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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 8, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: pressure grows on the us government over its refusal to waive immunity for a diplomat‘s wife, who fled the uk after a fatal car crash. we'll speak to the family of 19—year—old harry dunn, who was killed. the prime minister brands extinction rebellion protestors "uncooperative crusties" as he calls on them to stop blocking london's streets. grammy and emmy award winner, harry connickjr will be here to tell us how he's recreating musical classics
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from the great american songbook. dealing with its debt — restaurant chain pizza express calls in advisors over its £1 billion debt, ahead of crunch talks with its lenders. andy murray's remarkable comeback from injury continues. it's confirmed that he'll play singles at the australian in january, it'll be his first singles appearance at a grand slamoa it'll be his first singles appearance at a grand slam since major hip surgery. sunshine and showers today but loving through quite quickly on a gusty wind. i will have more in 15 minutes. it's tuesday 8th october. our top story: the foreign secretary dominic raab has called on his us counterpart, mike pompeo, to allow a diplomat‘s wife to return to the uk and face police questions about a fatal traffic accident. 19—year—old harry dunn died in august after his motorbike was hit by a car near raf croughton,
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in northamptonshire, a military base used by the us air force. the main suspect, named as anne sacoolas, has left the uk and is protected from prosecution by diplomatic immunity. ben ando reports. a tragedy on this english country road that is spiralling into a diplomatic incident between britain and the united states. 19—year—old harry dunn died when his motorbike was struck by a car driven on the wrong side. now dominic raab has raised the issue with mike pompeo. the car was being driven by anne sacoolas, seen here on her wedding day 16 years ago. the wife of a diplomat working at this military base. i would like to think that, as a mum, she would at least try to put herself in a position and just wave
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the immunity herself and come and see us. the immunity herself and come and see us. i think that's about the only hope we have got. anne sacoolas it's back at home in this neighbourhood near washington, dc. immunity can be waived, last year, the husband of a british diplomat in new york was arrested and charged with domestic violence, with the agreement of the government here. now, say harry dunn's family to even that score. further details have emerged of the european union's objections to british proposals for changes to the irish backstop in the brexit negotiations. a major concern centres on an article which says neither side would introduce checks on the border between northern ireland and ireland. we'll hear from our correspondent, chris page, in dublin in a moment, but first let's speak to our political correspondent, nick eardley, who is in westminster for us this morning.
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give us more details on those concerns. the big worry that europe has is, surprise surprise, over plans for the irish fodder. the new ones borisjohnson set out about plans for the irish fodder. the new ones boris johnson set out about a week ago. they are getting into the nitty—gritty and there is a big problem emerging over the idea that you would have no checks on the border between northern ireland and the republic after the uk leaves but a vote every four years on whether they wanted to continue, basically a veto. more concerns yesterday and in europe has said they think it takes way too much control when it comes to the european single market. the view from the uk government is very much to put the ideas on the table and talk about concerns and tried to
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move forward with negotiations but there is no show at the moment of negotiations moving forward and there is only ten days until boris johnson was hoping europe might signoff on a new deal. things have not been moving as fast as the prime minister wanted. at the moment, it is not looking good. meanwhile, ireland's finance minister will unveil a no—deal brexit budget today. the plans will outline how irish firms will be kept afloat if the uk leaves the eu in a "chaotic manner". our ireland correspondent, chris page, is in dublin for us this morning. what more can you tell us about these plans? in any capital city, these plans? in any capital city, the budget is a big particular event but this is the budget date in ireland with ireland most economically expose with the effects
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of brexit administers abasing their plans for the next financial year with the assumption the uk will leave the european union without a deal. that is their worse—case scenario. in those circumstances, 50,000 jobs could be lost, they might have to borrow more than what they would ideally like to and there isa they would ideally like to and there is a question of support for businesses, the agri— food sector and business is particularly vulnerable and at the main business lobby here says more than £1 billion will be needed over three years in order to get those business particularly at risk through the rocky period. the finance minister will also have an eye on his domestic agenda. a general election set to take place next year. he
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would hope that message would go out to other capital cities that ireland does not want a no—deal but if it happened they will be ready. president trump has defended his decision to pull us troops out of northern syria, but repeated his warning to turkey not to take advantage of the withdrawal. mr trump said he would "decimate" its economy, if ankara took actions he considered to be "off limits". turkey says it's completed preparations for a possible military operation in northern syria, warning that it could start at any time. police have arrested 280 people in london, as environmental campaign group extinction rebellion, begin their latest protest against climate change. key sites in london have been blocked including whitehall, horse guards parade and the mall, with some activists chaining themselves to vehicles and railings. the demonstrations are set to continue for the next two weeks, with protestors calling for urgent government action to reduce carbon emissions.
