Skip to main content

tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  October 2, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

2:00 pm
today at five... borisjohnson publishes his ‘final‘ brexit plan telling the eu the only alternative is no—deal. hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at two... a call for compromise from the eu — borisjohnson the prime minister calls it a ‘fair and reasonable compromise‘ says his plans for the irish border which gets rid of the backstop — are his "final offer", with northern ireland the only alternative, he says, staying in the european is a no—deal brexit. single market for goods, but leaving the customs union. yes, yes, this is a compromise by earlier he told the conservative party conference his plan would need both sides to change their positions. the uk and i hope very much that our yes, this is a compromise by the uk andi yes, this is a compromise by the uk friends understand that and and i hope ourfriends understand compromise in their town. —— tone. that and compromise in their turn. the letter says the proposals protect the good friday agreement and provide security for farmers as the duke and duchess of sussex end their tour and businesses on both sides of the irish border. of southern africa, they launch a court case against a sunday newspaper for publishing a private letter. hundreds of people in hong kong stage a sit—in at the school of a teenage activist shot by police during violent clashes. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. manchester city's bernardo silva has been charged with misconduct by the
2:01 pm
football association for his social media post about team—mate benjamin mendy. thank you. and darren has the forecast. the sun is out, chance to dry off today but there is a hurricane called lorenzo heading towards the uk. we will have a look at its history and where it's going and what impact we can expect in the next few days. i shall see you later on here in the studio, thank you, darren. also coming up — tributes are paid to former itn and bbc newsreader and former question time host peter sissons, who has died at the age of 77. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. in his first conference speech as conservative leader, borisjohnson has called for compromise from brussels, saying the proposals he is putting forward to resolve the brexit deadlock are "constructive and reasonable". the prime minister used his speech
2:02 pm
to confirm parts of his new offer to the eu. his proposed brexit deal is being briefed to eu member states now. and will be formally presented to the negotiating teams this afternoon. we're expecting the full details of the plan any moment, which the government wants to kick in at the end of a transition period at the beginning of 2021. what we do know is there will need to be some new customs checks on the island of ireland, although borisjohnson has insisted they won't be near the border. it suggests northern ireland would leave the customs union under the proposals, allowing it to take part in any new trade deals struck by the uk with countries around the world. but there would also be increased regulatory checks on products crossing the irish sea between northern ireland and the rest of the uk. that suggests northern ireland would stay in parts of the single market under the deal. the government we understand is calling this plan ‘two borders
2:03 pm
for four years‘. and to ensure the people of northern ireland are onside with this arrangement, the stormont assembly would be given more powers to shape northern ireland's future relationship with the eu. the deal also suggests a time period after which the relationship between northern ireland and the eu could change. but the assembly is currently suspended. the european commission said they will "examine the proposals objectively" but they have firmly rejected similar proposals in the past. chris mason has this report. you won't have to wait much longer for brexit, has been the prime minister's message here. so keen were party members to see boris johnson's first conference speech as leader, they started queueing before dawn even thought of cracking. to a blast of the who, he was in the hall, and soon talking brexit. after three and a half years, people are beginning to feel that they are being taken for fools, and they‘ re beginning to suspect that there are forces in this country that simply don't want brexit delivered at all. and, if they turn out to be right in that suspicion,
2:04 pm
then i believe there will be grave consequences for trust in our democracy. and that is why... ..that is why we are coming out of the eu on october 31, come what may! and then came a mention, without much detail, of what the government's doing now. today, in brussels, we are tabling what i believe are constructive and reasonable proposals, which provide a compromise for both sides. we will, under no circumstances, have checks at or near the border in northern ireland. he added that he wants to... ..protect existing regulatory arrangements for farmers and businesses on both sides of the border, and at the same time, we will allow the uk whole and entire withdrawal from the eu with control over our own trade policy from the start. applause. mrjohnson had a word or two to
2:05 pm
say about the house of commons. laughter. if parliament were a reality television show, then the whole lot of us, i'm afraid, would have been voted out of the jungle by now! applause. but, at least we'd have had the consolation of watching the speaker being forced to eat a kangaroo testicle! laughter. cabinet ministers enjoyed that one, but 200 miles south, in westminster, this was happening at the same time. questions to the prime minister. thank you, mr speaker. i have been asked to reply... and, a parliamentary first... diane abbott! the first black briton to represent a party at prime minister's questions. yesterday marked the start of black history month... back in manchester, the prime minister wanted to go beyond brexit, to talk health. we're not only recruiting more
2:06 pm
doctors and nurses and training them, but in the next ten years, we will build a0 new hospitals in the biggest investment in hospital infrastructure for a generation. and, to talk crime. the first thing you've got to do, basic hygiene, if you're going to spread opportunity, is to insist on the equal safety of everybody‘s street, wherever they live, that is why we are recruiting 20,000 police officers, thank you, priti, and indeed, thank you, saj. and this is what it looks like when you realise you've just been name checked. from there, to the conclusion. so let's get on with sensible, moderate, one nation, but tax—cutting conservative government, let's get brexit done, and let's bring this country together. thank you very much! a kiss from his girlfriend, a handshake from his dad, and the analysis of what he had to say begins. chris mason, bbc news. we can now go live to the conservative party
2:07 pm
conference in manchester, our chief political correspondent is there. perhaps one of the most surprising aspects of this, it wasn't the aggressive approach many were predicting? no, there had been some briefing saying this is going to be the final offer from the uk and it would be take it or leave it for brussels. the prime minister didn't repeat those words, although he did say he felt it was a generous compromise by the uk and he hoped it would be taken in that spirit by brussels and that they also would compromise. the speech, as you would expect, going down very well with those in the hole. they came out all of them telling me they were energised, ready for a general election if we ever get to that point. iam election if we ever get to that point. i am joined election if we ever get to that point. iamjoined by election if we ever get to that point. i am joined by matt hancock, the health secretary. the speech didn't feel that prime ministerial, lots of jokes but didn't feel that prime ministerial, lots ofjokes but no new policies. was it a serious speech from a prime minister? yes, a very optimistic speech. typical burris, of course there were lots ofjokes and he
2:08 pm
tells them very well but there was also a thread and a story through it, which is once we get brexit done, we can get on to building all the things britain wants to see in helping people in all parts of the country to live their best life. whether that is on the health service, building 40 new hospitals over the next decade, or whether it is on schools and the police and transport, infrastructure— he set out that one nation vision very clearly. he also dealt with brexit because in order to get onto that, we have to get brexit done. that slogan has been everywhere this week, we have heard it many times but it is pretty simplistic, isn't it? it is notjust a matter of getting brexit done but how you do it and there are still many people, people i spoke to in the audience, who are very concerned about the possibility of a no—deal brexit, as you yourself must be as well? i truly believe that we have to deliver on the referendum result, because even though i've voted
2:09 pm
remain, i believe in democracy. 0ne of the things the prime minister talked about in a way i haven't heard him talk about before, is how delivering brexit is notjust something that those who voted leave frustrated about that there are so many people who voted remain who wa nt many people who voted remain who want to get it done so we can then move forward. i think the best way to do that is with a deal. the new deal that the prime minister is proposing an is being briefed to european capitals right now, which we will publish later this afternoon, i think that is a good compromise approach. it is sensible and reasonable and a good way through the technical details, because although it is the technical details that need to be agreed with the european union, ultimately, the big reason we need to get brexit doneis big reason we need to get brexit done is one of high principle, which is we live in a democracy and when we have democratic votes, whether you agree with the result or not, we implement them. you say technical details, it's more than that. some
2:10 pm
people looking at these, we know there will be checks on the island of ireland. for some people, that is risking peace. they really feel that is going to risk the piece that is so is going to risk the piece that is so precious there. it is going to be a problem, isn't it? it's very, very important that we maintain the good friday agreement. we maintain the progress that has been seen in northern ireland and the prime minister is absolutely clear that there will not be checks at or near the border. but we also need to resolve the problem of having been in the european union and now we are leaving... they will become a focus, when they, for people? there are ways through that and they will be published later. but i hope what happens when they are published as they are taken in the spirit of compromise and trying to find a solution. and then we can get onto all the other positive things we want to do, for instance oi'i things we want to do, for instance on the nhs. do you think it would be a deal that could get through
2:11 pm
parliament? we know a number of your collea g u es parliament? we know a number of your colleagues didn't vote for theresa may's deal and the dup as well, are they onside with all this? i very much hope that this will go through parliament. the overriding sense in the country as we need to get it done. there was a funny part of the speech when the prime minister, talking about how he wanted a general election, because we are in this extraordinary time is where the prime minister wants a general election but the leader of the opposition won't let him have one, which has never happened before. i think that a compromise that allows us to move forward from this and past the stage the country has been in the last three years, i do believe, i'm confident, i hope it will go through parliament. i think it will be very, very sensible for parliament to vote for it. what about an extension, a delay to brexit? what would it achieve? it's the law. head of the 29th of march
2:12 pm
we had this debate and we ended up with an extension. it didn't make any difference, when it comes to needing to leave with a deal. we have to respect the result of the referendum. the best way to do that is with a deal. but we do have to respect that result and then we can get on with all of the positive things, and ultimately, the speech was one of the most optimistic i have heard from a prime minister in years, and that is energising. 0k, matt hancock, thank you very much indeed. lot of chatter about a general election here, ministers very confident that if that were to happen and they would say there is, of course, they believe boris johnson can come back with a majority to try and move on, as they say, from all the talk of brexit. talking of chat, are you losing your voice? it's been a long three weeks! laughter thank you very much, vicki young. as
2:13 pm
we we re thank you very much, vicki young. as we were hearing, borisjohnson talking about how to move forward without checks at the northern ireland border. emma vardy reports. this pivotal frontier is invisible on the ground, and all sides have agonised over how to keep it that way. borisjohnson‘s new plans for the irish border are expected to require new compromise. and northern ireland's democratic unionists are key. they rejected theresa may's agreement because it created differences between northern ireland and the rest of the uk. they have been much warmer towards borisjohnson‘s position. we want to see an agreement reached, one that we can support, nigel has talked about this, one that works for every part of the united kingdom and, indeed, for our friends and neighbours in the republic of ireland
2:14 pm
and other eu member states. the land border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland is open for the movement of goods because right now, we are all following the same eu rules. after brexit, goods crossing the border would need to be checked. it's expected the new proposals will require northern ireland to follow eu rules on some things, like animal health, creating a border down the irish sea. but to remain part of the uk's regime when it comes to customs duties. that's always gone against the demands of the eu, and, crucially, the irish government. it's not good news, we don't believe that customs checks on the island of ireland will be the basis of an agreement between the eu and the uk. but, let's wait and see the detail of the proposals, when we get them later on, and we will make a much fullerjudgment. lying behind why the border issue has been so emotive, is northern ireland's history
2:15 pm
of conflict, removing any sign of a border was fundamental to ending 30 years of violence. today, northern ireland's conflict is largely in the past, but brexit has rekindled old divisions. borisjohnson has promised no checkpoints near the border, but for many across this island, who want no new checks at all, that's unlikely to go far enough. trade, north and south here, based on shared membership of the eu, means there is so much at stake. thousands of livelihoods will depend on what the new brexit offer can deliver. emma vardy, bbc news, belfast. our europe correspondent damian grammaticas is in brussels. leaders ignore the eu countries will look at this beach and ask themselves, is borisjohnson serious about a deal? simon, they are going to look even more at the text of what he is putting on the table, because
2:16 pm
finally they have something, now boris johnson's finally they have something, now borisjohnson‘s g folk frost arrived here about 15 minutes ago, clutching a small case. he inside the building to deliver that. —— david frost. michel barnier will brief eu countries later today and jean—claude juncker, president of the commission here, we'll talk to both angela merkel and borisjohnson this afternoon. so that process of evaluating this will begin. the eu says they will evaluate this proposal against their already stated criteria. that basically means, does this achieve what the eu and the uk, crucially, were saying, signed up to at least outset of the process in december 2017, the beginning of the negotiations, boris johnson as foreign secretary agreed in thejobjoint report johnson as foreign secretary agreed in the job joint report act, no infrastructure or controls on the
2:17 pm
island of ireland to keep the borders open. the signs are the eu and ireland are already deeply sceptical and are not likely to see this as a that, because it imposes a customs border on the island of ireland. however you dress that up, whatever the prime minister said in his speech or you heard matt hancock a few minutes ago saying technology and these wouldn't be at the border... from the irish and eu point of view, it still means controls and disruption to live in northern ireland. it still means a break in the interlinked economy and crucially also to work it seems this also requires or would require the eu to be asked to grant all sorts of exemptions to small businesses in ireland and northern ireland. for tax collection at the border, for vat to be waived as well. for the eu, those are huge holes. so
2:18 pm
difficult to see how this will go but with the eu view this as a basis for negotiation? perhaps. it is interesting, borisjohnson‘s gamble is clearly appealing for compromise from the eu or it is a no—deal brexit. that is what he is basically saying, isn't he? yes. that is what he laid out. there are problems with that because number one, i think the eu will not view this as a compromise. as i was saying, they will view this as a significant step away from the commitment made by the uk in december 2017 to have no infrastructure at all on the island of ireland and the uk's commitment to the good friday agreement, the peace process in northern ireland. the eu will also view this as problematic because of the issue of, does this address all the questions in ireland, does it have support fully of the communities in northern
2:19 pm
ireland? fully of the communities in northern ireland ? it seems fully of the communities in northern ireland? it seems unlikely, because it would impose controls both customs control box going to ireland and across regulatory controls across to the uk. those are problematic. equally, that question of a cce pt problematic. equally, that question of accept this or accept a no deal, from the irish point of view, what's being proposed here, customs checks, although away from the border, is what would happen in no deal. then you ask yourself, why would the irish government want to agree to this now, rather than seek a better alternative of which it says there are several on the table? damian grammaticus in brussels, thank you. our reality check correspondent chris morris is here. customs checks on the island of ireland have so far been a complete no—no? they have, and one of the reasons for that, if you take a step back, cooperation between north and south on the island of ireland, this kind of idea that lies at the heart of the good friday agreement relies on
2:20 pm
very large part and has done from the beginning, on both countries, the beginning, on both countries, the republic of ireland and the uk, northern ireland, being in the same legal system, being in the same economic policy system within the european union. don't forget, ireland and the ukjoined european union. don't forget, ireland and the uk joined the european union. don't forget, ireland and the ukjoined the eu at the same time in the 19705. there has never been a case where one of them has been in and one of them out. so that rather pull5 them has been in and one of them out. so that rather pulls the rug, a lot of people in ireland fear, from underneath that delicately, that delicate balance which was put together in the good friday agreement. that is a real problem. and yes, we had from the prime minister, we will hear more and see more in terms of the legal text sometime later this afternoon, no customs checks on or near the border. how do you define near? is it ten miles, 20 miles, and how much difference does that make in terms of the very sensitive political message it sends to both sides in northern ireland ? thi5 northern ireland ? this idea of effectively two
2:21 pm
borders, what is your understanding of how that would work? in effect, you would have a cu5tom5 border on the island of ireland but also a borderfor border on the island of ireland but also a border for checking border on the island of ireland but also a borderfor checking product standards and standards for animals and food for a few years between northern ireland and the rest of great britain. so, if you like, a board of the regulations down the irish sea, a borderfor customs down the island of ireland. we had from damien, it won't go down particular well with the rest of the eu. in a sense, one of the big questions is, does the eu turn round and say no straightaway? or does it say, we will try and engage with this, with the hope from their perspective of pulling it into a slightly different shape? we know there was a briefing from downing street over night saying it is a final offer but we didn't really hear that from boris johnson in his speech. in an interview with the sun this morning when he was asked, would you look at a counteroffer? he said of course we will look at anything they say. so these things are always subject to a bit of a tweak here and there. the
2:22 pm
trouble with this is, it's a very farfrom trouble with this is, it's a very far from what the eu has previously signalled it would be prepared to accept, it seems a big jump to get anywhere close to a deal in the next couple of weeks. i wanted to come onto that, the clock is ticking. remind us of the timetable at the moment. the clock is ticking because, we have said this again, under law, if nothing changes, we are supposed to leave the eu deal or no deal on the 315t leave the eu deal or no deal on the 31st of october. of course, we now have the ben act as part of the law which instructs the prime minister if there is no deal or no vote in favour of no deal by the 19th of october to ask for an extension. we know the government has said it is not prepared to do that. does boris johnson break his promise or does he break the law? that is something which is going to have to play out over the next couple of weeks. those who drafted the benn act seem pretty confident it's watertight. the government seems equally confident we are going to ignore it. that's something we have to look at. the other things worth mentioning in terms of this phrase get brexit done
2:23 pm
and then we can get on with everything else, we won't pay into the budget and everything else. even the budget and everything else. even the borisjohnson the budget and everything else. even the boris johnson plan the budget and everything else. even the borisjohnson plan as we understand it, and we have to see the legal text, the idea of this two borders would only begin in 2021. there would still be a 15 month transition period when we would still be paying into the budget, when all the rules stay the same and in those 15 months, the idea is we would negotiate an entire free trade agreement and our future relationship with the european union, which as we have discussed before, again in the times of the time frame, is an extremely tight timetable. my computer says the imo irish prime minister says he will speak to boris johnson irish prime minister says he will speak to borisjohnson on the phone this evening. that relationship will be crucial? it is. we have to remember, no deal is not a good look for ireland. it relies tremendously on its trade with and through great britain. we talk a lot about north—south trade on the island of ireland across the land border but
2:24 pm
actually for both northern ireland and the republic of ireland, economically what is more significant is the trade to britain. but it is because of the political sensitivities at the border that thatis sensitivities at the border that that is where so much of the focus is and why it has become the biggest stumbling block towards an orderly withdrawal from the eu. thank you, chris morris. the duchess of sussex is suing the the mail on sunday newspaper over the publication of a private letter she wrote to her father, sent shortly after she and prince harry got married in 2018. the duke said the legal action was in response to "relentless propaganda" against her. the paper says it will defend itself "vigorously". our correspondent nicholas witchell is with the royal couple on their tour of southern africa. business, at least on the surface, as usual. the final day of the sussexes‘ trip to southern africa and a visit to a township nearjohannesburg. the theme, youth unemployment and how to generate jobs. as ever, the media interest was intense. but away from the photo calls
2:25 pm
one issue was dominant. the sussexes‘ attack on the british tabloid media. this article in the mail on sunday last february is what triggered it. it quoted extracts from a private letter from the duchess to her father. she is taking legal action against the paper for alleged breach of privacy. but it is the outspoken statement by the duke which has caused sharp surprise. he spoke of a "ruthless campaign" against his wife. he went on: he recalled the hounding of his late mother, diana. in a speech, harry spoke of his love for africa, which had helped him after his mother was killed and then, this general observation.
