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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 7, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning — welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: pressure on the us over the american diplomat‘s wife implicated in the death of a teenager in a car crash — northamptonshire‘s chief constable demands her return to the uk. borisjohnson‘s brexit deadline — the french president tells him the eu will decide at the end of this week whether a deal can happen. the hidden condition affecting hundreds of thousands of women the uk — mps launch an investigation onto the debilitating impact of endometriosis.
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the final thomas cook passengers return home. and from today you can claim refunds for cancelled holidays — i'll explain what you need to do. misery for manchester in the premier league. champions city lose 2—0 at home to wolves, whilst manchester united are beaten by newcastle. and have britain's diving team learned to defy gravity — orjust do some clever camera work? good morning. after the torrential rain this weekend, it remains u nsettled. rain this weekend, it remains unsettled. heavy rain and gusty winds moving from the west to the east followed by sunshine and heavy showers. more later. it's monday the 7th of october. pressure is growing on american authorities to return a diplomat‘s wife who police want to question about a fatal traffic accident. 19—year—old harry dunn died after his motorbike was hit by a car in northamptonshire. the suspect, named as anne sacoolas, left the uk despite telling police
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she did not plan to. simon jones has more. harry done‘s parents say they have been trapped in a living nightmare since there sun's death. killed along this road in northamptonshire near the us air force base that was home to a 42—year—old woman being treated as a suspect in the case. the wife of a diplomat, she has left the uk despite telling the police she did not plan to. she is understood to be called anne sacoolas though this is not been confirmed by the police. from mum to mum, knowing and believing that she isa mum, knowing and believing that she is a mother, i wouldn't want to think that she put herself on the plane to go home to avoid what she's done because i couldn't live with myself. the chief constable of northamptonshire nick adderley has now intervened, saying on twitter:
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it's an appeal echoed by harry dunn's mother. we are not out to get her put behind bars. if that's what the justice system her put behind bars. if that's what thejustice system ends up doing, then we can't stop that but we are not out to do that. we are out to try and get some peace for ourselves. the us state department says it is in close consultation with british officials and any request will be considered carefully but immunity is rarely removed. it offered its deepest sympathies to harry dunn's family. simonjones, bbc news. borisjohnson will make a series of phone calls to eu leaders today to try to secure support for his brexit plans. he will tell them they have a final opportunity to reach a deal and must compromise to achieve one. the french president, emmanuel macron, has said the eu will decide whether an agreement is possible by the end of the week.
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our political correspondent, helen catt, joins us now from westminster. a crucial week for the government? yes, the next few days are absolutely vital in trying to move on these talks to a position where they are in intense negotiations. needed to hammer out a final deal. so far, eu leaders have said what the government has put forward isn't enough to be able to that so we're going to see this diary of activity, more talks with civil servants in brussels. stephen barclay, the brexit secretary touring european capitals and boris johnson brexit secretary touring european capitals and borisjohnson speaking to eu leaders and we are expecting him to say much what he said to the french president yesterday which is that he now believes the eu must match the compromises that he says the uk has made in recent weeks and months, that this is a final opportunity to get a brexit deal but they must compromise to achieve it. as you said, immanuel micron has given the deadline to the end of the
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week to see if this deal is possible. —— emmanuel macron. why this time? downing street has pointed to this being the place where the deal would be done but it's taken more significance after parliament passed the law that says ifa parliament passed the law that says if a deal is not done by the end of that summit, that's when boris johnson would have to ask for a dilated brexit. downing street still insisting that doesn't stop unknown deal. a senior downing street source says it eu leaders are betting if that law will prevent no deal, that would be an historic misunderstanding. more on that of course across the programme. we'll be speaking to the health secretary, matt hancock, just after 7:30 this morning. customers due a refund after losing their thomas cook holiday will be able to apply for money back from today. ben's here with all the details. two weeks ago today, the travel firm collapsed with those debts of about £3 billion. all the attention up to now has been getting people back
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abroad. that repatriation ever coming to an end today. the civil aviation authority telling us that 140,000 passengers have been brought back. i have to say it's been a relatively calm, organised affair, they have all those people back on flights. 94% of them came back on the day they are due back. we also talked last week, about the 9000 staff in the uk who are now facing a very uncertain future but from today, anyone booked on a holiday in future will be able to claim a refund. the civil aviation authority thinks there is about 360,000 bookings that need to be refunded. so what they are going to different todayis so what they are going to different today is open a new website and on line so you can apply to get your money back. i've been hearing stories of people who have already been refunded and that's if you paid by direct debit, for example but if you need to claim a formal refund,
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you need to claim a formal refund, you can do that from today. those other ones, protected by the insurance scheme atol, you will get your money back within two months but the onus is on you if you have a holiday booked to approach them and get that refund. it will not happen automatically. quite a logistical nightmare, 360,000 future bookings which now need to be unpicked but nonetheless, from today, attention is turning to that. getting back from abroad. how you go about it as well. the police watchdog has been accused of "shocking failures" for the way it investigated detectives' response to false allegations of a paedophile ring at westminster. retired high courtjudge sir richard henriques — who conducted an independent review of 0peraton midland — says inquiries into scotland yard were "minimal, unprofessional and flawed". in response, the independent 0ffice for police conduct said it carried out a "thorough and
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detailed investigation". senior members of the royal family are spearheading a new campaign, aimed at helping people to spot the early signs of poor mental health. princes william and harry, and their wives, catherine and meghan, are narrating a short film which will be broadcast on tv this evening. katharine da costa reports. i don't really know what to do. i think ijust kept it in and kept it in until people started noticing that something wasn't right. 27—year—old cher suffered from depression and anxiety after a miscarriage two years ago. she finds exercise helps to boost her mood and shows no with friends and family but at the time she says she felt utterly lost. i kind of opened up and for me, that was a big thing because it's really hard to open up about mental health but once you do open up, you feel like part of you is relieved, basically. cher is not
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alone. a survey by yougov found eight in ten people have experienced early signs of stress or anxiety or trouble sleeping over the last 12 months. 0ver trouble sleeping over the last 12 months. over a quarter of people waited six months before getting help while three quarters of those wished they'd done so sooner. everyone knows that feeling. when life gets on top of us. a number of celebrities and members of the royal family have previously spoke publicly about their own battles with mental health. now they've joined forces to launch an on line toolkit to give simple personalised advice and information, from improved sleep to exercise and meditation as well as details of who to call in an emergency. the royal couege to call in an emergency. the royal college of psychiatrists says it's a useful resource but warns it doesn't address the needs of patients with more severe mental illnesses and with one in ten psychiatric posts unfilled, it says there is an urgency to meet the needs of the
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most vulnerable. katherine da costa, bbc news. scientists think they have managed to date a massive flare that originated from the centre of the milky way. this is an artists impression of the so—called ‘sifter flare' which some scientists claim ripped through the galaxy 3.5 million years ago in the middle of a "super massive black hole". researchers say the impact was felt 200,000 light years away. if you've been toying with the idea ofjoining a gym but haven't yet got round to it, then prepare to be inspired. meetjong—so lim. she's 75, a grandmother, and she's now a champion bodybuilder. jong—so wasn't always a weight—lifting enthusiast, she first began working out to help with a painful back condition a couple of years ago. she hopes to carry on competing until she is 80.
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that is a good inspirational motivational video. a trapezius. that muscle there. not in the middle. do translated. it means you don't get back that. that's what you really don't want. swimmers have god really don't want. swimmers have god really good traps, don't they? that bit between the elbow and your waist. 0ut like that. bit between the elbow and your waist. out like that. i never knew that. that lady is my inspiration. i could just about pick up my cup of coffee this morning, never mind the weights. you got several years. not really, i'm going quick. i feel like i'm ageing in superspeed after the
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weekend. what a busy, crazy weekend. really big shocks and incredible stories. a really bad day in the premier league. first off, champions city sufffered a shock defeat at home to wolves. adama traore with two late goals at the etihad. it's the champions's second defeat of the season, and they're already eight points off leaders liverpool. a bad day too for manchester united — they were beaten 1—0 by newcastle. teenager matty longstaff with the goal on his debut — he'd started the game alongside his brother sean. united are now 12th in the league, just two points above the relgation places. great britain finished the world athletics championships with their lowest medals total since 2005. the men's team didn't even finish their 4x400 metres relay on the final day, as they failed to pass the baton.
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and francejoin england in the last eight of the rugby world cup after battling to a 23—21win over tonga. who they and england will play in the quarter—finals will be decided on saturday when the two sides meet in yokohama. i think that's my favourite bit of sports news. if you're found a foot ball sports news. if you're found a football and he got two lads like that were desperate to play, despite the weather showed. the big brother gave a little bothered them out of the match award. so cute. should we find out about the weather first of all? carol will give us the details. how is it going to be? u nsettled unsettled this week. as we go through this week it remains u nsettled. through this week it remains unsettled. they will be windy with
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rain or showers. later we will see a little sunshine in some places. the reason for all of this is we have a set of runs coming our way. currently the environment agency have six flood warnings in england, but as you know that can change and the website is updated quite regularly. 0nce the website is updated quite regularly. once again, we have more rain coming ourway regularly. once again, we have more rain coming our way courtesy of these fronts. moving west to east, look at the squeeze on the isobars, particularly across the north—west. that tells you it will be windy. it is already. it will be across the north—west of scotland, transferring through the course of the day. we have all this rain and around this band of rain we also have gusty winds through the rac, coming down towards south as well. and also inland. through the day we watch this band of rain continuing to drift eastwards, eventually getting into east anglia and the south—east. behind we start to see the writing up behind we start to see the writing up process taking place across northern ireland and north—west
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scotland. there will be some showers and some of those showers could be heavy and thundery. temperatures roughly where they should be at this stage in october. 11 in the north, 16 in the south. through this evening and overnight there goes the band of rain, eventually pushing away from the south—east. some clear skies, but a plethora of showers coming in, enhanced by these weather fronts. 0nce coming in, enhanced by these weather fronts. once again, look at those isobars. they are all squeezed and that means it will be windy. gusty winds through tomorrow as well. we have got all these showers. some of us have got all these showers. some of us will mist them all together and have a dry day with some sunshine. —— mist. tomorrow you could catch a showers almost anywhere. these are the windless indicated in the black circles. with exposure, particularly, it will be windy. temperatures tomorrow 12— 17 degrees. as we move into wednesday, while we still have a lot of showers around, some of them merging to give longer spells of rain, the wind is
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not as strong. there will be some sunshine in the forecast as well. at worst brate spells, meaning there will be quite a bit of cloud around. temperatures 11 in lower work to about 15 as we sweep down towards london. the outlook the on that remains unsettled. thank you so much. let's take a look at today's front pages. the daily express says a defiant borisjohnson has warned the french president, emmanuel macron, that the uk will leave the eu at the end of the month. a no—deal brexit could lead to shortages of vital drugs, according to the mirror, which reports the view of medical experts who are warning about treatment for patients with cancer and epilepsy. the guardian says data belonging to thousands of people is being held on a secret counter—terror database. the paper's front page also features a photo of dina asher—smith,
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holding her medals after a successful world athletics championships in doha. and finally, the daily star reports that the family of a man who took his own life after appearing on thejeremy kyle show are calling for footage and documents relating to steve dymond to be released by itv. those are some of the main front pages. dan and sally are here. you have the ft out of. good morning, yes. it is rare that we go ft. hsbc on the front this morning, news of job cuts for the banking giant. it has announced or is expected to announce 10,000 cuts in a cost—cutting driver. the boss suggesting that they need to start doing something about the cost and they have said that while staff reb component of that. they have over 200,000 staff around the world —— area big 200,000 staff around the world —— are a big component of that. it is on top of the 4700 announced earlier this year. and its rival, deutsche
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bank, announced 18,000 job cuts a little earlier this year. clearly the banking industry is trying to work out its future and how it can save money in the face of diminishing reserve —— returns of some of their investments. story buried on page 43 of the times this morning, an interesting one ahead of christmas, they are poised to close the doors on house of fraser entirely. he got his hands on the farm last year. a number of those doors are already empty. it is suggested after the crucial trading period, in january, suggested after the crucial trading period, injanuary, when it is to make money, you could close the stores entirely, bringing an end to the firm founded back in the early 80s. thank you. should we keep on a mike ashley theme? newcastle. we talked about belong stop brothers yesterday, a moment ago, that fantastic yesterday, a moment ago, that fa ntastic story yesterday, a moment ago, that fantastic story from yesterday. basically the perfect kind of
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schoolboy ideal scenario. imagine scoring for your club on your debut, mum and dad in the stands, everybody goes absolutely crazy. they are playing for newcastle united. making the difference. how often does that happen that homegrown talent comes through and ends up playing for a clu b through and ends up playing for a club that they actually support? that was a wonderful moment for newcastle yesterday. great for steve bruce as well. this story about triggers for glastonbury, sold out in 34 minutes. having bought some tickets last week i think 34 minutes is actually quite a long time. you bought tickets for glastonbury? not for glastonbury. something else. i was by the computer with ten minutes to go before they sold. it must have taken me two seconds to go yesterday did not get the tickets. all of two seconds. 34 minutes. it was billie
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eilish. she was training because of it. i honestly can't believe a —— trending. lucky you if you got one. it isa trending. lucky you if you got one. it is a long time 34 minutes, buying tickets, in my view. who is into the crown? i love it. how could you not be? eye and behind. we are up to series three. vanessa kirby played princess margaret. she was on the sofa last year. she has been taken over by helena bonham carter, who has spoken to the princess via a psychic to try to get the part right. helena bonham carter said she spoke to princess margaret via a psychic to ask if you could later the ground, who said yes, but she did not tell her during this little chat, nothing out of the ordinary she said, apparently princess margaret was glad that helena bonham
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carter was playing her, but she said you have to make sure that you use smoke a cigarette correctly, she said, because get the smoking right, this is what princess margaret said to helena bonham carter, at the smoking right, a smoked in a good way and remedy cigarette holder was as much a weapon for expression as it was for smoking —— and remember. i wonder what would have happened if she said i am not chuffed about you playing me, actually. have you had the pleasure of watching michael on strictly out? shall we remind ourselves? doing another classic. i can't believe we played that bit of it. a small error that happened. and this is the fateful later on. lots of people suggested that catcher was actually drunk —— katya. that was quite clearly a joke. there was
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confetti on the floor. so she slipped on that. the first time around. inside information! i am going next week to watch it live. i don't want to do any spoilers, but mike is still in it. it would have been really awkward... eye looking forward to seeing it live. let us hope you bring him luck. if he goes out before david james... hope you bring him luck. if he goes out before david james. .. we will see you both a little later. we bring you up—to—date with another story. new figures obtained by the bbc show that knife crime is rising at the fastest rate in areas outside of london — in places such as norfolk, surrey and lancashire. over a five—year period between 2014 and 2018, offences involving knives in england and wales increased by more than two thirds. the home office says 20,000 new police officers will be recruited to deal with the issue. here's our home affairs correspondent, sarah corker.
