brown according to the party attempted to bring someone into the international lounge at the conference who did not have the releva nt conference who did not have the relevant pass, know this person was stopped by a member of staff and there was some sort of demonstration with sir geoffrey at which point security staff intervened and the conservative party spokesman said the incident was unacceptable and
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he's been asked to leave the conference. he's on his way out and secretary is about to speak about law and order, nextjoin her now. today, here in manchester, the conservative party takes its rightful place as the party of law and order in britain once again. applause .we applause . we stand with the brave men and women of our police and security services. and we stand against the the gangs, they drug men, the thugs, the gangs, they drug men, the thugs, the terrorists who seek to do us
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harm. and we say that proudly and without apology, as the party that has always back the forces of law and order, and we always will. we asked him to do the most difficult ofjobs, we asked him to put themselves in harm's way, to run towards danger, to ensure that we are not in danger. being here in manchester it's impossible to forget that. just over two years ago, they said he was baked into one of the most sickening terror acts of our country ever witnessed. manchester truly experience the worst of humanity that night. but also the best. that spineless coward was admitted at the heroism of our emergency workers and britain's
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finest intelligence agencies. and as they face up to such danger, they need to know that they are not alone. they need to know that they have a prime minister, a home secretary, and a government that stands beside them. i am that home secretary. borisjohnson is that prime minister. and the conservative party is that government. applause one of my first acts as home secretary was to start recruiting 20,000 new peace officers. giving them the strength that they need in numbers. giving them new and immediate funding, and supporting and to quicken them with the powers they need to keep us safe. including lifting restrictions on emergency stop and search powers for all forces across england and wales.
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giving police officers the confidence that they need to cut down on violent crime. these are the police powers, police chiefs told me they need, i've heard their voice and i'm answering their call. i want to tell you why and there are three reasons, firstly because backing the forces of law and order essential to our dna as conservatives, giving people the security they need to lead their lives and live their lives as they choose is an essential pa rt lives as they choose is an essential part of ourfreedom. lives as they choose is an essential part of our freedom. we recognise that freedom and security are not opposites but equal. and that ensuring people can live their lives free from fear is the essential foundation for a life of liberty because the job we asked the police
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to do is ever more difficult and dangerous. these are facts that i never forget. almost every day, i passed the gates of the houses of parliament, there stands a memorial to pc palmer, killed in the line of duty on the 22nd of march 2017 giving a terror attack at the heart of our democracy. his sacrifice will never be forgotten. around the corner from my office stands a national memorial and a book containing the names of 4000 men and women killed as they went about their work, tragically we must
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now add a new name to that proud wall of honour. pc harper, a 28—year—old nearly led, simplicity and brutally killed in the line of duty on the 15th of august this year. he too will always be remembered. i will always remember visiting thames valley police the day after he was killed, they shock and the sorrow was palpable, but the determination to come together to carry on and continue their relentless pursuit ofjustice was inspiring. their safety, their dedication, and their loyalty are what i think of every single day.
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the second reason we must back the police is to remove the grape gangs and organised criminals have on our communities. they just don't and organised criminals have on our communities. theyjust don't care who they hurt or abuse. the kingpins of these criminal gangs are exploiting children, forcing them to carry to crack cocaine and heroin across carry to crack cocaine and heroin a cross we carry to crack cocaine and heroin across we will and coastal communities, threatening them into carrying guns and knives as protection, manipulating them indicating innocent people. faced with this new and growing danger, our police will know that i will pack them to get this under control. and if there has been any doubt about that commitment in the past, that that am here today —— let that am here today. recruiting 20,000
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police officers is just the start. i'm equipping police officers with the kit and tools they need to protect themselves, and others from harm. i have created a new fund it to give police chiefs the ability to train and equip police officers with tazers. it is a job of chief co nsta bles tazers. it is a job of chief constables to tazers. it is a job of chief co nsta bles to ma ke tazers. it is a job of chief constables to make that operational decision. it is the job of the home secretary to empower them to do so. iam giving secretary to empower them to do so. i am giving them that power. and today, i am announcing a £20 million package to roll up county lines drugs gangs to stop them from terrorising our towns and our villages and exploiting our children. i am also announcing a new £25 million safer streets fund for a
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new security measure of our britain's worst crime spots. and as well as giving the police the powers they need we must do much more to recognise their commitment, their bravery, and their professionalism. i have been humbled by the office as i have been humbled by the office as i have met. and the experiences that they have shared with me. this is why i have personally accelerated the work to establish the peace cove na nt. the work to establish the peace covenant. this is a patch to do more asa covenant. this is a patch to do more as a mission to help those who serve our country, to recognise the bravery, the commitment, and the sacrifices of serving and former officers. and we will enshrine this into law. we will also ensure that
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anyone who assaults a police officer receives a sentence anyone who assaults a police officer receives a sentence that truly fits the crime, to make fellas that would attack an officer think twice, that's what i mean by backing the police. and there's a third reason we must back our police. it is because this is what the people want, and what they expect us to do. this is a government driven by the people's priorities. hard—working, honest, law—abiding people whose needs are humble and whose expectations are modest. and whose demands of their government are simple. they want us to listen, they asked us to respond. and they expect us to do what we say. from crime to
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immigration, to leaving the european union, we are ready to listen and do what they want. it's called democracy. and that really should not be a controversial statement. they are a lemaster us, and we are there servants. ourjob is to deliver on their priorities. but too many people are losing faith in politics and in politician. and they are questioning the health of our democracy. because of her three yea rs our democracy. because of her three years ago, the british public turned out to vote in their millions. and they knew what they were voting for. they were told the final result would be delivered. but the euphoria and optimism of that referendum day