2:26 pm
we will firmly stand up for what we believe. we are fortunate enough to have a position that gives us amazing opportunities and we will do everything that we can to play our part in building a better world. meghan also spoke, offering some final thoughts in praise of the people they'd met and in support of the different issues they have championed. the visit has been important for both of them. by pretty common consent, much of it of course expressed in the tabloid press, the sussexes have had a very successful visit to southern africa. but they end the tour at loggerheads with an entire section of the british media. in london, the editor of the mail on sunday, ted verity, said nothing as he arrived at his office. the paper said it stands by its story and will defend the case vigorously. if the case is fought out in open court, it's conceivable
2:27 pm
that the sussexes will have to give evidence. it will be a defining moment for them, the wider royal family, and the british popular press. let's have a look at the weather. if you have been watching all week, you have been watching lorenzo and it is about to come close to us. not quite as bad as it was? well, that is right, yes. very good. i will do this, shall i? there has been confusion, notjust on my part but on the part of the channel because the rain we had yesterday was nothing to do with lorenzo, nothing to do with lorenzo's x even. who said it was common name names? i don't know, but it is there if you wa nt to i don't know, but it is there if you want to go back and view it! i'm just trying to clear it up. there was no confusion as we will see a little later on. i want to take you back to saturday, a bit of history about lorenzo. this was saturday, when it was a category five. the top
2:28 pm
end, major hurricane, gusting 160 mph. at this point it was a record breaker because no other category five has been this far north or east in recorded history. since then, obviously, it has been weakened and moving on. it has been driving its way a little further north, getting closer to the uk. last night, it was very close to the azores and it was just a glancing blow, fortunately, but the winds were still gusting 101 miles an hour across the western side of the azores. you can see there is no i in there now. this is there is no i in there now. this is the forecast track issued by the national hurricane centre and you can see how it goes up towards the uk and it slows down and then it bends back into the uk, is a much wea ker system bends back into the uk, is a much weaker system by this point. so, this is what we are expecting as we head into tomorrow. 12 metre waves across western parts of ireland and it has been named storm lorenzo by the irish met service because the impacts will be greater there. we
2:29 pm
are going to look at 65 miles an hour across the eastern coast of northern ireland and on friday, the strongest of the winds will transfer down to the south—west of england and wales. so windy across the uk, yes, but nothing too severe. except for the waves sydney south west during friday, yes. ok. tell us what's in store for the rest of us? i want to show this picture first of all. we have had some big waves today pounding the east coast. this was scarborough in north yorkshire. i must point out before you or any viewer... that is a statue, not anybody risking life and limb. that isa anybody risking life and limb. that is a statue in scarborough, obviously getting very wet. for many parts of the country today it's been a lovely day. lots of sunshine around. blue skies and a chance to dry off after all the rain we have had just recently. just a temporary respite, mind you. pretty chilly in the sunshine, temperatures ten — 12.
2:30 pm
few showers in scotland over night but generally dry. clearer skies away from these western fringes, west wales and northern ireland, weather cloud is beginning to arrive and the breezes picking up. away from here, it will be chilly. temperatures could be close to freezing in some rural areas. briefly, we have this push of colder air across the uk but this out not far away as warm air, tropical air, of course. this deep area of low pressure by thursday is storm lorenzo, named by the irish met service, where the impacts will be greater because that is where it will be close to as we head into tomorrow afternoon. for the uk, we will find after a bright start some sunshine forced western areas continue to cloud over and then we will properly find a spell of rain moving on, nothing particularly exceptional about that rain. the winds will continue to strengthen across these western areas, particularly windy around eastern
2:31 pm
parts of northern ireland during the afternoon and into the evening tomorrow. ahead of it, much quieter weather continues, probably dry, dry, a little sunshine but clouding over and quite chilly, 12—14. the deep area of low pressure, where does it go after that? it brings wet and windy weather for a while and then the area of low pressure wea ke ns. then the area of low pressure weakens. the winds dropped out, stronger winds transferred to the south—west. the rain we will see will be pushing away into the new continent by friday afternoon and it sta rts continent by friday afternoon and it starts to come down again. a bit milder, 14 in the central belt, 17 and southern parts of england and wales. into the weekend, there may be some brightness, a bit of sunshine, milder but there will be some rain pushing in from the east. at the moment, it looks like most of that will be saturday night. easing away during sunday but if we look out in the atlantic, we are dominated by low pressure again. the jet stream will be pushing areas of low pressure to the uk and we will maintain the spell of wet and windy weather. bye—bye for now.
2:32 pm
this is bbc news, our latest headlines... a call for compromise from the eu — borisjohnson says his new plans for the irish border are his final offer, the only alternative, he says, is a no—deal brexit. yes, yes, this is a compromise by the uk and i hope very much that our friends understand that and compromise in their tone. the uk's brexit negotiator david frost has arrived
2:33 pm
at the european commission. as the duke and duchess of sussex end their tour of southern africa, they launch a court case against a sunday newspaper for publishing a private letter. hundreds of people in hong kong stage a sit—in at the school of a teenage activist shot by police during violent clashes. coming up on the programme — the clean up begins on the isle of man after severe flooding left people trapped in their homes. sport now on afternoon live with jane dougall. manchester city's bernardo silva could be facing punishment over a tweet he posted last month. yes, this tweet was about his team—mate, benjamin mandy, who incidentally was black. bernardo silva tweeted a picture of him alongside a brand mascot of spanish chocolate which is featured in racist caricatures. the fa
2:34 pm
subsequently contacted his club, manchester city, about it. bernardo silva deleted the tweet and then later tweeted, can't even joke with a friend these days. but the anti—discrimination society kick it out, says it it is insulting and improper and bringing the game into disrepute. bernardo silva has written to say he regrets that his post may have unintentionally caused defence. he has been defended by pep guardiola. mandy has written in support of him saying he did not ta ke offe nce support of him saying he did not take offence at the tweet, but he has been charged with misconduct by the football association and has until the 9th of october to respond. let's look ahead to the world
2:35 pm
athletics championships and all eyes on doha and dina asher—smith. athletics championships and all eyes on doha and dina asher-smith. yes, very much so because she is the favourite for the 200 metres final, not just because favourite for the 200 metres final, notjust because she has performed so well this season, but also because so many of the other contenders have pulled out. the olympic champion, elaine thompson jamaica has pulled out and daphne schippers has also pulled out. also, a nigerian athlete who ran faster than her this year, she was disqualified on monday. it could put more pressure on her being the favourite. but she also won silver in the 100 metres the other night and looked in great form. she co mforta bly and looked in great form. she comfortably won the 200 metres semifinal. if she wins it later on this evening, she will become the first british woman to win a world sprint title ever. katarina johnson
2:36 pm
thompson starts her hack tackling —— heptathlete campaign this afternoon. the first event is the 100 metres hurdles and that starts just after three o'clock. she is a medal hope but has never had a podium finish at a major global outdoor event. she admits she made mistakes at beijing in 2015 and at rio in 2016 and at london in 2017. but huge disappointment for adam emily last night. he says he feels he let so many people down after missing out ona many people down after missing out on a medal in the men's 200 metres final. it was so close. he was leading for the first 100 and was in third place until the last 20 metres, coming fourth in the end by the very slightest of margins. the same thing happened to him at the rio olympics three years ago. it was won by favourite american noah lyles. new zealand have recorded the biggest score in a match yet at the
2:37 pm
rugby world cup, hammering canada 63-0. rugby world cup, hammering canada 63—0. all three barrett brothers got their names on the scoresheet. that is the first time three brothers have started for the all blacks. their ninth and final try came from brad webber. new zealand are one point behind pool leaders italy. they might not be there for long because they still have to face both south africa and the all blacks themselves. france needed three late tries to survive a scare and see off the united states of america for their second win. at one point the us werejust three their second win. at one point the us were just three points behind at 12-9. us were just three points behind at 12—9. france then scored three more tries to pick up a bonus point and that moves france up to second and that moves france up to second and that means they are one point ahead. the new boss of the premier league has been named as the chief
2:38 pm
executive. he joins from the guardian media group and replaces richard scudamore who retired at the end of last year. andy murray is through to the quarterfinals of the china open after beating cameron norrie over three sets. after two tight first sets, both of which were taken on tie—break, murray raced through the decider. it was the first time he has won two straight atp tour singles with his mother judy looking on and applauding him. it is the first time he has won a singles matches since hip surgery in january. that is all for now. more later. what was the name of the chinese player? i don't know if! pronounce it properly. we will come back to you in an hour. back now to our main story.
2:39 pm
borisjohnson, says he's sent constructive and reasonable proposals to the european union on britain's planned withdrawal at the end of the month. speaking at the conservative party conference in manchester the prime minsiter gave few details, but said there would be no customs checks at or near the border between ireland and northern ireland. the issue has been a sticking point in negotiations with the eu. he warned the only alternative was a no—deal exit. let's talk more on this now with former advisor to david cameron laura trott and journalist and former spokesperson for theresa may, joeyjones. joey, i want to talk about the tone of the speech. it is not what we we re of the speech. it is not what we were expecting. you would be forgiven having listened to the conservative party chairman this morning, james cleverly, and reading the language that was breathed into the language that was breathed into the newspapers, that it would be a very trenchant the newspapers, that it would be a very trencha nt ultimatum the newspapers, that it would be a very trenchant ultimatum from boris johnson and he would be facing down the eu and saying, take it or leave it. i don't know if there was a section like that in the speech, but it did not make it to the platform.
