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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 6, 2019 8:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning and welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and rachel burden. our headlines today: the prime minister urges the eu to compromise on a brexit deal and insists his plan is winning
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support among mps. a controversial debate on allowing married men to be catholic priests will be held at the vatican. more success for great britain at the world athletics championships. the men's and women's sprint relay teams both won silver. it was dina asher—smith's third medal of the competition. good morning to you. it has been a very wet night with surface water flooding across parts of scotland and northern and eastern parts of england. take care if you are heading out first thing this morning. more rain to come in eastern areas but brightening up with sunshine across the west. i will have all the details for you a little later on. it's sunday 6th october. our top story: boris johnson has urged the european union to show that it's willing to compromise with the uk on a brexit deal. writing in two sunday newspapers, the prime minister appeals to the eu to begin serious negotiations, saying that his proposals are picking up support among mps
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on all sides. let's speak to our political correspondent, helen catt, who's in our london newsroom. this is where the kind of politics really begins, the persuasion to try and get those on the eu side of things to take his proposal seriously. absolutely. in this article borisjohnson calls on the eu tojoin us at article borisjohnson calls on the eu to join us at the negotiating table ina eu to join us at the negotiating table in a spirit of compromise and cooperation. he uses the analogy of the uk having jumped to an island in the uk having jumped to an island in the middle of a river and he wants the middle of a river and he wants the eu to do the same. one way he suggests of increasing the chances of that happening are if he can go to brussels armed with proposals that mps support. he uses this article to suggest that he believes that support is growing. mps from every wing of his party, from the dup and even some labour mps think this is a deal which look like one they can get behind. the question is whether it looks like a deal that the eu can get behind and the nose is here are really not so positive.
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last night the irish by mr leo varadkar said once again that while he thinks the deal is possible, that these proposals do not form the basis for deeper negotiations. on friday european diplomats said they thought they might make clarification over the weekend and talks are due to resume tomorrow. to return to borisjohnson's article here, he uses it to say that if no deal is reached, we will still be leaving on the 31st of october, leaving on the 31st of october, leaving open the question of how given that parliament has passed a law to say that we can't. that question we keep coming back to. thank you, helen, from our london newsroom. 99 people have now died in clashes between demonstrators and security forces in iraq, prompting the united nations to demand an end to what it called a senseless violence. protests against unemployment and government corruption began in baghdad on tuesday, and have since spread
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to the south of the country, with troops using live rounds and tear gas on the crowds. the un's top official in iraq says those responsible for the deaths must be prosecuted. hong kong's courts have overturned a ban on protesters wearing face masks. the law because violent protest when it was announced on friday. they're the protests are planned for today but the network system has been reopened. china correspondentjoins us from hong kong. the rain there, so how likely are further protests given that people are already out? they're the demonstrations are planned and further demonstrations are under way. this throng of people walking by us has been going on for 20 minutes and it is hard to estimate the numbers, but definitely in the tens of thousands today, despite the rain. and look what most of them are wearing. masks, masks, masks. wearing a mask, a face covering now, at these illegal protests, and this
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is an illegal gathering, is technically illegal, but there is very little police presence and as far as we know nobody has been arrested in hong kong in the last two days since that ban came into place. if the cameraman can just turn to his left, we have got a throng of march is mostly in shorts and t—shirts. over here, this team has been working for about 20 minutes building that. they have got plastic tires and their faces are covered and they have got gloves, and almost like a special ops team, on the periphery of many of these protests, trying to hinder the work of the police as and when they come. this protest so far, as far as we know, is a peaceful one. the police present is above on some of the wa lkwa ys present is above on some of the walkways but so far no intervention that we have seen. thank you, robin brant reporting live from hong kong. great britain has enjoyed more medal success at the world athletics championships in doha, with both the men
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and women taking silver in the 4x100 metres relay. callum hawkins came close to adding to the haul. he missed out on a bronze in the marathon byjust six seconds. such a narrow difference over such a distance. here's our sports correspondent, natalie pirks. she's had the expectation of a nation on her shoulders, but dina asher—smith has more than delivered. two medals down, one to go. but the relay hasn't always gone britain's way. tanoy: great britain and northern ireland! and it looked like it could be tricky again. a last—minute injury saw asha philip drafted in, to kick things off. commentator: so asha philip, united states outside her. and she's lost a little bit of ground here. dina was swapped from the last leg to second, charged with chasing jamaica's 100 metre world champion, shelly—ann fraser—pryce. but she was long gone, and by the time the baton reached daryll neita, britain was in a straight fight for second. jamaica take the gold! great britain, silver.
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united states, the bronze. remarkably, despite ripping up the script, britain's women delivered the silver medal in back—to—back championships in a time just short of the national record. but would the men also be jumping for joy? britain were the defending champions, but the speed in the american team was ferocious and there would be no catching them. it's united states, gold. silverfor great britain and northern ireland. bronze forjapan. it was a blisteringly fast european record. no golden moment this time, but silver selfies felt as sweet. that's two silver medals, one for britain's women, and one for britain's men. and it means that dina asher—smith ends these championships with three medals. we all handled the situation, like, fantastically. i think it's a testament to how much experience you've all got as a squad. it means she's now the first british athlete to win three medals at the same world champs, with a little help from herfriends. natalie pirks, bbc news, doha. we will be live in doha shortly.