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step into the sensational, stylish buckle town hall. in the shadow of its famous tower, blackpool has some of the most deprived neighbourhoods in britain. there is a darker side to this seaside town. if someone started on the i would stabbed them. a lot of people bring knives, like, when we have fights, like. these boys are 14 and 15 years old. 0ne told me he'd been stabbed in the leg. he then showed me a picture of himself holding a machete at home. to protect their identities, their voices have been changed. is it a normal thing for people to carry knives around here? yeah, pretty much. 20 think people are carrying knives was yellow protection. so if someone comes to you knives was yellow protection. so if someone comes to you with a knife you pull out a knife as well. nothing is going to happen. you pull out a knife as well. nothing is going to happenlj you pull out a knife as well. nothing is going to happen. i know people carrying them. people how old? our age. 14 years old. 13 at
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the least. why would a 13—year—old boy need to carry a knife? protection. from what was mac from each other. students are taught about the dangers of carrying knives. lauren is 19. they have both been threatened. me and my mate walking home and a guy came out and threatened to stab one of my mates. we had a knife pointing to him. you feel safe going out? no. i have a friend who got machete linear park bya group friend who got machete linear park by a group of lads when playing foot well, because they wanted to play in a half and we said no. ashley, who ru ns a half and we said no. ashley, who runs the trust, says the rise in knife crime is linked to drugs. we have a significant issue of county lines in black, from that we have a lot of young people and adults who are now carrying knives. what is the youngest? we have come across eight and nine —year—olds carrying knives in the town. series knife crime here
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in blackpool has almost tripled over the last five years stop county lines drug gangs, cuts to youth services, poverty, unemployment, exclusion rates of schools, they have all been linked to a rise in youth violence. 15 miles away in preston, byron is still living with the trauma of his brother's death. my the trauma of his brother's death. my brother was fatally stabbed in the neck. so i have my name across -- his the neck. so i have my name across —— his name across my neck. every timea —— his name across my neck. every time a looker memorising a man. john jay was stabbed by a group of men in the street after an ongoing feud. he was just 18 years old. it was a planned attack, wasn't it? yeah, he was stabbed with a sword, a small acts, and he was beaten with a golf clu b acts, and he was beaten with a golf club —— acts. the whole country is suffering from knife claim. and a lot of places like preston and the small cities like preston get no mention and suffering just as much as everyone else in this country. the home office is recruiting 20,000
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new police officers over the next three years to help tackle what byron describes as a war against knife crime. time now to get the news, travel, and weather where you are. a p pa re ntly apparently got things mixed up with that 75—year—old weightlifter earlier. it is very disappointing. good morning. i'm asad ahmad. climate change protestors from the group extinction rebellion have gathered at marble arch in central london overnight, following a weekend of police arrests. the group brought parts of the city to a standstill in april, as part of a peaceful, but disruptive, protests against climate change. but the government has told the group that any further protests could alienate them from the public and lose them support.
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research by the bbc shows most of the 20 worst boroughs for serious knife crime are in the london, although incidents are actually on rising faster outside the capital. the highest recorded rate was in westminster, particularly in the west end, where a more robberies are being reported where knives are used. the head of the metropolitan police says officers are doing their best to tackle the problem. some parts of london have, as everybody knows, over the years, have been really troubled by violence. and it's ourjob to work with the local public there and everybody else to reduce violence. that's what we intend to do. it's been my number one priority, it remains my number one priority. from today, you'll be able to start getting a proper look at big ben again. over the coming weeks, the scaffolding surrounding the elizabeth tower is being removed as restoration work continues. structural work is taking place on the building which is around 160 years old.
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let's take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube board, the 0verground is suspended between gospel 0ak and barking — late running engineering. in putney, west hill closed westbound due to emergency gas works. and in twickenham, there's a lane closed eastbound at hospital bridge roundabout — after an accident. and in east london, the a13 — at the exit slip road — is closed at prince regent lane. now the weather with kate. good morning. it is a mild start out there this morning. there might be a little bit of brightness at first, perhaps in the east, the cloud will thicken throughout the morning and then the rain arrives as we head through the afternoon. so the brightness first thing in the east, you might see a little bit of sunshine before that cloud rolls through. and then the rain. quite a blustery day, the winds strengthening and the rain heavy at
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times, especially as we head into the rush hour this evening. damages getting up to around 14— 15 celsius. however know tonight, still quite where to start with this evening, but the rain will clear away it was, the cloud following of as well. behind the clear skies. the minimum temperature similar to last night, around 11 or 12 celsius. 0n temperature similar to last night, around 11 or 12 celsius. on tuesday, around 11 or 12 celsius. on tuesday, a lovely bright start, rightly so first, but we are likely to see some witty heavy showers through the course of tuesday. you might even hear a rumble course of tuesday. you might even heara rumble or course of tuesday. you might even hear a rumble or two of thunder. a dutch warmer tomorrow, 17 celsius, day for wednesday, but drier and just a little bit brighter. —— tudge warmer. do check out our website from your mobile phone or tablet to see a report on men teaching other men to chat up women on london's streets. the bbc went undercover to find out more — and it raised serious questions about the so—called pick—up coaches. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin.
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we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. it's been 10 days of highs, lows, firsts and falls — we'll look back at the world athletics championships in doha. also this morning, we'll catch up with ‘magic‘ mike bushell after his eventful week on strictly. musician dermot kennedy has come a long way from busking in dublin. with more than 300 million streams and a single in the top 20 — he's fast becoming one of ireland's greatest musical exports. he'll be here after nine. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. pressure is growing on american authorities to return a diplomat‘s wife who police want to question about a fatal traffic accident. 19 year old harry dunn died after his motorbike was hit by a car
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in northamptonshire. the suspect, named as anne sacoolas left the uk despite telling police she did not plan to go. simon jones has more. harry done's parents say they have been trapped in a living nightmare since there sun's death. killed along this road in northamptonshire near the us air force base that was home to a 42—year—old woman being treated as a suspect in the case. the wife of a diplomat, she has left the uk despite telling the police she did not plan to. she is understood to be called anne sacoolas though this is not been confirmed by the police. from mum to mum, knowing and believing that she is a mother, i wouldn't want to think that she put herself on the plane to go home to avoid what she's done because i couldn't live with myself.
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the chief constable of northamptonshire nick adderley has now intervened, saying on twitter: it's an appeal echoed by harry dunn's mother. we are not out to get her put behind bars. if that's what the justice system ends up doing, then we can't stop that but we are not out to do that. we are out to try and get some peace for ourselves. the us state department says it is in close consultation with british officials and any request will be considered carefully but immunity is rarely removed. it's offered its deepest sympathies to harry dunn's family. simon jones, bbc news. borisjohnson will make a series of phone calls to eu leaders today to try to secure support for his brexit plans. he will tell them they have a final opportunity to reach a deal and must compromise to achieve one. the french president, emmanuel macron, has said the eu will decide whether an agreement
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is possible by the end of the week. passengers who had their thomas cook holiday cancelled will be able to apply for a refund from today. nearly 400 —— 400,000 bookings had been made when the world's oldest tour operator collapsed two weeks ago. meanwhile, the final flights to bring home stranded holidaymakers who were abroad when the company went bust will arrive back in the uk this morning. the police watchdog has been accused of "shocking failures" for the way it investigated detectives' response to false allegations of a paedophile ring at westminster. retired high courtjudge sir richard henriques — who conducted an independent review of 0peraton midland — says inquiries into scotland yard were "minimal, unprofessional and flawed". in response, the independent 0ffice for police conduct said it carried out a "thorough and detailed investigation". senior members of the royal family have given their support to a new national mental health campaign. princes william and harry, and their wives, catherine and meghan, are narrating a short nhs film, aimed at helping people
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to spot the early signs of poor mental health. the video, featuring davina mccall, gillian anderson, and freddie flintoff, will be broadcast on commercial channels this evening. seven in ten drivers want to see councils enforce the law against motorists who leave their engines running when they're parked, research from the rac has found. councils already have the power to issue £20 pound fines to guilty drivers — but few do so. the rac is calling on councillors to put up ‘no engine' idling signs and to employ officers to issue penalties. if you've been toying with the idea ofjoining a gym but haven't yet got round to it, then prepare to be inspired. meetjong—so lim.
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it's not an easy mistake. the traps at the top. the laptop aside. all i can to lose my lapse in traps and every pa rt can to lose my lapse in traps and every part of my body, just ridiculous. it was my own actual sob. i did remind myself quite a lot that it was entirely my own choice and fault. how is your gastro silliness? what is that? it's your ca lf silliness? what is that? it's your calf muscle. too much information. i do need some advice. very sore toes.
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moving on. don't run and swim 48 kilometres on the weekend. that's good advice. a bit late, but thanks. ididn't swim good advice. a bit late, but thanks. i didn't swim at all over the weekend. i finished with a massive pizza. i saw the picture of that. i willjoin you. professional sport. should be going to pop a sport. a really bad day yesterday. they were both beaten in the premier league. liverpool's lead at the top of the premier league is eight points this morning, after an awful day for
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the manchester clubs yesterday. manchester city slipped up for the second time this season losing 2—0 to wolves, while 0le gunnar solskjaer remains under pressure as united manager after losing to newcastle. joe lynskey reports. in every league season, new faces emerge a new challenges take shape. in manchester this morning, the size of the task feels greater than ever. just two months in, city, the champions, are eight points off the top. they were swept away by wolves aside who have not won here since the 70s. a aside who have not won here since the 705. a 2-0 -- aside who have not won here since the 70s. a 2—0 —— zero victory was made in wolverhampton and done in liverpool. the city right now have lost their direction. incredible scenes. manchester city opened up in one game. more now than they were in the last season. we're at our best and teamwork, you can see them contact so fast, it was a bad day. we have teams in the premier league so we we have teams in the premier league so we lost the game. with manchester united, the bad days come more often now. at newcastle, their
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multi—million pound squad was struck another blow, this time by a teenager. matty long staff was born in 2000, the year when united had just won the travel —— trouble but this defeat leaves them 12 and with patients being tested. we are never happy when we don't win games and we are going to a difficult period. 0ur attitude is very good, it's a spot on and they are working hard of course. newcastle, the goalscorer long staff was making first league start, doing it alongside his brother sean in midfield and his dad david in the stands. for a family forged on tyneside and a team, fighting to stay up, this was proof that faith and the locals still matters. elsewhere yesterday, chelsea's resurgence under frank lampard continues. they thrashed southampton 4—1 at st mary's to go up to fifth, with england's new boys mason mount and tammy abraham among the scorers. elsewhere, arsenal moved up to third
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with a 1—0 win over bournemouth. the shocks continuted in scotland. celtic were beaten 2—0 at livingston. it's their first league defeat of the season and the first time they've ever lost to livingston. they drop to second in the premiership, and steve gerrard's rangers go top after they thrashed hamilton 5—0. great britain ended the world atletics championships with five medals — that's their lowest total since 2005. their champiosnhips ended in bizarre fashion. the women's 4 x 400m relay team thought they'd claimed bronze after third placed jamaica were disqualified. but that decision was overturned on an appeal, so britain were moved back to fourth. to complete a disappointing final day britain's men didn't even finish their four by 400 metres relay, failing to pass on the baton. that was won by the usa, who comfortably topped the medals table.