2:40 pm
it will be interesting to see why it is he teetered away from that much more aggressive tone. in the end of the brexit site i think his arguments were well marshalled. i thought it was quite well—written, that particular section. if there was a bit of the speech that was competent we find out? we will find it out. borisjohnson in the run—up to the referendum had two drafts of a certain article that went into the telegraph and people will be asking questions as to why the tone of the speech was somewhat different to the way in which downing street had briefed it previously. it lacked detail would be the main criticism in terms of what the deal being offered to the eu is. i suppose that would always be the case. you would expect that. overall i thought it was a confident speech from a man who thinks his plan is working. in amongst all the hubbub of this week the conservatives are 11 points ahead of the lib dems. focus groups
2:41 pm
are showing their key message of getting brexit done is cutting through. actually, given where we we re through. actually, given where we were on sunday with the various allegations swirling around boris johnson i think the tories will be happy with how this week will have gone. will they be happy? within the bubble they will be happy. it was a competentjob by bubble they will be happy. it was a competent job by the bubble they will be happy. it was a competentjob by the prime minister. i thought it was going to be a good speech from him. people think he is such a force of nature and he has been such a fixture in our political life for some time that most people didn't realise he was not a very good platform speaker. most speeches he gave on he was mayor of london we re he gave on he was mayor of london were rambling and talked about selling tea to the chinese. i thought it petered out. but generally speaking from his point of view, given the stakes that we are confronting and the event we are now going to be plunged into, i think
2:42 pm
this speech will be seen as an irrelevance. i mean that in a nice way. the only way it would have been memorable would have been if something had gone wrong and that did not happen. and the dig? that was normal. it covered a lot of domestic round. there was not a lot of foreign policy and that that you would normally expect, but in terms of the nhs and schools, it was all the familiar and domestic policy that you think of in a prime minister's conference speech and very much a pre—election share and tell of what the conservatives want to be pushing. the fact the government is now going to publish its proposals this afternoon, that is where we will have to get a sense as to if it is a final offer, as we we re as to if it is a final offer, as we were told. or is there a bit more in there? do they recognise they are going to have to go into this having
2:43 pm
compromised, and there is compromise built into the heart of these proposals from government, but recognising that they might need to go further. you put out a naughty tweet because you said you wanted to see a cut of michael gove in one pa rt see a cut of michael gove in one part of the speech that you thought would be relevant. you are talking about the cocaine habits of the bourgeoisie. rememberwhen about the cocaine habits of the bourgeoisie. remember when gordon brown had that speech about no time for a novice, plainly aimed at david miliband. but the broadcasters had clearly been told there was a key passage there and it cut straightaway right into david miliband's face. on this occasion whoever it was read the speech ahead of time, or perhaps it was not finished in time to allow people that privilege, they were not quick enough. you have both come back from manchester, how would you assess the week? it has been really odd, hasn't it? bizarre because it was so normal. it was briefed that it would be no—deal brexit rally and it was
2:44 pm
just a normal conference. we had announcements about the nhs on sunday, we had the george osborne style national minimum wage on monday, which is the classic then we have been doing for years. it felt quite normal, which given the circumstances and the date was a bit odd. there was that slight air of unreality. we can see and the businesses we now work with can see the challenges that are confronting the challenges that are confronting the uk government, we know boris johnson is in a weak position, he was having his tail tweaked by jeremy corbyn and others over the timing of the general election, we know the likelihood of getting a deal over the line in a couple of weeks' time and passing it through parliament is unlikely. but you go up parliament is unlikely. but you go up to people in manchester and they say, it is boris, it is fine, it will be ok, and it brooks no argument. ifear that will be ok, and it brooks no argument. i fear that bubble will be ok, and it brooks no argument. ifear that bubble may be fairly quickly pricked and we will be back to reality with a bump,
2:45 pm
perhaps in hours, and perhaps in days to come. he did not deal with inconsistencies in his speech, there was no mention of the ban act, it was no mention of the ban act, it was we are living on october the sist, was we are living on october the 315t, come what may and no rolling back. very good to talk to you both. mp5 are debating a new law on domestic violence, which would prevent alleged perpetrators from cross—examining their victims in court. it will also create a legal definition of domestic abuse. graham satchell reports. our former colleague, the bbc and itn newsreader charlotte neer runs this refuge in southern england. it provides shelter and help for up to 11 women and 24 children at any one time. the government's domestic abuse bill comes back to the commons today after fears it would be lost when parliament was suspended. it defines abuse legally
2:46 pm
for the first time to include coercive, controlling behaviour and will stop alleged perpetrators cross—examining victims in court. campaigners have welcomed the bill, but say it doesn't go far enough. i think for us the most important thing that is missing is the guarantee of funding for refuges and other specialist services. domestic abuse murders are at a five—year high and really this is something that we and other campaigners have been saying, that unless safe refuge is provided for victims of domestic abuse, then sadly the murder rates will go up. according to the charity women's aid, local authority funding for refuges has dropped by almost a third since 2010. and 60% of people referred to refuges last year were turned away. there are so many barriers for someone who is subject to domestic abuse in terms of understanding what services are out there and having and interacting with statutory and 60% of people referred to refuges last year were turned away. there are so many barriers for someone who is subject to domestic abuse in terms of understanding what services are out there and having and interacting with statutory services or community and family and understanding what they are going through and putting a name
2:47 pm
to it and these are the kind of things we really need to address to end this postcode lottery for victims and their families. the government insists victims of domestic abuse should be able to access appropriate support at the appropriate time and the bill provides, in their words, a once in a generation opportunity to stamp out this devastating crime for good. graham satchell, bbc news. our former colleague, the bbc and itn newsreader peter sissons has died at the age of 77. a statement from his management company said he "died peacefully last night" in maidstone hospital in kent. my colleague huw edwards is with me now. i know you knew him very well. we remember him at the bbc but he was a majorfigure at the remember him at the bbc but he was a major figure at the itn as well. the first thing to say is he was a gold standard broadcaster. that is the thing that struck me from a very
2:48 pm
early age. i was watching him on the lunchtime news on itn when i was a teenager, so he had a very long career. i don't think peter would quibble with this, but his happiest period was at itn over all those yea rs, period was at itn over all those years, especially on channel 4 news. for a decade or more from when channel 4 news was launched, he was the face of channel 4 news and he really was an outstanding interviewer and presenter and i think he was happiest there. he was poached famously for the bbc and he came and people liked his company. he found the job more limiting came and people liked his company. he found thejob more limiting i think that thejob he found thejob more limiting i think that the job he had he found thejob more limiting i think that thejob he had had at channel 4 and he found it slightly frustrating at times. but as you would expect from someone like peter, he was a supreme professional. a great writer, a great journalist, and he professional. a great writer, a greatjournalist, and he did a superbjob for the greatjournalist, and he did a superb job for the bbc as well. did he enjoy doing western time?”
2:49 pm
superb job for the bbc as well. did he enjoy doing western time? i think it was an incredibly difficult time for him. he was put in after sir robin day and that was a pretty big act to follow. i can say this because he and i chatted about it, peter felt he was being asked to do things which he wasn't comfortable doing in terms of the style of the programme and he found it, i think, a bit ofa programme and he found it, i think, a bit of a challenging experience. the bbc decided it was not working as well as it might have done and took peter off, or agreed with peter, that he would not do it for much longer. his spell was a couple of years, quite short, and then david dimbleby took over. that was probably one of the most difficult parts of his bbc time. decide the viewers will not have seen was his mischievous side. he had a fantastic sense of humour and enjoy a drink, asi sense of humour and enjoy a drink, as i suspect you do as well. he enjoyed a very long lunch in a great fleet street tradition. he was fantastic company, he had a store of
2:50 pm
amazing stories. he had been a war correspondent and he was injured and shotin correspondent and he was injured and shot in africa, so he was a very experienced correspondent before he started presenting. he had lots of stories, he loved a good gossip. he was pretty ha rd stories, he loved a good gossip. he was pretty hard on those people who he thought were not up to the job and that included fellow presenters. that was always fun over lunch. when you thought the lunch was over, there was always another bottle on order which was a bit of a challenge as well. but he was great company andi as well. but he was great company and i will miss that because he was in touch and very supportive of me when i started off as a young presenter and he could not have been more generous and that is a really good reflection on him as a man as well. we will really miss him. french police are staging what they call a national ‘march
2:51 pm
of anger‘ in paris in a protest against rising rates of suicide in the force. unions say there have been over fifty police suicides since the start of the year. our correspondent hugh schofield is there for us the french police say their working life has deteriorated to such an extent that they have had enough. there are various demands from funding to pensions, but the root cause is very simple. it is burn—out. what with terrorism, the yellow vest protests on top of their regular work, officers are saying they are being stretched to snapping point with millions of hours of overtime that are still unpaid. then there is the big killer statistic, literally, that this year already more than 50 officers have committed suicide, victims, say the union, of the pressures they have been living under and they say without big changes on funding, recruitment, on tougher sentencing policy, that number can only keep going up. in a moment the latest business news. first a look at the headlines
2:52 pm
on afternoon live. borisjohnson calls for compromise from brussels , saying the proposals he's putting forward to resolve the brexit deadlock are "constructive and reasonable". as the duke and duchess of sussex end their tour of southern africa, they launch a court case against a sunday newspaper for publishing a private letter. hundreds of people in hong kong stage a sit—in at the school of a teenage activist shot by police during violent clashes. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. the chief executive of tesco says he'll leave hisjob next summer. dave lewis took over at britain's biggest retailer five years ago at a turbulent time. he says it's the right time to move on. a former boss of boots has been lined up to replace him. the construction sector is suffering its worst downturn since the financial crisis. a closely watched survey suggests that building activity in september fell at the second fastest rate since 2009, although the downturn injune this year was even deeper.
2:53 pm
the economists behind the research say that brexit and the weak outlook for the overall economy are to blame. the cash machine provider link is promising to spend one million pounds putting machines in communities where people are finding it hard to access cash. it's enough to pay for up to 50 atms in so—called "cash deserts". with their use in decline, the consumer group which? recently complained they were being removed more quickly in deprived areas. america's biggest car maker is back in the headlines. the strike has been going on for three weeks? 50,000 workers at general motors are on strike over pensions and security and benefits. a5 pensions and security and benefits. asa pensions and security and benefits. as a result, gm has laid of 6000 workers in mexico. the strike in the us has had a knock—on effect that does not plant south of the border that make pick—up trucks. gm expects
2:54 pm
those who are laid off will all return to theirjobs after the strike. the workers in mexico have been put on an indefinite mandatory vacation on 55% of their pay. samir hussein is at the new york stock exchange. the strike and the effects clearly being felt way beyond the us border. absolutely. not only is it being seen in mexico, even if you look north of the border in canada we have seen that two plans have also closed down as a result of this. if you look on the whole, you see that more than 10,000 non—unionised gm workers have been laid off temporarily. we are seeing a lot more impact of the strike. as you pointed out, we are already in week three and it does not seem like it is going to end anytime soon. the two sites are still talking. the contract was offered to workers and
2:55 pm
the union rejected it and offered a counter proposal and they are waiting to hear back from general motors. the other point is the mounting cost of the strike overall, eye watering numbers gm is talking about losing each day and in total so far? absolutely. one analyst, jp morgan, has estimated so far in the third quarter gm has lost about $1 billion. that is a pretty significant amount of money. even right now if you look at the way gm stock is trading, it is down 55%. on the one hand gm had to stop making as many cars. we have talked about this before, car sales are down and people are not buying as many new ca rs down and people are not buying as many new cars and we have seen a peak and that is coming down. that said, the car is being impacted here in terms of what they cannot turn around any more is some of its
2:56 pm
biggest and best selling pick—up trucks. as always, thank you very much. let's have a look at the markets. let's bring the numbers up for you. the ftse100 is down sharply, 2.5% lower. falling for the third consecutive day. the uk market is facing a lot of uncertainty over brexit. on top of that is the concern about global growth because of the us and china trade war which is still going on and the downturn in construction i mentioned a few minutes' ago. a couple of bright spots. tesco rising up better than expected. the shares had opened lower when the chief executive and nancy was going. outside the ftse 100, metro bank is not up as much as it was earlier in the day, more than 20%. this is after it had a relaunch
2:57 pm
ofa 20%. this is after it had a relaunch of a bond scheme to raise fresh capital which was successful. it had to give investors an incentive but it worked. it also announced its chairman and founder it will be leaving, vernon hill. things there that are pleasing investors. i will be back with more in less than an hour. thank you. see you later on. now it's time for a look at the weather. we can cross the newsroom to darren. the sun is out and things are drying off. a few showers to come mainly across northern parts of scotland and the temperatures are 13—15. wins are brisk down the north sea coast and we could catch a few early showers this evening, but on the whole it will be dry overnight, except the far south—west of england and wales and northern ireland where the breeze will pick up a bit. away
2:58 pm
from here it will be cold and clear and in ruralareas from here it will be cold and clear and in rural areas temperatures will be close to freezing. sunshine to start the day although western areas are clouding over more and more. this rain will not have any significant impact but the wind will be strengthening across the western side of the uk with the strongest winds in the east coast of northern ireland, gusts of 50 or 60 miles an hour. a5 ireland, gusts of 50 or 60 miles an hour. as you head further east, it should be dry and bright, cloud amounts still increasing and on the chilly side.
2:59 pm
3:00 pm
hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 3: a call for compromise from the eu. borisjohnson says his plans for the irish border are his "final offer" — the only alternative, he says, is a no—deal brexit. yes, yes, this is a compromise by the uk and i hope very much that our friends understand that and compromise in their tone. the uk's chief brexit negotiator david frost is at the european commission. the uk is due to submit its formal plans for altering the northern ireland border arrangements this afternoon. as the duke and duchess of sussex end their tour of southern africa — they launch a court case against a sunday newspaper for publishing a private letter. hundreds of people in hong kong stage a sit—in at the school of a teenage activist shot by police during violent clashes. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport.
3:01 pm
there she is, jane. hello, simon. manchester city's bernardo silva has been charged with misconduct by the football association over his social media post about team—mate benjamin mendy. silva says he regrets he may have unintentionally caused offence. talk to you later, jane. and looking at the weather, skyward, here is darren. thank you, we needed a day like this, it's dry but probably the calm before the storm because hurricane lorenzo or what is left of it, will be heading towards the uk. we will have a look at the impact later in the programme. thanks, darren. also coming up — tributes are paid to former itn and bbc newsreader and former question time host, peter sissons, who has died at the age of 77.