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roman catholic bishops are gathering at the vatican this morning for the start of a three—week meeting which will include discussions on whether to allow married men to be ordained as priests. the move, which would break centuries of tradition, would help to alleviate a shortage of clergymen. david willey has been reporting on events in the vatican for nearly 50 yea rs events in the vatican for nearly 50 years and he joins events in the vatican for nearly 50 years and hejoins us now events in the vatican for nearly 50 years and he joins us now live from rome. thank you for your time. we are talking about this and they are going to be talking about it but it is still a long way from becoming catholic law, if you like. yes, it is indeed. i think it is notable that although there is a group of women religious and lay women who have been invited to attend and observe the proceedings, they are significantly not being allowed to vote in any of the conclusions taken by the synod. i think many catholic women feel that the words of the pope about inclusion in the power structure of the church for women
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are all very nice but nothing much has happened. however one must say that pope francis is very gradually changing the face of the government of his church. he has been on the throne of st peter is now for six yea rs. we throne of st peter is now for six years. we are beginning to see the strategy. he has now chosen more than half the cardinal electors who will appoint his successor when he dies or decides to resign. so the future of the church is becoming rather different to the future of the church envisaged by the traditionalist catholics who have now come out into the open to challenge him. some traditionalist catholics have even called on him to resign and accused him of heresy. right, yes, he is going to have a mountain to climb if you want to make these changes. thank you very much indeed, david willey and room for us this morning.
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mental health patients are at increasing risk due to poor treatment facilities and ageing buildings. that's according to new evidence gathered by the organisation which represents nhs hospital, ambulance and community services. nhs providers found there were nearly moo more safety incidents last year than in the previous 12 months, including a patient who fell from a window. the government says that mental health care is a priority. of course we welcome the announcement of additional investment for some new hospitals. it's much needed. but we were really dismayed there was nothing in there at all for mental health despite all of the commitments that we've heard so far. and the fact that there's really unacceptable conditions out there in mental health buildings and facilities, which we know are really putting patients' safety at risk. a bbc radio ixtra gig in birmingham was called off last
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night, after a man suffered what police describe as a slash wound while he was backstage. the event was taking place at the city's arena and being broadcast live on radio. the injured man was treated on site by medical staff and did not require hospital treatment and west midlands police have launched an investigation. today marks the end of operation matterhorn to repatriate uk holidaymakers whose flights were cancelled after the collapse of thomas cook last month. the civil aviation authority says it has brought home more than 130,000 of the travel firm's customers during the two—week operation. tomorrow it will begin accepting applications for refunds from customers whose holidays were cancelled before they had left the uk. it is 8:11am. when we talk about dementia and those who live with it, most of us probably picture an elderly person. but the condition can affect people as young as 30. more than 42,000 people under
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the age of 65 in the uk have so—called young onset dementia. the show this report about an hour ago and we have had a phenomenal response from people. it is the case of ken barnes from yorkshire who is just 57. his wife linda has been telling us about it. where are you going to get the water from, then? no, over here. that's it. for somebody who was a builder, who could build the house we're in, and was very, very capable, to struggle making a cup of tea, it's sad for us and it's very sad for the family to see. what do you need next, do you think? i don't know. give us a clue. look in there. you need a couple of cups. dementia's a thief. it takes away the person that you fell in love with. it turns them into a shadow of the person that they were but
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they are still there and you just have to search a lot harder to find them. ken barnes is 57 years old. he was diagnosed with young onset dementia four years ago. the speech is getting more difficult. short—term memory is definitely getting a lot worse. it's all the things that you really take for granted. you're looking very dashing. me looking very ‘90s. i can't see you. we've always been a team. we met at 16 and next month we will have been married for 36 years. i do quite a lot of poetry and i think it helps me to express things and this one is called linda's poem. this is the hardest poem i think i'll ever write. it draws on deep emotions i've kept
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hidden from the light. i'm usually uplifting with funny things to say but this poem's very different. it's a poem about decay. so strong and tanned and handsome is what other people see. "he doesn't seem that different, just forgetful, just like me." but they don't know the anguish, the talk of suicide, or understand the sadness that is going on inside. we walk down the street, don't we, together, and we've always held hands. and i see little old ladies and little old men holding hands and we know that won't be us. when i'm ready, i'm going to approach it. once a week ken joins the time out together group which is run by dementia forward. it's north yorkshire's only dedicated day service for people
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with young onset dementia. demand for places far outstrips supply and for linda and ken, it's a lifeline. it gives me a bit of space and that's important because we are joined at the hip a lot of the time. ken is never a burden but it is hard work thinking for two all the time. how do you feel in yourself about dementia 7 how do you feel about it? we don't have to... no... i'm lost with it. yes, you're lost, aren't you? so it's hard work.