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my my finishes into strong, ijust lost a bit too much on the left with a baton and i didn't quite get it already. great britain finished sixth overall with two golds and three silver medals. it's their worst total since helsinki in 2005. dina asher—smith won half those, and was given her silver medal alongside her 4 by 100m teammates last night. do you know what she's going to do when she comes home? she is going to paint her kitchen. that's the next thing she really wants to do. she liked the hotel she was staying in. she really likes the cafe in the hotel was staying. blue and purple. i like hotel was staying. blue and purple. ilike a hotel was staying. blue and purple. i like a good edge. good combine. you could just throw it out. i love the edgy bits. i've got more. i will
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carry on. england's next game at the rugby world cup will decide who they play in the quarter finals — that's after france also secured their place in the last eight by beating tonga. france battled to a 23—21 scoreline and will meet england on saturday in their final group match. the winner of that will finish top of pool c, and will play either wales or australia in the first of the knockout matches. france going for the iceland thunderclap in their celebrations. no matches at the rugby world cup today. wales play fiji on wednesday, and they've mafde two changes to the side that beat australia last time out. james davies and ross moriarty both start in the back row, in place ofjustin tipuric and aaron wainwright. tottenham's new stadium played host to its first nfl match yesterday.(00v)the stadium is pretty unique in that it's built the stadium is pretty unique in that it's built specifically for both football and american football, and the transformation has been taking shape this week. in the match itself the oakland raiders beat the chicago bears 24—21 in a brilliant match — well worthy of the surroundings.
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that's what's been happening this week. the match itself, the oakland raiders who beat the chicago bears, can you believe there's a picture underneath? the same company that did that built the roof. it's kind ofa did that built the roof. it's kind of a specialist subject. this is one of a specialist subject. this is one of my favourite things of the day. finally to proof that british olympians are always pushing the boundaries, even when they're on holiday... this is british olympic champion jack laugher and some of his diving friends and colleagues using some creative mobile phone work making themselves into avengers, hopefully we see jack and some of the others too perhaps doing the same moves with medals in 12 months time. it's taken me about half—an—hour to work out why they may have done it.
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fantastic. that was take one, though. very good. as the best one i've seen. thank you very much. it's often described as a hidden epidemic — one that affects 176 million people across the world. endometriosis is a condition that can affect women from their teenage years and causes intense pain. more than 13,000 who suffer from it in the uk have shared their experiences with the bbc — they say it has badly affected their education, careers, relationships and mental health. following the research, mp's are today launching an inquiry into its impact. broadcaster emma barnett has been speaking about living with the condition. i was iwas in i was in agony. my periods could be very heavy, they could be lighter but the one constant theme was how much pain! but the one constant theme was how much pain i was in. i mean, it was
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bone grinding. and yet when i went to see doctors with my mum, they would say, " this is whatjust some girls have." you are listening to emma barnett on five live. as someone emma barnett on five live. as someone who often interviews politicians, i get answers for a living, or i try my very best, i had failed to get answers from doctors andi failed to get answers from doctors and i saw all sorts of doctors over the years. they didn't know until the years. they didn't know until the age of 31 i had endometriosis. i'd gone 21 years without diagnosis. endometriosis is a condition in women where cells that represent like the womb lining that should leave your body during a period don't and instead, they stay within your body and attach themselves to different organs, building up lesions and causing really difficult painfor lesions and causing really difficult pain for women. in the largest study
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of its kind, the bbc has spoken to more than 13,000 women with endometriosis. nearly all said it had affected their career, sexual relationships and mental health. around half said it impacted their ability to have children. and half said it led to suicidal thoughts. i'm going off to meet mum and daughter victoria and jessica who both have endometriosis.” daughter victoria and jessica who both have endometriosis. i think people just think it's a painful period. 0h, shut up, it's a painful period, get on with it. i wish it was a painful period and i had it once a month but we live with pain every day. depression is a massive pa rt of every day. depression is a massive part of endometriosis as well. it has been for us. i'd been on antidepressants since i was 17 which is the same time i was diagnosed. at its worst, how bad has endometriosis affected you? it affects everything. i've been so poorly recently, i've been at home, not being able to go to college and even at home, i can't
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do anything and i'm exhausted every single day. as aborted closer, you think? yes, because we understand each other. i have really good friends and i can speak to them and say i am really struggling today but no—one really understands as someone who is going to it, just like you can't understand how much pain i am in white now but my friends don't, they don't have to live like this. the same number of people have the condition in this country is type 2 diabetes and we know next to nothing and how to treat it. it's seem to be embarrassing to talk about it. i didn't think i'd ever come on. i did it with you. it's heartbreaking to have spoken to victoria and jessica without living this joint life in agony but it really reinforces to me how important it is to realise any of these symptoms, that you go to the gp and get a referral to a specialist, that you fight for a
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better existence. that was emma barnett. to send questions. we have a specialist in all of this will hopefully give us some answers. what is striking is how little information there is for people. and lots of people suffering as well. you sort yourself out. we will find out what is happening in the weather this morning. this photograph is an indication. good morning. good morning. this picture was taken yesterday in norfolk they want to bellwether watchers. we had a real deluge of rain. we had some pictures to showers you yesterday of what it was like, a video. in norfolk, parts of norfolk, 14—15 millimetres of rainfall. a lot of that fell in just six hours —— 40—50. the environment
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agency has two flood warnings in east anglia to watch out for. across the uk, or in england, we have six from the environment agency, with more rain on the way today. you can see the rain as it has been falling through the course of the night, a new band coming in from the west, drifting eastwards. that is courtesy ofa drifting eastwards. that is courtesy of a plethora of weather fronts coming away. if you look at the high suppose, particularly in the north—west, the squeeze tells you it will be a windy day, particularly so in the north—west, but in other parts of the uk as well. gusting at the moment in the outer hebrides, up to 65 mph. it will be fairly gusty this morning through the irish sea and also the english channel. even inland we have gusty winds around this band of rain, which is continuing to move from the west and east. this heavy at the moment. it will turn a little later and more patchy in nature as it makes its way into east anglia and the south—east. behind its brightest guys, some sunshine, but still a few heavy showers coming our way. —— brighter
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skies. moving on that brisk wind. through the evening and overnight we see the back edge of that rain eventually clear away from east anglia and the south—east. behind it something drier, clear skies, anglia and the south—east. behind it something drier, clearskies, but then with this array of weather fronts it does mean we will see further showers. and again the squeeze on the isobars telling you it will be windy. by tomorrow morning, still strong winds across the north—west, but it will be a blustery day wherever you are. still a lot of showers. tomorrow we could catch a showers almost anywhere. as is the way with showers, many of us could mist them and have a largely dry day. the black circles indicating the strength of the gusts of wind. temperatures, 12 in the north and 17 in the south. as we head into wednesday, it is another blustery day. the wind is not as strong as the next couple of days. still have a good array of showers. some of those merging to give longer spells of rain. but in between there will be sunny skies around. temperatures 11—15. roughly where
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they should be at this stage in october. in summary, for this week ahead we are looking at some heavy downpours, be it rain or showers, some sunny downpours, be it rain or showers, some sunny spells, and often pretty windy. this is not unusual weather for this time of year. it is, of course, awesome. and it feels like it. thank you very much. the collapse of thomas cook two weeks ago left 150,000 passengers stranded overseas. this morning, the final flights arrive home. ben's here with more. here is in this year with us with more detail. the final flight is the one that lands at manchester airport at 8:35am. from orlando to manchester. really bringing an end to an error of thomas cook, the last flight to an error of thomas cook, the last flight bringing back the stranded passengers, some of the 150,000 caught up in all of this. 392 people will be on that last flight. altogether, the civil aviation authority has brought back 140,000 people, the rest have made their own way back stop interestingly, it a 94% of them actually managed to come
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back on the day and about the same time they were due to come back, so many of them won't have noticed a huge difference to their travel plans, given it has been relatively smooth and the civil aviation authority organise this, known as operation motorman, got people back quite quickly. those are people who have been on holiday, what about those whose holidays were cancelled? the attention and was turning to those who you to go away. 360,000 holidays were booked with thomas cook that now have to be refunded. that affects about 800,000 passengers. clearly a lot of work for them to do right now. they are expecting a flood of applications for refunds, because from today you can put in your claim for a future holiday that has been cancelled to get your holiday back. people like geoff. let's have a listen. we were going to go to cuba stop we have been before. it was all booked. we will looking forward to it. we had
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been and got everything paid. we we re been and got everything paid. we were ready to pack and go. we were gutted, we were devastated. where did you see it? tv. i didn't think it was real at first. was itjust media? we are looking for another holiday. trying to find something but everything has gone up in price due to the demand, i suppose stop so we are struggling, really. that has been one of the big problems, it is all well and good people getting their money back, but if they try to book another holiday now, given the demand and one less play in the market, it means prices have gone up. from this morning, the new website launch is for people —— the new website lodges for people to get their money back. you can claim a refu nd their money back. you can claim a refund from today. what you need to do is to go onto the website to actively make a claim. it won't be done automatically so you have to register the claim. what the cia has
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said if you put the claim in we will pay y°u said if you put the claim in we will pay you back within 60 days, within 60 days. —— within two months. people who have paid direct debit by instalments are getting their money back already. and it only applies if you booked for the package, the hotel and the flight. if you just did the flight you will have to claim back through travel insurance or through your credit card. a lot of people, a lot of money, where's the money coming from those yellow we have been talking about atol a lot. they say no taxpayer money is going to be needed, because that scheme is essentially an insurance scheme. every time a travel agent books a flight they pay money to protected. all the money will come from that. there is enough money in that fund to cover it. so there is no taxpayer money needed. on the screen there, that is the site to claim. if you have a claim to make. that will be paid, they say, within two months. we will keep that on our
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social media as well. we'll be talking to the civil aviation authority about it later. thank you. after ten days of highs, lows, historic hatricks and devastating defeats — the world athletics championships in doha have come to a close. britain finished with five medals — but the spotlight hasn'tjust been on the sporting action, as our sports correspondent natalie pirks reports. it was perhaps fitting for a championship is riddled with controversy that britain's night finished in drama. the mancz 4x400m relay team couldn't get the batten round and the women's quartet came forth, were briefly onto bronze, and them out of the medals again. it meant the nation felt terminal short of the target, yet it doesn't tell the whole tale. after a handful of places and strong performances, notably from women. sunshine of the track, and assassin honour, dean asher—smith became the first british athlete to win three medals at the
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same championship and became a world champion to boot. it is dean asher—smith. she is the champion. champion to boot. it is dean asher—smith. she is the championlj don't asher—smith. she is the champion.” don't know what to say. it has improperly sunk in. they dreamt of this. katarina johnson-thompson came to doha lucky woman reborn. the stadium forever etched in the memory as the scene of her greatest habitats on victory. that is an excellent run! it actually felt like a dream and the lights and everything. it has been unbelievable andl everything. it has been unbelievable and i can't believe this is the result. world athletics is in a very healthy state and british athletics is very much a part of that. we have gold medal acea, we have filezilla, and that means we are punching with the rest of the world. -- medals here. the performances have been fantastic, there have been plenty of issues organisers to deal with. the atmosphere tonight is amazing, but it hasn't always been this way. when asher—smith made history last weekend, the lack of crowds was a depressing sight. the humidity was
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also an issue, a third of this starters in the women's marathon on, held at midnight, failed to finish when the news fell that mo farah's former coach had been banned for four years for doping offences, it hung over the stadium like a dark cloud. and human rights watch also high on the agenda with the governing body defending the decision to hold the championships here. a passionately believe that sport can shine a spotlight on so many issues that other areas of the world simply do not want to address. the decision to bring the championships here there were far more negatives than there were positive. think it was a mistake anything most of the fans and athletes say the same thing. with a world cup looming, lessons have undoubtedly been loaned by qatar. and as the curtain goes down in the first world championships in the middle east, britain's gaze can turn further east, to the tokyo olympics, with some optimism. natalie pirks,
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bbc news, doha. lovely to end with a gold—medallist as well. how exciting. and a nice listener for next year. —— loosen up. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. i'm asad ahmad. climate change protestors from the group extinction rebellion have gathered at marble arch in central london overnight — following a weekend of police arrests. the group brought parts of the city to a stand still in april, as part of a peaceful but disruptive protests against climate change. but the government has told the group that any further protests could alienate them from the public and lose them support. research by the bbc shows most of the 20 worst boroughs for serious knife crime are in the london — although incidents are actually rising faster — outside the capital. the highest recorded rate was in westminster — particularly in the west end, where more robberies are being reported, where knives are used. the head of the metropolitan police says officers are doing their best to tackle the problem.