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the protests aren't just confined to london, up to 60 cities around the world are taking part over the next two weeks. yesterday, campaigners in new york drenched wall street in fake blood. traffic was blocked in the centre of madrid. and over 100 people were arrested in amsterdam, after setting up a campsite on a main road. just after 7:00, we'll speak to an extinction rebellion campaigner. and at 8:10, the metropolitan police will outline their plans on dealing with the protests. let us know what you think about that protest. do you support it? are you worried about issues it is causing the people in those cities? police in western germany have arrested the driver of a stolen lorry, which crashed into several vehicles in the city of limburg, injuring at least 16 people. witnesses said the driver accelerated before ramming into cars that had stopped at traffic lights. police have not yet determined whether the crash was deliberate
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or an accident. a flotilla has arrived in new zealand to commemorate the 250 years since captainjames cook first visited the country. the boats include a reproduction of the british ship endeavour, which set sailfrom the yorkshire port of whitby, and landed in new zealand in 1769. events to celebrate the milestone have been met by demonstrations from several maori groups protesting over the treatment of indigenous people under the subsequent colonial rule. sally is here with a look at the sport. andy murray with news coming out of australia is that andy murray's recovering is cracking on ata murray's recovering is cracking on at a marvellous pace. he will play singles at the australian open, the first time since major hip surgery
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that he plays a single in a grand slam. he is through to the second round in shanghai. lots of speculation about the future of the manchester united manager old gunner solskjaer this morning. united are on a really poor run — their worst start to a league season for 30 years. they play liverpool next, and some reports suggest that solskjaer could be sacked if they lose that one badly. a tropical storm could affect scotland or ireland's chances of progressing at the rugby world cup. typhoon hagibis is heading for the southern islands of japan where both teams are due to play this weekend ireland are due to meet samoa on saturday. if that game's called off it could be called a draw — and that would see ireland at risk of going out. are you doing the weather! don't tell carol, she will be whelled
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cross! —— whelled cross. wales are aiming to stay on track for a first appearance at a major women's football tournament. they take on belarus tonight in qualifying for euro 2021 in england. the storms are very unpredictable andi the storms are very unpredictable and i know carol is already aware. loads of teams needing bonus points to make sure they get through to the final stages. you need to play. will you hang around for the papers. hello. good morning. you hang around for the papers. hello. good morninglj you hang around for the papers. hello. good morning. iwas intrigued by the way all news. that's coming up by the way all news. that's coming up shortly. —— whale. the daily mail leads with the headline, "face justice for my son". the paper carries quotes from charlotte charles, mother of harry dunn, who is calling on the wife of a us diplomat to return to the uk and answer questions about the events which led
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to the death of her son. the times, meanwhile, says the us has been accused of "double standards and a betrayal of the special relationship" for refusing to waive diplomatic immunity. the picture is of an extinction rebellion protestor in trafalgar square yesterday. the guardian leads on brexit with a warning from the economic research group, the institute for fiscal studies, which claims tax cuts and higher spending are needed to offset a no—deal brexit. it features a photo of stephanie arcuri, the us businesswoman embroiled in a row over her connections to borisjohnson when he was mayor of london. children's lives are being "wrecked by obsessions fuelled by technology", reports the daily telegraph. the paper carries quotes from one nhs chief who says tech companies are "cashing in" on "disorders caused by gaming and social media", leaving the nhs to "pick up the pieces". the paper also has a picture of protestors involved in the extinction rebellion marches in london yesterday. i think ithinki i think i said stephanie but it is jennifer arcuri. it is definitely
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jennifer. i think sally should go first because r. to log yesterday andl first because r. to log yesterday and i took up all her time. he did. —— because i talked to long yesterday. i apologised. —— because i talked to long yesterday. iapologised. i —— because i talked to long yesterday. i apologised. iwant —— because i talked to long yesterday. iapologised. iwant to show you this in the telegraph. plays for chelsea, do you remember, three years ago, this picture. costa, with a broken nose. in training, he broke his nose. there was some chat about how he did it. had to play with a mask on. it was in fact his teammate who broke his nose. went into school the next day and discovered what he did and
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anyway, he has been picked for england. it did not hinder his career england. it did not hinder his career in any way. go on, you go next... i have got more. you are building this up too much. good morning. yesterday we told you a lot about the website to claim your refund from thomas cook launched yesterday but, surprise surprise, the website cannot handle all the demand. about 800,000 people affected, 360,000 bookings to be refunded. some have been done already but nonetheless, the caa said to persevere because of the site will work you might have to try a couple of times. a humpback mail spotted in the thames. lots of people on social media taking picture. —— whale. seen yesterday.