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there can be tears. i think we still love each other and i think that makes a big difference. just occasionally you watch a report and it makes you stop, doesn't it? thank you to linda and to ken for talking to us. we really do appreciate it. such a personal subject. we're joined now by rosie whittington, who was so concerned by a lack of facilities for dementia patients that she re—mortgaged her own home to build a care centre in kirkby, near liverpool. we are we a re really we are really grateful to you for coming in. i am sure what you just fill in that report with linda and ken is something that you see every day. i am seeing it more and more. early on in my career it was few and far between but unfortunately it is becoming more and more. for young onset? yes. do we know why it
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happens? we don't. there are rules we can follow to prevent. healthy lifestyle. making the right choices. but no. we don't know. lifestyle. making the right choices. but no. we don't knowlj lifestyle. making the right choices. but no. we don't know. i think what it's really heartbreaking about ken's situation and you will see this ina ken's situation and you will see this in a lot of the people that you ca re this in a lot of the people that you care for, he is aware of what is going on. he is aware of the breakdown in the mechanics of what is going on in his brain and you can see them struggling with it.|j is going on in his brain and you can see them struggling with it. i think thatis see them struggling with it. i think that is the hard part and that is where the family needs a lot of support as well. we must never ever forget the carer and the family in this journey because they are a massive part of it. linda talked about the respite going along to that centre because she said we are joined at the hip otherwise. all the time she is there with him.|j joined at the hip otherwise. all the time she is there with him. i have got a day centre for people living with dementia, but day centres do
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not suit everybody. since starting this day centre, i have quickly realised that young onset needs a more of a bespoke package. out of 45 clients who come through our doors, seven have got young onset, but we do have to treat them differently. some on 0121. we have to make them feel like they have a job. we have got to be creative with these people with diagnoses. when we were watching that, you turned to me and ata watching that, you turned to me and at a particular point in that report, you said love conquers all. from what you have just said, that family support, that devotion, is crucial. dementia care can be so simple it can be missed. a smile, friendly face, hot meal, warmth, security, it is that feeling. sometimes they can't express how they are feeling that they can read
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you. so if you approach them with love and kindness, i think you can conquer almost anything. love and kindness, i think you can conquer almost anythinglj love and kindness, i think you can conquer almost anything. i wasjust going to ask why you decided to go to such lengths, to really put yourself out on a limb to help people in this situation? that is my calling. iam people in this situation? that is my calling. i am just so blessed and grateful to have the courage to take a positive risk and reap the rewards, really. you say reap the rewards. i don't mean to sound trite but what do you get from it? you have risked everything in order to help people. i am rich with emotion. it is hard to describe. it is a feeling. it is horses for courses. some people like children. ijust love older people or people with memory problems. the department for health and social care say they want to make the uk the best country in the world in which to live with dementia. they are putting £4
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billion into adult social care over the next 12 months. whatever you invest, emotions are crucial, aren't they? of course. there are massive gaps in the service obviously, which is why i pursued what i did. we have never been given any funding to support what we do. and there is a crisis out there. there is not enough for these people, just not enough. thank goodness for people like you. and all the families who come to your centre, i am sure they really appreciate the effort that you make. thank you for coming in. thank you for the invite. it is 8:20am. lots of you have been in touch about that subject this morning. let's have a look at the weather forecast. a wet start. that is right. good morning. iwill start with a sunnier scene. it is not raining everywhere. some glorious sunrise pictures coming through in wales and northern ireland but further east it has been very wet
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indeed. this is the culprit, this frontal system, the ridge of high pressure which is bringing fine weather to the south—west, but it has been causing problems, this weather front, with has been causing problems, this weatherfront, with heavy rain falling on saturated ground at we are likely to see more minor flooding across parts of england and it has been wet across scotland as well. this is the rainfall radar with the dark blues. parts of scotla nd with the dark blues. parts of scotland and northern england seeing the heaviest bursts. in the south—east of england, an area with very heavy rain, in london, and the home counties over the last few hours. in the middle part of the morning, it stays breezy across the east coast of scotland with the rain slowly petering out. a lovely morning for northern ireland into wales and the south—west with some showers around but we held onto the cloud across eastern england with heavy bursts of rain around lincolnshire and east anglia. this area will potentially see further heavy rain throughout the afternoon whereas elsewhere the rain should
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ease down a bit. it does stay windy along the eastern coast and then later in the day it turns windy across parts of the midlands, southern england and into wales. but the sunshine in the south—west we could see 17 degrees which will feel very pleasant. generally the low to mid teens celsius elsewhere. rain peters out across most of the country this evening in the first pa rt country this evening in the first part of the night thanks to the high pressure but then the next weather front arrives across the west bringing heavy rain and strong winds, hail is in fact, and severe gales for the north of scotland. —— gales for the north of scotland. —— gales and fat. this is because of the low pressure that remains anchored towards the north west of the country sending this weather front across the shores. very closely set isobars meaning a windy start to mandate with severe gales transferring towards the northern isles. —— to monday with gales. it brightens up in scotland and northern ireland but it will remain
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very windy across the north and the north west of scotland. temperatures a few degrees down on what we have had over the weekend. 12 to 1a or 15. we could just scrape 16 in the far south—west. for the rest of the week it stays unsettled with low pressure nearby and westerly winds coming off the atlantic so generally around the seasonal average. spells of heavy rain interspersed with sunshine and showers so an autumnal coming up. thank you. speak to you later. this is breakfast from bbc news and it is 8:23am and time for the front pages. the observer has more details about prince harry's legal action against two newspaper groups over alleged phone—hacking. it says he'll claim the tabloids hid evidence of illegal activity. the sunday mirror carries an interview with the footballer—turned—actor