3:02 pm
hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. let's go straight to the tory party conference. vicki young is there with some breaking news? that is right, the uk government has published its proposals that they are going to put to brussels and this of course centres around the controversial issue of the northern irish backstop. these are the alternative plan now that the government is going to put forward. they shape up like this. northern ireland, essentially, stays in the single market for goods. that is from the creation of an all ireland regulatory zone, meaning ireland follows the eu rules the goods. but we have heard a lot over the last few months and years about the stormont lock, it was called, how they can get some kind of say to the stormont assembly when it finally gets back to sitting, how can they
3:03 pm
give the people of northern ireland a say over all of this. so the plan is that stormont would have a vote on whether to enter these arrangements in the first place, plus they would then have a vote every four years on whether to carry on with it. what about the issue of checks? this has been the problem all along. if you have northern ireland and ireland in different economic zones, then you need to have some kind of cheques. that is what they are trying to get round. there will be additional cheques from goods moving from great britain to northern ireland but the uk would not apply checks entering northern ireland from ireland. they talk about a new deal for northern ireland, financial commitments to help them manage these changes. so the other issue about the customs union... northern ireland, these proposals say, would leave the eu customs union along with the rest of the uk. that has been a huge issue,
3:04 pm
particularly, of course, for the dup, who do not want to be are treated differently from the rest of the uk but under these proposals they will have to follow eu rules on goods. but we will all leave the customs union together, so they are saying they would be no new customs checks between north and south. then theissue checks between north and south. then the issue of these checks, where do they take place? another hugely contentious point because neither side wants to have infrastructure at the border. that has been got rid of. they don't want to go back to that. what is a plan for all of that? the uk government, as we have heard many times before saying the vast majority of the cheques they think could be carried out electronically. they do envisage a small number of physical checks but don't propose to have new buildings orany don't propose to have new buildings or any kinds of infrastructure. they would be carried out near the companies who are affected. so they are the broad plans. everyone will
3:05 pm
be waiting to see how brussels responds to this. interesting, a vital role for stormont, just looking at this, as well. looking at the timing of how long this is going to implement. yes, there is obviously a major problem there because stormont is not up and running. what has been interesting, in the last few months, the dup have talked about the undemocratic backstop. now, they would say that this deals with that because there is a safe at the stormont assembly there on going into all of this is an arrangement, but also on whether they stay in it and vote every four years. the problem with that, and we would have to see even more of the detail of all of this, is whether that is a unilateral veto, if you like, something you would imagine that the eu would not accept. does northern ireland have a veto whether they go into this arrangement or if they come out of it, how will they decide, at what point, that northern ireland could leave this alternative
3:06 pm
backstop arrangement? crucially, of course, for ireland, it is all about the response from leo varadkar. he earlier today, having been briefed on some of this, although he said he had not seen the final text, didn't think it sounded very encouraging. government sources are saying they believe if there is another political goodwill on the side of the eu, they could enter an intense ten day period of negotiations almost immediately, with the aim of coming toa almost immediately, with the aim of coming to a final agreement at the eu council in the middle of the month. the eu commission is also receiving a full legal text of this proposal this afternoon, alongside a letter from boris proposal this afternoon, alongside a letterfrom borisjohnson proposal this afternoon, alongside a letter from borisjohnson to jean—claude juncker. letter from borisjohnson to jean-claude juncker. we know leo varadkar will make a phone call to borisjohnson this evening. that is going to be crucial, isn't it, how these two men get through this? yes, it has always been the crucial relationship of all of this. speaking to government insiders about all of theirs, who went through the three years with theresa may, they feel that there has been a
3:07 pm
good working relationship between borisjohnson good working relationship between boris johnson and leo good working relationship between borisjohnson and leo varadkar, partly, which is patented the obvious, both men need a deal. a no deal situation for ireland, i think the irish central bank reckons it will be a 4.5% fall in gdp in ireland injust will be a 4.5% fall in gdp in ireland in just one year. the consequences of no deal for the uk, we have had lots of documents showing what might happen there. so, of course, for both men, a deal is the best option. a5 of course, for both men, a deal is the best option. as ever, it is about who is willing to compromise, are they willing to compromise on these kinds of things? some speculation dublin would be coming under pressure from the eu to accept some of these arrangements. on the other hand, everyone very mindful of the very unique set of circumstances on the island of ireland, preserving peace and continuing with that are not risking it in any way. so pressure on everybody. the other interesting question is about to steal, if it were to be accepted by
3:08 pm
the eu, about the chances of getting through parliament. now, we understand the dup have been involved in all of this. there have been some very, very careful conversations over the last few weeks. it appears, although we have not heard from them formally, that they have decided that they would be able to back this and that is crucial because of the dup back it, there are some of the tory party, there are some of the tory party, the erg who i think would be able to go along with it if the dup were happy. without breaking -- without breaking news, thank you, vicki young. we can speak to chris morris. you have been looking through... we have a letter from the have been looking through... we have a letterfrom the prime minister to presidentjean—claude juncker and some explanatory notes. what we haven't been given is the legal text of the proposed british plan. one thing that is interesting, though, where i think the uk has certainly
3:09 pm
moved, is on this idea that's been talked about for several weeks of an all ireland zone for food and animals. it is essentially an all ireland zone for all goods which might cross the border. in other words, removing the need for any checks on goods crossing between ireland and northern ireland. so that means bits of machinery and so forth. no new infrastructure? if it was approved to begin with by the northern ireland assembly, then for four years, potentially renewable, northern ireland would be part of a single zone for regulations on the island of ireland. customs is a different issue. on customs, the prime minister is a very clear. we have heard it in the interviews he has done with the bbc this week, saying that northern ireland has to remain part of the uk customs territory, not part of the eu customs territory. i think the problem with customs, because what
3:10 pm
they are saying in these documents essentially is that if checks are needed for things moving between northern ireland and ireland, it should be a very small number of physical checks and they should be done almost exclusively at traders premises or other points in the supply chain. part of the problem with this is the eu doesn't do this anywhere else that any border around the edge of its customs union. the letter from the prime to minister presidentjean—claude juncker says to enable this to happen, we should both put in place specific workable improvements and simplifications to existing customs rules. in other words, the uk is saying, we are leaving, we want to change and you will have to change your rules to accommodate us. that has a ways been accommodate us. that has a ways been a bit ofa accommodate us. that has a ways been a bit of a sticking point because in a bit of a sticking point because in a lot of eu capitals, notjust brussels, people will be saying, hang on, why are we having to change our rules to accommodate you? i think the british argument will be, you are the ones, as we are, say northern ireland and ireland has to be treated as a special case but
3:11 pm
obvious reasons, politics and security and so forth, and therefore you need to move a little bit to accommodate us. will it be accepted? we have heard mood music, not good at all. as i said before, i think one of the key thing is... is there a chink of light, something that perhaps would open the way for this? it could do, it could do. i think it is less than 50—50, considerably less then 50—50, getting a deal done this month. although, a slight side bar, shows how old i am, in the middle of the 19905 i remember sitting in a hotel in dato ohio for three weeks, the bosnian peace talks we re three weeks, the bosnian peace talks were being negotiated by the us and every day got gloomier and gloomier until the final day when a deal was done. so never say never, but i think the key question today is a lot of what is in this is stuff that has been in some form rejected by the eu before. do theyjust say no
3:12 pm
outright and say we are not going here? ordo outright and say we are not going here? or do they engage with this and have something of a negotiation? i think that is what essentially they hoped would be of the british government, that they could at least ta ke government, that they could at least take this as a starting point and say, we have come a long way with this, we have moved, thought about this. have they come a long way? no physical checks at the border but we are going to put them, we will have the customs checks at your place of work, it still there? and is that possibility? this comes back to the joint report, as it was called, in december 2017, which is an agreement signed by the eu and theresa may's government, which set out the terms that led to what became the backstop. one of the specific commitments made by the uk and that which they would not be any infrastructure or checks of any kind on the island of ireland. they would argue, we are not putting up checkpoints, we are not putting up new buildings, we are asking for all these checks to be done in peoples
3:13 pm
places of work. the eu may well argue, wejust don't places of work. the eu may well argue, we just don't think that is feasible. don't go too far because this is breaking news and i know you wa nt to this is breaking news and i know you want to have another look at the document. for now, thank you, chris. let's get some reaction from westminster now. our political correspondent nick eardley is in central lobby. sorry, i promoted you very briefly there! i will take the pay rise! this is only just there! i will take the pay rise! this is onlyjust happened but what are they saying there? pasta a big question is if europe were to get and entertain this idea, would parliament do the same? the same? the dup over the last 24 hours or so have been suggesting that they are open to some of the things that borisjohnson is suggesting. i have heard a lot of people here saying this morning that if they come on board, some of the brexiteers who refused to back theresa may's deal might do the same and that would give borisjohnson a fighting chance of getting this through parliament.
3:14 pm
but at the same time, the opposition parties are trying to coordinate what they are doing as well, and try and find some way of opposing boris johnson's plans. i have one of them here, the smp's westminster leader ian blackford. i know you haven't had much time to digest these plans because they have been published in the last five minutes or so but what is your sense, looking at the basic proposal, do you think it is workable? what it seems to be suggesting is the backstop is time—limited. the northern ireland assembly has the right to disentangle that. i cannot say that is going to be acceptable to europe, because at the end of the day, the whole point about the backstop is it is not time—limited. i don't think this is a way forward. i think it is simply windowdressing from the government. they have given this figleaf to the dup to say the dup can control the process. that is not the way for the government to handle these negotiations on a meaningful way. as in scotland, we voted heavily to remain. we have no desire
3:15 pm
to be dragged out of europe against our will and we will not sit back and allow that to happen. you will be hearing the same things everyone else in this building is hearing, which is some people who opposed the deal that theresa may came back with that desperate to find something to back this time. some brexiteers and some labour mp5 as well. do you think there is a chance now that brexit deal is going to get through the commons in the next three or four weeks? i don't believe so. at the end of the day, there is no such thing as a good brexit. any form of brexit will cost jobs thing as a good brexit. any form of brexit will costjobs in thing as a good brexit. any form of brexit will cost jobs in scotland. we know there is a threat to up to 100,000 jobs in scotland. unemployment is never a price worth paying that ideology, because that is what this is because that we would oppose it and i hope parliamentarians do the same. you have been at a meeting of opposition leaders who have been, it seems, talking at length about what to do without coming up with anything. sources in your party saying this afternoon that you are prepared to act soon to try and bring down the
3:16 pm
government. what does that mean? are you going to do it on your own?|j have said to colleagues across other parties that we know the government is prepared to face down the benn act, they are not prepared to recognise we have legislated against no deal. the government seems to suggest we will be leaving on a no deal basis, quite simply the opposition parties have to accept their responsibilities when you have a government that is behaving in such a cavalier manner, we have to stop them. we can do that by taking the keys of number ten downing st off borisjohnson. the keys of number ten downing st off boris johnson. the question is, how question that we have had this in the last few days, how and when do you do it? through a motion of no confidence, which will trigger a situation where we can put in an alternative administration for a limited period with the focus of delivering an extension to article 50 and an election. when do you do that? soon as the majority is there. there is a clear majority for the benn act against no deal was that the majority for the benn act has to
3:17 pm
acce pt the majority for the benn act has to accept the responsibilities we have, that we have to stop this prime minister. there is a sense of frustration other —— that hasn't happened was that we need to stop borisjohnson and happened was that we need to stop boris johnson and his cronies from the leave campaign crashing us out of the european union at the end of october. we are weeks away from doing this. we need to act with a sense of urgency. just finally, the european union have been clear they will look at these proposals that are being published today in good faith. are you doing the same? of course, we will always look at any proposal is in good faith but we cannot support anything that will be detrimental to the interests of the people of scotland and leaving the european union is demonstrably not in our interests. we would absolutely oppose that. ian blackford, thank you. simon, a lot of the opposition parties i expect over the next few hours will be saying something similar. they are not convinced by these plans. they are concerned they might not work. one of the crucial things here,
3:18 pm
though, will be hearing from the dup, are they going to entertain this proposal? and then hearing from those brexiteers that held out against theresa may's deal last time and perhaps, just as crucially, another one to throw into the mix, labourmps, another one to throw into the mix, labour mp5, who have flirted with the idea of backing a brexit deal because they want to get this done. will they now be persuaded by some of the suggestions we have heard that this is make or break time? nick eardley, thank you. our europe correspondent damian grammaticas is in brussels. yes to a single market, no two are customs union from borisjohnson? what we have now seen is the letter that has been sent, it has just been published, the letter tojean—claude juncker and the details and proposals. i have had a chance to have a very quick look over it. essentially, it is picking bits and pieces of what's been talked about before mashing them together. so
3:19 pm
yes, you get northern ireland staying with the uk in its customs territory, which means a separate customs territory to the rest of the eu and the republic of ireland, which means border controls or customs controls would have to be in place. but the regulations, things like plant, animal food place. but the regulations, things like plant, animalfood health, industrial goods, chemicals, those sorts of things, northern ireland would stay under the eu system, temporarily. i think you had would stay under the eu system, temporarily. ithink you had ian blackford said with consent or a vote required in northern ireland to continue that process. that could fall away in future. that is the time limit, that will be a concern for ireland. the other thing worth pointing out is on the crucial issue of customs, remember, this is a big eu and irish red line. no new infrastructure on the border of ireland or related checks and controls. that was the promise at the beginning of the negotiations from the uk side. is that they are?
3:20 pm
those would have to be brought in for stop the prime minister's letter says proposing or customs processes should take place in a decentralised basis electronically, is a good moved between the two countries. he goes on to say, there should be specific workable improvements and a firm commitment by both parties never to conduct checks at the border in future. translation: he is asking the eu to sign up to no border checks at its frontier in perpetuity in the future. the eu will view that, i think, as a serious problem because how does it control smuggling, how does it collect taxes? equally, the implication in that underneath the text i was just looking at is what the uk is asking is for a swathes of exemptions for a northern irish businesses, small businesses and others, to be cleared of all customs obligation so they can trade freely. for the eu, that again raises the
3:21 pm
question— how do you enforce all of this, how is it workable question that there is a huge amount of asking in here and also asking the eu and ireland to breach their red lines. will this fly? it is hard to see that it will. the irish prime minister already has been speaking just before these were published, saying that he thinks that they are not promising, these proposals, and he is posing the question why would the british government want to impose checks on people north and southin impose checks on people north and south in ireland, which they would do? essentially, a frictionless border but you introduce friction in peoples and warehouses and along their supply chains? yes, exactly. and it only works if you get many exemptions from the eu saying, we will waive all sorts of requirements and turn a blind eye to all sorts of things to let trade flow freely faster would they do that question but there has been no sign at all so far that they would. that they would want to agree with
3:22 pm
that. and certainly, in terms of protecting their single market and the good friday peace agreement, which they say is an absolute priority, and the free flow of exchanges back and forth on the island of ireland, this would introduce friction into all of that. so very difficult to see the irish consenting to this, or the eu if the irish don't. is there something for them to negotiate on? they are discussing that we will get to view a little later on, but as eu sources have been saying, the people in northern ireland, this imposes checks and controls, moving things north and south, the republic, in terms of customs checks, and also east and west to the uk, to the rest of the uk, gb, in terms of regulations. so it imposes checks all around and therefore may not ultimately, more struggle ultimately to get consented northern ireland as well. 0k, well. ok, thank you very much for that.
3:23 pm
leo varadkar said he is yet to see the full written proposals but has told the irish parliament what we are hearing is not encouraging, would not be the basis for agreement. chris morris is here from our reality check team. customs union, single market, becomes separate? yes, kinda. one interesting thing, there has always been from the beginning no new border down the irish sea. i have a quote here which we looked up earlier, borisjohnson in the tory leadership hustings in belfast, under no circumstances, whatever happens, will i allow the eu or anyone else to create any kind of division down the irish sea. then you look at this document and see it may not be division but there will be significantly more checks on goods moving between great britain and northern ireland, within the united kingdom. at the moment there are checks on live animals, for example, moving from britain to northern ireland, but now there will be checks on pretty much everything.
3:24 pm
his letter to jean—claude juncker said that agri— food goods, so anything really in the food chain, entering northern ireland from great britain would do so via a border inspection post, which is part of eu law. that can be a very intrusive form of inspection. the letter says they will be subject to identity and document checks and physical examination. but crucially it says those checks will be carried out by uk authorities. so even though, in effect, that would become, at least for a few years, the border of the single market, it would be uk authorities according to this proposal that would carry out those checks even after the uk is that the eu. so again, will the eu be happy with the uk saying we will be the ones responsible for making sure your laws are carried out? there is an infringement of the law, where does that go in terms of a court if the uk has left the eu? there are lots of details on here which the eu will pick up on anything, this is
3:25 pm
not quite the way we think things should be going. but at least you can say the uk, after all this time, there is a serious proposal on the table. just reading the political editor from the sun. the dup seem to be onside but there is still work to be done. the dup put a statement out which we will be reading in a moment. but what seems clear is that needs to be an awful lot of compromise from the european union and from ireland? there does. no sign of that? there was not much in boris johnson's party sign of that? there was not much in borisjohnson's party conference speech on brexit, understandably, because we knew these documents were coming out later in the day for someone one line that struck me, if we fail to get an agreement because of what is a technical discussion of the future of customs checks, it won't be a deal. for many people in ireland, this is not a technical
3:26 pm
discussion. for any check associated with the land border, even if not at the border comes down to issues of identity and the painfully crafted compromise that were put together when the good friday agreement was born. i think they would object to the idea that this is simply a technical issue on which the eu is saying computer says no. they are saying computer says no. they are saying this is much more subtle than that and in many ways potentially more dangerous than that and that is why it needs to be treated seriously. talk us through the process. this is a letter, not a legal document as such? no better legal document is being given to the eu, a legal text. the proposal is the backstop is contained in what is called the protocol of ireland and northern ireland, part of the withdrawal agreement. the uk proposal is to strip most of that out and put in this new legal text which they are presenting to the eu today. they hope then is that in a remarkable ten day period of negotiation, it
3:27 pm
all gets sorted out before an eu summit on the 17th of october. a5 all gets sorted out before an eu summit on the 17th of october. as i said before, ithink summit on the 17th of october. as i said before, i think the chances of that happening are extremely unlikely, but never say never. never say never. i said there was a statement from the dup, which i will read to you. it says the dup has argued that it is important to secure a balanced and sensible dealers we leave the european union. those who know anything about northern ireland will appreciate theseissues northern ireland will appreciate these issues will only work with the support of the unionist and nationalist community was that the dup has always indicated the uk must leave as one nation and in so doing that no barriers to trade are erected within the uk. this offer provides a basis for the eu to continue in a serious and sustained engagement with the uk government without risk to the market of the united kingdom. we welcome the fact that all sides now recognise that that all sides now recognise that that requirement in order to secure agreement, these proposals will ensure northern ireland will be out of the eu customs union and the single market as with the rest of the united kingdom. it goes on into
3:28 pm
some detail. but chris, yes, they are saying in principle, we see a way forward here. but, i'm going to be a cliche here, it will be in the detail? the devil is always in the detail. don't forget, this is also... even if this was something which the eu we re if this was something which the eu were to agree to in some form, which asi were to agree to in some form, which as i said the moment looks unlikely, it needs to get agreement and approval in parliament. even if the dup are on board, i don't think that's by any means guaranteed. we have seen before, the numbers are and would continue to be incredibly tight. that is why i think the fact we are now in october, the summit in the middle of the month, the brexit deadline at the end of the month, it feels like this may have come too late but maybe that was a deliberate strategy not to string things out a bit too much and the idea of it is this deal or no deal may concentrate some mines. i think what is interesting is there is certainly a
3:29 pm
suggestion that if the eu were to engage with this in any way, then the uk will listen to their suggestions. overnight, we were briefed, it is take it or leave it, this is ourfinal offer. but briefed, it is take it or leave it, this is our final offer. but that is not what we had from the prime minister in his speech had not what he said in a newspaper interview this morning when he said, of course, we would look any suggestion suggestions made. i think if you would like a result for the british government today, it would be to have this not completely rejected out of hand. and we may know because the response from dublin will be utterly crucial. the taoiseach said he will speak to borisjohnson tonight? yes, and also the other eu leaders as well stop some more important than others. if they felt ireland were happy they would be much more disposed to this? yes, they would. there is an element of they would. there is an element of the eu 26, if you like, not wanting to let down the 27th member when the 28th is intending to leave. obviously the irish voice in the room is extremely strong. the french
3:30 pm
will want to have a look at this and say, are we sure there is no hole on the edge of a single market? because thatis the edge of a single market? because that is the big issue, really, for the eu, in terms of the trade and economic issues. we don't want any kind of deal that is going to put the integrity of our economic zone, the integrity of our economic zone, the single market, under threat. ok, chris, thank you. chris morris from the reality check team with the latest on the breaking news. ok, time for a quick look at the weather. darren has that. much—needed dry weather across the uk today, after a chilly start. still not particularly warm out there this afternoon but at least most there this afternoon but at least m ost pla ces there this afternoon but at least most places are enjoying blue skies and sunshine. there are some areas of cloud here and there are particularly across northern parts of scotla nd particularly across northern parts of scotland we could see a few more showers. on the whole, it remains dry, plenty of sunshine around but on the side, tempered meat temperature is 13—14. still quite windy down the eastern coasts where
3:31 pm
it feels particular chilly and a few showers not far away. on the whole, dry, clearing skies for the most pa rt dry, clearing skies for the most part but there breeze will blow more clout in to the south—west of england and northern ireland. not as chilly here but elsewhere with clear skies, temperatures close to freezing in some rural areas. we have this burst of cold air around the middle part of the week but not far away we have so much warmer air. this is tropical air and it comes from this deep area of low pressure. this was a hurricane and has now been named storm lorenzo. the biggest impacts are likely to be across the western side of ireland. for the across the western side of ireland. forthe uk, we across the western side of ireland. for the uk, we will see the clouds thickening up across many western areas. we will see a spell of rain coming in as well, nothing particularly unusual about that area of rain. the winds will be strengthening, particularly through the irish sea and into northern ireland, western scotland, the strongest winds for more eastern parts of northern ireland. ahead of it towards the east, it remains dry, the wind is not as strong here.