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a p pa re ntly picture. —— whale. seen yesterday. apparently they have been high tides. it is fed that it could end up tides. it is fed that it could end up in tides. it is fed that it could end upina tides. it is fed that it could end up in a shallow waters. —— feared. divers are on standby at the moment. hopefully, it will decide it has made a navigational error and it will hand in the other direction. on continued animal news, pigzilla is the headline here. these are bred in china, up to the size of a polar bear, and 79 stone. there has been a shortage of pork because of swine flu so they are breathing these giant pegs in an attempt to sort of
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feel the pork gap —— giant pigs.|j was lucky to see this little chap. it is the first eastern bongos to be born ina it is the first eastern bongos to be born in a zoo in more than 11 years. it is in chester zoo and i've seen it, and it's absolutely — its ears are absolutely enormous for its head and it's absolutely gorgeous. an eastern bongo? henry winter in the telegraph, sorry, the times today. saying one of these men is going to have to be the next england manager. if you look at the golden generation of players, you wouldn't have picked either of those as manager, stephen gerard, perhaps not outgoing enough to bea gerard, perhaps not outgoing enough to be a manager, and how times have changed, both doing really well in their jobs. changed, both doing really well in theirjobs. thank you very much both for sharing so nicely. carol has
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already talked to us about the wind, what is going on this morning? yes, ican what is going on this morning? yes, i can sort you does not i can talk to you a lot about the wind now because we're talking about typhoon hagibis. this is because it is to take. the japanese met agency have categorised it as a violin typhoon. if this was in the atlantic, it would be a category five hurricane so would be a category five hurricane $03 would be a category five hurricane so a massive beast. and as it approaches, we think south honshu. but still a lot to play for. don't be full, it will still have a 103 mile an hour sustained speed, and severe gusts. it is likely to deposit 300 — 500 millimetres of rainfall but will weaken as it makes its way the islands. this is a home, what we have today is a windy day, nothing like that, though. it is going to be wet at times. we are
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looking at showers for the rest of this week. low pressure is going to be dominating the weather over the next few days, you can see from this guitar string —like isobar array that it guitar string —like isobar array thatitis guitar string —like isobar array that it is going to be windy. so we are handing onto these yellows, the wind is coming from the south—west. temperatures will be roughly where they should be at this time in october. some of us we are starting ona drainer, october. some of us we are starting on a drainer, a sony note as well, but a lot of showers coming in from the west —— starting on a dry note, a sony note. some of the showers are merging together, indicating the kind of dusting you can expect. strongest in the north—west. temperatures 11—17. if you get out of the wind, out of those showers, it won't feel too bad. as we had on through the evening and overnight
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period, we will have a lot of showers. still lots of gusty winds, blowing from the west towards these as we go through the night. temperature—wise, perhaps down a touch, but nonetheless we not expecting any issues with fog authorised, there is too much wind around for either. —— fog authorised. low pressure is still the dominant feature, you can see it to the north of scotland. once again we will see further showers. those showers good form anywhere. once again, looking at some of the merging to give heavier downpours. we could see some haylen season thunder —— see some haylen here some thunder —— see some haylen here some thunder as well. temperatures ranging from 11 in the north to 15 as we sweep down towards the south. on wednesday into thursday, we still have low pressure dominating. this weather front is giving us a wee bit ofa weather front is giving us a wee bit of a headache. we'll see some rain coming in from the west across northern parts of the uk, as we come
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further south, something drier and brighter, but still one or two showers, and the other thing is it isn't going to be as windy as the next couple of days. temperatures 10-18, next couple of days. temperatures 10—18, so you can see the trend. it's just a little bit warmer, especially so in the south. that leads us into the weekend, and once again, well, the weekend balls looking a bit unsettled. we will still have some showers, we will still have some showers, we will still see some rain, but in between there will also be some sunshine. back to you. thank you very much. sally was doing a bit of a weather report, stealing your thunder, quite literally. no, that is 'snowjoke'. never take on curra with weather —based jokes —— carol. thousands of climate change activists around the world are taking part in a two week protest, calling for urgent government action to reduce carbon emissions.