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some parts of london have, as everybody knows, over the years, have been really troubled by violence. and it's ourjob to work with the local public there and everybody else to reduce violence. that's what we intend to do. it's been my number one priority, it remains my number one priority. from today, you'll be able to start getting a proper look at big ben again. over the coming weeks, the scaffolding surrounding the elizabeth tower is being removed as restoration work continues. structural work is taking place on the building which is around 160 years old. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube board, the 0verground is sever delays between gospel oak and barking — late running engineering. on the roads, west hill in wandsworth is closed westbound due to emergency gas works. these are the delays towards the closure.
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and in east london, the a13 — there are queues westbound towards m25j30 — due to a broken down vehicle woolwich ferry — one boat all day. these scandals continue they are. it hardly ever works properly. —— there. expect even more delays. now the weather with kate. good morning. it's a mild start out there this morning. there might be a little bit of brightness at first, perhaps in the east, but the cloud will thicken throughout the morning and then the rain arrives as we head through the afternoon. so the brightness first thing in the east, you might see a little bit of sunshine before that cloud rolls through. and then the rain. quite a blustery day, the winds strengthening and the rain heavy at times, especially as we head into the rush hour this evening. temperatures getting up to around 14 or 15 celsius. now, overnight tonight, still quite wet to start with this evening, but the rain will clear away it was, the cloud following of as well. and behind the clear skies. the minimum temperature similar to last night,
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at around 11 or 12 celsius. on tuesday, a lovely bright start, dry at least at first, but we're likely to see some pretty heavy showers through the course of tuesday. you may even hear a rumble or two of thunder. a touch warmer tomorrow, 17 celsius. a cooler day for wednesday, but drier and just a little bit brighter. do check out our website from your mobile phone or tablet to see a report on men "teaching" other men to chat up women on london's streets. the bbc went undercover to find out more — and it raised serious questions about the so—called "pick—up" coaches. good morning welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today. pressure on the us over the american diplomat‘s wife implicated in the death of a teenager in a car crash — northamptonshire's chief constable demands her return to the uk. borisjohnson's brexit deadline — the french president tells him the eu will decide
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by the end of this week whether a deal can happen. the hidden condition affecting hundreds of thousands of women the uk — mps launch an investigation into the debilitating impact of endometriosis. the final thomas cook passengers return home this morning — two weeks after the holiday giant collapsed. and from today you can claim refunds for cancelled holidays — i'll explain what you need to do. misery for manchester in the premier league. champions city lose 2—0 at home to wolves, whilst manchester united are beaten by newcastle. and britain's diving team assemble — have they learned to defy gravity orjust do some clever camera work? morning. some torrential downpours this weekend. this week it's going to remain unsettled. followed by
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some heavy showers behind it. i will have more in the minutes. —— for the minutes. --15 ——15 minutes. it's monday the 7th of october. our top story. pressure is growing on american authorities to return a diplomat‘s wife who police want to question about a fatal traffic accident. 19 year old harry dunn died after his motorbike was hit by a car in northamptonshire. the suspect, named as anne sacoolas, left the uk despite telling police she did not plan to go. simon jones has more. harry dunn's parents say they have been trapped in a living nightmare since there son's death. he was killed along this road in northamptonshire near the us air force base that was home to a 42—year—old woman being treated as a suspect in the case. the wife of a diplomat, she has left the uk despite telling the police she did not plan to. she is understood to be called anne sacoolas though this is not
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from mum to mum, knowing and believing that she is a mother, i wouldn't want to think that she put herself on the plane to go home to avoid what she's done because i couldn't live with myself. the chief constable of northamptonshire police, nick adderley, has now intervened, saying on twitter: it's an appeal echoed by harry dunn's mother. we are not out to get her put behind bars. if that's what the justice system ends up doing, then we can't stop that but we are not out to do that. we are out to try and get some peace for ourselves. the us state department says it is in close consultation with british officials and any
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request will be considered carefully but immunity is rarely removed. it's offered its deepest sympathies to harry dunn's family. simon jones, bbc news. borisjohnson will make a series of phone calls to eu leaders today to try to secure support for his brexit plans. he will tell them they have a final opportunity to reach a deal and must compromise to achieve one. the french president, emmanuel macron, has said the eu will decide whether an agreement is possible by the end of the week. in a moment we'll speak to our brussels reporter adam fleming, but first we can hear from helen catt in westminster. so far, boris johnson so far, borisjohnson hasn't managed to convince eu leaders that the proposals he put forward last week on the basis for a new deal so we're going to see a flurry of activity. stephen barclay, the brexit secretary, is touring european capitals. boris johnson is secretary, is touring european capitals. borisjohnson is going to speak to more eu leaders and what we expect is that he will say pretty much what he said to the french president yesterday which is that
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borisjohnson president yesterday which is that boris johnson believes president yesterday which is that borisjohnson believes the eu must match the compromises the uk has made in recent weeks. the reason for the time pressure as the next week is the crucial eu summit which of course is the date that was sighted ina law course is the date that was sighted in a law passed by parliament last month which says if he hasn't got a deal, then he must ask to extend the brexit process. borisjohnson has said he won't do that but he will comply with the law. if eu leaders are betting that will prevent an ideal, that will be an historic misunderstanding. thank you very much for the moment. well how might those phone calls be received in europe, our brussels reporter adam fleming joins us now to tell us. some furious phone calls to be had? yes, some more phone calls. i think the important one was the one with the important one was the one with the french president and he said to big things. first of all, that deadline, although they don't call
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ita deadline, although they don't call it a deadline here, which is we will have a pretty good idea by the end of the week if these proposals are going to lead to a new deal anytime soon. going to lead to a new deal anytime soon. hence by friday is such a big deal. it's how the summit is on the 17th. get a move on and speak to the eu's negotiating team, in other words, don't think you can negotiate a deal by ringing around eu leaders. by a deal by ringing around eu leaders. by officials and politicians sitting in rooms in brussels and two negotiating teams working on a text for the treaty. we are not on that stage yet. we are having discussions with the eu asking questions about the uk's plan, the uk providing some clarifications and answers. they haven't got into the really intense work of sitting around a table working on a text that could turn it into the final treaty. they are not happy about signing up to a pledge to give an open border on the island
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of ireland forever without any details about what sort of checks the uk will do on stuff coming into northern ireland because that could end up in the eu. we will put some of those questions about what might happen this week to the health secretary, matt hancock. passengers who had their thomas cook holiday cancelled will be able to apply for a refund from today. nearly 400,000 bookings had been made when the world's oldest tour operator collapsed two weeks ago. this meanwhile, the final flights to bring home stranded holidaymakers who were abroad when the company went bust will arrive back in the uk this morning. the police watchdog has been accused of "shocking failures" for the way it investigated detectives' response to false allegations of a paedophile ring at westminster. retired high courtjudge
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sir richard henriques — who conducted an independent review of 0peraton midland — says inquiries into scotland yard were "minimal, unprofessional and flawed". in response, the independent office for police conduct said it carried out a "thorough and detailed investigation". senior members of the royal family are spearheading a new campaign, aimed at helping people to spot the early signs of poor mental health. princes william and harry, and their wives, catherine and meghan, are narrating a short film which will be broadcast on tv this evening. katharine da costa reports. seven in ten councils want councils to ta ke seven in ten councils want councils to take action against people who leave their engines running. the rac is calling on councils to put an end to engine idling signs, sorry, to put up those signs. and to employ officers to issue those penalties.
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it's just coming up to 7:09am. let's get a little bit more on one of our main stories. a scheme to refund people whose holidays we re were cancelled. they will be able to apply for a refund from today. nearly 400,000 bookings had been made when the world's oldest tour operator collapsed two weeks ago. we were speaking to ben thompson, our business presenter. we can speak to its chair, dame deirdre hutton, from our westminster studio now. there are those who come back and those of booked holidays for the future. yes, indeed, and i have to say i'm deeply relieved that we are coming to the end of the flying programme. the last two planes were in the airas programme. the last two planes were in the air as we speak over the atlantic. that was one enormous largest ever peacetime repatriation. that was just task one. we now move on to the second task which is the
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refu nd on to the second task which is the refund will be three times bigger than the previous biggest one. another huge task. we understand 800,000 people covered by that. it's a huge amount of money. covered by various insurance policies but in terms of the reef scheme, the website goes live today. we'll put that on the screen a bit later on but it's a massive operation, isn't it? yes, it is. it is 360,000 forward bookings. that encompasses about 800,000 individuals. it is a huge undertaking. i think the key thing is for people to go to our website, thomascook.caa.co.uk, and they will find all the details for filling in the form and any valid form, we are attempting to pay out in 60 days. i was going to ask about that. the plan is 60 days, it might extend for someone with so many
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people applying. about 100,000 people applying. about 100,000 people have paid thomas cook by direct debit who will be paid much quicker than that in the first 24,000 of those, their refunds are being processed today. the rest will being processed today. the rest will be done over the next few days so it's everybody else we are aiming to pay out within 60 days. can i ask you, if people are watching this morning, i'm sure many of our viewers will be either coming back or had booked holidays through thomas cook and they might be thinking about criteria. what should they be thinking about? basically, are they protected by atol? if they produce their atol certificate, it applies to them. they should go to the website because they will find full instructions there about how to fill in the form and where the evidence is needed to go with it. you mentioned for those who didn't catch it, there is the full address to go to on the screen while we're
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talking to you this morning. is a bit of confusion and this is what we we re bit of confusion and this is what we were referring to, some who might have looked in a thomas cook shop but that is not necessarily a thomas cook holiday. it is possible people who booked in a thomas cook shop, there holiday was booked through another tour operator and if they have any doubt about that, go to a registered travel agency and ask their advice. there are so many different types of booking that it would be foolish of me to try to do it now but the best thing is to go and get advice from a protected shop. in terms of the industry generally, thomas cook were a huge player. what are some of those other big players in the industry thinking about what has happened to thomas cook and warning signs about others? everybody is really sad about this. this was not a job we ever wanted to do and i'm always reminding myself, there are 22,000 people worldwide who have lost theirjobs over this, 9000 in the uk. of course it's been
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a terrible shock to the industry. we are comfortable that it's very competitive, highly effective industry and the slack will be taken up industry and the slack will be taken up by industry and the slack will be taken up by the company ——by other companies. thank you for your time this morning. we will put the website address on the screen. it's thomascook.caa.co.uk. that's where you need to go if you want to process that refund. it really feels autumnal and there have been problems for people as well, haven't they? that's right. problems particularly yesterday in east anglia. this is the weather watchers picture from andrew in norfolk where we saw torrential rain in a short amount of time. you can see these pick is, the debt of the water that car is going through, parts of norfolk had 40—50 millimetres of rain injusta norfolk had 40—50 millimetres of rain injust a few norfolk had 40—50 millimetres of rain in just a few hours. today, there are still six environment agency flood warnings in force, two
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of which are in east anglia. there is more rain in the forecast. you can see the rain coming in from the west. this is heavy rain as it pushes steadily eastwards. gusty winds around it. as you can tell from the isobars which are close together, we got dusts in the outer hebrides of about 60 miles per hour. but it will just around the hebrides of about 60 miles per hour. but it willjust around the irish sea as it moves from the west towards the east. these black circles give you an indication of the kind of wind gusts we can expect through the morning and the rain continuing to push steadily from the west towards the east through the course of the day. behind it, it will start to brighten up. the extreme will start to brighten up. the extre m e west will start to brighten up. the extreme west of wales, northern ireland and western parts of scotland, you will see some sunshine today but also showers and through the afternoon in particular, some of those showers could be heavy. temperature—wise, 11— for dean degrees. there are some large puddles around. this rain is falling
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on already saturated ground. through this evening and overnight, the rain continues to sweep away from the south—east. a temporary lull but is more weather fronts advance from the north—west, they will bring in some more showers, some of which will be heavy and sundry but again, look at the isobars tells us tomorrow is going to be another windy day, particularly with exposure. you can see the array of showers packing in, some heavy, thundering with hail as well. gusty winds around them. in between, bright skies with a fair bit of cloud at times or indeed there will be some sunshine with temperatures roughly where they should be at this stage in october, 12 in the north and 16 or 17 as we pushed down towards the south—east and then for wednesday, we could catch a shower almost anywhere, some merging to give longer spells of rain. the wind is not as strong but still a breezy day and we will see some sunshine in between.