3:32 pm
still a little chilly, temperatures 12-14. the still a little chilly, temperatures 12—14. the deep area of low pressure is arriving close to the uk. as it moves is arriving close to the uk. as it m oves a cross is arriving close to the uk. as it moves across the uk, it tends to weaken. some wet and windy weather for a while and then the winds will drop out the many places foster stronger winds transparent to the south—west and that rain getting swept into the near continent. in the afternoon on friday, most places dry, a bit of sunshine coming through and probably not quite as chilly, 14 in the central belt and 17 for southern parts of england and wales. a5 17 for southern parts of england and wales. as we head into the weekend, will stay milder but whilst there will stay milder but whilst there will be some sunshine abound, we had some rain coming from the west. at the moment, most of it on saturday night. the rain tending to peter out on sunday but if we look into the atlantic, more areas of low pressure, more wind and rain set to arrive across the uk as we head into next week.
3:33 pm
this is bbc news, our latest headlines... the government has published its brexit proposals to the eu — borisjohnson says the plans are the only alternative to a no—deal brexit. yes, it is a compromise. ireland essentially stays in the single market for goods. as the duke and duchess of sussex end their tour of southern africa — they launch a court case against a sunday newspaper for publishing a private letter. hundreds of people in hong kong stage a sit—in at the school
3:34 pm
of a teenage activist shot by police during violent clashes. and one of six runners to win this yea r‘s and one of six runners to win this year's stirling prize for architecture. sport now on afternoon live with jane dougall. bernardo silva is in a lot of trouble over a tweet? this tweet was about his team mate benjamin mendy who's black. bernardo silva tweeted a picture of mendy alongside a brand mascot of the spanish chocolate conguitos which has tropes frequently found in racist caricature. a chocolate covered figure with large lips. a chocolate covered figure with large lips. this was last month, the fa subsequently contacted manchester city about it silva later tweeted: "can't even joke with a friend these days." but the anti—discrimination charity kick it out has criticised the post saying that "racist stereotypes are never acceptable as "banter". silva has written to the fa to say he regrets the fact his social media post may have
3:35 pm
unintentionally caused offence. he's also been repeatedly defended by manchester city manager pep guardiola, who said it would be a "mistake" to punish him for the tweet. mendy has also written in support of silva, saying he did not take offence at the tweet. but silva has been charged with misconduct by the football association and he has until the 9th of october to respond. and hopes for gold in the world athletics championships for dina asher—smith. we are putting pressure on her already. yes, that is later on her already. yes, that is later on tonight. but before that... but before that... a great start from katarina johnson—thompson — she's won her 100 metre hurdles heat in a personal best of 13:09. that meant she was momentarily in the lead for the gold medal with 1111 points. she's since been overtaken. but it's so positive for katarina, one of britain's medal hopes at the world championships. she's never had a podium finish at a major global outdoor event. watch her heat — she moved away from the favourite
3:36 pm
nafi thiam straight away and eased ahead of the rest of the pack. she crossed the line with quite a margin between her and second place. between her and second place. just look at the expression on herface, a personal best time. seven events in the heptathlon. say you can keep across all the action via the bbc sport website and app and live on bbc two this afternoon. in the women's shot put britain's sophie mckinna threw a lifetime best of 18 metres and 61centimetres to automatically qualify for the final. and you can see how much it meant to her! fantastic scenes from the world athletics championships. fantastic scenes from the world athletics championships. meanwhile, dina asher smith is favourite to win the 200 metres later this evening. notjust because she's performed so well, but also because several other contendors have pulled out. the olympic champion elaine thompson
3:37 pm
from jamaica, the 100m champion shelly—ann fraser—pryce, and the dutch defending champion dafne schippers have all pulled out for topnights race. out for topnight‘s race. asher—smith comfortably won her 200—metres semi final. if she wins later, she'll become the first british woman to win a world sprint title. she holds the british record in the 200m after her european championships victory in berlin last year. she has already won silver in the 100 metres final the other night. new zealand have recorded the biggest score yet at the rugby world cup, hammering canada 63—0 in oita. all three barrett brothers got their names on the scoresheet with tries for beauden, and jordie, and scott, the first time three brothers have started for the kiwis. their ninth and final try came from brad weber, it was his second. new zealand are a point behind pool leaders italy,
3:38 pm
who won't be there for long you imagine, they still have to face both south africa and the all blacks. france needed three late tries to survive a scare and see off the united states for their second win. at one point the us were just three point behind france at 12 point to 9 but france then scored three more tries to pick up a bonus point. the win moves france up to second in pool c, one point behind england. more in the next hour. back now to our main story. the government has published its brexit proposals to the eu, including its plans to replace the irish backstop.
3:39 pm
meanwhile, angela merkel says it is important that we stick together, the 27. the chancellor said that whilst they still hoped for an orderly brexit, they were prepared for a no deal. the government publishing the proposals in the last few minutes. we can speak tojohn campbell whojoins few minutes. we can speak tojohn campbell who joins me now from belfast. what is your reaction? the really big thing from an irish point of view is what this document says is, listen, there will have to be a customs border in ireland. we will try and make that border as decentralised and as frictionless as possible, but there will be some form of new customs procedures between north and south. at the centre of this the government seems
3:40 pm
to be suggesting that virtually everything which could happen in customs could happen at company premises through declarations you could make when the goods are leaving and arriving. but it also talks about additional premises anywhere in ireland and northern ireland where the customs procedure and clearance could take place. what are those additional premises going to be called ? are those additional premises going to be called? customs posts? trade facilitation centres? what are they going to be. there will be some form of new centres which will be required for at least some of the customs procedures. i think therefore it is going to be a document which will be very difficult for the irish government to a cce pt difficult for the irish government to accept because we know as early as yesterday leo varadkar, the irish prime ministers said, ok, if there is no deal, there will have to be checks, but we are not going to sign up checks, but we are not going to sign up to checks, but we are not going to sign uptoa checks, but we are not going to sign up to a deal which would also
3:41 pm
involve checks. unless leo varadkar walks things back radically, this will be a difficult document for the government to accept. there is also an idea whereby the very smallest traders would not be subject to duties or customs procedures and that idea has come back. at the time that was not a very well received idea in 2017 although it has been floated again now. the other important thing is the rule of stormont. aside from dealing with customs, this also has to deal with regulatory issues, the rules of the single market. under the backstop northern ireland alone would have stayed in the single market for goods and that would have been a situation which would have been a situation which would have been maintained until the eu and the uk decided something else to replace it. what this document says is, yes,
3:42 pm
northern ireland would continue to fall under single market rules in food, agriculture and manufactured goods, but stormont would have to vote on a cross community basis to accept those rules will come into force and every four years, like the world cup, stormont would have to decide whether it wanted to continue to follow the new rules or it would revert back to uk rules. this is also likely to be a problem because, without boring you on the detail, there is a mechanism at stormont, there is a mechanism at stormont, the petition of concern, which can give one community or another of concern, which can give one community or another veto. nationalists will be saying, is this a plan to give the dup a veto on whether or not northern ireland should continue to follow the single market rules which are essential for keeping the border frictionless? you know all the detail, you have been doing this story for years. i wonder in your guts do you get a sense that any part of this could fly?”
3:43 pm
in your guts do you get a sense that any part of this could fly? i think there is an enormous hurdle there in terms of what is being said about new customs checks. the irish government keep referring us back to december 2017 and the joint report. what they agreed to at that point was no infrastructure at the border and no related checks or controls. this is unambiguously new related checks or controls for cross—border trade. i think the irish government is going to have to either walk back or take is going to have to either walk back ortakea is going to have to either walk back or take a huge amount of persuading by the uk and its other allies to accept these sorts of proposals. i think it will be incredibly difficult. john campbell, the economics and business editor for bbc northern ireland. let's go to westminster. nick is there. interesting reaction from the dup in the last few minutes, not rolling this out, giving perhaps a cautious welcome to what borisjohnson is
3:44 pm
suggesting, saying it could be the basis of something they will get behind. if that were to happen, there is an expectation here that some of those brexiteers who refused to back theresa may might get on board and then the numbers are very tight. one party that will not be backing it is plaid cymru and i have got their leader here, liz sabir roberts. you have had a look at the plan, is it a roberts. you have had a look at the plan, is ita go? roberts. you have had a look at the plan, is it a go? i read it briefly, it came through 20 minutes ago. looking at it superficially it looks to be very much made up of contradictions. in another interpretation you wonder whether this has already been refused by the eu. the response of the eu will be significant. if it has been written in sucha significant. if it has been written in such a way as to make it likely to be refused by the eu, you have to ask the question is the prime minister in the blame game now and doing what he wanted to do all
3:45 pm
along? he may have done a double think about this, he may even want to get a deal, but he is very comfortable with sliding us towards ano comfortable with sliding us towards a no deal scenario at the end of this month now and we are talking about tens of days away, and putting the blame on everybody else. since he was elected by his conservative party as prime minister he has put the blame on parliament. he is now likely to put the blame on westminster. these are bully boy tactics of somebody who is desperate to get us out at the end of the month. he is topping it off with a northern ireland growth deal bit bunked to the dup. i wonder whether you think if this deal were endorsed by the eu, could it get through this parliament? there are an increasing number of people here who think there could be the numbers to get some sort of brexit deal through late october. you make a very
3:46 pm
critical point there, but let's wait to see what the eu say rather than pre—guessing it will stop do you think this could get through parliament now? all i have learnt this last six months i know that tomorrow will be volatile and changing. i also know we have a prime minister who is stage managing his appearance and his messages. there probably will not be a statement tomorrow because he cannot stage manage the chamber. he has lost every vote that he has brought to the floor of the chamber. he has also been found to be acting illegitimately by the supreme court only last week. the benn act requires him to seek an extension by the end of this month. will he do his duty? ian blackwell from the snp said he is not convinced the
3:47 pm
government will extend the brexit process as the benn act says. you quys process as the benn act says. you guys made a big deal about prorogation and parliament is back now and opposition parties are not doing much, they don't seem to be agreeing on their tactics.|j doing much, they don't seem to be agreeing on their tactics. i would really like to see the papers presented to the eu, in more detail. we have got the details of what borisjohnson is we have got the details of what boris johnson is proposing. we have got the details of what borisjohnson is proposing. what are you going to do next? we know this man is very comfortable with is going towards a no—deal brexit. he gave us five pages of yellowhammer with some of it redacted and we know there are other pages as well. members of parliament are only representatives of the public, but the public should know what no deal means and they should know what the government knows about no deal. at the same time we know borisjohnson is the master of distraction. he would like a general election, he would like a general election, he would like a general election, he would like not to be held to account by the end of this month. ourjob is
3:48 pm
to make sure he behaves like a prime ministerand to make sure he behaves like a prime minister and notjust to make sure he behaves like a prime minister and not just the cheerleader for the conservative party. thank you very much. simon, opposition parties as you might expect are pouring a lot of cold water on this proposal right away. we are due to hear from the labour leader in the next half an hour or so and we will bring you that when we have got it. one of the key questions is, is this going to win over the tory brexiteer to have held out in the past, and are there some labour mp5 who out in the past, and are there some labourmps who might out in the past, and are there some labour mp5 who might flirt with the idea of backing this, if europe plays ball. that is nick eardley in westminster. that is nick eardley in westminster. joe owen is from the institute of government and joins me now... the backstop issue is at the heart of the difficulty. if you assume for a moment the eu says, fine, we like
3:49 pm
it, you can have it and the legal text co m es it, you can have it and the legal text comes out before the european council, they do need to get a majority in parliament. there were two groups that never came through for theresa may when she put her deal forward. for theresa may when she put her dealforward. the brexiteer wing of her party and the dup, and also the labour levers, the people she was courting and trying to construct a deal that would win them over and she told them that they were 50 or 60 ready to vote the next time. they never came through. we have heard tentative responses from the brexiteer site of the conservative party that suggests they may be more supportive of this, but he has also lost 21 mp5 in those 21 mp5 and the labour mp5 that support the deal prefer a much softer brexit. if those labour mp5 like the fact there was a those labour mp5 like the fact there wasa uk those labour mp5 like the fact there was a uk wide customs union, they like the alignment of the uk to a level playing field provisions,
3:50 pm
those things have disappeared in this draft, so it is not clear whether they would support this. the gamble boris johnson is whether they would support this. the gamble borisjohnson is taking quite clearly is that there are those who do pretty much almost anything to avoid a no deal and any deal would be better than that. that becomes a very credible threat if they get through a first meaningful vote if you like in this benn legislation and if it falls away. how does it fall away? the benn legislation will fall away? the benn legislation will fall away? the benn legislation will fall away if parliament votes in favour of a deal in principle before the 9th of october. there is a provision in the benn act which says if there is a provision, then fine. but if they do not pass that legislation, it looks like the prime minister's next letter to donald tusk will be one asking for an extension on the 19th of october. what are the other difficulties that you foresee with this? the big
3:51 pm
challenge is how this will be received in brussels and the fact that the uk is putting in essentially a time limit and an exit, which is something brussels was so against with theresa may negotiating. and then the fact it puts a customs border down the middle of the island of ireland, which is against what the two sides signed up to in the joint which is against what the two sides signed up to in thejoint report, which protects the all ireland economy with no associated cheques. this government is saying, we do not stand by that, we would like to see what we can do away from the border to minimise the checks, but that is something the eu is not likely to be keen on. the purpose of a backstop is to have something that can be in place if we fail to agree a future relationship at the end of transition which is currently the end of next year. these are big changes. it is creating one border between great britain and northern
3:52 pm
ireland and another border between northern ireland and the republic. just the practicalities of getting that in place, getting traders ready, all of the businesses that need to adapt and the intermediaries. even if they had absolute clarity on what it would look like now, it would be a huge task. in the past this has been yea rs task. in the past this has been years in the making. sorry about the coughing. it is fascinating. thank you. our former colleague, the journalist and presenter peter sissons, has died at the age of 77. peterjoined itn in the 19605 before moving to the bbc in 1989 to present question time and the six o'clock news. he also presented the nine o'clock news and 10 o'clock news, and also this channel, before retiring from broadcasting in 2009. the bbc‘s director general tony hall has described him as "one of the great television figures of his time". a statement from his management company said he "died peacefully last night"
3:53 pm
in maidstone hospital in kent. ben is here with all the business needs. we are looking at the bloke who saved tesco. this is what they are calling dave lewis. their motto is every little helps and he did a lot since taking over. they had huge problems. when he took over in 2014 they were having a tough time. the supermarket had been overstating its profits in the past and he then led a massive turnaround plan for britain's biggest supermarket chain. five years on he has surprised a nalysts five years on he has surprised analysts by announcing he will be leaving next summer and he said the decision was a personal one. he will be replaced by ken murphy, someone who has held a number of senior positions at the company who owns the chemist chain boots. carl
3:54 pm