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vinnie jones, his first since losing his wife tanya to cancer earlier this year. you can see the pain on his face. "sack me if you dare" says the sunday times, which claims borisjohnson will goad the queen to fire him rather than resign over brexit. there's also a picture of prince george with his parents and sister charlotte at the football yesterday. he watched aston villa beat norwich by five goals to one. he supports aston villa like his pa rents. he supports aston villa like his parents. how much they will thank their parents for that remains to be seen! you never know! and the sunday telegraph reports that senior ministers have suggested the prime minister should appoint nigel farage as britain's eu ambassador in the event of a brexit delay. it also has a picture of prince george's trip to the football. nazir afzal, former chief prosecutor for north—west england, is here to tell us what's caught his eye. this first story that we are going to talk about is one that is quite gruesome in its detail sojust a
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warning about that. it is from inside the sunday mirror. the sunday mirror have been running a very good campaign particularly focusing on allegations in relation to telford in shropshire, but a broader campaign around child sexual abuse going on for generations now, certainly for a generation. this particular article reinforces the view which i share that many of the victims were criminalised themselves. not only where they abuse and never got justice, themselves. not only where they abuse and never gotjustice, but they were also forced to become involved in low—level criminality, criminal damage, shoplifting, drugs, that kind of thing, and they will carry those convictions for the rest of their lives, which means they have great difficulty in rehabilitating and getting work and jobs. their view and my view is that we should literally be expanding their criminal records. they were victims throughout and then they can get on with their lives. —— removing their criminal records. it is up to
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their criminal records. it is up to the government to take some action. you will know about this, but when i go into women's presence, a lot of the inmates that i meet are victims first. i am the inmates that i meet are victims first. iam not the inmates that i meet are victims first. i am not saying that is a lwa ys first. i am not saying that is always the case but this is domestic violence and coercive and controlling behaviour. and very often the sex offenders make them commit crimes because it blackmails them. you can't go to the police to report what is happening to you because you have offended yourself and we have got to do something about that. you mention to the sunday mirror having a campaign and they have a track record as a campaigning paper. they have. this is inside the sunday times. amazon and the call—outs for workers who get injured at work. the lovely of freedom of information request discovered that amazon are getting an ambulance called to their warehouses once every two days. comparatively, ford would get it once every 20 days. that tells you there is something not quite right about what is happening there.
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people suffering enormous stress and injury etc. amazon are saying they area injury etc. amazon are saying they are a very good employer and other people might disagree. they have very strict timetables about what they do. apparently people have got to urinate in bottles because they haven't got time to go to the toilet. there's allegations have been made about amazon for a while and given that they are one of the largest companies in the world, they need to look at what they are doing in terms of their staff. with the comparison to what you said about ford, i don't know how many factories they have in the uk but amazon have got 21 whopping warehouses like this one. absolutely. it is about putting that it first. one other thing is i do with the people's powerhouse, is putting that it is unfair that we really need to do more for workers. iam really need to do more for workers. i am getting to the stage with my children now that when they come to me with helpful homework i am struggling, especially mass but also english because it is taught differently and there are words that
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you are not familiar with. but tutors are being brought in to help pa rents. tutors are being brought in to help parents. we say that everything is getting so much easier now! the reality is that physics, mathematics, chemistry, those courses, people are actually struggling and they always have done. thousands and thousands of pa rents a re done. thousands and thousands of parents are going on youtube to try and understand what their children are learning to be able to support them. many more are trying to buy tutors and for themselves to give them an understanding of what they should be helping their children with. it is a middle—class problem, isn't it? i am chair of a further education college in manchester and ican education college in manchester and i can assure you that most of our pa rents would i can assure you that most of our parents would not be able to afford tutors. having a parent who has the time, space and energy to sit down and help with homework is a privilege in the first instance. we definitely need a level playing field here because all children should have the same access to the same support. looking at this headline, there is a serious point to the story but i'm not sure if it
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is in good taste but i know the point. basically, dignity run 50 crematoria and they have introduced defibrillators because they are very stressful occasions, collating your loved one, and there has been a spate of people have a near death experiences and also death experiences. they have made a promise not to try and resurrect the dead, which i think is unnecessary, to make that kind of promise. but the reality is that we need more defibrillators in public places where people are likely to be stressed out and need that kind of support. i don't know what to do and we need more people to be trained to help people in the circumstances. just a final thought on women in prisons before you go, and this story is on social media this morning, park run have introduced their first morning, park run have introduced theirfirst ina morning, park run have introduced their first in a women's prison. they have done then in men's presence, and this is the first in a
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women's prison, and it'll be interesting to see what impact that has on rehabilitation. rehabilitation is key for keeping a safer and we need to see what we can do to keep us all safer. just reading this, in fairness to dignity, i think it is the headline writer who has said that about promising not to resurrect the dead. thank you. it is always great to see you and you are welcome anytime. stay with us. 8:30am with headlines the way. hello, this is breakfast with rogerjohnson and rachel burden.