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an event in london, organised by environmental campaign group extinction rebellion caused significant disruption yesterday. activists set up blockades and some chained themselves to vehicles and railings. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is in central london this morning. sam, i'm sure you saw the quote from the prime minister calling these people "uncooperative crusties, who should stop blocking the streets with their hemp—smelling bivouacked" . many parts of london were com pletely . many parts of london were completely blocked off, we are at whitehall, many, many dancers you can see. many protesters have slept the night here on the streets. part of the extinction rebellion protest, they want zero carbon emissions in they want zero carbon emissions in the uk by 2025 and a citizen's assembly set up to impose that. many
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think those are unrealistic expectations. yesterday, i spent time with protesters and those caught up by the disruption and heard what they had to say. the rhythm of london, radically altered. grievances, gridlock. teresa is a 61—year—old carerfrom scarborough. scientists have told us u nless we scarborough. scientists have told us unless we change the way we are living, we are heading for a mass extinction. it's going to be a horror show. what about the disruption you are causing? ordinary people going about their everyday lives? we're very sorry, but it's the only way we can make our pay attention. we are non—violent, direct action. we are all using the system that is being given to us. i drive a diesel man, i'm not proud of it, but is —— it's the only way in still better cheaper transport can
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be brought in an electric cars can be brought in an electric cars can be made more available. it does seem kind of odd, to be honest. it does seem odd, but i don't have a lot of money, i can't afford an electric car. this man normally crisscrosses london in his taxi, but not today. what impact is this happening on your likelihood? if you get the emissions tests around this zone, it is going to be high, definitely. we aren't moving. what is your message to the protesters? we are trying to change, but you can't force overnight change, i would say, you know? as with previous protests, this one has celebrity support. none of us would need to be here governments were doing what they
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needed to be doing, but they aren't. many people say there is a level of hypocrisy because a lot of these people will drive cars, they will fly, people will drive cars, they will fly, you are a successful actor, no doubt you fly, or do you play?|j fly, you are a successful actor, no doubt you fly, or do you play? i cry when i have to but i'm trying to reduce flying. what extension rebellion not about what, well, it's very important to take personal measures, but there is a huge issue here, what they are calling for is government action. would you be arrested for this cause? preferably not today, but i would if i needed to be. two weeks of protostar plan, it could be that the disruption has only just it could be that the disruption has onlyjust begun. it could be that the disruption has only just begun. —— it could be that the disruption has onlyjust begun. —— two weeks of protests are planned. we spoke to carolyn and claudia who slept overnight here. what do you hope to achieve? i hope for the government to listen to us. i read yesterday that boris thinks he may be egged if he came and talked to us, many of us are vegans, he came and talked to us, many of us are vegans, it would be very wasteful, and we are non—violent and peaceful. we just want to talk about
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a crisis that we think are facts the whole of humanity. we want to achieve without people to a hero, and understand does make people to hear and understand the three demands we mention. the number of resources used to deal with managing this is extraordinary. what do you think about that? i'm very scared about what is happening to our world, and i want to increase awareness is best we can. every person who has lately inconvenienced, they may ask what are these rebels doing? what do they want? and they'll ask that question and talk to someone, maybe even look them up on the internet. increased awareness of this dire situation we're in. 30 more days of this, the people of london are going to be hugely disrupted —— 13. what do you think might happen at the end of those 13 days. do you think there would be a big change? last time, the claimant emergency was declared shortly afterward. we need the government to —— claimant emergency,
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but we need the government, not the parliaments who gladly emergency. we are looking —— to declare a claimant emergency. everything is at risk, and we can't afford to see that disappear. you can see the tents behind me. the protesters say there will be 13 more days of this. so whatever your views on this, london is going to look like a slightly different place for the next two weeks. and i will be speaking to the deputy commissioner of the metropolitan police as well. still to come in addition to that, we will have the latest on the future of the restau ra nt have the latest on the future of the restaurant chain its express. —— pizza express.
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right now, the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. activists from 'animal rebellion' — a movement linked to 'extinction rebellion' — have spent the night occupying smithfield meat market in farringdon. they said they wanted the world—famous market — to share their "vision of a future pla nt—based food system". protestors held a minute's silence for what they said were "animals whose lives are lost" at smithfield before selling pla nt—based products there. if you want to be a vegetarian, via vegetarian. whatever. these are people who need to work, they need to earn a living, they need to have jobs. so it's not these people we are targeting a soul, we are trying to send a message out to the government. our —— at all.