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in summary, as we in summary, as we go in summary, as we go through this week, the outlook remains unsettled. there will be heavy downpours, either rain or showers merging, but equally some sunny spells. but it is often going to be windy. autumn has well and truly arrived. it really has. let us try and enjoy it. we will see you later. have you got your big coat yet? i've brought it in today for the first time.” started on the weekend. mince pies and everything. by emirati. it is a quarter past de backer —— eight ready. what is wrong... 60 minutes pasztor seven. "60 ——60 minutes past seven. new figures obtained by the bbc show that knife crime is rising at the fastest rate in areas outside of london — in places such as norfolk, surrey and lancashire. over a five—year period between 2014 and 2018, offences involving knives in england and wales increased by more than two thirds. the home office says 20,000 new police officers will be recruited to deal with the issue.
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here's our correspondent, sarah corker. step into the sensationally stylish blackpool town hall... in the shadow of its famous tower, blackpool has some of the most deprived neighbourhoods in britain. there is a darker side to this seaside town. if someone started on me i'd stab them. a lot of people bring knives, like, when we have fights, like. these boys are 14 and 15 years old. one told me he'd been stabbed in the leg. he then showed me a picture of himself holding a machete at home. to protect their identities, their voices have been changed. is it a normal thing for people to carry knives around here? yeah, pretty much. why do think people are carrying knives? protection. so if someone comes to you with a knife you pull out a knife as well. nothing's going to happen. i know people carrying them. people how old? ourage. 14—year—olds carrying knives. 13 at the least. why would a 13—year—old boy need to carry a knife? protection. protection from what though? from each other.
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at blackpool football club's community trust, students are taught about the dangers of carrying knives. lauren is 18, keeley 17. both have been threatened. me and my mate walking home and a guy came out and threatened to stab one of my mates. we had a knife pointing to him. you feel safe going out? no. i've got a friend who a got machete in the park by a group of lads when they were playing football, because they wanted to play in our half but we said no. ashley hackett, who runs the trust, says the rise in knife crime is linked to drugs. we have a significant issue of county lines in blackpool and from that we're having an awful lot of young people and adults that are now carrying knives. what is the youngest that you've come across? we've come across eight and nine—year—olds carrying knives in the town. serious knife crime here in blackpool has almost tripled over the last five years. county lines drug gangs, cuts to youth services, poverty, unemployment, exclusion rates of schools, they've all been linked
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to a rise in youth violence. 15 miles away in preston, byron is still living with the trauma of his brother's death. my brother was fatally stabbed in the neck. so i have his name across my neck. every time a look in the mirror i get to see his name. jon—jo was stabbed by a group of men in this street after an ongoing feud. he was just 18 years old. it was a planned attack, wasn't it? yeah, he was stabbed with a sword, a small axe, and he was beaten with a golf club. the whole country is suffering from knife crime. and a lot of places like preston and these small cities like preston get no mention and we're suffering just as much as everyone else in this country. the home office is recruiting 20,000 new police officers over the next three years to help tackle what byron describes as a war against knife crime. sarah corker, bbc news.
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we're joined now by alison cope, who lost her sonjoshua after he was stabbed in birmingham in 2013. we have spoken to you before and i know you are an anti— knife crime campaign an hour. are you surprised by the figures that the serious knife i'm as rising outside of london really steeply? no, this has been creeping up and up every few months and it is the same conversation we are having, we need to do more, what is actually going on? nothing seems to be changing and it just increases every on? nothing seems to be changing and itjust increases every couple of months. you are still talking to young children. it is six years since your son sadly died. it is disheartening that the messages in getting through? i think the most frustrating thing is the message is getting through. when you are in front of a young person, really
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explaining, respectfully, the consequences of carrying a knife... you can make an impact. absolutely. the fact that it isn't national compulsory frustrates me. the fact that the solutions are there, we talk about them all the time, we know what we need to do, it is not happening. you talk about the solutions, you give them this a very stark example you can see mines being changed and people thinking in different ways —— mines. being changed and people thinking in different ways -- mines. their minds change, they don't want to be in the situation they are in, they are scared, they still have to go into an environment where they don't have to deal with it. they are walking the streets frightened, they might be in situations that are difficult and there doesn't seem to be the support once you've got to them and made them think twice about carrying the knife. what is it that makes an impact? you talked about the fact that your son hoped to be a successful rapper and that was taken away from him, is there a change in them, what is the point that hits home? the fact that they could lose theirfamily, because
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home? the fact that they could lose their family, because it home? the fact that they could lose theirfamily, because it can happen and it is not sometimes how you think it can be. an instagram post, it can be something you put out on social media, can be all kinds of reasons. when you break it down like that they start to think, oh, if i'd do this that could happen either say goodbye to my dad, my name, and which child wants to leave their child —— family behind? none of them. is about that across to them. you also tell positive stories to the children you speak to. tell us one of those. i took about the fact thatjoshua was making mistakes as he grew up. but his love for me was the change, he thought to want to leave my mum behind? no, have got to try hard and make a positive change my life and he did and he very successful. it is to give young people hope. anything we take that away from them every day. we tell them there are no jobs, there's away from them every day. we tell them there are nojobs, there's no this, there is no that, it is about giving them hope to see that no what situation you are in deserve to have a future and you can go and get that
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future if you work hard and concentrate. one of the things commander think it was mentioned in the film we had a couple of minutes ago, that thing about people thinking that they need to carry a knife because that makes them feel safe. what is your response to that? i think it is heartbreaking. when icepick to primary school children, nine and 10—year—olds, and they ask them, say to them if you went to town on a saturday, how many teenagers to think of carrying knives? and a lot of them say all of them. this is the message we are giving young people. we are making them feel so scared on the street and then we tell them there are no police. you do know that even if you ring 999 they will not come to you. we are creating this fear that is ripping through communities and young people incorrectly believe the only choice they do have is to make sure they can state as safe as they can buy carrying a knife. it is ridiculous. you might make a fantastic point to a group of young kids but all those other things being reinforced when they go back into society, go home, spent time
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with their friends. absolutely. there are solutions to that. bringing out more police, community centres, reinvesting into communities and young people. but we see time and time again that is not happening. we are going the opposite way. the thing is that early about losing yourfamily, way. the thing is that early about losing your family, it way. the thing is that early about losing yourfamily, it is not necessarily about being stabbed, it is about being convicted did for stabbing somebody. then the consequences have a massive effect also. a goto presence, recently went toa also. a goto presence, recently went to a prison in keynes and they met 14 —year—olds, 15 —year—olds, and it showed the date of relief cop —— release, 2037. are they going to be happy with that choice? absolutely not. we need to stop as many young people making that choice and then it stops families like myself living devastated forever. so it is just investing in everybody, really. are you positive you can make a change? yeah, absolutely, always. they won't stop because young people listen, they are respectful, they really ta ke they are respectful, they really take it on board. what i would love
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to see is more support for people like me. you get many people up and down the country supporting young people, but then we let them down as soon as people, but then we let them down as soon as they go back to the environment they are scared of. alison cope, good to talk to you. thank you very much for coming in. i know your work at least will continue, but thank you very much. thank you. great to speak to you this morning. thank you. you are watching bbc breakfast. coming up shortly we will have the spot with sally and carol is keeping us up—to—date with the weather and she is saying it is autumnal. if you didn't know that you have gotten out of bed yet. we also have the health secretary matt hancock with us in about 15 minutes. we have said this about 15 minutes. we have said this about 18,000 times, but it is a breach —— big week for brexit. time now to get the news, travel, and weather where you are. good morning. i'm asad ahmad. climate change protestors from the group extinction rebellion have gathered at marble arch in central london overnight, following a weekend of police arrests. the group brought parts of the city to a stand still in april, as part of a peaceful but disruptive
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protests against climate change. but the government has told the group that any further protests could alienate them from the public and lose them support. research by the bbc shows most of the 20 worst boroughs for serious knife crime are in the london, although incidents are actually rising faster — outside the capital. the highest recorded rate was in westminster, particularly in the west end, where more robberies are being reported where knives are used. the head of the metropolitan police says officers are doing their best to tackle the problem. some parts of london have, as everybody knows, over the years, have been really troubled by violence. and it's ourjob to work with the local public there and everybody else to reduce violence. that's what we intend to do. it's been my number one priority, it remains my number one priority. from today, you'll be able to start getting a proper look at big ben again. over the coming weeks,
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the scaffolding surrounding the elizabeth tower is being removed as restoration work continues. structural work is taking place on the building which is around 160 years old. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube board, the 0verground is sever delays between gospel oak and barking — late running engineering. on the roads, westminster bridge — closed. not westminster bridge — closed. even buses going aci be not even buses going across them. do be aware of that and diversions that are in place. and in east london, the a13 — there are queues westbound towards m25 j30, due to a broken down vehicle. and in twickenham, there is a glenn close eastbound after hospital brit roundabout after an earlier accident. now the weather with kate. good morning. it's a mild start out there this morning. there might be a little bit of brightness at first, perhaps in the east, but the cloud will thicken throughout the morning and then
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the rain arrives as we head through the afternoon. so the brightness first thing in the east, you might see a little bit of sunshine before that cloud rolls through. and then the rain. quite a blustery day, the winds strengthening and the rain heavy at times, especially as we head into the rush hour this evening. temperatures getting up to around 14 or 15 celsius. now, overnight tonight, still quite wet to start with this evening, but the rain will clear away it was, the cloud following of as well. and behind the clear skies. the minimum temperature similar to last night, at around 11 or 12 celsius. on tuesday, a lovely bright start, dry at least at first, but we're likely to see some pretty heavy showers through the course of tuesday. you may even hear a rumble or two of thunder. a touch warmer tomorrow, 17 celsius. a cooler day for wednesday, but drier and just a little bit brighter. do check out our website from your mobile phone or tablet to see a report on men "teaching" other men to chat up women on london's streets. the bbc went undercover to find out more — and it raised serious questions about the so—called "pick—up" coaches.
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is hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. hello this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. pressure is growing on american authorities to return a diplomat‘s wife who police want to question about a fatal traffic accident. 19 year old harry dunn died after his motorbike was hit by a car in northamptonshire. the suspect, named as anne sacoolas left the uk despite telling police she did not plan to go. we're joined now by chief constable, nick adderley. i know that he wrote to the embassy. did say? basically i thought as head of the organisation in northamptonshire, the investigation is live, the investigation is
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ongoing and it's right that she comes back here and faces justice. not only is it the right thing to do for the family that actually is the right thing to do by the laws of this country. what had she said to police about what she was planning to do? interestingly, when she first walked into it, the question of diplomatic immunity was raised. she had not been using the village. her family had left the country which is incredibly disappointing. not only for justice here incredibly disappointing. not only forjustice here in the country. if i ask you another question, tell me about the impact on harry's family. how has that impacted on them? firstly, charlotte, harry's mother, they are absolutely broken by this. i know that the lady in question under investigation is also a mother andi
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under investigation is also a mother and i know how she would feel if it was one of her children in an incident like this. that was my appeal to the american authorities. you know how you would feel if it was one of your children. come back and do the right thing. diplomatic immunity as faras and do the right thing. diplomatic immunity as far as i understand is rarely waived. are you optimistic this might happen? no, my optimism is not high. i said that in the letter, but i know that is a privilege that can be exercised. understand the political sensitivities around that in terms of protection for people. again, it's the right thing to do. what would be the process if the suspect decided to come back to the uk, then what would the process be? clearly the investigation will carry on. my officers are carrying on with that investigation. the cctv footage, investigation. the cctv footage, investigation will carry on. what will happen of course is deciding to
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come back, and get the support of her country. she will be interviewed. whatever the outcome of that investigation would be, that would lead her to a logistical process. what are the chances of the family getting justice, getting some sort of closure on what happened?” do want to make the point that what i don't want to do is castigate a whole american community. we have very good relationship with the american community on that base and we are working with them. we are quite right that the family needs closure and we need to see justice done. whatever that outcome may be. what about how it is impacting on the family? what are their plans, currently. i understand there getting support from the foreign
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office, getting support from dominic raab himself. and from trained officers. we will do all that we can do. giving the support that we can do. giving the support that we can do. and again, will push hard with the american authorities and for the family. nick adderley, chief co nsta ble family. nick adderley, chief constable for northamptonshire police, thank you. borisjohnson will make a series of phone calls to eu leaders today to try to secure support for his brexit plans. he will tell them they have a final opportunity to reach a deal and must compromise to achieve one. the french president, emmanuel macron, has said the eu will decide whether an agreement is possible by the end of the week. the police watchdog has been accused of "shocking failures" for the way it investigated detectives' response to false allegations of a paedophile ring at westminster. retired high courtjudge sir richard henriques — who conducted an independent review of 0peraton midland — says inquiries into scotland yard were "minimal,
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the police watchdog has been accused of "shocking failures" for the way it investigated detectives' response to false allegations of a paedophile ring at westminster. retired high courtjudge sir richard henriques — who conducted an independent review of 0peraton midland — says inquiries into scotland yard were "minimal, unprofessional and flawed". in response, the independent office for police conduct said it carried out a "thorough and detailed investigation". passengers who had their thomas cook holiday cancelled will be able to apply for a refund from today. nearly 400,000 bookings had been made when the operator collapsed two weeks ago. meanwhile, the final flights to bring home stranded holidaymakers abroad when the company went bust will arrive back in the uk this morning. if you haven't caught up on last night's strictly yet — then look away now. movie week was an eventful one for our very own ‘magic‘ mike bushell and his partner katya —
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but despite a couple of missteps, they survived the second vote off of the series and will dance again next week. we'll speak to them both later about what they've got in store. i'm going to support him. i can't wait. a giant fireman ‘s pole. look out. bringing it to bbc breakfast? the best part of strictly on saturday night was, craig said anton did well. there was lots of giggling. he said, i am slightly distracted by your fake fake teeth. that did not go down well. awkward. we got the health secretary shortly. we got the health secretary shortly. we are talking about how it's only october and the mighty have fallen, its early days in the premier league. it was a tricky day yesterday. for both of the manchester clubs. both beaten in the
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premier league. champions city lost 2—0 at home to wolves, whilst united's woeful start to the season continued with defeat to newcastle. joe lynskey reports. in every league season, new faces emerge a new challenges take shape. in manchester this morning, the size of the task feels greater than ever. just two months in, city, the champions, are eight points off the top. they were swept away by wolves, a side who have not won here since the ‘70s. a 2—0 victory was made in wolverhampton and done in liverpool. but city right now have lost their direction. incredible scenes. manchester city opened up in one game. more now than they were in the last season. we're at our best and teamwork, you can see them contact so fast, it was a bad day. we have teams in the premier league so we lost the game. with manchester united, the bad days come more often now.