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here's a summary of this morning's main news. borisjohnson has boris johnson has urged borisjohnson has urged the european union to show it is willing to compromise with the uk on a brexit deal. writing in two sunday newspapers, the prime minister appealed to the eu to begin serious negotiations, saying his proposals are picking up support among mps on all sides. his comments come after the irish prime minister says mr johnson because my current plans do not form the basis for deeper negotiations. hong kong's courts have rejected the latest attempt to overturn a ban on protesters wearing face masks. the police have yet to arrest anybody for breaching the new law, which caused violent protests when it was announced on friday. for the demonstrations are planned for today but the city bus or metro system has been partially reopened. roman catholic bishops are a gathering of the vatican this morning will be start of a three week meeting which will include discussions on whether to allow
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married men to become priests. the move, which would beg centuries of tradition, would help to alleviate a shortage of clergymen that has been the focus of a furious backlash by traditional catholic bishops. pope francis has previously indicated he is open to the idea. mental health patients are at increasing risk due to poor treatment facilities and ageing buildings, according to evidence which has been gathered by the organisation which represents nhs hospital ambulance and community services. nhs providers found there we re services. nhs providers found there were nearly 11100 more safety incidents last year than any 12 months. including a patient who fell from a window. the government says mental health care is a priority. today marks the end of operation matterhorn, the project to repatriate uk holiday—makers whose flights were cancelled after the colla pse flights were cancelled after the collapse of thomas cook last month. the civil aviation authority says it has brought home more than 130,000 customers during the two—week
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operation and tomorrow it will begin accepting applications for refunds from customers whose holidays were cancelled before they had left the uk. those are the main stories this morning. now the sport. john is here. more medals in doha? absolutely. all smiles for the relay teams. two silver medals for the men and women. good on the track. silver saturday. there could be more to come later. the medals keep coming for great britain at the world athletics championships in doha. the women took silver in the four by 100 metre relay, edged into second place byjamaica. but it was a season's best time for gb. and it gave dina asher—smith her third medal of the competition — two silvers and that gold from the 200 metres. but this one was all about the team. and we will be speaking to them live in doha in the next few minutes. we also spoke to the men's quartet earlier — they also won a silver, setting a european record in the process — they were only beaten by a usa team that ran the second
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fastest race in history. laura muir missed out on a medal in the 1500 metres, finishing fifth behind winner sifan hassan, in what was a really quick race — in fact, muir's time was faster than the one which gave kelly holmes olympic gold in 200a. muir was caught with about 150 metres to go. hassan, who also won the 10,000 metres title, broke the championship record and was really emotional afterwards about the suspician hanging over her, after her coach alberto salazar was banned for doping offences. they think i don't get tested. i get are tested they think i don't get tested. i get a re tested every they think i don't get tested. i get are tested every time. they can test me every day if they want. they are welcome. i will be happy. i get such a hard time in this championships. i did like this here to show the world iam clean. did like this here to show the world i am clean. i am always clean. i will be clean.
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britain's callum hawkins was only six seconds from a medal in the marathon, finishing fourth behind ethiopia's lelisa desisa. his brilliant performance came 18 months after he collapsed while leading the marathon at the commonwealth games. hawkins prepared for the conditions in doha in a garden shed with heaters bought from a supermarket. premier league champions manchester city are at home to wolves this afternoon — that's one of four games today. and they're now eight points behind liverpool, who extended their lead with a late winner against leicester yesterday. nick parrott rounds up the action. a flare—up at full—time at anfield. on the face of it, you wouldn't know who'd won and who'd lost. perhaps it should have been a draw. liverpool controlled the first half and took the lead thanks to sadio mane. leicester couldn't muster a shot on target until the 80th minute, butjames maddison made it count. then the moment that helped spark the ill feeling, the referee spotted marc albrighton's step on mane's foot and pointed to the penalty spot. the video assistant referee backed
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up the decision and james milner kept his composure to maintaining liverpool's perfect start to the season. we did a lot of good things, and winning again against a side like leicester, you all will be seeing that during the season. they will cause a lot of teams massive problmes and i expect them really in the top four. so, it was a big one. good. var was needed to separate west ham united and crystal palace, too. they were drawing 1—1 with just minutes left, whenjordan ayew‘s goal was flagged offside. but the decision was overturned and the win moved palace into the top four. also, on the upper big—spending aston villa, their team is starting to gel, and record signing wesley struck twice as they beat norwich 5—1. it saw them leapfrog the canaries, who dropped into the relegation zone. and just above them now are everton, who lost 1—0 at burnley. tottenham's difficult start of the season didn't get any better as they lost 3—0 at brighton.