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well, prime minister borisjohnson has called the protestors "uncooperative crusties" while the metropolitan police say they've made 280 arrests. yesterday, whitehall, horse guards parade and the mall were among the places in westminster, brought to a standstill. two bridges were also blocked. in other news. children who are addicted to computer games are to be offered treatment on the nhs via skype. the service is being offered by the london—based centre for internet and gaming disorders. nhs bosses say its in response to an "emerging problem". boats in the thames estuary are being warned today to keep a lookout for a whale that's been sighted near the dartford crossing. it's believed to be the first time in ten years that a humpback has been spotted in the river. experts say it appears to be in good health. it follows the visit of benny the beluga in the same area a year ago. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. on the roads, the extinction rebellion protests continue,
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which means parliament square, whitehall, westminster bridge, the mall, millbank, victoria embankment and the strand all remain closed. and elsewhere, in bermondsey, druid street remains is closed due to a police investigation. finally, in mitcham — cranmer road closed for emergency repairs. now the weather with kate. good morning. it's a mild and bright start for many of us this morning. we'll see some really decent spells of sunshine throughout the day, but heavy so as to contend with as well. first thing this morning there may be just be first thing this morning there may bejust be a first thing this morning there may be just be a little bit of car down towards the south—east, but it's clearing away quickly. that is the re m na nts of clearing away quickly. that is the remnants of the note range. plenty of sunshine, this line of heavy showers arrives. you may get a rumble of thunder, some rain mixed into the heavier ones —— hail mixed in. a westerly, south—westerly breeze, quite a brisk one. those
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salves will blow through quite quickly. the same seem overnight and in the evening, if you are showers perhaps, but showers out there. a brisk wind pushes them through. the minimum temperature reaches eight celsius. tomorrow, again, sunny spells, some showers around, quite a gusty, brisk breeze, 16 celsius the maximum. it stays rather unsettled but some sunny spells i never too far away from a shower. va nessa vanessa phelps will be on bbc london radio seven and i'll be back in half—an—hour. hello this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. it's 6:30. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning, sophie mckinna became the first british woman to reach the shot put final in 36 years, while at the athletics world championships in doha. she'll be here to tell us aboutjuggling twojobs and how her grandad still drives her to training! grammy and emmy—award winning singer, harry connickjr, will be here to tell us
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about his love for piano and recreating classics from the great american songbook. performance poet, hussain manawer, has worked with the likes of ed sheeran and ellie goulding, and uses the power of poetry to talk about mental health. he's joins us ahead of his first uk tour. i think he will be performing live. he is fantastic. the foreign secretary dominic raab has urged his us counterpart, mike pompeo, to allow a diplomat‘s wife to return to the uk and face police questions about a fatal traffic accident. 19—year—old harry dunn died in august, after his motorbike was hit by a car near raf croughton, in northamptonshire, a military base used by the us air force. the main suspect, named as anne sacoolas, has returned to the us.
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families of diplomats are protected from prosecution in their home country by what's known as "diplomatic immunity". further details have emerged of the european union's objections to british proposals for changes to the irish backstop in the brexit negotiations. a major concern centres on an article which says neither side would introduce checks on the border between northern ireland and ireland. the prime minister's chief negotiator, david frost, has remained in brussels for further talks with the european commission. meanwhile, ireland's finance minister will unveil a no—deal brexit budget today. the plans will outline how irish firms will be kept afloat if the uk leaves the eu in a "chaotic manner". the irish government has warned economic growth could come to a near halt next year, putting up to 80,000 jobs at risk if the uk leaves without a deal. president trump has defended his decision to pull us troops out of northern syria, but repeated his warning to turkey not to take advantage of the withdrawal. mr trump said he would "decimate"
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its economy if ankara took actions he considered to be "off limits". turkey says it's completed preparations for a possible military operation in northern syria, warning that it could start at any time. police have arrested 280 people in london, as environmental campaign group, extinction rebellion, begin their latest protest against climate change. key sites in london have been blocked including whitehall, horse guards parade and the mall, with some activists chaining themselves to vehicles and railings. the demonstrations are set to continue for the next two weeks, with protestors calling for urgent government action to reduce carbon emissions. the protests aren't just confined to london, up to 60 cities around the world are taking part over the next two weeks. yesterday, campaigners in new york drenched wall street in fake blood, traffic was blocked in the centre of madrid, and over 100 people were arrested in amsterdam, after setting up a campsite on a main road.
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a no—deal brexit could send government debt to its highest level since the 1960s, a leading economic research group has warned. the institute for fiscal studies said borrowing would likely climb to 100 billion pounds and total debt would soar to 90% of national income. this means the uk could be borrowing almost as much as the country earns ina year. the treasury says its fiscal policy framework is under review. you are very excited about the whale story. i am concerned about the whale, i think it probably needs to go home. a humpback whale, thought to be up to 10 metres in length, has been spotted in the river thames. the mammal was seen spouting water near the dartford crossing between kent and essex over the weekend. experts say the whale does not seem to be distressed and hope it
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finds its own way back to sea. it's even been nicknamed hessy online. i hope it gets back safely but rescu e rs i hope it gets back safely but rescuers are on standby if the whale becomes distress. what do you do? i am notan becomes distress. what do you do? i am not an expert. that noise exactly. that one. i might get a call. i have some remarkable news about andy murray. at the australian open last year, we were poised to hearing announced his retirement but we have just heard that he is going to return to the australian open and play singles in january. to return to the australian open and play singles injanuary. the to return to the australian open and play singles in january. the first time he would have played singles at a grand slam since having surgery. he is currently playing in shanghai.