mckeever is the managing director of the retail consultancy visual thinking. is it overstating it to say he was the man who saved tesco? no, you are quite right and many retail ceos would be of the same view. he has achieved nothing short ofa view. he has achieved nothing short of a remarkable turnaround in the la st of a remarkable turnaround in the last five years. he took over at a time when competition was really starting to hot up in the grocery sector. the discounters aldi and lidl snapping at the heels of the big, traditional retail grocers. do you think he did enough to fend off that competition? i think so. what he has done is reset the dial at tesco. when he joined it, it was bloated and overgrown and there was a lot of trouble. a food scandal and an accounting scandal and mistrust by customers. but gradually he has worked on new initiatives and the most dramatic was the acquisition of
3:55 pm
the cash—and—carry group booker foods. that gave tesco a whole new avenue to explore, providing food to hotels, restaurants and the public sector. but with the introduction of jax, the low—priced discount chain that was intended to take on aldi and lidl. he showed a great deal of innovation and he steadied the ship. when we mention that foray into the discounting side, jax was an experiment that did not work and some say his record at tesco was not spotless. when we look at the position he has left the supermarket chain in, the share price is not much higher and it has lost market share in the grocery field. yes, fundamentally you could argue did he do to many different kinds of initiatives? there is perhaps an argument to say that by focusing on too many things at once perhaps it
3:56 pm
was a distraction built in their and perhaps tesco could have gone further in that time with less things to worry about. thank you very much, carl mckeever. somebody has to get 20p to put in the metre and put the lights back on. they will be lucky, you can't get cash anywhere. yes, etiennes, they are going out in a rapid rate. we will talk about that later. the ftse 100 is down even further. there is a lot of pressure on it because of the ongoing worries about the trade war between china and the us and brexit. add to that the downturn in construction. the figures are out today. tesco share price slightly but not much. the matter back announcing it has succeeded in raising some fresh capital and that its founder will be going. a lot going on in the markets and that is a little snapshot for now. see you
3:57 pm
in 45 minutes. now it's time for a look at the weather we are seeing much needed dry weather across the uk. after a chilly start it is not particularly warm out there but most places are enjoying blue skies and sunshine. there are some areas of cloud here and there, particularly in northern parts of scotland. on the whole it remains dry and there will be plenty of sunshine around, and temperature typically 13 or 14. still quite windy on the eastern coast where it feels particularly chilly and a few showers not far away. on the whole, dry and clearing skies for most parts. the far south—west of england and northern ireland will pick up some cloud, so not as chilly here, elsewhere it will be close to freezing in rural areas. we have a burst of cool air in the middle part
3:58 pm
of the week and not that far away we have some tropical air. it comes from this deep area of low pressure and it is storm lorenzo. the biggest impact will be across the western side of ireland. for the uk the rain will come in as well, nothing unusual about that area of rain. the wins will be strengthening, particularly in the irish sea and into northern ireland and western scotland. the strongest winds for more eastern parts of northern ireland. i had of it it remains dry and the winds are not as strong, but it is still a bit chilly. that the area of low pressure arrives close to the uk and as it moves across it tends to weaken. wet and windy weather for a while and then they will drop out. stronger winds to the south—west and the rain gets swept down to the near continent. in the afternoon on friday most places will
3:59 pm
be dry and it will not be quite so chilly. a5 be dry and it will not be quite so chilly. as we head into the weekend, it will stay milder. whilst there will be some sunshine around we have got rain coming in from the west. most of it will be on saturday night. that rain peters out on sunday. if we look into the atlantic more wind and rain is set to arrive across the uk as we head into next week.
4:00 pm
hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 4: the government has published its brexit proposals to the eu. borisjohnson says the plans are the only alternative to a no—deal brexit. yes, yes, this is a compromise by the uk and i hope very much that our friends understand that and compromise in their turn. the proposals include plans to replace the irish backstop, with northern ireland essentially staying in the european single market for goods through the creation of a "all—island regulatory zone", but leaving the eu customs union along with the rest of the uk. stormont would have to approve the arrangements. as the duke and duchess of sussex end their tour of southern africa, they launch a court case against a sunday newspaper for publishing a private letter. hundreds of people in hong kong stage a sit—in at the school of a teenage activist shot by police
4:01 pm
during violent clashes. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. that is with jane. hello, simon. the brits are doing so well at the world athletics championships. a great start from katarina johnson—thompson, winning her hurdles heat with a personal best. excellent, thank you. and darren is looking at the weather. hello, what a difference a day makes, the sun is out, a chance to dry off but there is an old hurricane heading towards the uk called lorenzo. we will have a look at that later in the programme. thanks, darren. also coming up — "a gold standard broadcaster". tributes are paid to peter sissons, the former itn and bbc newsreader and question time host, who's died at the age of 77.
4:02 pm
hello, everyone. this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. the uk has published its proposals for replacing the controversial backstop, the guarantee against a hard border in ireland, which was part of theresa may's brexit deal with the eu. the prime minister borisjohnson has written to the president of the european commission, jean claude—juncker, saying it would be a ‘failure of statecraft for which we would all be responsible‘ if the two sides failed to strike a deal. as part of the plans, northern ireland would essentially stay in the european single market for goods — through the creation of an ‘all ireland regulatory zone‘, there would be additional checks on goods moving from the mainland of great britain to northern ireland — but not on goods entering northern ireland from ireland — effectively creating a border in the irish sea. northern ireland would, however, leave the eu customs union, along with the rest of the uk — so there would have to be new customs checks between
4:03 pm
the north and south. those checks could be carried out electronically, according to the proposals — but a small number of physical checks would have to take place. they would be conducted away from the border on business premises or at points on the supply chain. the prime minister told the tory conference earlier that his plans for the irish border are his ‘final offer‘ — and insists the only alternative is a no—deal brexit. yes, this is a compromise by the uk andi yes, this is a compromise by the uk and i hope very much that our friends understand that and compromise in their turn. because if we fail to get an agreement because of what is essentially a technical discussion on what is the exact nature of future customs checks, when that technology is improving the whole time, then let us be in no doubt, conference, of what the alternative is. the alternative is no deal, and that is not an outcome we want. it is not an outcome we seek at all, but let me tell you, my friends, it is an outcome for which we are ready.
4:04 pm
well, our chief political correspondent vicki young give us this outline on what‘s contained in boris johnson‘s plan. this, of course, centres around the controversial issue of the northern irish backstop. these are the alternative plan now that the government is going to put forward. they shape up like this... northern ireland, essentially, stays in the single market for goods. that‘s through the creation of an all—island regulatory zone. that means northern ireland follows the eu rules for goods. but we‘ve heard a lot over the last few months and years about the stormont lock, it was called, how can they give some kind of say to the stormont assembly when it finally gets back to sitting? how can they give the people of northern ireland a say over all of this? so the plan is that stormont would have a vote on whether to enter these arrangements in the first place, plus they would then have a vote every four years
4:05 pm
on whether to carry on with it. what about the issue of checks? this has been the problem all along, of course. if you have northern ireland and ireland in different economic zones, then you need to have some kind of checks. that is what they are trying to get round. there will be additional checks from goods moving from great britain to northern ireland but the uk would not apply checks entering northern ireland from ireland. interesting also, they talk about a new dealfor northern ireland, that‘s financial commitments to help them manage these changes. so, the other issue about the customs union... northern ireland, these proposals say, would leave the eu customs union along with the rest of the uk. that has been a huge issue, particularly, of course, for the dup, who do not want to be treated differently from the rest of the uk, but under these proposals they, of course, will have to follow eu rules on goods. but we will all leave the customs union together, so they‘re saying they would be no new customs checks between north and south.
4:06 pm
then the issue of these checks, where do they take place? another hugely contentious point because neither side wants to have infrastructure at the border. that has been got rid of, they don‘t want to go back to that. what is a plan for all of that? the uk government, as we have heard many times before, saying the vast majority of the checks they think could be carried out electronically. they do envisage a small number of physical checks, but don‘t propose to have new buildings or any kind of new infrastructure. they would be carried out near the companies who are affected. so, they are the broad plans. of course, everyone will be waiting to see how brussels responds to it. that was vicki young in manchester. let‘s go to westminster now and our political correspondent nick eardley. what is the reaction so far? we have this dual track over the next day or so, where we will be looking for
4:07 pm
european reaction, is this a go, how will the calls go? and ireland, what does the irish pm lee over radtke say? but there is also the question of weather this deal is a go at westminster. the dup have said in the last hour that they are open to this plan, there is some suggestion that they think it is a goer, the idea of more financial support for northern ireland being something they could work with, as well. but broader than that, the reaction will be important. to what extent do people think this could get parliament and also that boris johnson is putting a realistic offer on the table? let‘s talk some of that through with tom brake, the brexit spokesman for the lib dems. do you think this is a potential
4:08 pm
a nswer to do you think this is a potential answer to the impasse? first of all, i don't think it is a genuine offer from our prime minister. i don't think he is serious about securing a deal. i think he wants to take us out without a deal. i think what this proposal does this actually creates two borders are northern ireland, rather than not having a boarder at all. in those circumstances, first of all, i think it will be a hammer blow for the northern ireland economy and i also think that it will not be in keeping with the good friday agreement. sol will not be in keeping with the good friday agreement. so i don't think it will get a very good response from the irish or european union. we have heard from the lib dems in the last few weeks, you will do anything to avoid a no—deal brexit. this is an option, isn‘t it? to pass a deal is the best way, with her time and time again, to avoid no deal but it doesn‘t sound like you guys are entertaining this is a prospect? we have made it from the very beginning three years ago that the best deal we have got is the one we have got as members of the european
4:09 pm
union currently. but just as we did with theresa may, we will make the same proposal to boris johnson. with theresa may, we will make the same proposal to borisjohnson. if he thinks this is a fantastic deal and he is willing to put it to the people in a peoples vote, then we will help him do that. that has been our position, that is a compromise on our part. and then really the people will be able to test whether this is their interpretation for what they were voting for three and half years ago. the lib dems have a number of sister and brother parties in europe. are you hearing any reaction from them this afternoon what they think of these proposals, whether they are going to take them seriously? i haven't heard anything yet because obviously the proposals, the ink is barely dry on them. but clearly, i would expect the response to be consistent with what has been said so far. what has been said so far, and was incidentally something the uk government had said, is any proposal that brings back something on that border, it might not be
4:10 pm
exactly on the border, it could be some distance from the border, is something they would object to and it used to be something the british government objected to as well. more broadly, if you look at this parliament, the dup are now looking at this proposal borisjohnson put forward. that could bring on side a number of brexiteers who didn‘t back theresa may‘s deal. some labour mp5 are desperate to get over the line. do you think this parliament might actually now that this new deal if brussels were to get on board and leave you guys outflanked? well, i think it is unlikely that this deal could get through, if it we re this deal could get through, if it were not linked to the idea of a confirmatory vote. of course, what the prime minister has successfully done by kicking out 21 of his own members of parliament and indicating that many of those are going to be deselected and would not be readmitted into the conservative party, has created a large group of people who potentially can more than offset the support that he might
4:11 pm
secure through the dup. but many of those x conservative members of parliament, my understanding is they would support, because many of them do wanta would support, because many of them do want a deal, they are now in a position where they would only support that subject to a confirmatory referendum. so if the prime minister is willing to bring his deal forward, put it to parliament and say, look, if you vote for this, i will allow a confirmatory vote to take place, that would be the prime minister's best way of getting this through. one final question, the lib dems have been taking part in these talks with other opposition parties. it seems like you will completely disagree on what to do next. we had the snp on about an hour ago saying we need to bring down the government right away and put an emergency government in. plaid cymru suggested we should try and impeach the prime minister. the lib dems, i‘m not sure what your offer and the table is right now. is there a break in the alliance and put that be a deciding factor in what happens next? i would argue actually the
4:12 pm
opposition groups have been fully united. we are fighting together against no deal. of course, we collectively passed the benn act which stops our prime minister taking us out without a deal. of course, there are nuances in terms of what we are proposing. we don't agree with the snp, for example, and my understanding is neither do the other opposition parties, that a vote of no confidence would be the way out of this mess. we are in huge brexit mess. the only way of closing down this issue, in our view, is to secure a peoples vote and get a resolution. crashing out without a deal, which seems to be what the prime minister wants, is a guarantee we will have 55 and ten years more of negotiations, arguments with the european union about our future. ok, thank you very much. opposition parties, as you are hearing, are not impressed with this plan. different interpretations as to whether or not it might potentially have the numbers to get through the commons
4:13 pm
now that the dup are flirting with the idea of backing it. some tory brexiteers who have so far refused to back anything that the government had come back with might now be swayed by that. in the last three minutes, whilst i have been interviewing the lib dems, the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has been here as well, giving his take on what boris johnson here as well, giving his take on what borisjohnson is suggesting is that i think we can have a listen now. it is worse than theresa may's deal. i can't see it getting the support he thinks it will get and it will take us into a regime in britain of deregulation of undercutting and i think it will also undermine the good friday agreement. what is it that is worse than theresa may‘s proposals? agreement. what is it that is worse than theresa may's proposals? what is worse is particularly the section on northern ireland, which is very unspecific at the good friday agreement can be upheld within the terms of the letter he sent. also much worse is the specific intention
4:14 pm
to deregulate alongside europe, whereas in fact, when we were negotiating with theresa may plasma government, they did agree to some degree of regulation. our talks broke down because they were not strong enough on environmental regulation but this prime minister seems to want to lead to a deregulated britain with a race to the bottom. we were briefed this was going to be a final offer. it doesn‘t seem is a final offer now. what is your view of the language that the prime minister has been using an also not been using? at the end of his letter he says, i'm sure this can all be agreed by october 31. i'm sure he knows full well that what he has put forward is unlikely to be agreed. what he hasn't acknowledged that he has a duty under the acknowledged that he has a duty underthe eu numbertwo acknowledged that he has a duty under the eu number two act, acknowledged that he has a duty underthe eu numbertwo act, the act of parliament, which requires them to apply for an extension in the event of no agreement being reached. do you sense now the prime minister, what he is really after is no—deal brexit? everything to do with his behaviour
4:15 pm
and his language over the past few weeks has been about getting a no—deal brexit. i think the very least he could do is come to the house of commons tomorrow to explain what his proposals are, to answer questions on them and we will be able to tell him quite clearly that we believe this deal is not a cce pta ble we believe this deal is not acceptable and we do believe that a much better deal can be reached with the european union, which could then be put to the british people to have the final say between that deal and an option of remaining in the eu. pretty strong, worse than theresa may plasma deal was a big gamble borisjohnson is may plasma deal was a big gamble boris johnson is taking may plasma deal was a big gamble borisjohnson is taking is quite clear. they will be those in parliament who would rather and if he deal than the prospect of a no deal? absolutely. that is what some of those briefings overnight were about, about this being the last option that the uk government is going to put on the table. that is partly saying to europe, you need to play ball, you need to take this seriously. it is partly sent to mp5