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and to make matters worse, their goalkeeper and captain hugo lloris will be out for a while after he dislocated his elbow. nick parrott, bbc news. a really nasty injury. the top two in the scottish premiership, celtic and rangers, play today. motherwell are still third, three points behind celtic after beating st mirren, and kilmarnock won at hearts — chris burke with the only goal. that leaves hearts two points off the bottom. the day's other matches ended in draws. england women's manager phil neville said a fourth defeat in five games "isn't acceptable", they were beaten 2—1 by brazil in a friendly in middlesbrough. debinha scored both of brazil's goals — the first a goalkeeping error by mary earps. unlucky again for the second which found its way in via a deflection. beth england lifted the crowd with her first international goal — but having beaten brazil a year ago, and again in february, frustration this time for phil neville.
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we kept going to the very end. our play at times was some of the best football i have seen us play for a long time. now we are in that period where things are probably not going for us where they were 12 months ago. we have to stick together and believe what we are doing is right. england reached the quarter finals of the rugby world cup, france can join them there with victory over tonga this morning. england the first side to reach the knock—out stage, thanks to a 39—10 win over 1a—man argentina in tokyo. england's last pool match is against france and that will probably decide who finishes top. new zealand are all but through, they ran in 11 tries to beat namibia, tj perenara with the try of the game — some are saying the try of the tournament so far. he started it and finished it, with some great offloading in between, and then a brilliant dive to finish. 71—9, it finished. edinburgh have made it two wins from two in the new season
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of rugby union's pro 1a. they won 19—11 at cardiff blues — this try from mark bennett sealing victory in a close game. there were wins too for the dragons, the cheetahs and munster. top flight rugby league will be played in north america for the first time, after canadian side toronto wolfpack beat featherstone rovers to win promotion to the super league. formed in 2016, with the aim of reaching super league within five yea rs. toronto have achieved it injust three. the defending motogp world champion marc marquez is on the brink of a sixth world title, despite crashing for the second time in two days, in qualifying for the thai grand prix. he'll start third on the grid and he only needs to finish two points clear of his nearerst rival to take the title. great britain's women gymnasts are guaranteed a place at next year's olympic games, thanks to their performance at the world championships in stuttgart, where they've reached the team final. but there was no doubting the star of the show —
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the american simone biles performed two original skills in qualifying, becoming the first woman to complete a triple—double move on floor, and then a double—double dismount on the beam. both moves will be named after her. you know you are good when you get moves named after you. what would yours be? the watson world ? what would yours be? the watson world? —— world. i could set myself some thing up here. i think my days have gone. i don't think it is going to happen. you never know, look at mike bushell. more to come on mike before the end of the show. shall we stick with the sporting theme? yes. silver saturday for great britain in the world championships. men and women relay teams took
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second place. we spoke to the men an hour ago. let's go back to doha and natalie pirks. you have got the women with you this time, hopefully. good morning. i'm quite interested to see what the watson world is. first of all, i do have the ladies with me. we've got dina asher—smith, ashley nelson, daryll neita. back to back success of silvers in successive championships, even more impressive was the fact that there was a kerfuffle before the final. let's have a chat with them and see it was about. what happened five minutes before you went out? well, these things happen in relays. basically amani didn't feel comfortable running. she said, i basically amani didn't feel comfortable running. she said, lam going to take myself out for the team. i stepped in and basically had to get myself ready, even though they had a b team said. she is fine but she wasn't going to risk
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anything for the team and did what was best. that is what team spirit is all about. you guys are chatting about how important it was that you came out and had a routine ready for your big entrance. what happened there? passing the bagon is the most important thing! they cancelled our walk—out. then we had to keep going. imight get walk—out. then we had to keep going. i might get you to do that in a minute. dina, you were meant to run the anchor leg and you ended up in second next to shelly—ann fraser—pryce. what was going through your mind? i wasjust focusing on getting the bat to ashley in the best possible position. daryl was meant to be first. then it was actually to me. that didn't work. but i think it is testament to how much experience we have as a squad.