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has given way to frustration and to angen has given way to frustration and to anger. as a group of politicians, led byjeremy corbyn. think they know better. and have done everything possible to stand in the way of democracy, ignoring the will of the people, i was proud to be pa rt of the people, i was proud to be part of that referendum campaign, a campaign that was electrified by 19 who encouraged us to believe in a brighter britain, and i'm proud to serve in his government as we work asa serve in his government as we work as a team and focus on getting brexit done. applause. and as home secretary at this defining moment in our country's history, i have a particular
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responsibility when it comes to taking back control. it is to end the free movement of people once and for all. applause. instead, we will introduce an australian style points—based immigration system. cheering and applause. one that works in the best interests of britain, one that attracts and welcomes the brightest and the best, one that supports the brilliant scientists, the finest academic and leading people in theirfields. and one that is under the control of the british government. applause. because let me tell you something, this daughter of immigrants and needs no lectures from the north
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london metropolitan liberal elite. cheering and applause. that is what you get with the government that is driven by the people's priorities. of course, there will be only two dissenting voices. you can work out who they are... diane abbott, jeremy corbyn. because the choice isn't who the people want to be our next prime minister, it is also about who the people want to be there next home secretary. do we really want a labour home secretary he would leave our communities and the country less safe ? our communities and the country less safe? the labour party he would not even attempt to take back control of our borders, because they want to surrender our border control and extend free movement. and on policing, the labour party would stop the police from doing their
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job. and when it comes to our brilliant intelligence agencies, what can i say? the labour party trusts our foes more than our friends. applause. to all of this, i say no, no, no. applause. only the conservative party is driven by the people's priorities and that means backing the police, the country and our communities. that pragmatic approach is grounded in the good sense of the british people. it keeps us focused on what matters today. that's the lesson i took from the very person who inspired me tojoin our party. a conservative prime minister elected
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40 yea rs conservative prime minister elected 40 years ago this year. margaret thatcher knew that if you... applause. .. margaret thatcher knew that if you made the british people your compass, if you took time to understand their lives and priorities, then your direction would always be true. my policies, she said, are not based on some economic theory but on things that i and millions like me were brought up with. an honest‘s day's work, for an honest day's pay. live within your means, pay your bills on time and support the police. applause
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. that advice is as sound today as it was 40 years ago. support the police, we will. applause. this party, our conservative party is backing those who put their lives on the line for our national security. as we renew our place as the party of law and order in britain, let the message go out from this hole today, to the british people we hear you. to the police service, we back you. and to the criminals, isimply service, we back you. and to the criminals, i simply say this, we are coming after you. cheering and applause.
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we stand for the forces of right and against the forces of evil. we stand for the law—abiding majority and not the criminal minority. we stand with those who seek to do right by themselves, theirfamilies those who seek to do right by themselves, their families and their communities. and we stand by britain, ready to give the leadership of our great country deserves. so as conservatives, we must remind the public what we stand for. and, as a party of the united kingdom, we will get brexit done and deliver on the people's priorities. thank you. applause. the home secretary addressing the tory party conference and the conservative party will reclaim its place as the party of law and order and to the police service, we back you and to the criminals, we simply
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say this, she said, we are coming after you. she has been something of the past that darling for the conference and today, a standing ovation and a positive reaction. among the announcements, a £20 million package to stop county lines drugs gangs terrorising our children. a new £25 million safer street fund for new security measures for britain's worst crime spot and as well as giving the police the kit and power they need we must do more to recognise their commitment, their bravery and their professionalism. one of the biggest cheers before the speech was when she talked about a prime minister of yea rs she talked about a prime minister of years ago. margaret thatcher, she said, knew that if you made the british people your compass, if you took time to understand their lives and priorities, your direction would a lwa ys and priorities, your direction would always be true. again, she received loud applause for that. closing she said, we stand for the law—abiding
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majority and not the criminal minority. this comes as law and order, very much the focus of the conservative conference today saying they will fix the sentencing system, make sure serious criminals face tougherjail terms. that make sure serious criminals face tougher jail terms. that was from the justice secretary tougher jail terms. that was from thejustice secretary earlier said thejustice secretary earlier said the conservatives would scrap early release for violent sexual offenders and they would be required to serve two thirds of the sentence behind bars. a tougher sense of treating criminals, the feeling from today. let's go to vicki young, who was listening to priti patel‘s speech. she has always been popular at conference? yes, she is the big draw here, not just conference? yes, she is the big draw here, notjust for conference? yes, she is the big draw here, not just for today conference? yes, she is the big draw here, notjust for today but conference? yes, she is the big draw here, not just for today but they love priti patel in this audience. what she said today and the message he gave, they love just as much. what she said today and the message he gave, they lovejust as much. i think the moment when she said, i
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will speak to the criminals to say, we are coming after you, rapturous applause at that point and priti patel, saying she wants to reclaim the mantle of being the party of law and order. talking about 20,000 extra police officers, about giving taser guns to all of the police, more money to try and deal with drugs gangs as well. so a raft of policies there to really fit in with that message. the message here has been about getting brexit done and then focusing pretty clearly on crime and 20,000 extra police officers we heard borisjohnson talking about over the summer and extra money for the nhs and schools. focusing on those people's priorities, they call them, the other slogan we have heard many times from here. wanting to move on from brexit to talk about things that may be more appealing to people. but of course, the whole issue of brexit is still dominating
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here as we get closer and closer to the deadline of october the 31st, to the deadline of october the 31st, to the eu summit and of course today, confirmation that the government is going to come forward with its proposals to the eu in the next couple of days, as my colleague, chris mason reports. a morning with the media for the prime minister looks something like this. cameras everywhere, even stylistic help on offer. but after the comb, a quick ruffle of the hair. and straight away to the crux of the brexit conundrum, keeping the irish border open when the uk and ireland are following different rules after brexit. the difficulty really is going to be around the customs union and to what extent northern ireland can be retained within eu bodies at all. we have made a very good offer, we are going to make a very good offer, we will table it formally very soon.