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at newcastle, their multimillion—pound squad was struck another blow, this time by a teenager. matty longstaff was born in 2000, the year when united had just won the treble but this defeat leaves them 12 and with patience being tested. we are never happy when we don't win games and we are going to a difficult period. our attitude is very good, it's a spot on and they are working hard of course. for newcastle, the goalscorer longstaff was making first league start, doing it alongside his brother sean in midfield and his dad david in the stands. for a family forged on tyneside and a team fighting to stay up, this was proof that faith in the locals still matters. joe lynskey, bbc news. there were premier league wins too yesterday for chelsea and arsenal. a shock too in scotland, where celtic were beaten 2—0 at livingston.
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it's their first league defeat of the season and the first time they've ever lost to livingston. they drop to second in the league, and steve gerrard's rangers go top after they thrashed hamilton 5—0. great britain ended the world atletics championships with five medals — that's their lowest total since 2005. their champiosnhips ended in bizarre fashion too. the women's 4x400 metres relay team thought they'd claimed bronze after third placed jamaica were disqualified. but that decision was overturned on an appeal, so britain were moved back to fourth. sleep to complete a disappointing final day britain's men didn't even finish their 4x400 metres relay, failing to pass on the baton. that was won by the usa, who comfortably topped the medals table. no matches at the rugby world cup today. wales play fiji on wednesday and they've mafde two changes to the side that beat australia last time out. james davies and ross moriarty both start in the back row, in place ofjustin tipuric
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and aaron wainwright. finally to proof that british olympians are always pushing the boundaries — even when they're on holiday. this is british olympic champion jack laugher and some of his diving friends and colleagues using some creative mobile phone work making themselves into avengers. hopefully we see jack and some of the others, too, perhaps, doing the same moves with medals in 12 months' time. quite big fans of the avengers movies. the divers assemble. it's just mesmerising. very impressive. imagine those fellows on holiday. skills wise, it's great. the diving skills are incredible. it took me a long time to work out how they did it. it was early this morning. to be fair, ithink it. it was early this morning. to be fair, i think it would have taken a long time to work out how to do it. we're talking world championship athletics later on. that's returned to our main story. borisjohnson will make a series of phone calls to eu leaders today to try to secure support for his brexit plans. last night, the french president, emmanuel macron, told the prime minister that the eu
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will decide whether an agreement is possible by the end of the week. we're joined now by the health secretary, matt hancock. we've got a change in the way that we see mental health across this country and across society, which is good. mental health is as important as physical health. when you think about the physical health, you think about the physical health, you think about the physical health, you think about the things you need to do to stay healthy. even if you are quite trim. everybody should be thinking about these things. the same is true in mental health of the tools haven't been there to help. so this new tool is about helping everybody, whether you have strong mental
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health or whether you've got a mild problem. or something more significant. to strengthen your mental health. the film about it is being narrated by prince william and prince harry. and the duchesses because they recognise how important it is that everybody positively thinks about their mental health, thinks about their mental health, thinks of it as an asset. i'm delighted this is going out today. i'm sure we will talk to you about that in a bit more detail. we have said this a lot, it's a big week for brexit. having conversations and today as well about trying to secure this deal. quite a few of those eu leaders are talking about the importance of compromise. where are you willing to compromise and where might be the shifting of the sand? i'm not going to go into details of the negotiation, i'm here to talk
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about improving britain's mental health and what we can all do to do that. clearly you've heard some of the news overnight. the brexit secretary was on the bbc yesterday. the prime minister is having conversations with his eu cou nterpa rts conversations with his eu counterparts and i hope we can get a good deal and leave with a deal on the 31st and i think that is doable if the eu are willing to compromise and then we can get onto talking about important things like what we're doing in the nhs to help people stay healthy. it's interesting that from an eu point of view, they still believe despite what was johnson has view, they still believe despite what wasjohnson has been talking about that there was sufficient resort in parliament to prevent an ideal. the prime minister has said to emmanuel macron and we understand that the uk will leave at the end of the month whatever. and i ask you, how that will happen given there is an act of parliament to prevent that. one of the reasons that many,
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many people including people who voted remain like me want to get brexit done it so that instead of every time any government spokesman comes on and minister responsible for another area of policy, having to constantly for another area of policy, having to co nsta ntly a nswer questions for another area of policy, having to constantly answer questions as a commentator on brexit, instead, we can get it done, deliver on the referendum result and then concentrate the public debate on things that really matter. with respect... no, with respect, i've come want to talk about mental health. asked you about that. i've got nothing further to add on brexit. it's quite important. you're a government minister in the point i'm making is, the only way to get things done, is ashley to break the law so i'm asking you, is that the way things are going to happen? i think that is a relevant question. it's a question that iron every other minister has answered, because the answer is low ——no. there are so
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many more things in life than the details of our exit from the eu. i haven't got any further detail to add on that particular question but what i do care about is making sure that this commentary gets the best possible healthcare that i'm responsible for and that we have a public debate that looks at all the other things that matter instead of after one perfunctory question, moving off the subject i'm here to talk about and that i spend my days working on behalf of everybody who needs support across this country. you can keep asking questions about exit, i'm not going to say anything interesting because of got nothing further to add to what's been talked about. what do we talk about something else for a change. if there is an ideal brexit, are you co mforta ble there is an ideal brexit, are you comfortable with healthcare provision in the united kingdom? yes, and we been doing a huge amount of work on that. we got plans in place to deal with all
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eventualities. it's obviously something that's incredibly important to get right and to make sure that we are ready and we have done the work. to make sure that everybody we are we able to get their medicines which is notjust a job the government but also the pharmaceutical industry. we been doing a huge amount of work to make sure that is all in place. we've got about 20 days to go but yes, we will be ready. i understand there is a degree of agitation and you this morning because you are here to talk about health. i asked you about that in many people watching will know thatis in many people watching will know that is an important campaign as well. but many of our viewers can and i'm guessing this might find your agitation slightly strange given this is a big week and this is a huge decision, notjust for the government but to everyone else in this country. it's something everybody is talking about. i'm sure
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you would acknowledge the importance as well so when i ask you about, i know you've been asked before but this is the week that it could, the rubber hits the road, this is the week that that amendment is important to ask you about and you area important to ask you about and you are a government minister, you're involved in these high—level discussions so can i ask you again, why you annoyed that asking you that question when it is a crucial question when it is a crucial question about the government abiding by what parliament had passed and abiding by the law of this country? surely that is releva nt. look, it's relevant. they have been asked to endlessly before. every government minister has been asked it stop the reason i've find it frustrating that after one question about an incredibly important topic that we then go on to brexit, and it is obvious that i'm not going to be saying anything new. we are in the middle of a negotiation. of course i'm not going to be seeing new things. the reason for the frustration is that there is so much more to life. and one of the many
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reasons that we need to get brexit done and move on is so that we can talk about everything else that's happening as well and so that we can have these sorts of discussions and this sort of debate based on a discussion about everything that is going on in public life in this country and everything that is important to people. and instead it just gets focused on. at ijust thought, moving on after one question, on a subject as people as —— rebels mental health, thought it was perfunctory. they thought it was time, instead, that we concentrate asa time, instead, that we concentrate as a country on the broad range of things that matter. of course getting the details of brexit right matters. but that wasn't what this interview is about. what this interview is about. what this interview is about is how we strengthen the mental health of our nation. anything that is extremely important. that is something we have covered throughout the programme as well and we will talk about tonight. thank you very much your time. matt hancock, the health secretary, talking to us about mental health
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and other things this morning on bbc brea kfast. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. it really feels autumnal. and there are some issues are some people. that is right. good morning, everybody. these weather watchers people are from fop st andrew, taken yesterday, where we saw torrential rain. you can see the depth. 40—50 millimetres, two inches fell in six hours and parts of norfolk. there are still two flood warnings in force. there are a fold —— further force. there are a fold —— further for across england. there is more rain on the way. some of us have seen rain on the way. some of us have seen the rain falling through the course of the night across northern ireland and western part of the uk, continuing to drift eastwards. some of that has been heavy. you can see why we have got a couple of weather fronts moving west to east. that is of the story. the squeeze on the high also telling us that is a windy
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day, gales down the irish sea, we have already got gusts of wind 60 across the outer hebrides. the black circles indicate the gust of wind where you are. through this evening and overnight and through the rest of the afternoon, we move from west to east with the rain. still some heavyin to east with the rain. still some heavy in it. as it approaches the south east it will turn lighter and more patchy. and then behind it we are looking at brighter skies and some sunshine coming through. but there will be some showers as well. some of those could be heavy. temperature wise, 11—16. roughly where we should be at the stage in october. there goes the rain. we see the lot of a clearing esanda and the south—east. behind it drier comes our way. we have another array of weather fronts coming in, our way. we have another array of weatherfronts coming in, bringing further showers. if you look at the isobars, once again, telling you it will be windy. gusty winds, particularly in the north—west, anywhere tomorrow could catch a shower, if you do it could be heavy and thundering with some hail. it
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will blow across quite quickly because of the strength of the wind. again, the black circles indicating the gusts. some of us will mist it all together and get away with a dry dough and sunshine. temperatures tomorrow, 12—17. on wednesday it is a similar story tomorrow, 12—17. on wednesday it is a similarstory in tomorrow, 12—17. on wednesday it is a similar story in that there will bea a similar story in that there will be a lot of showers, some of those merging to give long spells of rain. still a blustery day not quite as many as the next two. in between the showers we will see some sunshine. temperatures 11 in the north to 15 in the south a stubborn summary for the week ahead, it is unsettled, heavy downpours of rain or showers, some sunny heavy downpours of rain or showers, some sunny spells, but it is often going to be quite windy. and thank you so much. look at that week ahead. heavy downpours. thank you! sunny spells as well! sorry, carole! two weeks ago the civil aviation authority told us it was hoping to bring the majority of stranded thomas cook passengers home in a fortnight.
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so how have they done? ben's here with more on this one for us. they have done it, pretty much. two weeks ago today we were talking about the just announced collapse of the firm in two weeks later they have got most of those people back. the last flight, actually, and this morning in about 45 minutes it is due in manchester coming from orlando. it will be the final flight for thomas cook, 392 passengers on board. so altogether the civil aviation authority, part of this operation might want to get people back. they brought 140,000 people back. they brought 140,000 people backin back. they brought 140,000 people back in these past two weeks. 94% of them on the day and about the same time they were due to fly back. many people might not have noticed a huge difference. and of course for them it has been about getting them back on time and attention can turn to the next step, which is people who have got a holiday booked in the future. there were about 800,000 passengers who have a holiday booked, about 360,000 bookings, and what they are expecting now is a
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flood of new claims that begin today. you can apply on the website from today to get your money back if you were due to go on holiday. that applies to a lot of people, people like jeff. we were going to cuba, where we have been before. and it was all booked. we were looking forward to it. he had just been and got everything paid. we were ready to pack and go. we were gutted, devastated. she came in and told us. so it on tv. we did not think it was real. was it media or what? we're looking for another holiday, we are trying find something, but everything has gone up in price due to, you know, the demand, i suppose. so we are struggling, really. that is one of the big problems. people find that if they try to rebook, evenif find that if they try to rebook, even if they get the money back, a holiday now is more expensive because there are fewer providers. but today is the day you can start claiming a refund if you were due to
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go on holiday. there is a website and there is a phone number. you can do that directly. it means that you have to approach them. you have got to approach the civil aviation authority. they will not do it automatically for you. the details are on—screen. you need to choose an option on the left—hand side. many of you are saying you cannot find it. it is on the left—hand side. choose your option and fill in your form. there is also a phone call if you need to do it on the phone. but remember you have to do it. it doesn't happen automatically. remember you have to do it. it doesn't happen automaticallym remember you have to do it. it doesn't happen automatically. it is a lot of money. where is that coming from? we have heard a lot about atol over the past few weeks. that is the insurance scheme. every time you book a holiday little bit of money goes into an insurance scheme in case anything goes wrong. the civil aviation authority telling us there is enough money in the fund that will cover it so that any taxpayer money. all the costs covered for all those lights that have brought people back and, as we said, if you need to apply to get your money back do so online or using the phone. thank you.