4:16 pm
here who are desperate to get a deal and not leave without a deal, this is your chance. so the three groups that are going to be really key over the next few days, domestically at least. the dup, who as i say put out a statement in the last hour or so giving a cautious welcome to boris johnson‘s plans. we know there were conversations with the dup taking place before this plan was published and it seems that they are open to what is being suggested. speaking to people in the european research group, the hard—core rex that is, the ones who have always supported it, who didn‘t all get on board with theresa may plasma deal, a senior figure in the erg said to me earlier, he thinks of the dup get on board, then you get the number of tories who will still rebel and won‘t vote for this down to single figures. they think potentially quite negligible numbers, so under five. then you have to look out for the labour mp5 who have said they wa nt to the labour mp5 who have said they want to get brexit done, want to
4:17 pm
deliver a good deal. do they think this ticks the box? there are some who privately said they wish they could bring theresa may plasma deal back, but would they get on board with this, if borisjohnson can get it over the line with europe? that isa it over the line with europe? that is a big if and it over the line with europe? that is a big ifand i it over the line with europe? that is a big if and i suppose the two things play into each other. there will be some in europe who want to know if this has a chance of getting through the commons before they entertain it properly. but there are some suggestions of slight movement here, wouldn‘t get overexcited about it, don‘t assume at the moment this isa it, don‘t assume at the moment this is a goer if it comes back to the commons, but slight movement that we have not seen before. that means it is more possible that borisjohnson could get this through. far from guaranteed. nick, thank you. nick ea rdley. our europe correspondent damian grammaticus is in brussels. that phrase wouldn‘t get overexcited about it, i suspect that is summing up about it, i suspect that is summing up how they feel there? we wait to hear what the eu will officially make of this because the
4:18 pm
discussions are ongoing. michel barnier and david frost, the prime minister‘s chief negotiator, have been locked inside the commission going over this. we will hear a little later michel barnier briefing members of the european parliament and then i think we will start to hear from other parts of the eu, as hear from other parts of the eu, as he starts to brief eu countries as well. but the problem i think you can see immediately for this, for the eu side, is what‘s in these documents that we now have breaches the eu‘s own red lines in the negotiations. it has shown no sign of wanting to cross those red lines at any point up to this stage, really, so what are those? well, absolutely central to that is the idea is no customs controls, no checks on the island of ireland. what does this say? it says they would have to be a customs border, customs processes it says should be a decentralised basis, electronically, with creative
4:19 pm
solutions in future, coupled with a firm commitment by both parties never to conduct checks at the border in the future. essentially, the uk side is saying there would need to be customs checks that they are asking the eu to promise not to do that at their frontier. the eu has always said it will protect that single market and check what is coming in, ensure taxes are paid, ensure goods are safe. but equally, the eu will say the idea of electronics and distributed centres, thatis electronics and distributed centres, that is still infrastructure, that is still a huge imposition on business and still crucially, for ireland, something that undermines the good friday agreement, the peace process , the good friday agreement, the peace process, the status quo on the island of ireland, the free exchange island of ireland, the free exchange is back and forth and that is another red line. the third thing, the time limit, four years and this would have to be renewed with northern ireland with an effective veto in northern ireland. the republic of ireland has always had a time limit would not be acceptable. but borisjohnson would perhaps make the point as far as the good friday agreement is concerned, there would
4:20 pm
still be no border checks, and that was always crucial for the good friday agreement. there is also the point that we should perhaps dress again, the backstop is only you to be used if talks do not go as eve ryo ne be used if talks do not go as everyone is hoping they would go? yes. a couple of things. on the border checks, this relies heavily on the idea that there should be no checks at the border, along that line or near it, that is what the uk position is now. that is not what the uk position was at the beginning of the negotiations under theresa may. the agreement then between the uk and the eu in the first stage of the negotiations was no checks or controls anywhere on the island of ireland. that‘s why this is a significant step backwards, i would say, for the irish government to even consider accepting this. the other thing then to say is i think the difficulty for the eu side, as
4:21 pm
well, imposition of anything on the island of ireland does change the status quo and does therefore undermine what it sees as the peace process and also the functioning of its own market. is there a sense, i don‘t know if you have had a chance to speak to many people already, that boris johnson is hell—bent on a no deal and this is just something johnson is hell—bent on a no deal and this isjust something he knows will not be acceptable to the eu? i think there was a definite sense early on when borisjohnson first met european leaders, there was definitely a sense that he was someone they could deal with, who was wanting a deal and looking at ways to try to find one. that has since, i think, ways to try to find one. that has since, ithink, there ways to try to find one. that has since, i think, there has been a lot of disappointment on the eu side, it‘s fair to say, because of the development of the political process in the uk, how that has gone. i think there is still a fundamental belief that boris johnson probably does want to get a deal somehow but does want to get a deal somehow but does this go far enough for the eu
4:22 pm
side? we will find out later. it is ha rd to side? we will find out later. it is hard to see how it does because ultimately, it brings in all of those border controls and checks and asks the eu to waive all sorts of it‘s own rules and regulations. when do you think we will have a clearer idea of what the reaction is to this? we will get a brief idea perhaps a little later today. then i think in the next 24—48 hours, i think by the weekend, we will certainly start to get a much clearer idea, if not then, set me the beginning of next week. but really, the crucial period now is the next coming week, because by the end of that, there needs to be the essence of an agreement there in place if anything is going to get agreed by eu leaders at their summit in the middle of october. it has to be from the eu‘s processors, it has to be agreed by ministers in the governments before it goes up to the leaders at the summit. that process
4:23 pm
through the ministers is ahead of the summit. that gives us a week, next week, basically. lee over radtke will be crucial, he is having a phone call with borisjohnson later tonight because not many eu leaders will be looking to how he responds because if he doesn‘t like it, they won‘t like it? responds because if he doesn‘t like it, they won't like it? yes, that is a critical part of this whole jigsaw puzzle. there has always been a feeling here that with the uk try to play off sides and get the rest of the eu... coming up with a proposal like this late in the day, something that really stretches the boundaries of what the eu might consider, with the uk be using that to get the rest of the eu to lean on island and say, look, by this because the alternative is no deal, essentially the uk approach to this. the feeling is that that is very unlikely, however much other countries want to avoid no deal, ultimately they want to preserve that sort of unity of the eu 27 and it will be very
4:24 pm
difficult for them to force ireland to do something it viewed as clearly against its wishes. but also clearly when this crosses many of the eu‘s own red line throughout. it‘s hard to see how the eu itself would row back on that. thank you, damian grammaticus. earlier, we heard from our reality check correspondent who helped to break down and explain the prime minister‘s proposals on the border between northern ireland and ireland. i have a quote here we looked up earlier. borisjohnson at the tory leadership hustings in belfast, under no circumstances whatever happens will i allow the eu or anyone else to create any kind of division down the irish sea. the new look at this document and say, well it may not be division but there will be significantly more checks on goods moving between great britain and northern ireland, within the united kingdom. at the moment, there are checks on things like live animals moving from britain to northern ireland. but now there will be checks on pretty much everything.
4:25 pm
his letter to jean—claude juncker said that agri— food goods, so anything really and the food chain, entering northern ireland from great britain would do so via a border inspection post, which is part of eu law. and that can be a very intrusive form of inspection for stop the letter says they will be subjection to identity and documentary checks on physical examination. crucially, it says those checks will be carried out by uk authorities. so even though, in effect, that would become, at least for a few years, the border of the single market, it would be uk authorities, according to this proposal, that would carry out those checks, even after the uk has left the eu. so again, is the eu going to be happy with the uk saying we are going to be the ones responsible for making sure your laws are carried out? obviously if there is an infringement of the law, where does that go, in terms of a court, if the uk has left the eu? there is lots of details on here which the eu will pick up on and then, this is not
4:26 pm
quite the way we think things should be going faster but at least you can say the uk, after all this time, there is now a serious proposal on there is now a serious proposal on the table. just reading the political editor of the sun, the dup seem to be onside but there is still work to be done. the dup put a statement at which we will be reading ina statement at which we will be reading in a moment. but what seems clear is that needs to be an awful, an awful lot of compromise... from the european union and from ireland? they‘re the european union and from ireland? they‘ re really the european union and from ireland? they‘re really does. the european union and from ireland? they're really does. there is no sign we will see that? there wasn't much in boris johnson‘s sign we will see that? there wasn't much in borisjohnson‘s party conference speech on brexit, understandably because we knew these documents were coming out later in the day. one line that struck me was when he said if we fail to get an agreement for what is basically a technical discussion of the future nature of future customs checks, it will be no deal. for many in ireland this is not a technical discussion. the idea of any kind of check
4:27 pm
associated with a land border even if it is not at the land border comes down to issues of identity and the painfully crafted compromise that was put together when the good friday agreement was born. i think they would object to the idea that this is simply a technical issue on which the eu is saying computer says no. they are saying this is much more subtle than that and essentially come in many ways, more potentially dangerous than that and thatis potentially dangerous than that and that is why it it needs to be treated seriously. chris morris from our reality check team. bbc northern ireland‘s economics & business editorjohn campbell, says this is a document that will be very difficult for the irish government to accept. i think the really big thing here from an irish point of view is what this document effectively says is, listen, there is going to have to be a customs border in ireland. we will try make that border as decentralised and as frictionless as possible, but there is certainly going to be some form of new customs procedures between north and south. really at the centre of this, the
4:28 pm
government seems to be suggesting that virtually everything that could happen at customs could happen at company premises, three declarations you make when goods arrive and leave. but it also talks about the fa ct leave. but it also talks about the fact some goods may have to go to additional premises, which could be anywhere in ireland or northern ireland, with a customs procedure could take place. what are we going to call the additional premises? will they be called customs clea ra nce will they be called customs clearance centres, customs post? what are they going to be? that is suggesting there will be some form of new centres which will be required for at least some of the customs procedures. so i think this, therefore, will be a document which will be very difficult for the irish government to accept, because we know just as early as yesterday, leo varadkar, the irish taoiseach said if there is no deal, we know there will have to be checks, but we‘re not going to sign up to a deal which also involve checks. so unless leo
4:29 pm
varadkar walks things back very rapidly, i think this will be a very difficult document for the dublin government to accept. there are other new things in there on customs as well, for example an idea which was first floated by the british government in the summer of 2017. the very smallest traders in northern ireland wouldn‘t be subject to any customs duties, wouldn‘t be subject to customs procedures, that idea has come back. if i remember at the time, that was not a very well received idea in 2017, although it has been floated again now. i think the other important thing here is the other important thing here is the role of stormont. so aside from dealing with customers, this also has to deal with regulatory issues, like the rules of the single market. under the backstop, what would have happened is northern ireland alone would have stayed in the single market for goods and that would have been a situation that would have been a situation that would have been maintained until the uk and eu decided something else could replace it. what this document does is put ina it. what this document does is put in a bigger role for stormont. it
4:30 pm
says northern ireland would continue to follow many single market rules on food, agriculture and manufactured goods, but stormont would have to vote on a cross community basis to accept that those rules would come into force and then every four years, a bit like the world cup or olympics, stormont would have to decide whether it wa nted would have to decide whether it wanted to continue to follow eu rules or would revert back to uk rules. this is also likely to be a problem because without boring you on the detail, there is a mechanism at stormont called the cause of concern which can give one community or other a veto. the nationalists in particular, they will be saying hold ona particular, they will be saying hold on a moment, is this a plan to give the dup had veto on whether or not northern ireland should continue to be following the single market rules, which are essential for keeping the border frictionless? john campbell, the bbc northern ireland economics and business editor. nigel farage, brexit party leader, has been tweeting about the proposals.
4:31 pm
we will bring you more reaction throughout the afternoon and evening. now it is time for a look at the weather. it is the calm before the store you could say today. a bit on the chilly side at 12—14. some showers in northern parts of scotland. with those strong, cold winds driving one or two down the east coast overnight. a5 or two down the east coast overnight. as the breeze picks up in the far south western parts of wales and northern ireland it is cloudy in places and it will not be so cold here. elsewhere, cold in rural areas. tomorrow is a fairly mild start and the cloud thickens on the
4:32 pm
western side of the uk and rain will get swe pt western side of the uk and rain will get swept up from the south—west. the winds will be strengthening across the south—west through the irish sea, particularly into northern ireland and western scotland. that is from storm lorenzo and it is affecting western powers on wednesday and thursday. further east it is dry and bright but rather chilly. this is bbc news, our latest headlines... the government has published its new brexit proposals and presented them to the eu —
4:33 pm
borisjohnson says the plans are the only alternative to a no—deal brexit. yes, yes, this is a compromise by the uk and i hope ourfriends understand that and compromise in their turn. understand that and compromise in their turn. the proposals include plans to replace the irish backstop, with northern ireland essentially staying in the european single market for goods through the creation of a "all—island regulatory zone", but leaving the eu customs union along with the rest of the uk. and stormont would have to approve the arrangements. as the duke and duchess of sussex end their tour of southern africa, they launch a court case against a sunday newspaper for publishing a private letter. sport now on afternoon live with jane dougall. and a busy afternoon in the athletics world championships in doha. we will come to dina asher smith in a moment but some success for british athletes this afternoon. katarina johnson thompson has won
4:34 pm
her 100 metres heat in the heptathlon and did it with a personal best time. she was momentarily in the lead for the gold medal and has since been overtaken. but it is positive for her. she was one of britain‘s medal hopes, but she has never had a podium finish at a major global outdoor event yet. she moved way from the favourite straightaway and she eased ahead of the rest of the pack. eventually she crossed the line well ahead of second place. take a look at the expression on herface. suchjoy because she saw the time and it was a personal best. next up is the high jump a personal best. next up is the high jump which is just going on at the moment. that is her best event as well, so fingers crossed she does well, so fingers crossed she does well there as well. great for her. also in the women‘s shot put briton‘s sophie mckenna through a lifetime best of over 18 metres and
4:35 pm
that means she automatically qualifies for the final. look how much it meant for her. fantastic news for her as well because she has not been doing so well. she was injured earlier this year. laura muircame third in injured earlier this year. laura muir came third in her qualification he for the 1500 metres and is co mforta bly he for the 1500 metres and is comfortably through to the semifinal and fellow brit sara macdonald is also three. currently eilish mccolgan is going well in the 5000 metres heat. huge pressure on dina asher—smith put on by the likes of you and me, but a real chance of gold later. but she is young and responds well to pressure. she is favourite to win the 200 metres later on this evening and that is not because she has performed so well this season, but because several other contenders have had to pull out.