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but there is a difficulty if you try to keep northern ireland in the customs union. one of the basic things about being a country is that you have a single customs perimeter and a single customs union. the prime minister accepts the reality, as he puts it, of customs checks being necessary on the island of ireland after brexit, but is still not providing details of how he thinks this could happen in a way that doesn't amount to moving the border somewhere else. but borisjohnson says he is compromising, with agriculture in northern ireland effectively being regulated by the european union. the uk government has already made a very considerable offer. if you look at what we're saying on the sanitary and phytosanitary arrangements, that is we are already accepting that you could have, in the famous words attributed to ian paisley the elder, you could have a situation which, as it were, in northern ireland the people are british but the cattle are irish.
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that is a big concession by the uk government. the government says the earlier idea it had submitted to brussels, so—called non—paper which suggested customs clearance zones in ireland or northern ireland, is not the same as the legal text they are going to submit in the next few days. but there is a sense that there are some in these negotiations who are just desperate to trash anything the uk suggests. who could they be thinking of? well, here was the irish deputy prime minister last night — nothing cryptic about his view on this floated idea. so what happens if there isn't a deal? mrjohnson later suggested if the eu delayed brexit again, against the government's will, it would regret it. brexit is due to happen remember, at the end of this month. how it happens, and whether it happens, remains farfrom clear. chris mason, bbc
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news, in manchester. we know —— we are in a strange position that the irish press had some details leak. boris johnson said this idea of having these control centres, these checks on both sides of the border, but back from the border, he said that wasn't the case. we had simon cove knee last night saying non—papers, the name of the proposal that went on, non—papers equals nonstarter. so it doesn't bode well for borisjohnson in his quest to try and get a deal. although he says he is still optimistic about it. there is a reason why we came up
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with the deal that we did after two years of negotiations with prime minister may and her government. what the backstop provides for is a single customs territory, it doesn't provide for britain or northern ireland to stay in the eu customs union. it provides for what's described as a singles customs territory. that satisfied our demand and our desire that there not be because customs checks north and south but also satisfied many unionists that there not be custom checks east and west. a single customs terriroty designed specifically to meet that need and that's why we ended up with the backstop and that's why the backstop actually is the best solution, because it avoids customs posts north and south and also avoids customs posts east and west by having the entire uk within a single customs territory. as we speak, i am hearing the french foreign minister has said and no—deal brexit is the most plausible outcome, as far as they are concerned. another side bar to this if you like, but while priti patel
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was walking on the stage to address theissue was walking on the stage to address the issue of law and order, there was a tory mp getting into a bit of a lather with security? yes, we have had a statement from conservative party, talking about geoffrey clifton brown. he is a senior backbench mp. he was trying to go into the international lounge, which is an area here within the press office. he was trying to get someone in there who didn't have the right pass and he was stopped by a member of staff. he seems to have got into a row with that security person. so the spokesman for the conservative party said the incident was totally unacceptable. geoffrey has been asked to leave conference and we are establishing the facts to see if action is necessary. we will always adopt a zero tolerance approach to any inappropriate behaviour to our hard—working staff. any inappropriate behaviour to our ha rd—working staff. we any inappropriate behaviour to our hard—working staff. we will see if any more comes of that, but it caused quite a scrum and a lot of
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interest as it was going on. everyone wasn't sure what happened and the details still are a little bit vague but sir geoffrey clifton brown has been told he has to leave the conference. anything else going on today? i think that's it. i will let you go and have a cup of tea. vicki young, at the conservative party conference. there have been violent clashes in hong kong between police and protestors as china celebrates the 70th anniversary of communist rule. one protestor has been shot in the chest with live ammunition and at least 51 people are in hospital. two are in a critical condition. thousands of demonstrators took to the streets in defiance of a ban on protests and were met with police firing tear gas and live rounds. the demonstrations took place as the chinese government staged a huge military parade in beijing. a warning that this report from our diplomatic correspondent, paul adams, contains scenes some viewers might find upsetting. one anniversary, two reactions.