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good morning if you havejust turned on your tv. after ten days of highs, lows, historic hat—tricks and devastating defeats, the world athletics championships in doha have come to a close. britain finished with five medals, but the spotlight hasn'tjust been on the sporting action, as our sports correspondent natalie pirks reports. it was perhaps fitting for a championships riddled with controversy that britain's night finished in drama. the men's 4x400m relay team couldn't get the baton round and the women's quartet came forth, were briefly bumped to bronze, and then were out of the medals again. it meant the nation fell two medals short of the target, yet it doesn't tell the whole tale. after a handful of fourth places and strong performances — notably from women. sunshine of the track, and assassin on it, dina asher—smith became the first british athlete to win three medals at the same championship and became a world champion to boot. it's dina asher—smith! she's the champion. yeah, i don't know what to say. i don't think it's properly sunk in.
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but i dreamt of this, but it's real now. katarina johnson—thompson came to doha like a woman reborn. this stadium now forever etched in the memory as the scene of her greatest heptathlon victory. that's an excellent run — 30.08! it actually felt like a dream and the lights and everything. it has been unbelievable and i can't believe this is the result. world athletics is in a very healthy state and british athletics is very much a part of that. you know, we have gold medallists here, we have finalists here, and that means that we're punching with the rest of the world. well, the performances have been fantastic, but as always there have been plenty of issues organisers to deal with. the atmosphere tonight is amazing, but it hasn't always been this way. when dina asher—smith made history last weekend, the lack of crowds was a depressing sight. the humidity was also an issue, a third of the starters in the women's marathon, held at midnight, failed to finish.
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when the news fell that mo farah's former coach, alberto salazar, had been banned for four years for doping offences, it hung over the stadium like a dark cloud, shrouding his star athletes who'd done nothing wrong. and human rights were high on the agenda, with the governing body defending the decision to hold the championships here. i passionately believe that sport can shine a spotlight on so many issues that other areas of the world simply do not want to address. the decision to bring the championships here — there were far more negatives than there were positives. think it was a mistake and i think most of the fans and athletes say the same thing. with a world cup looming, lessons have undoubtedly been learned by qatar. and as the curtain goes down in the first world championships in the middle east, britain's gaze can turn further east, to the tokyo olympics, with some optimism. natalie pirks, bbc news, doha. our wonderful gold—medallists.
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our wonderful gold-medallists. don't forget we have bushel on the way in about an hour talking about getting through to next week and the pole. and falling over. time now to get the news, travel, and weather where you are. good morning. i'm asad ahmad. climate change protestors from the group extinction rebellion have gathered at marble arch in central london overnight — following a weekend of police arrests. the group brought parts of the city to a stand still in april as part of a peaceful, but disruptive, protests against climate change. but the government has told the group that any further protests could alienate them from the public and lose them support. research by the bbc shows most of the 20 worst boroughs for serious knife crime are in the london, although incidents are actually rising faster outside the capital. the highest recorded rate was in westminster, particularly in the west end, where more robberies are being reported where knives are used. the head of the metropolitan police says officers are doing their best to tackle the problem.
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some parts of london have, as everybody knows, over the years, have been really troubled by violence. and it's ourjob to work with the local public there and everybody else to reduce violence. that's what we intend to do. it's been my number one priority, it remains my number one priority. after 20 years, the london motor cycle museum in greenford will have its doors closed this morning — as is has permanently shut due to rising rents. the museum has a unique collection of motorbikes, which date back over a hundred years. ealing council had subsidised the museum for a number of years but it says it can longer afford to do so. a collection of bikes will be auctioned later this month. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube board, the 0verground is severe delays between gospel oak and barking — late running engineering.
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it has just changed to minor delays. on the roads, the m25 has queues anticlockwise from j3 swanley through to the dartford tunnel because of a broken down lorry. very frustrating for drivers. in putney, west hill closed westbound due to emergency gas works with delays through wandsworth. in twickenham, there's a lane closed eastbound after hospital bridge roundabout — an earlier accident. now the weather with kate. good morning. it's a mild start out there this morning. there might be a little bit of brightness at first, perhaps in the east, but the cloud will thicken throughout the morning and then the rain arrives as we head through the afternoon. so the brightness first thing in the east, you might see a little bit of sunshine before that cloud rolls through. and then the rain. quite a blustery day, the winds strengthening and the rain heavy at times, especially as we head into the rush hour this evening. temperatures getting up to around 14 or 15 celsius. now, overnight tonight, still quite wet to start with this evening, but the rain will clear away it was, the cloud following of as well. and behind the clear skies. the minimum temperature similar to last night, at around 11 or 12 celsius.
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on tuesday, a lovely bright start, dry at least at first, but we're likely to see some pretty heavy showers through the course of tuesday. you may even hear a rumble or two of thunder. a touch warmer tomorrow, 17 celsius. a cooler day for wednesday, but drier and just a little bit brighter. va nessa vanessa feltz is on bbc radio two london and she will be speaking to someone good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today... pressure on the us over the american diplomat‘s wife implicated in the death of a teenager in a car crash. northamptonshire's chief constable demands her return to the uk. borisjohnson's brexit deadline — the french president tells him the eu will decide by the end
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of this week whether a deal can happen. the hidden condition affecting hundreds of thousands of women the uk. mps launch an investigation into the debilitating impact of endometriosis. the final thomas cook passengers return home this morning, two weeks after the holiday giant collapsed. and from today you can claim refunds for cancelled holidays. i'll explain what you need to do. misery for manchester in the premier league. champions city lose 2—0 at home to wolves, whilst manchester united are beaten by newcastle. movie week was an eventful one for our very own ‘magic‘ mike bushell and his partner katya n strictly — we'll speak to them both later about everything that happened. some of us had torrential rain over the weekend especially yesterday. many of us are starting on a dry note this morning. but a weather
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front is moving in to the east starting with heavy rain and showers. it's monday the 7th of october. our top story. pressure is growing on american authorities to return a diplomat‘s wife who police want to question about a fatal traffic accident. 19—year—old harry dunn died after his motorbike was hit by a car in northamptonshire. the suspect, named as anne sacoolas, left the uk despite telling police she did not plan to go. simon jones has more. harry dunn's parents say they have been trapped in a living nightmare since their son's death. he was killed along this road in northamptonshire near the us air force base that was home to a 42—year—old woman being treated as a suspect in the case. the wife of a diplomat, she has left the uk despite telling the police she did not plan to. she is understood to be called anne sacoolas, though this has not been confirmed by the police. from mum to mum, knowing or believing that she is a mother,
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i wouldn't want to think that she put herself on that plane to go home to avoid what she's done, because i couldn't live with myself. the chief constable of northamptonshire police, nick adderley, has now intervened, saying on twitter: . my optimism is not high. i said that in the letter. it's a privilege that can be exercised. i understand the political sensitivity around that in terms of protection for diplomats around the country, but it won't stop us trying because it's the right thing to do. it's an appeal echoed by harry dunn's mother. we're not out to get her put behind bars. if that's what the justice system ends up doing, then we can't stop that but we're not out to do that. we're out to try and get some peace for ourselves. the us state department says it's
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in close consultation with british officials and any request will be considered carefully but immunity is rarely removed. it's offered its deepest sympathies to harry dunn's family. simon jones, bbc news. borisjohnson will make a series of phone calls to eu leaders today to try to secure support for his brexit plans. he will tell them they have a final opportunity to reach a deal and must compromise to achieve one. the french president, emmanuel macron, has said the eu will decide whether an agreement is possible by the end of the week. well, how might those phone calls be received in europe? our brussels reporter adam fleming joins us now. i'm not sure who he will call because we haven't received a list yet but the most important one that happened yesterday was with emmanuel macron, the french president. to make interesting bits of information that you just explain, first of all, the idea of a deadline. there has to be progress by friday of this week if that is to be a deal to be signed
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at the next summit of eu leaders on the 17 october. nobody here thinks that will happen. they think that's very, very unlikely. the other point he made was that negotiations happen between the uk negotiating team and you delete met eu negotiating team led by michel barnier. that's dropping a big hint to borisjohnson that calling round eu leaders, that will not work. in terms of the process , will not work. in terms of the process, the two sides are still asking each other questions and laying out positions. they haven't got to the stage where they are sitting round a table with a detailed text of a potential treaty. that has not happened yet. the reason it hasn't happened is because the uk thinks it is compromised by tweaking its plans. the eu says that they are not willing to accept yet, and it all comes down to this idea of making a pledge by both sides never to have a border on the island
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of ireland, but the eu says they wa nt of ireland, but the eu says they want a lot more detail from the of ireland, but the eu says they want a lot more detailfrom the uk about what sort of checks they do on products going into northern ireland that could end up in the eu before they sign up to that pledge. that's basically what it's all about. adam, good to talk. passengers who had their thomas cook holiday cancelled will be able to apply for a refund from today. nearly 400,000 housand bookings had been made when the world's oldest tour operator collapsed two weeks ago. the final flight bringing home stranded holidaymakers will arrive back in manchester in the next half an hour. the civil aviation authority says its attention will now turn to people who are owed money. its 360,000 forward bookings, atol protected bookings, encompassing many thousands of individuals. it's a huge undertaking. the key thing is for people to go to our website, at thomas cook dot caa, dot co—dot uk,
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and they will find all the details they need for filling in the form. any valid form that we receive, we are aiming to pay out within 60 days. the police watchdog has been accused of "shocking failures" for the way it investigated detectives' response to false allegations of a paedophile ring at westminster. retired high courtjudge sir richard henriques — who conducted an independent review of 0peraton midland — says inquiries into scotland yard were "minimal, unprofessional and flawed". in response, the independent office for police conduct said it carried out a "thorough and detailed investigation". senior members of the royal family are spearheading a new campaign, aimed at helping people to spot the early signs of poor mental health. princes william and harry, and their wives, catherine and meghan, are narrating a short film which will be broadcast on tv this evening. katharine da costa reports. i didn't really know what to do. i think ijust kept it in and kept it in until people started noticing
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that something wasn't right. 27—year—old cher struggled with depression and anxiety after suffering a miscarriage two years ago. she finds exercise helps to boost her mood and now shares her worries with friends and family but at the time she says she felt utterly lost. i kind of opened up and for me, that was a big thing because it's really hard to open up about mental health but once you do open up, you feel like part of you is relieved, basically. cher is not alone. a survey by yougov found eight in ten people have experienced early signs of stress, anxiety or trouble sleeping in the last 12 months. over a quarter of people waited at least six months before getting help while three quarters of those wished they'd done so sooner. everyone knows that feeling. when life gets on top of us. a number of celebrities and members of the royal family have previously spoken publicly
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about their own battles with mental health. personalised advice and information, from improved sleep to exercise and meditation as well as details of who to call in an emergency. the royal college of psychiatrists says it's a useful resource but warns it doesn't address the needs of patients with more severe mental illnesses and with one in ten psychiatric posts unfilled, it says there's an urgency to meet the needs of the most vulnerable. katherine da costa, bbc news. it's often described as a hidden epidemic, one that affects 176 million people across the world. endometriosis is a condition that can affect women from their teenage years and causes intense pain. more than 13,000 who suffer from it in the uk have shared their experiences with the bbc. they say it has badly affected their education, careers, relationships and mental health. following the research,
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mps are today launching an inquiry into its impact. broadcaster emma barnett has been speaking about living with the condition. i was in agony. my periods could be very heavy, they could be lighter, but the one constant theme was how much pain i was in. i mean, it was bone grinding. and yet when i went to see doctors with my mum, they would say, "this is whatjust some girls have." you are listening to emma barnett on 5live... as someone who often interviews politicians, i get answers for a living, or i try my very best, i had failed to get answers from doctors and i saw all sorts of doctors over the years. i didn't know until the age of 31 i had endometriosis. i'd gone 21 years without diagnosis.