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all of the changes were successful and we ran a really fast time and we crossed the line and we were like, look at that! very minimal practice. it is testament to our hard work and our individual ability, talent and experience, and the trust we have in each other. you found out halfway through mixed zone that you are the first british athlete, notjust woman, to win three medals at the same world championships. what does that mean? it is really cool. i had no idea. you were there. i didn't know. it's really special. obviously iamjust know. it's really special. obviously i am just here doing my thing, going through the motions, trying to make sure that i am successful in every event that i enter. but you forget that might have some sort of resonance or something outside. each event resonance or something outside. each eve nt ha d resonance or something outside. each event had some sort of thing behind it that i managed to be, the first
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medalfor 30—something it that i managed to be, the first medal for 30—something years, the second was the first 200 metres gold and to come off and find this out, it has been a memorable championships. this is next level stop. when you walk down the street now, forget about it. that means i can't go go to waitrose with no make—up on! actually, this is particularly special for you because actually, this is particularly specialfor you because it is actually, this is particularly special for you because it is your first championships 20 —— since 2014? yeah, we have easily got the gold in the relay and i got a bronze in the 100 metres. it is great to come back and sharing medal with these ladies, seeing their success over the years has inspired me. i have wanted get involved. you had a little cry afterwards?” have wanted get involved. you had a little cry afterwards? i am always crying. jeanette, amazing athlete herself, my training partner for
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many years, and i started laughing when she first interviewed me. it was really awkward. then last night, she sounded so proud of me. i was like, thank you! it was really special. it certainly didn't look awkward. darryl, you then had to run the anchor leg. what a job you did holding of the american? thank you. i wanted to bring success for the team. we had practised it the day before. i felt really confident with the change. i did my best. we practised so hard. we have got a lot of trust and bonding in this team. the sky is the limit. that is the key thing. it is about how much you love each other, care for each other, respect each other... yeah, without that trust, this isn't happening. you can be as fast as you like but if you don't have the bond you are not doing well. we are really proud of ourselves and onto tokyo. darryl has the best eyelashes
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in athletics, by the way! dinner, just briefly, what does this mean for tokyo and for you personally? for me personally, it's been cool, it's been great. but i think as a squad, the men and women, it bodes really well for tokyo. obviously the men rang fantastically fast, they ran the european record, which was incredible. you could see on their faces they were pushing for more, which shows testament to where we are. with our switches and all of that, we still came out with one of our fastest times ever and a silver medal, that bodes fantastically well for both teams. fingers crossed. bring it on. britain now have five medals from these world championships. the minimum target is seven. four more opportunities for medals today. let's see what they could manage on the last day. thank you so much. as you were saying to me, sports personality of the year? it will be interesting
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this year. they are all great. that was a really, it was a team success. but dina asher—smith is so humble, so modest. she is a phenomenon. i love her. i am off now, by the way. i am going to read the news for andrew marr. lots more to talk about here. before that, the weather. thank you. it has been very wet indeed this morning across parts of scotland, northern and eastern england. yellow warning is in force in these areas for the next few hours because the ground is pretty saturated, especially across england and wales, where we have seen a lot of rain in recent weeks. minor flooding is possible but the warning area becomes confined towards east anglia and the south—east. this is the culprit. that weather front. heavy rain, the dark blues across central, southern and eastern scotland. the dark blues developing across east anglia and the south—east. we could see some
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atrocious conditions on the road for the next couple of hours. the rain will slowly start to fragment across scotla nd will slowly start to fragment across scotland through the morning. it will stay quite damp and breezy across the east coast and in towards the northern isles. glorious start for northern ireland, into wales, the south west of england, with some sunshine. heavy rain, the bright colours for east anglia, where we could be looking at some flooding. it stays pretty damp across the north end of the east. the rain continues to ease away from scotland. breezy towards the north—east. one or two showers. putting into north wales and the midlands. it is this east corner which could see the rain continued through the afternoon. a fine day in the south—west. quite windy across england and wales this afternoon. temperatures reaching 16 or 17 degrees. drier overnight for a while. then the next frontal system pushes him to bring wet and windy weather into scotland, northern ireland, gales or mics gales for the
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north and west of scotland. the frontal system continues to work its way eastwards across the country through monday. a fine start across the east with some sunshine. then the east with some sunshine. then the clouds building and rain arrives. it was fragment as it reaches eastern areas. a windy day for scotland, northern ireland and the northern isles. sunshine and showers, some of these could be heavy. windy for the western isles. a blustery day, an unsettled day. temperatures a few degrees down on the weekend. 12 to 16 celsius. beyond monday it stays unsettled. we continue with the theme of low pressure over the atlantic. it will feed in strong winds across the uk. spells of rain but there will be some sunshine as well. a few showers mixed in. not completely doom and gloom. thank you very much. good morning. on married priest to dedicate
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themselves to their flock and to god instead of their own family, have been the mainstay of the roman catholic church for centuries. but that could be about to change. senior bishops are meeting the vatican today for the start of a special assembly which will discuss the idea of allowing married men to be ordained. you to tell us more as brandon thompson from catholic voices, which advocates the church position. let's be clear, this is a specific group of bishops meeting in rome, isn't it? yes, they are meeting for the next three weeks and it is all about the amazonian region. the documents they will be studying, the working document, the breath of it is quite breathtaking. the first part of it, the voice of the amazon, is looking at all sorts of issues, the rights of indigenous populations, land rights, migration, the church's activity in the region and sustainable development. one of the questions within how the church —based ministers to be people in the