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while beijing celebrated, hong kong was once again full of defiance. it began peacefully enough, protesters filling the streets to mark what they see as a black day, rejecting the communist party and its leadership. appealing to the international community to support their calls for democracy. official slogans were torn down. set alight. organisers have called this a day of grief. gunshots. it was a day of violence, too, and rage — among the worst so far. all over the city, hardcore protesters confronted the police. the response — volleys of tear
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gas and rubber bullets. one clash outside government offices witnessed by bbc correspondent stephen mcdonell. they're moving up the stairs to try and reach where the police are. charging forward. the protesters are hoping that they have the numbers, but the police are continually firing at them, round after round of rubber bullets and tear gas. and now the protesters are retreating. there's been too many rubber bullets fired, too much tear gas. and there was worse — in the market town of tsuen wan, a policeman pulled out a pistol and shot an 18—year—old protester at point—blank range. it's thought to be the first time live ammunition has been used in this way. the protester is now in hospital
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in critical condition. this was always going to be a day of high emotion, but as the authorities in beijing spoke of peaceful reunification, the reality on the streets of hong kong was very different. paul adams, bbc news. our reporter stephen mcdonnel is in hong kong and has been following the days events on the ground. he sent us this. throughout hong kong's summer of discontent people have been worried that eventually somebody would be shot with a live round and that's exactly what happened today. the police have confirmed that an officer discharged their weapon, shooting an activist in the chest and footage seems to show that protester was bashing a police officer with a pole before that happened. into the night, the conflict continues and this is the 70th anniversary of communist rule that will be remembered, not for china's achievements in hong kong,
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but for a political crisis now in its fourth month and with no sign of ending. earlier i spoke to the director of soas china institute, professor steve tsang, and i asked him if he was surprised the protests had sustained themselves for as long as they have. no, iam no, i am afraid i was not surprised it would have lasted certainly until today, the 70th anniversary of the founding of the people's republic of china. once the original issue was not resolved and the protests were wind on to become an issue of demands for democratic rights in hong kong, it was going to last. the original issue being the extradition agreement. i am wondering if you have a view what china will do next, having got through this day of celebration, is this the moment they might say enough is enough? the police shooting of one of the
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protesters may potentially be a significant turning point. if the protesters should die, i think we are going to see a major escalation by the protesters in hong kong. the dynamics may well change and we see an escalation of force being used on both sides. if the protester should, andi both sides. if the protester should, and i hope he will, survive, then we are probably still going to see some kind ofan are probably still going to see some kind of an escalation, but it will be much more potentially co ntrolla ble be much more potentially controllable and therefore, the escalations in terms of repression is the government will use may also be more carefully calibrated. we are looking at the actions of several thousand pro—democracy demonstrators, how representative of
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a——or demonstrators, how representative of a —— or are they of the wider population of hong kong? you are right, the number of people actually protesting and using violence are in the low thousands, but they are mostly young people with very little access to resources and they have been able to sustain that because they are receiving support from the wider population. you have a lot of people in hong kong for example in the professional classes, lawyers, doctors and your accountants, who will lose their license to practice if they were found to have committed anything that could give them a criminal record. so those people would never be able to go out on the front lines to support the demonstrators. but we also know a lot of money has been collected from the general public to support them, so the general public to support them, so it is a reasonable assumption that a lot of the professional
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classes are in fact supporting the demonstrators. so the government's calculation that they can arrest the low thousands of activists and it will be all over, i think is optimistic. xi jingping, will be all over, i think is optimistic. xijingping, promising to make the state system work, is he a patient man because there is no sign this is going to give soon?“ xijingping wants to make one country xijingping wants to make one cou ntry two xijingping wants to make one country two systems work, then he will have to work for a political solution in hong kong. this kind of confrontation are never resolved without some kind of political solutions. the alternative to political solutions is using very, very high level of force to repress the protesters. xi jingping very high level of force to repress the protesters. xijingping is talking about implementing the one country talking about implementing the one
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cou ntry two talking about implementing the one country two systems when he is consistently resorting to an increasing level of repression. in a speech in beijing to mark 70 years since the chinese communist party took control, president xi jinping said no force could stop china's onward march. crowds cheered as thousands of soldiers marched through tiananmen square in a display of military might. robin brant sent this report from the capital. for big birthdays, china's ruling communist party doesn't do things by halves. lined up perfectly and ready to go, 15,000 military personnel prepare to parade past the country's top political leaders. president xijinping, unhindered now by limits on his term in office, took centre stage. beside him, two predecessors — one of them, jiang zemin, so old and frail now that he needed help to his seat. looking on too were the country's most senior party officials, all of them men. surprise, surprise, security is very tight here ahead of the parade. the police just moving a few people