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endometriosis is a condition in women where cells that represent like the womb lining, that should leave your body during a period, don't, and instead, they stay within your body and attach themselves to different organs, building up lesions and causing really difficult pain for women. in the largest study of its kind, the bbc has spoken to more than 13,000 women with endometriosis. nearly all said it had affected their career, sexual relationships and mental health. around half said it impacted their ability to have children. and half said it led to suicidal thoughts. i'm going off to meet mum and daughter victoria and jessica who both have endometriosis. i think people just think it's a painful period. "oh, shut up, it's a painful period, get on with it." i wish it was a painful period and i had it once a month but we live with pain every day. depression is a massive part
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of endometriosis as well. it has been for us. i've been on antidepressants since i was 17, which is the same time i was diagnosed. at its worst, how bad has endometriosis affected you? it affects everything. everything. i've been so poorly recently, i've been at home, not being able to go to college and even at home, i can't do anything and i'm exhausted every single day. has it brought you closer, do you think? yes, because we understand each other. i have really good friends and i can speak to them and say i'm really struggling today but no—one really understands like someone who is going through it, just like you can understand how much pain i am in right now but my friends don't. they don't have to live like this. the same number of people have the condition in this country as type 2 diabetes and we know next to nothing and how to treat it. it's seen to be embarrassing
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to talk about it. i didn't think i'd ever come on national television and talk about my bowels, but, hey!. i did it with you! it's heartbreaking to have spoken to victoria and jessica about essentially living this joint life in agony but it really reinforces to me how important it is that if you recognise any of these symptoms, that you go to the gp and get a referral to a specialist, that you fight for treatment and for a better existence. a big thank you to victoria and jessica for taking part in that. and emma joins us now, alongside andrew horne, professor of gynaecology at the university of edinburgh. you have brought a resident expert. thank you. from what little i knew about it beforehand, it seems to me that women arejust about it beforehand, it seems to me that women are just not talking about this. it's one of those taboo women arejust not about this. it's one of those taboo women are just not talking about. it's because it's to do with
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periods. i did dress like my period today to blend in with your sofa! but it isn't abnormal. what is abnormal is the level of pain endometriosis leaves you with. there will be women watching this, and men living with women right now, who are just not coping. what's even worse is, and no offence to my esteemed expert here, when they go to the doctors they are in a situation where for the first few times, because it takes an average of seven and a half years to be diagnosed, they are told to take painkillers, asi they are told to take painkillers, as i was. wire wanted to help raise awareness today, is that to those women watching this, don't accept pain as your lot. women and pain don't have to go together like bread and butter. you have to advocate for yourself and fight for a better life. you spent many years in painful stop at what point did you think something is not quite right here. this is more than normal, this is debilitating. my husband and i
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we re is debilitating. my husband and i were trying for a baby. we were on holiday. i was having natural periods, i was not having hormone treatment, which is often recommended to deal with this. i was off the pill. we were walking in stockholm in sweden on holiday and i just collapsed. i felt like chains we re just collapsed. i felt like chains were dragging me down and i couldn't walk a single step further. professor, picking up on that thought, you talk about pain and the rest of it. so many women out there will be used to it. when does the alert happen and when do we know that this is not normal?” alert happen and when do we know that this is not normal? i think that's a very good question, and what we tend to say to women is any pain that is interfering with your quality of life, so if it means you are not going out to social activities, if you are not able to study or work, if it affects your relationships, then that pain is not normal and that's when you should go and seek help and advice. what really concerns me, you say the average is
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really concerns me, you say the average is seven really concerns me, you say the average is seven and a half years to be diagnosed. that seems extraordinary. emma has touched on this, it is largely because of lack of awareness. people may be thought the pain was normal, they have been told the pain is normal and they have not looked for help. they have gone for help and may be their gp has not picked up on the diagnosis. it can be confused with other pain conditions so it is difficult to diagnose. but the big thing is we do not have a simple test that can diagnose a blood test. as emma said, you have to have keyhole surgery to actually formally make the diagnosis. but we have to be referred to a gynaecologist by a gp who can then do the specialist surgery. who can then do the specialist surgery. it is not a diagnostic test like a saliva or blood test. gps now have to start saying, if it's to do with this amazing factory that is within you as a woman, it could be anything. it could be polycystic ovaries. you have to go to a specialist. i might be asking an
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ignorant question, not so much taking it back to endometriosis, why is it so painful and what is happening in the body? endometriosis is when you get tissue from the lining of the womb that can go outside of the womb. it can go to the pelvis, the bowel or bladder. if you imagine the tissue, the lining of the womb, gets stimulated by the hormones from the ovaries and causes inflammation and local bleeding and that in itself is how we think it causes pain, but it is very complicated and we don't fully understand whole story. it is so frustrating. there will be women tuning in this morning who think they have got it, but, no disrespect, you know i am a huge admirer of your work and what you do, but you in the medical profession still don't know. the same number of people have endometriosis as type two diabetes. and we know a lot about managing symptoms for people with diabetes. but we don't know what causes
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endometriosis and we don't know how to cu re endometriosis and we don't know how to cure it. you have tojust endometriosis and we don't know how to cure it. you have to just sort of figure it out. i'm going through a very bad phase of it at the moment andi very bad phase of it at the moment and i don't know how to manage it. this is why awareness campaigns and surveys like this are so important because the conditions you talk to that we know about have had lots of money thrown at them to try to improve the care and understand causes and improve treatments. we need much more research funding to try to understand it better.” need much more research funding to try to understand it better. i would also hammer home the point. i have written a whole book about periods because of the taboo of it. women also have to go and ask for help. when they are believed, which is another point i was making, but not just accept this is how they have to live. i didn't advocate strongly enough for myself and i am embarrassed by that now which is why i want to talk about it. and you we re i want to talk about it. and you were sleepwalking your way into infertility because of it as well. it isa infertility because of it as well. it is a mad phrase that trips off my
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tongue now, but it's incredibly grave when you think about it. i say it with huge awareness that i have been one of the very lucky ones to have had ivf and it worked and we have had ivf and it worked and we have a little boy and i couldn't be more grateful but i did not know i had this condition until i started trying for a baby. if i hadn't met someone trying for a baby. if i hadn't met someone at that point and hadn't started trying, the condition gets worse. i was lucky that it hasn't gone into my fallopian tubes and ovaries. it was just hanging around my bow, which isjoyous! one of those lovely symptoms we were talking about with the guests. but theissue talking about with the guests. but the issue is, knowledge is power. for 21 yea rs the issue is, knowledge is power. for 21 years i did not know i had anything and i might have made different life choices. you say you are still managing it. has the diagnosis changed things?” are still managing it. has the diagnosis changed things? i had the operation which lasers it out, the cells that cause the pain, we don't quite understand. sadly i still have pain afterwards. some women are pain—free for a while. but it
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allowed me to get ivf because i wasn't doing well at doing things naturally. right now i would say i have to think about whether i will look at hormonal treatment, having tried things like the coil, but i am nervous about putting that into my system but it can work very well. i have to perform for a living. if i can't do that then i can't work. thinking further down the line, will i have an early menopause? will i have to have an hysterectomy? because i have other conditions as well. but let's not get into that. the first port of call is, if you have issues, go to your gp. and push, advocate. thank you both for speaking to us. and let us know what you think about that this morning because we will try to make time to read comments later and emma will deal with this on your radio 5 live
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show later this morning. and autumn is here. let's have a look. not looking great out there in sa lfo rd. look. not looking great out there in salford. let's find out what is happening with carol kirkwood. this is glasgow. not the finest of days in glasgow. time for the rest of the day's whether and what the next few days look like. judging by the picture, not great! this is actually the picture from yesterday and you can see the flooding we had in a very short amount of time in norfolk. and we have pictures to show how bad it was. you can see the car going through there and the depth of the water. parts of norfolk with 40—50 millimetres of rainfall falling in six hours. there are still two flood warnings in east anglia this
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morning. those are issued by the environment agency. across england there are a further four. six in england altogether. and more rain today. some of us have already seen the rain, pushing out of northern ireland, moving across parts of scotland, england and moving away from wales just now. courtesy of these weather fronts. looking at the spacing of the isobars, looking at gusty winds today. the rain has not reached some eastern areas yet and for some of us we started off with a beautiful sunrise. this is a time—lapse picture from london and you can see the sunrise and a bit of cloud around. don't be full, if you are stepping out, it will rain later. the black circles indicate wind gusts. gusty winds currently around the outer hebrides, the irish sea. around the outer hebrides, the irish sea. wherever you are around the band of rain it will be gusty. you can see the rain moving in the direction of east anglia and the south—east through the morning and
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some of us already have it. behind it, brighter skies, sunny spells and showers. some of the showers could be heavy. temperatures almost exactly where they should be at this stage in october, 11—16. through this evening and overnight, the back edge of the rain clearing. some clearer skies behind it. with this low— pressure clearer skies behind it. with this low—pressure nearby we still have weather fronts bringing showers and isobars telling us it will be windy again. tomorrow, we still have some sunny spells to look forward to but equally a lot of showers. you could catch a shower almost anywhere tomorrow. still quite gusty winds, in the black circles. in between the showers there will be some sunshine and it is worth mentioning that with showers, not all of us will catch one. some of us could stay dry all day. temperatures of 12 in the north and 17 in the south. on wednesday, still a lot of showers and they are merging to give longer spells of
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rain. wind not quite a strong but still a blustery day with sunny spells here and there. top temperature of 15. in summary, the outlook remaining unsettled. heavy downpours, be it rain or showers. some sunny spells, not a complete wash—out, but it will often be windy. studio: thank you for those sunny spells that you find! let's take a look at today's front pages. the daily express says a ‘defiant‘ borisjohnson has warned the french president, emmanuel macron, that the uk will leave the eu at the end of the month. a no—deal brexit could lead to shortages of vital drugs, according to the mirror, which reports the view of medical experts who are warning about treatment for patients with cancer and epilepsy. also a moving series of interviews with vinniejones as well. the guardian says data belonging to thousands of people is being held on a "secret" counter—terror database. the paper's front page
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also features a photo of dina asher—smith, holding her medals after a successful world athletics championships in doha. we will speak about that with sally shortly. and finally, the daily star reports that the family of a man who took his own life after appearing on thejeremy kyle show are calling for footage and documents relating to steve dymond to be released by itv. and lots of strictly on the front pages as well. in about half an hour we will hopefully speak to mike and katya. this might be the fall. mike, ever the gentleman, trying to look after her. apparently she screams, go on and finish it! and then she fell over again. that was a bit more theatrical. they will be here on brea kfast, theatrical. they will be here on breakfast, as they are every monday talking us through what will happen next. do you know what dance it will be? i know what he is dancing to but i think it might be a secret. don't
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tell us then. lots of people trying to get tickets for glastonbury 2020 yesterday, it sold out in 34 minutes. i tried to get tickets for a popular singer and they sold out in 0.2 seconds. i am exaggerating but i must have pressed go within two seconds and they were all gone. 34 minutes i think, you were lucky! they have done well there, really. asian hornets. we occasionally talk about the killer asian hornets, the ones that decapitate honeybees and then take the bodies back to their nests. they have discovered quite a few nests that have been wiped out in the uk. they brought in the dudes in theirfull in the uk. they brought in the dudes in their full regalia to get them. i didn't realise that they came in backin didn't realise that they came in back in 2004. they were mistakenly brought in to france in a container of chinese pottery from east asia and that's how they got into europe. watch out for them, they have yellow
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legs and they are very dangerous. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. just when you thought it couldn't rain even more, we had a huge amount of rainfall falling yesterday, particularly across norfolk and suffolk. that led onto some flooding issues. that's the scene that we had in norfolk yesterday. through today there's more rain in the forecast. it's all moving its way in from these weather fronts, linked into this quite deep area of low pressure that is moving its way gradually towards iceland.
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the rain is quite heavy this morning across western areas, accompanied by a strong wind. these are the winter gusts. just take note of the west of scotland, up to 60 mph here, but widely 35 to 45 mph wind gusts. that rain is going to move its way gradually eastwards towards east anglia and the south—east of england. you will see that rain this afternoon. it is quite slow moving so for many central areas that rain will last for much of the day. in wales, through scotland and northern ireland, things brightening up this afternoon with a few sunny spells here and temperatures about 12 to 16 celsius, around about the average really for the time of year. tonight that rain will clear away from the south—east. there will be some showers moving their way in from these western areas. that is all linked in with more weather fronts which are moving their way in. and all still associated with this area of low pressure that is moving ever closer towards iceland. the focus of the showers during tuesday across scotland and northern ireland, bands of showers moving to the south—east.
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those showers could be heavy, maybe even thundery at times on tuesday. and again it's going to be windy. these are the wind gusts. 30 to 40 mph quite widely. up to 50 or 60 mph wind gusts in northern parts. temperatures around about the mid to the high teens. for the rest of the week, it remains quite unsettled. some showers again on wednesday before further spells of rain and some strengthening winds for the end of the week. certainly into the weekend. so rain for many of us certainly at some point throughout the week. goodbye.
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this is worklife from bbc news, with sally bundock and david eades. the sustainability drive by big business steps up a gear but is it enough? live from london, that's our top story on monday 7th october. the company behind persil, dove, pot noodles and marmite, unilever, pledges to halve its use of new plastics in just six years. we have spoken to the

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