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region, a couple of lines in the document, is about the possibility of married priests. there is a shortage of clergymen. this is one small part of a wide—ranging discussion, and of course it is the one that people have hooked onto. this could fundamentally change how the catholic church is run? there area the catholic church is run? there are a couple of things to say. it is not a president, even in this country there are already married priests. anglicans who have come over. the unique thing about this is ina over. the unique thing about this is in a specific region, in order to serve the needs of the people who maybe don't see a priest for a year or two, could ordaining some elders, could that be a way of serving the people? ultimately this is not meant to bea people? ultimately this is not meant to be a doctrine. it is not about changing beliefs, ultimately. it is about pastoral practice, how we can serve the people. there isn't anything within the original catholic doctrine about celibacy for priests. that came later with pope
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gregory? yeah, it became something... the gift of celibacy started on the 11th century. we had it in the beginning. christ himself was celibate. that was by choice, wasn't it? yeah, many of the disciples and apostles and those who came afterwards have this practice. the point is that we ought not to just change and have married priest for the sake of it. there are other christian combinations that have had christian clergy —— married clergy. it doesn't move boost numbers. hopefully the senate is looking at some of the deeper issues. one other issueis some of the deeper issues. one other issue is the fact that women are involved in this discussion, 35 senior catholic women, but they have no voting rights. in this day and a token that even be justified? part of what the document talks about is, it says that women are already leaders in the church, but what does that official recognition... you can't be leader if you can't influence decisions? it is part of
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how the church works. how does the church officially recognised the voice of women? presumably in these three weeks that will be an open discussion, how do we listen better to the voices of women? pope francis is keen, he wants people to be part of the conversation. what that might look like in the future, who knows? this is something they want to come in continuity with tradition but looking towards the future, how can we strengthen their contribution?m ta kes a we strengthen their contribution?m takes a long time for the wheels to change in rome, doesn't it? thank you for your time. brandon thompson. we had anton du beke impersonating austin powers, michelle visage as liza minnelli and magic mike bushell ripping his trousers off. it can only be one thing, movie week on strictly come dancing. in the first themed week of the series, each dance was inspired by a film. which couple will end up on the cutting room floor? we will discuss that in
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a moment. here are the best bits from last night. as my what good is sitting alone in the room... # everybody was kung fu fighting... music.
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nine. nine. ten! i love movie week. we're joined now by tv critic, benjy potter. lovely to have you with us. let's talk about mike bushell. what i like about him is he is clearly aware that he has a bit of a comedy character but he is taking it seriously. he is putting the effort in? definitely. he is not the worst dancer on the dance floor this year by any stretch of the imagination. he went out, he turned up and he delivered. they were a couple of moments there last night. this little clip where he really, i suppose, went full throttle with the moves. let's see if we can see it.
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that is impressive, isn't it? here we go again. just so we can already enjoy it. i'm not quite sure which pa rt enjoy it. i'm not quite sure which part of the chacha chart that is. it is all over —— open to interpretation. i don't think my giving you himself! is that a move you have seen here before? not on the studio floor, maybe someone out there. he did make what i thought was a thread to bring the fire man's pole to the studio. how would you feel about that? nobody wants to see that. had he fell a couple of times. she seemed to do a comedy fall after the comments from the judges. some people were wondering if she was all right. she went on social media afterwards to say, it's all right, i wasn't drunk. quickly during the comments of the judges she insisted that it was nothing to do with mike. and as a strictly micro fan and
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expert myself, i could see from the routine that i think it was her own doing. and i would say... they were very professional about it. the judges loved it. we will talk about the top of the leaderboard in a moment. we will talk about anneka, who is out of the bottom, i think, from last night. i noticed on social media, hashtag save anneka, last night. people love her but she is struggling? this is it, really. character is the public have idea affection for it can last in the competition much longer than expected! if people are rooting for her, we might see her around for a little bit longer than maybe she should be. last night was a little bit manic. i am calling her manic rise. i love her to bits i look at
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her and rise. i love her to bits i look at herandi rise. i love her to bits i look at her and i think, that would be me. let's talk about the tens last night. two of them from calvin fletcher, who came in in place of jamie langfield he has taken it by storm, hasn't he? yeah, he has really ta ke n storm, hasn't he? yeah, he has really ta ken flight. storm, hasn't he? yeah, he has really taken flight. that number at last night, that merely pop and is, spectacular, really kicked off the show. two tens in week three. it is a first show. two tens in week three. it is afirst in show. two tens in week three. it is a first in the history of the show. knowing ot how i know her, she will taken to new heights. but we have to remember, even if you are absolutely amazing, like aston merrygold a couple of years ago, it doesn't mean usa. are you enjoying the series? amazing, fantastic. thank you very much. that's it from all of us today. thanks for your company. dan and louise will be back from six o'clock tomorrow and we will catch up o'clock tomorrow and we will catch up with mike. enjoy the rest of your
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weekend.
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this is bbc news. i martine croxall. the headlines: writing in two sunday newspapers, borisjohnson urges the eu to show that it's willing to compromise with the uk on a brexit deal, a move which some european leaders welcome. i think everyone, certainly our country, certainly our country, is also interested in finding a deal, finding a compromise, finding a way for europe and great britain to move forward. hong kong's high court rejects an attempt to overturn a ban on protestors wearing face masks as demonstrators gather for a rally against police violence. roman catholic bishops are gathering at the vatican this morning, as the pope opens a three—week synod focusing on the amazon region of latin america. more british success at the world athletics championships in doha as both the men and women's100

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