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down from the main thoroughfare, where we will see the tanks later. but make no mistake, china does want the world to look in at this event. the military leadership have said this is not about the show of force, but this is definitely about china showing off on its 70th birthday about how far it's come. translation: it was today 70 years ago that chairman mao stood at this very place and announced solemnly the founding of the people's republic of china. before today, military leaders said it wasn't supposed to be a flexing of muscle. but make no mistake, this was, more than anything, a military display by a nation that after 70 years is once again taking its place at the top table. robin brant, bbc news, beijing. breaking news coming from birmingham crown court about a romanian gang
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that targeted the cotswolds, stole cash and jewellery worth around £850,000. that is kept in and his wife who were part of the gang and what happened was they stole cash and jewellery and they have just been sentenced to a total of 27 yea rs been sentenced to a total of 27 years and four months in prison. they burgled 76 properties in affluent areas in the west midlands. these pictures, this is the west midlands police website. they were caught after one of the gang members left unusually small footprints at several of the houses they burgled. the gang were sentenced, they stole designer watches, rolex and cartier watches worth up to £30,000 each and
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asian gold items. west midlands police believe a wider gang committed far more offences and had taken cash and valuables worth millions of pounds. but this happening at birmingham crown court, the prosecutor describing the hub of the prosecutor describing the hub of the conspiracy as an aladdin's cave of stolen jewellery. so sentencing totalling 27 years and four months handed out at birmingham crown court toa handed out at birmingham crown court to a romanian gang involved in stealing cash and jewellery worth £850,000. you are watching afternoon live on bbc news. for years, we've been told to eat less red or processed meat to reduce our chance of developing cancer, but now a new study has cast doubt on that advice. an international team of experts has concluded there's little evidence to support it and the risks from eating bacon, sausages or steak has been overstated. but the study has caused widespread controversy with one scientist condemning it as "dangerously misguided". our medical correspondent,
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fergus walsh, reports. there have been repeated studies linking red and especially processed meat with heart disease and cancer. the current guidance from the government advises people to eat no more than 70g of red and processed meat a day, equivalent to two rashers of bacon or 1.5 pork sausages. now, a team of international experts has reviewed existing data and found only weak evidence that it is worth trying to cut back. it's worth stressing that they did not find there was no evidence of harm, but simply that it was very weak. the argument here is not so much about the evidence, but how it's interpreted. there's agreement on the evidence linking processed meat to cancer risk. it's a small effect, but it is there. what's different here is that the researchers are recommending that it doesn't matter that much on an individual level. it doesn't matter that much on an individual level, but when you look at it across a lot of people, those effects can really add up. in 2015, the world health organization said eating 50g of processed meat a day,
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less than two slices of bacon, increased the chances of getting bowel cancer by 18%. in the uk, six out of every 100 people will get bowel cancer at some point. if we all ate an extra 50g of bacon a day for the rest of our lives, one more person per 100 would get bowel cancer. so what did customers at this cafe in central london make of the latest research? i laughed. something like this is always coming out in the news. "you can't eat this, you can eat this. "you shouldn't eat this, you should eat this. "have milk, don't have milk. "have meat, don't have meat." i mean, i'm lost. the job i do, i'm so active anyway that i can pretty much eat anything i like. yeah, i don't think it's a problem in moderation. i'd rather stay away from processed, because i don't know exactly what goes into that. as far as red meats are concerned, straight off the cow, ain't done me no harm.
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so cutting back on the amount of bacon or burgers you eat may make very little difference to your individual risk of getting bowel cancer, but across a whole population, it could mean preventing thousands of cases per year. fergus walsh, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello. the recent wet weather has increased the flood warning numbers across england and wales, over 70 now and we have more downpours in the forecast through england and wales this afternoon. stay wet and windy across the isle of man into northern england. the rain slowly petering out but an amber warning issued by the met office of isle of man. but further south, yellow warning is in force for heavy showers and thunderstorms which could cause localised flooding. high teens and celsius in the north but bright with some sunshine. as we
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head to this evening and overnight the colder air sinks outwards, pushes the rain and showers away and most pushes the rain and showers away and m ost pla ces pushes the rain and showers away and most places will be dry and a few blustery showers across northern scotla nd blustery showers across northern scotland which will be wintry over the hills and it will be cold. a touch of frost across northern england and scotland. we have a run of arctic air on wednesday but also a ridge of high pressure which should bring some sunshine and dry weather too much of the country before more wind and rain starts to push in on thursday. as a team and focus on getting brexit done.
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this is bbc news, our latest headlines. in hong kong, a teenage protester is in a critical condition after being shot in the chest at point blank range by police, during violent clashes. 51 people have been hospitalised. meanwhile in china, a huge military parade has taken place in beijing as part of celebrations of the seventieth anniversary of the chinese communist state.