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lots of speculation about the future of the manchester united manager old gunner solskjaer this morning. united are on a really poor run — their worst start to a league season for 30 years and they lost to newcastle on sunday. they play leaders liverpool next, and some reports suggest that solskjaer could be sacked if they lose that one badly. the cannot set the honestly say he does not look like a rabbit in the headlines. has he improved the team at this season? no, he hasn't so why ring, worrying times and how do united getting out of this? huge m ista kes united getting out of this? huge mistakes made. after the result at the weekend and the performance, i really do fear for him.
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another manager under pressure is tottenham's mauricio pochettino, and he'll be without his captain for the rest of the year. the club say that goalkeeper hugo lloris dislocated his elbow after falling awkwardly in their 3—0 defeat to brighton on sunday. he doesn't need surgery, but won't be available until at least the new year. plenty of women's international football to look forward to today, including wales. wales are who are aiming to reach their first major tournament at the european championship in england in two years time. they continue their road to qualification against belarus tonight, having slipped to a 2—all draw against northern ireland last time out. as hosts, england have already qualified so they're playing portugal in a friednly tonight. portugal in a friendly tonight. it's a testing time for phil neville's side — their defeat to brazil on saturday was their fifth match without a win, and there's growing pressure on the manager to turn theirform around. you can watch that match live on bbc four at 7 o'clock tonight. could a tropical storm play a part in knocking ireland or scotland out of the rugby world cup? well that's becoming a possibility this week as typhoon hagibis moves closer towards the southern islands ofjapan, where ireland are due
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to play samoa on saturday and scotland play japan on sunday. the rules say any match postponed due to weather is called a draw — and that could see either scotland or ireland go out. world rugby has been in touch with us world rugby has been in touch with us and they are a scheme is asked, as you are, to get this much out. there are updates every 2a hours but we just there are updates every 2a hours but wejust get on there are updates every 2a hours but we just get on with our dayjob and try to best prepare every single day and we will see what comes of that. well world rugby say they're monitoring forecasts and have contingency plans in place should key pool matches be affected. the weather could also have an impact on the japanese grand prix that's due to take place in suzuka on sunday. after an unprecedented summer of success, it's time for a new era for england's cricket team.
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after trevor bayliss' departure, the ecb have now appointed a new head coach. chris silverwood takes the reins having been involved in the england set up as a bowling coach this summer too. so what do we know about the 44—year—old ? well silverwood was an england international himself and played six test matches over a 16—year playing career. he brings a good knowledge of the county set—up having led essex to the county championship in 2017. and he already has a good relationship with england's players and selectors, having been fast bowling coach for the last 18 months. finally you might have missed a few of the new rules that have come into force in football this year. one player in northern ireland has found out the hard way about one of them. glentoran's striker darren murphy was substituted in his side's match against cliftonville, but this season players have to leave the pitch at the nearest point, so they can't waste time.
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so when murphy didn't do that the referee followed him, and sent him off before he could leave the field. he will not be doing that again. they went down to ten men, conceded and lost the match. i feel sorry for all of them. it is the rules. it is all of them. it is the rules. it is a harsh way to learn that lesson. the royal london hospital is one of europe's busiest trauma centres. on average two people are admitted there every day with injuries from knife crime. attacks have become so commonplace in some communities, that experts are shocked by the ease at which people are willing to use knives to settle the pettiest of scores. clive myrie has spent the last few months filming at the hospital and sent us this report. at the royal london hospital staff we re at the royal london hospital staff were on alert. another big of knife
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crime is about to enter the building. this man took a single blow to thejob. building. this man took a single blow to the job. a staggering act of aggression in the middle of a petty quarrel. it is over nothing. it is pointless. deprivation and hopelessness can attempt youngsters tojoin gangs hopelessness can attempt youngsters to join gangs and hopelessness can attempt youngsters tojoin gangs and deal drugs hopelessness can attempt youngsters to join gangs and deal drugs and the ease of access from any kitchen drawer means knife are ready weapons in any turf war or to settle scores. the fact that we're living in a society where is normal! based at the royal london hospital, her team councils knife crime victims after surgery, helping to prevent revenge attacks. it is heartbreaking because
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eocene children, families whose lives are destroyed. i had a young person here a couple of weeks ago, his mum found out on snapchat. she found out on snapchat that her child had been stabbed. now, what does that say about society? it is kind of losing here. a society where teenagers are having to be taught life—saving skills because of the prevalence of knife crime. it has come to this. what happens if you are out and you find out someone is carrying a knife? tell them, what do you think you are doing! they are not evil people, they do it for fear, out of peer pressure, protection, to be part of a gang. but knives make it more likely to be
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violent because it is in your pocket and you can use it. the key for society, dissuading young people from putting knives in their pockets in the first place. we're joined now from the royal london hospital by consultant trauma surgeon, martin griffiths. there is so much to talk to you about. he talked about why people might be carrying knives and talked about fear. what would you say to a young person thinking it is the right thing to do to put a knife in their pocket and leave their home? it isa their pocket and leave their home? it is a good question. i think, people like to interrogate people. i like to listen first and ask why. people like to interrogate people. i like to listen first and ask whylj note this is part of yourjob, you listen and ask them why and there is a myriad of reasons, isn't that?” think it is important to look at