4:36 pm
the olympic champion elaine thompson from jamaica, the 100m champion shelly—ann fraser—pryce, and the dutch defending champion dafne schippers have all pulled out for topnight‘s race. asher—smith comfortably won her 200—metres semi final. if she wins later, she‘ll become the first british woman to win a world sprint title. she holds the british record in the 200m after her european championships victory in berlin last year. she has already won silver in the 100 metres final the other night. she could be doing well for tonight. all the coverage will be across bbc platforms. bernardo silva tweeted a picture of mendy alongside a brand mascot of the spanish chocolate conguitos which has tropes frequently found in racist caricature. silva has written to the fa to say
4:37 pm
he regrets the fact his social media post may have unintentionally caused offence. he has until the 9th of october to respond to the charge. frank lampard ta kes respond to the charge. frank lampard takes his side to face lille in the champions league tonight. both sites are under pressure after losing the opening match of the competition. liverpool play salzburg at anfield. juergen klopp‘s side are hoping to get back on track after an opening defeat in the competition to napoli. we have to start winning and we should not waste time. that is it. we don‘t say that this game is halfway done, it is not. it is really tough and they will surprise a lot of people in the future is well salzburg salzburg is playing is made to surprise the bigger teams. new zealand have recorded the biggest score yet at the rugby world cup,
4:38 pm
hammering canada 63—0 in oita. all three barrett brothers got their names on the scoresheet with tries for beauden, and jordie, and scott, the first time three brothers have started for the kiwis. their ninth and final try came from brad weber, it was his second. new zealand are a point behind pool leaders italy, who won‘t be there for long you imagine, they still have to face both south africa and the all blacks. france needed three late tries to survive a scare and see off the united states for their second win. keep up—to—date with the world athletics championships on the bbc website. now on afternoon live let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. about cardiff city‘s decision to appeal against a fifa ruling. we‘ll be back with him injust a moment. and annabel tiffin is in salford and has today returned from the isle of man, we‘ll speak more about this in a minute.
4:39 pm
ben, bring us up to speed on this story. what has cardiff city decided to do next? this is a long—running dispute between two football club, cardiff city and not, over the ownership of a sala. you might remember back in january the tragedy unfolded. the 28—year—old argentine footballer was on his way to cardiff to start a brand—new career with the club in the premier league. but on the journey that he made from france, the plane in which he was a passenger crashed into the english channel and as a result he lost his life. his body was recovered from the water days later, the pilot, david ibbotson, is still missing. a5 a result of that tragedy there was an outpouring of grief right across the footballing community. you may remember the pictures of hundreds of thousands of football shirts, scarves and flowers being laid
4:40 pm
outside the cardiff city ground and outside the cardiff city ground and outside nna ntes outside the cardiff city ground and outside nnantes fc. it really united the community. but behind—the—scenes there is a bitterfeud over his ownership. nnantes there is a bitterfeud over his ownership. nna ntes say there is a bitterfeud over his ownership. nnantes say that all the paperwork was complete, but cardiff dispute this and say he had not registered as a player with a premier league and he was not their responsibility. nantes decided to turn the matter to fifa, world football‘s governing body, and on monday fifa made the ruling that cardiff need to pay the transfer fee which is worth £50 million. there is a payment of £5.3 million they should have paid months ago, but fifa says they need to pay it. cardiff stand by their words and say they are not liable and so they have turned to the court of arbitration for sport. there is a nasty taste about it when we are talking about a
4:41 pm
tragedy like this. what does cardiff city think it can achieve by this next move? when that ruling was made by fifa on monday it said it acknowledged fifa‘s decision, but it will go a step further and appeal it and it will turn to the court of arbitration for sport. that is where any sports law decision can be made, the final decision is made on any matter within sport. it hopes that thejudges will matter within sport. it hopes that the judges will make a final decision and consider the full scope of the evidence because it feels quite frankly the fee are only considered a narrow aspect of the overall evidence. but this is quite an unprecedented event and situation for them to rule on. we will have to see what comes of it. you will have plenty more at 6:30pm on bbc one. good to see you. let‘s go to annabelle tiffin. you havejust good to see you. let‘s go to annabelle tiffin. you have just got back from the isle of man, so what
4:42 pm
is it like? i landed about two and a half hours ago. today it is sunny, blue skies, dry, completely different to yesterday when the isle of man experience two weeks of rain in two hours. you can see the pictures now. the clean—up begins today and for many that is a huge job. when you look at the water, thatis job. when you look at the water, that is a road, not a river. some houses were under six feet of water and that was after the river burst its banks. the mess that leaves behind is really horrible. we went into one house last night which was right on the river and the cleaner had been cleaning up all day. the owner reckons £10,000 worth of damage was caused. unfortunately, he was not insured. it was notjust the amount of water, but the force of it washed away cars and a fire engine and a dozen homes had to be evacuated. for a while it was not
4:43 pm
possible to get access to the road. you saw the coastguard helicopter, that was brought in on standby and some residents were forced to wait it out upstairs. this is what some of them told us. it wasjust unbelievable, civil defence guys out of their vans, on the walls, it was so frightening. absolutely gutted. we had done our house up and it was lovely and then the water came over and ruined everything. you can't do much about it. quite angry, heartbroken, just devastated. it is something that i think would have been easily avoided. why are they angry? what do they think should have happened ? angry? what do they think should have happened? it was only four years ago that this same stretch of road in laxey was flooded. laxey is
4:44 pm
ina road in laxey was flooded. laxey is in a valley and it does flood, but not to this extent. residents are asking how this happened. obviously there was a lot of rain in a short amount of time, but there was also a lot of debris, would which had built up lot of debris, would which had built up in the river and lot of debris, would which had built up in the riverand it lot of debris, would which had built up in the river and it was acting like a dam, causing a build—up of water which led to the surge. but to add to that there was a hole in the river wall which was caused by construction work that had been taking place in the river. when the river swells it surged through the hole and into the road and into people's homes. manx utilities say although the gap had been shored up, the force of the river was too strong. the chief minister howard while from the manx government cut short his visit to the tory party co nfe re nce short his visit to the tory party conference in manchester to go back home and has been speaking to residents and he has promised a full investigation into how this happened. we will be talking about
4:45 pm
that more tonight. but we are also going to be paying tribute to newsreader peter sissons, who worked for itn and the bbc and was from liverpool. he was at school with some very famous people, jimmy tarbet and paul mccartney. yes, that is right. we will be paying tribute to him. fabulous, we all miss him. annabel tiffin, good to see you. and ben price in cardiff, thank you very much. you can access any of those stories on the bbc iplayer. and remember we go nationwide every afternoon at 4:30pm here on bbc live. the duchess of sussex is suing
4:46 pm
the the mail on sunday newspaper over the publication of a private letter she wrote to her father, sent shortly after she and prince harry got married in 2018. the duke said the legal action was in response to "relentless propaganda" against her. the paper says it will defend itself "vigorously". our correspondent nicholas witchell is with the royal couple on their tour of southern africa. business, at least on the surface, as usual. the final day of the sussexes‘ trip to southern africa and a visit to a township nearjohannesburg. the theme, youth unemployment and how to generate jobs. as ever, the media interest was intense. but away from the photo calls one issue was dominant. the sussexes‘ attack on the british tabloid media. this article in the mail on sunday last february is what triggered it. it quoted extracts from a private letter from the duchess to her father. she is taking legal action against the paper for alleged breach of privacy. but it is the outspoken statement by the duke which has caused sharp surprise. he spoke of a "ruthless campaign" against his wife. he went on: "there is a human cost to this relentless propaganda, specifically when it is knowingly false and malicious.
4:47 pm
i cannot begin to describe how painful it has been." he recalled the hounding of his late mother, diana. "there comes a point when the only thing to do is to stand up to this behaviour because it destroys people and it destroys lives. put simply, it is bullying, which scares and silences people." in a speech, harry spoke of his love for africa, which had helped him after his mother was killed and then, this general observation. we will firmly stand up for what we believe. we are fortunate enough to have a position that gives us amazing opportunities and we will do everything that we can to play our part in building a better world. meghan also spoke, offering some final thoughts in praise of the people they‘d met and in support of the different issues they have championed. the visit has been important for both of them. by pretty common consent, much of it of course expressed in the tabloid press, the sussexes have had a very
4:48 pm
successful visit to southern africa. but they end the tour at loggerheads with an entire section of the british media. in london, the editor of the mail on sunday, ted verity, said nothing as he arrived at his office. the paper said it stands by its story and will defend the case vigorously. if the case is fought out in open court, it‘s conceivable that the sussexes will have to give evidence. it will be a defining moment for them, the wider royal family, and the british popular press. nicholas witchell, bbc news, johannesburg. a5 as we were talking, our former colleague, thejournalist as we were talking, our former colleague, the journalist and presenter peter sissons has died at the age of 77. peterjoined itn in the 19605 before moving to the bbc in 1989 to present question time and the six o‘clock news. he also presented the nine o‘clock
4:49 pm
news and 10 o‘clock news, and also this channel, before retiring from broadcasting in 2009. the bbc‘s director general tony hall has described him as "one of the great television figures of his time". a statement from his management company said he "died peacefully last night" in maidstone hospital in kent. we shall all miss him. in a moment the latest business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. our main headline this hour — the government has published its brexit proposals to the eu — they include plans to replace the irish backstop, instead creating an an "all—island regulatory zone". here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. is it the start of a new trade war? after a 15—year dispute over subsidies the eu gave to plane maker airbus, the us has been told it can impose tariffs on £6.1bn worth of goods it imports from the european union. it could mean tariffs on goods ranging from planes to shellfish are imposed.
4:50 pm
the european commission said the tariffs would be short—sighted and counterproductive. the chief executive of tesco says he‘ll leave hisjob next summer. dave lewis took over at britain‘s biggest retailer five years ago at a turbulent time. he says it‘s the right time to move on. a former boss of boots has been lined up to replace him. the construction sector is suffering its worst downturn since the financial crisis. a closely watched survey suggests that building activity in september fell at the second fastest rate since 2009, although the downturn injune this year was even deeper. the economists behind the research say that brexit and the weak outlook for the overall economy are to blame. we don‘t put this in the script, but it says can you let me 20 quid?|j it says can you let me 20 quid?” have got one, actually. can you not find a cash machine? no. i won't get
4:51 pm
that back! cash machines are disappearing? some people say they cannot get access to cash and there are none in their community and now they will be able to request a free atm. it is being done by link, the company that manages the network of cash machines, and it has set up a £1 million fund to pay for putting these into what they call so—called cash deserts. there is a queue at the door there. how many would that pay for? it will only fund about 40-50 pay for? it will only fund about 40—50 machines, but link has said it could top up the fund if the service proves to be popular. but the way they will decide is there is certain criteria, like a lack of atms in the area, a safe location being found and if there is a post office where people can get cash, that might rule out the application. it seems like a
4:52 pm
goodidea out the application. it seems like a good idea but not everyone is impressed? no, one of those is the dissenting boss of the independent operating note machine and he says it isa operating note machine and he says it is a tiny bandage on a massive wound, saying these new atms will not make much difference when thousands have been shut and removed. that said, there are more than 50,000 fee to access cash machines across the uk and people are still using them. a total of 2.4 billion withdrawals last year, people withdrawing a total of £193 billion in cash, not all at once. people withdrawing a total of £193 billion in cash, not all at oncem would be even better if you got that. imagine. from your account, perhaps, not mine. consumer association which? recently revealed that free—to—use cash machines were disappearing quicker in deprived areas than in affluent ones. i put that point to one of the
4:53 pm
officers when i spoke to them earlier. you find that often in certain parts of the country and in certain types of community that move towards digital payment is happening at a different pace to others. but that said, pay to use atms are still a very small proportion of the overall estate. there are fewer of them today than there were ten years ago and i think they are still a very good choice for consumers in terms of ways to access their cash without paying for it. some sharp falls on the market today. equity markets falling quite steeply. we will get an expert take on what is going on. we will get an expert take on what is going on. tom stevenson is investment director at fidelity international. the ftse when i last looked was down more than 3% and other markets are down as well. what is going on? more than 3% and other markets are down as well. what is going 0mm isa down as well. what is going 0mm is a bit ofa down as well. what is going 0mm is a bit of a messy picture at the moment. there is a combination of events. we have got a lot of
4:54 pm
geopolitical uncertainty with the events in hong kong and the middle east. political uncertainty on both sides of the atlantic with the brexit situation here, but also the move towards possible impeachment in the us. but i think the key thing is the us. but i think the key thing is the data which is starting to come through. yesterday, we had some very worrying manufacturing data out of the us, but also out of europe and the us, but also out of europe and the uk, and today we have had some further data on the construction sector will stop all of this is adding up to suggest there is a real slowdown in the global economy going on at the moment. investors are just beginning to worry whether that will feed through into slower profits in the fourth quarter and into next year. i am glad you mentioned the construction figures. it shows there has been a slowdown at the second fastest rate since 2009. 2009 was in
4:55 pm
the immediate aftermath of the financial crisis. that presumably is one of the factors causing anxiety for investors? yes, there is a lot of anxiety in the construction sector. it is broad—based. it is commercial building, civil engineering and residential as well. this is the fifth month in a row when we have had a slowdown in construction. it is the second worst rate of decline in the last ten years. we have got a whole series of data this week. the key one is tomorrow. the service sector accounts for the majority of activity in the uk economy like in the us. we will be looking closely to see what happens in the service sector tomorrow. let's try and find a bright spot if we can. you have to look hard, but tesco‘s share price climbed modestly. this is despite
4:56 pm
the chief executive, the man seen as having turned around the company in a different period, announcing he will leave next summer. but some impressive profit figures helping the share price today. the profits we re the share price today. the profits were up about 7% in the first half of the year, but all the attention is on dave lewis, the boss of tesco for the last five years. when he joined the company five years ago it was in the wake of an accounting scandal. the company soon after he joined announced a massive, multi billion pounds loss. he has done a fantasticjob over the billion pounds loss. he has done a fantastic job over the last billion pounds loss. he has done a fantasticjob over the last five years in turning the company around. he has reigned in this international expansion which was not working. he has cut some jobs to cut costs. probably most importantly he made a bold and audacious acquisition of the food wholesaler booker. he has transformed the business in five years and unlike most chief
4:57 pm
executives he is getting out at the top. just time briefly to touch on metro bank, another boss departing. their share price surge, up more than 30% at one point this afternoon. partly that and partly a successful relaunch of their bond scheme? yes, the shares did bounce back today from an extremely low base. they had fallen about 90% since the beginning of the year when an accounting error was admitted. basically, the bank had misclassified a number of loans as being less risky than they were and that meant they didn't put aside enough reserves to cover its loans. the regulator takes a very dim view of that. it is a controversial business, it is struggling. you are right, it did raise some money today, but it failed last week to raise money and it had to offer a yield of 9.5% to persuade investors
4:58 pm
to back that loan, so it is not out of the woods yet. ok, tom stevenson, thank you very much indeed. ben... that is tom. thank you, ben. i am reading the european commission presidentjean—claude yorker has been speaking to borisjohnson on the phone this afternoon following the phone this afternoon following the government‘s delivery of its new brexit proposals to the eu. the prime minister informed the president about the contents of the proposal and the president welcomed the prime minister‘s determination to advance the talks ahead of the european union council and make progress towards a deal. he acknowledged the positive advancement, notably the decision on goods entering ireland from britain, however there are problematic points that will need some work on the
4:59 pm
further few days, notably on the backstop. it must be concerned, also these substantive customs rules. we must have a legally operational solution that preserves north and south cooperation and the all ireland economy and protects the eu single market and are in‘s place in it. he confirmed to borisjohnson the commission will now examine the legal text objectively and in light of our well—known criteria. much more on that at five with huw edwards. i will see you tomorrow. 02:59:41,325 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 that is it for this afternoon.
5:00 pm

38 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on