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borisjohnson has rejected leaked claims that the government has proposed "customs clearance zones" to tackle the irish border issue. a new study has concluded there's little evidence that eating red meat, sausages and bacon increases the risk of cancer. coming up: the countdown is on for this year's royal institute sport now on afternoon live: there is one story dominating sports and it is that shock of mo farah's former college but ramifications nevertheless. alberto salazar best known for being the former coach of mo farah has been banned for doping violations and has been given a four year from athletics. mo violations and has been given a four yearfrom athletics. mo farah violations and has been given a four year from athletics. mo farah as you mentioned has neverfailed a drug test and he's released a statement saying he last —— the left side of our‘s project in 2017 and he has no
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tolerance for anyone who breaks the rules but this has sent shock waves through the world of athletics because salazar is such a big name. but this is off a play investigation by the us anti—doping agency and in 2015 the bbc panorama programme broadcast the allegations, plus there's been a two—year crate case and after all of that, salazar has been found to have violated a doping regulation and he has been banned from athletics for four years. salazar has said that he is shocked and he will appeal but the findings are very and he will appeal but the findings are very disturbing. i will take you through them, an independent panel found salazar and a doctor in his employee, possessed and trafficked a bond performance enhancing substance and administered or attempted to administer a prohibited method to multiple track and field athletes. investigation added that salazar tempered and attempted to tamper with the doping control process. as
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he had mentioned, it's worth reiterating there are no allegations against mo farah, he spent six years working under salazar at the origin project before he left in 2017. he said he did not leave because of the allegations against salazar, and a former olympic silver medallist who isa former olympic silver medallist who is a bbc commentator also an ambassadorfor is a bbc commentator also an ambassador for nike says mo is a bbc commentator also an ambassadorfor nike says mo farah has not done anything wrong. mo farah isa has not done anything wrong. mo farah is a great champion and he has not done anything wrong. to create some guilt by association. by implication, he has never been found guilty of any offence and so you have to accept that. if a changes, 18 days but that the situation. it's up 18 days but that the situation. it's up to the public or anybody else to makejudgements up to the public or anybody else to make judgements about anything in life. we all have opinions on things and that's fair enough. but at the moment, there's absolutely nothing that says it is anything with what
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mo farah is doing. his first statement is on the bbc sport website you can find a pair plus the other reaction to this developing story. you are doing something now that you have not been for a long time and that is british tennis. many people will be pleased to hear that eight months on from surgery on his hip, former world number one andy murray has had a second run since for singles tennis and he has beaten the world number 13. it was 7-6, 7-6, both beaten the world number 13. it was 7—6, 7—6, both type and both sets, they battled from behind in both sets, he's one of them into the toughest players on the tour, because he has been out for so long he's currently ranked 503rd in the world. but because of that he will claim at least 100 paces after that we set up a missionary he could climb to around 370. there are a far cry from being the world number one backin cry from being the world number one back in 2016, but as the mention
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he's deleted a second round in beijing and he will now meet his british compatriots cameron in the second round but the most important thing about this match if he was pain—free and he enjoyed it. thing about this match if he was pain-free and he enjoyed it. just not being in payment now making tennis a bit more fun so the practise and the preparation for 20 minutes it's a lot easier the last two years that was not the case and i was finding it really stressful and was not getting much enjoyment out of it so it's a little bit different now which is nice. maybe we will see more smiles from and be merry in the future then. my chest as if he confirmed that kevin de bruyne will mix their champions league match tonight because of a groin injury. he hasn't said to have picked up the problem and his 3—1 win over everton over the weekend and no timeframe has been given as yet for his return. that's all this
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but for now we will have more for you in the next hour. engine for cheering us up. —— thank you for cheering us up. —— thank you for cheering us up. —— thank you for cheering us up. let's get more now on the tory conference and the latest efforts to get a brexit deal. the question of how to avoid customs checks on the island of ireland after we leave the eu has proved to be among the most difficult challenges thrown up by brexit. our reality check correspondent, chris morris, explains why it has proved so intractable. the irish border, it's the main reason why theresa may's efforts to negotiate an orderly withdrawal from the european union were rejected in the european union were rejected in the house of commons three times. uk and eu negotiators agree what became known as the backstop, but now boris johnson insists that it has to go. here's a reminder of exactly what it is. the backstop based talks of the future of the irish border after brexit, why? because this line between the irish republic and
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northern ireland will be the only land border between the uk and the european union. and that matters portrayed. because in theory there should be checked some stuff crossing the border after brexit. but no one wants new inspections at the party. they bring back memories of 30 years of conflict in northern ireland, and checkpoints could become a target. so that's where the backstop comes in. it's a legal guarantee to avoid a hard border under all circumstances. it's part of the agreement that sets out the uk withdraw from the eu, an agreement the british government is now seeking to renegotiate. the backstop would come into effect only if the uk and the eu can't agree a future trade deal after brexit. it would mean that the whole of the uk would mean that the whole of the uk would stay in the same customs territory as the eu. with northern ireland even more closely tied to eu rules, and the rest of the uk. that's just not acceptable to the current government. it went straight across the border to continue, but
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insists that uk sovereignty must be respected. some checks on the extent that any take place away from the pa rt that any take place away from the part in warehouses or business premises. let's let you talk of customs clea ra nce premises. let's let you talk of customs clearance centres or whatever, there would be checks of some kind and then add to friction his trade. that's not getting a warm reception in dublin or among business groups in northern ireland. it's of deep concern, this is contradictory to a lot of the advice that both myself and their freight transport association and every business organisation in the right the government in the last two and half years. talks would intensify in brussels but unless the eu has a big change of heart, it looks likely to reject the kind of solutions the government is suggesting. the tory party conference in manchester, the secretary has said the conservative party is now the party of law and order once again. she was talking about brexit and many other issues, she said the government would allow
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changes to immigration policies, this is what she had to say. as home secretary, at this defining moment in our country's history. i had a particular responsibility when it comes to taking back control. it is to end the free movement of people once and for all. instead, we will introduce an australian style points—based immigration system. applause. one that works in the best interests of britain, one that attracts and welcomes the brightest and the best. one that supports the brilliant scientist, the finest academics and leading people in theirfield. and one that is under the control of the british government. applause.
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because let me tell you something, this daughter of immigrants and needs no lectures from the north london metropolitan liberal elite. applause. and the home secretary also announced more government investment in policing. today i am announcing a £20 million package to roll up county lines drugs gangs, to stop them from terrorising our towns and villages and exploiting our children. applause. i am also announcing a new £25 million safer streets fund for new security measures for britain's worst crime spots. and as well as giving the police the kit and the powers they need, we must do much more to recognise their commitment, their bravery and their professionalism.