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individual situations. people like to lump issues together but each individual has a certain set of drivers that make them carry weapons and we need to try and find out what situation is in their home life, personal life, that made them make these dangerous choices. it is a desperate situation. people trying to teach young people how to save somebody from a knife attack. how do you get out of the situation of that being a think you have to do? -- thing. it is a practical skill, it has implications about how we look after people that are injured, but more important it allows us to enter the conversation about what it means to bea the conversation about what it means to be a user and a victim of knife injury. moving forward to practicalities and motivation. you have been very successful with
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people coming into your hospital who are not coming in again. is it again about individual conversations?” think the programme works because it is about consistency and a nurturing bond that lasts a significant period of time. our case managers work with the patients and their families. of time. our case managers work with the patients and theirfamilies. to work out how these victims have got here and how we can offer them positive choices. you are now nhs violence reduction is the end trauma surgeon. . . violence reduction is the end trauma surgeon... laughter. it is an extraordinary title. what is your priority and how are you going to change things things?” priority and how are you going to change things things? i went into the nhs and i am helping the clinical network and that is the combined practice. the idea is that
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the nhs has excellent practice that reduce violence and prevent injury and what we're going to do is co—ordinate and formulate a message and our healthca re co—ordinate and formulate a message and our healthcare workers who live in the community we serve become more effective in reducing violence. can you roll out across the uk, is that what your aim would be as did mark probably. tell us about the victims. is it your view that they seem to be getting younger? what can you tell us? well, the most common age in our department is 16, and the second most common age is 15. these are children of school age. they are getting younger and younger, and
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thatis getting younger and younger, and that is disconcerting. these are scared, young children often being scared, young children often being scared by other scared, young children. we need to understand that first when we talk about solutions. i heard you talk about the fact that they deem, the people who are carrying out these stabbings, seem to have knowledge on how to cause a really serious injury. in conversations we have seem to notice that there have been more complex and life—threatening injuries as time has passed. we are concerned that the pattern is changing and we worry that this relates to either a change in knowledgebase, experience, or practice. i don't think it's random and we're doing some work to try and assess this more formally. we really appreciate this work in your field. martin we really appreciate this work in yourfield. martin griffiths, thank you. apologies for the problems with
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the image quality. really good to hear from the image quality. really good to hearfrom him this morning. the image quality. really good to hear from him this morning. whatever guest we've got on this morning, you can get involved in the programme. there is always somebody manning the e—mails, and you can find us on facebook, twitter, and all social media this morning. why not enjoy it? there is a healthy discussion that goes along. i don't know how you find the time. just a little look every now and again. carol has got a lovely rainbow for us. it is a double? good eyesight! good morning. we have a very strong jet stream, so, low pressure is dominating our weather, and is driving in a lot of showers, some rain, and also rather windy conditions. that sets us up quite nicely. you can sit here
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across the north of the country, drifting over towards the far north of scotla nd drifting over towards the far north of scotland and with us for the next few days. the wind around it is coming from the west and south—west, so that is quite a cold direction for us. coming infrom so that is quite a cold direction for us. coming in from the atlantic, you can see yellows, meaning temperatures are where they roughly should be at this time for this point in the year. no problems with frost or fog. today we have a lot of showers. gusting to gale force in the north and the west, you can see the north and the west, you can see the gust speeds in the black circles. those showers could rattle through quite quickly but also be heavy with hail and thunder. some temperatures 11— 17 degrees. as we had on through the evening and overnight, it's a bit of a repeat performance. still a lot of showers, still some of them heavy, still gusty winds, and some clear skies. but if anything, temperatures this coming night will be just a little bit lower than the night that has
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just gone. but for the time of year, still not bad, no problems with frost or fog. as we move through wednesday you can see we still have low pressure dominating our weather. this weather front coming in, enhancing all the showers. still windy as well, gusty winds, blustery around those showers. and today you could catch a shower almost anywhere. but as is the nature of showers, some of us will dodge them and stay dry with some sunshine. temperatures tomorrow ranging from 11 in the north to 15 in the south. now, as we head into thursday and friday, there is a little bit of a question mark over the positioning of some fronts. we will see rain coming in across the atlantic and moving in across northern ireland, northern england. as we come further south, we think it will be dry with some sunshine. i could change. it
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all depends where this front ends up. as! all depends where this front ends up. as i mentioned, it's what we think at the moment. and whatever happens on thursday will have a bearing on friday. but what i can tell you is the next few days after that remain unsettled with some rain or some showers, but as always, a little bit of sunshine in between. sunshine and double rainbows, great. reports say the restaurant chain pizza express is facing some big problems. ben has been taking a look. no sunshine and rainbows there. lots of speculation about the future of pizza express. reports say it's called in advisers — not confirmed by pizza express. but the company is facing some big challenges. so what do we know? well, pizza express launched in london in 1965. from just one store, it grew into a massive chain with around 480 restaurants in the uk and ireland.