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applause. i have been humbled by the officers i have met and the experiences they have shared with me. this is why i have personally accelerated the work to establish the police covenant. this is a pledge to do more as a nation to help those who serve our country, to recognise the bravery, the commitment and the sacrifices of serving and former officers. and, we will enshrine this into law. applause. we will also ensure that anyone who assaults a police officer receives a sentence that truly fits the crime. to make the thugs that would attack an officer think twice. that's what i mean by backing the police. applause.
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could virtual reality help in unlocking the trauma experienced by members of the armed forces? researchers in wales are working with former soldiers to develop a new treatment for post traumatic stress disorder. the technology allows the soldiers to experience simulated warzones, as a way of confronting the pain of the past. the early signs are promising, as tomos morgan reports. at its worst, i... i attempted to take my own life. matt neve joined the raf at 16. two years later he was in iraq, as a driver transporting injured and dead soldiers from the conflict. you have all these emotions flowing through you, you know? fear, upset, you know, anxiety and it all kind of hits you in one wave, because you don't really know what's going on. that took its toll on me, the constant... just seeing that on a daily basis.
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just a year later and matt was medically discharged. he'd began having night terrors, flashbacks, drinking heavily and prone to angry outbursts, and those symptoms began taking a toll on his family. at the time, i did not know why matt's behaviour was like that because he didn't actually tell me what he had seen or he had been through, or about he'd even been in iraq. it made me think, "did i particularly want to be with that person," at the time. 12 years later, after speaking to other veterans whilst competing at the invictus games, matt started looking for his own treatment, but nothing helped. we're going to walk back towards that time of your deployment... recently, though, he's been taking part in a two—year vr trial by cardiff university and cardiff university health board. virtual reality exposure therapy — or 3mdr — involves patients walking on a treadmill in front of a large cinema—style screen, showing images of the traumatic experiences they may have witnessed. i see boots on the ground.
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blood. two thirds of the 42 veterans with treatment—resistant ptsd saw on average almost a 40% improvement in symptoms. even with the evidence available now... and the belief is, that it is not just veterans that could benefit from this treatment. we can see no reason why this could not be applied to individuals with ptsd following other traumatic events, and so what we are doing now is applying for funding to do a much larger study across england, scotland and wales to look at its effectiveness in the national health service. 3mdr is the only treatment that's managed to help matt's symptoms. although the night terrors remain, his daytime flashbacks have diminished completely and the future's now looking brighter than ever. the recovery journey is still ongoing, it'll never end but, planning—wise, we are going away as a family, and that is something we would not have done before, really, so it's just little things like that,
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little steps going forward, that will make the bigger difference. four romanian men and a romanian woman who broke into around 400 homes in the west midlands have been sentenced to a total of more than 27 years in prison. the gang stole millions of pounds worth ofjewellery but evaded capture until police investigating a separate offence spotted an unusual link. sian lloyd reports. she was photographed wearing some of the jewellery she helped dispose of, stolen from homes across the west midlands by a group led by her husband. the security camera footage shows him clambering up bed sheets, the group often entered and exited houses through upstairs windows to avoid ground—floor alarm systems.
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david and norma richardson's home was one of the last to be burgled before the gang was caught.” was one of the last to be burgled before the gang was caught. i think ijust before the gang was caught. i think i just could not accept before the gang was caught. i think ijust could not accept it, i did not realise someone had been in there taking everything when we started looking, everything was gone. just some of the items yet to be reunited with their rightful owners. found at a house rented by the gang and described as an lighting's cable of starting jewellery. they evaded capture for yea rs jewellery. they evaded capture for years until a footprint left by them trip them up. we noticed from the start that whoever was committing the offence has had very small feet and they were leaving a footwear impression the same trainer and the same pattern. when police stopped his carfor a separate same pattern. when police stopped his car for a separate offence they found his footprints matched. it led them to the other gang members, today they have been sentenced to a total of just over 27 years
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today they have been sentenced to a total ofjust over 27 years in prison. in a moment the latest business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. in hong kong, a teenage protester is in a critical condition after being shot in the chest at point blank range by police, during violent clashes. 51 people have been hospitalised. borisjohnson has rejected leaked claims that the government has proposed "customs clearance zones" to tackle the irish border issue. a new study has concluded there's little evidence that eating red meat, sausages and bacon increases the risk of cancer. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. thomas cook's auditor, ey is to be investigated. the accountancy watchdog, the frc, has launched a probe into the collapse of the travel firm and the way its accounts were compiled by ey which could potentially lead to the imposition of unlimited fines. thomas cook collapsed last week, putting 9,000 uk staff out of work.
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thejohn lewis partnership has annonced a major shake up, which lead to the integration of its department store and waitrose management teams for the first time. the current managing director of waitrose, rob collins is to step down, and 75jobs will go at the retailer's head office. uk house price growth has ‘almost ground to a halt‘ in september, that's according to the nationwide building society. it said activity in the housing market had been slow, but stable, for two years.and that the average home is now valued atjust over £215,000. the changing rooms atjohn millis are busy. the revolving door of management and my friend has you are a beach —— big shopper. i'll tell you why. there is something which links with what we will talk about.
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there is this big shake—up going on at thejohn there is this big shake—up going on at the john lewis there is this big shake—up going on at thejohn lewis partnership. we chose and john lewis management teams are going to be mixed by the first time ever. john millis has been a darling of the high street. the first ever half yearly loss recently unveiled. another sign of the times with evidence going on with the way we shop and the fact that people are not feeling that confident at the moment. what we have seen is the management of waitrose in particular, the managing director is stepping down. the current managing director ofjohn lewis is going to become the executive director for a brand, lewis is going to become the executive directorfor a brand, they will be seven directors. this has to be approved not by the usual kind of bored but rememberjohn the lease has equal partners. so they have a board of partners and they will have to get together and vote on whether or not this is the change they want to see. but i mentioned they share price and the reason we are looking
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at that is because argos has already stepped down and of course our gas has been bought by salsberry, like the changes going on, let's find out what's going on because jeremy stretch, head of currency strategy at cibc world markets. lots of change in the world of retail a sign of how tough things are. that's absolutely correct. you talked about that first half lost and john millis which really is unprecedented in the sense of the management team recognising that cost cutting is a necessary constituent in order to perpetuate the basement so that's what they are doing in this particular instance of it will be painful for the management team but costs will be cuts under this potential plan and of course they are undergoing their own structural difficulties with star closures being recently announced and it seems to be the case that obviously the senior management level there may have been recognition that difficult times are ahead so maybe there's an opportunity to look to move
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elsewhere outside of the retail space. an eagle eye view would have noticed that dow is down by three quarters of a present at the moment. we have heard news on both sides of the atlantic and surveys perhaps that might not have been the easiest to digest. you are right. being a separate —— equity market has fallen significantly in the last hour. after this manufacturing sentiment numbers out of the us which reflected a contraption and manufacturing sentiment in the recent month this is the first time we have seen back to back months before since late 2016. there are some obvious headwinds in terms of the manufacturing sector in the us. but in the uk of course he had seen even greater degrees of pressure so we have seen five straight months of contraction in the manufacturing sector and that just underlines contraction in the manufacturing sector and thatjust underlines some of the difficulties being faced by the economy and one of the reasons why we have the member is talking about the prospect of cuts i had. with or without at the which of christ has been quite a change in position for that particular member.
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great to talk to you. quite a mixed picture, lots of things to be concerned about. it's good that you have summarised it so succinctly. thank you. that's all the business news. the winner of the royal institute of british architect's most prestigious award, the riba stirling prize, will be announced a week today. there are six nominations for britain's best new building of 2019 which include a railway station, new council housing and a property made entirely of cork. we will be taking a closer look at each of the nominated buildings over the next week. today we look at the nevill holt opera building the 400—seat opera house is tucked away in the leicestershire countryside. it's located in the stable block which is attached to a grade i listed building that dates back to before the year 1300.
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this is originally a stable block courtyard. we've converted this beautiful, historic building into an exceptional but intimate theatre. you can't see it at all from the outside. you enter the building and this remarkable space is revealed. in contrast to many opera theatres which have gold and red velvet seats, we wanted to retain some of the character of the stable yard. we already had these rich iron stone walls, timber and felt a natural material to go to. our first task is to make a new floor, to bring the stage at ground level. we then created a new roof over the courtyard to make the room. but we wanted to keep a memory of the courtyard and so we introduced a large rooflight over the space. classical singing.
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we have a mission at nevill holt opera to encourage young artists and young performers and we want them to excel and sound excellent in this acoustic. the building is a little bit like an instrument and we had to tune it to ensure young performers can hear their own voices when they're performing. we did this with adjustments to the form of the balcony and ensuring there are reflective surfaces which bring the sound back to the performers. and the wooden material, very carefully designed and selected by the acousticians makes sure that the sound resonates but also is absorbed by the stone walls, so the whole building works in harmony. we get resonance and absorption. i can safely say there is not a bad seat to be had in this
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house and everywhere, the music in this building sounds fantastic. you can find out more about all of the nominated buildings on the bbc arts website and watch this year's riba stirling prize live here on the bbc news channel next tuesday evening from 8:30. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello there. the recent wet weather has increased the flood warning numbers across england and wales. over 70 now and we have more downpours in the forecast for england and wales through this afternoon. stays very wet, rather windy across the isle of man into northern england. the rain slowly petering out here. we have an amber warning though, issued by the met office of isle of man there.
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but further south, yellow warnings in force for heavy showers and thunderstorms which could cause some localised flooding. temperatures high teens celsius in the south, sounding much cooler further north but bright here with some sunshine. as we head through this evening and overnight, that colder air sinks southwards, pushes the rain and the showers away. most places will be dry, there will be a few blustery showers across northern scotland, which will be wintry over the hills. and it's going to be cold, a touch of frost across northern england and scotland. that's because we've got a run of arctic air on wednesday, but also a ridge of high pressure which should bring some sunshine and dry weather too much of the country before more wind
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today at five — the prime minister says brussels will be won round by his new proposals on brexit. borisjohnson tells the bbc the government will offer the eu "very constructive and far reaching proposals" in the coming days. with great respect to all those who are currently anxious about it, particularly in ireland, we do think our proposals are good and creative. we'll have the latest from the conservative party conference in manchester and we'll be talking to the former northern ireland secretary lord hain. the other main stories on bbc news at 5... the worst violence in 4 months, police shoot a protestor in hong kong as china celebrates 70 years of communist rule.

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