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in august, it reported a 10% fall in half—year profits, with sales pretty flat. so the company says it's focusing on upgrading its existing restaurants, rather than opening new ones. but it's a tough market. seen anecdotal evidence from all sorts of firms that this casual dining sector as it is cold is really struggling. —— called. prezzo, a competitor of pizza express, shut down 94 of its restaurants last year. jamie oliver's dining chain filed for insolvency in may. others like giraffe, gourmet burger kitchen and ca rluccio's have all been in trouble. many have asked landlords and suppliers to cut rents and prices.
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but for pizza express, it's the company's debt that's a problem. it has had to pay interest on that. in last year's accounts, it had £1 billion worth of debt with interest charges of more than £90 million. those repayments wiping out any operating profits. that's the frustrating thing for a business. it's making a reasonable amount of caste, pizza express right now, there is no danger of disappearing, but the idea it has to pay all this interest means is the future looks a bit unstable. it's cold in advisors to help have a look at what is happening next. and in the light of thomas cook, we know what debt can do to a firm, thomas cook owed £1.5 billion. it means a company can be doing pretty well in terms of customers and popularity, but debt can be real trouble. that
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debt is due in 2021, so there is some time to sort this out. there was chatter on social media. one of the theories was it was one of those firms or brands that expanded too quickly. you go to some towns and there may be three or four of them ina there may be three or four of them in a short distance of each other. it is one of those has 1.6 million per restaurant, per restaurant! the real worry for them as you might notice they are busy on a thursday ora notice they are busy on a thursday or a friday night or maybe saturday night, but they have those overheads seven days a week and they are really expensive. they have to get people through those doors all week to make those restaurants work. and then you look at rising input costs, a lot of things imported from overseas now cost a bit more because of the increase due to the lower british pound. they also have to pay more to their staff, that is
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affecting profits. and rents and rates on high street, that cost them, altogether, it's a bit of a perfect storm. we've seen this happen across the casual dining sector. it's the squeeze in the middle that we hear a lot about, the ones that don't particularly stand out, reliable favourites, they may be the first to go when they rein in their spending. you get a sense of joan. we will see you later, thank you. it's 6:55am. still to come on breakfast: some children are breathing in pollution, equivalent to a packet of cigarettes every week, while on the school run. we're in sheffield speaking to parents and students. and we are also in london this morning because we know that some people from extinction rebellion are camped out on the street, we will be speaking to a representative of
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extinction rebellion as well as a member of the metropolitan lease. borisjohnson member of the metropolitan lease. boris johnson cold member of the metropolitan lease. borisjohnson cold them uncooperative dust market called them uncooperative crusties. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, from bbc london, i'm asad ahmad. activists from 'animal rebellion' — a movement linked to extinction rebellion — have spent the night occupying smithfield meat market in farringdon. they said they wanted the world famous market to share their "vision of a future plant—based food system". protestors held a minute's silence for what they said were "animals whose lives are lost" at smithfield before selling pla nt—based products there.
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if you want to be a vegetarian, be a vegetarian. whatever. these are people who need to work, they need to earn a living, they need to have jobs. so it's not these people we are targeting at all, we are trying to send a message out to the government. well prime minister borisjohnson has called the protestors "uncooperative crusties", while the metropolitan police say they've made 280 arrests. yesterday, whitehall, horse guards parade and the mall were among the places in westminster, brought to a standstill. two bridges were also blocked. other news, children who are addicted to computer games are to be offered treatment on the nhs via skype. the service is being offered by the london—based centre for internet and gaming disorders. nhs bosses say its in response to an "emerging problem". boats in the thames estuary are being warned today to keep a lookout for a whale that's been
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sighted near the dartford crossing. it's believed to be the first time in ten years that a humpback has been spotted in the river. experts say it appears to be in good health. it follows the visit of benny the beluga in the same area exactly a year ago. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. on the roads, the extinction rebellion protests means parliament square, whitehall, westminster bridge, the mall, millbank, victoria embankment and the strand all remain closed. elsewhere, in bermondsey, druid street remains is closed due to a police investigation. and in mitcham — cranmer road closed for emergency repairs. now the weather with kate. good morning. it's a mild and bright start for many of us this morning. we'll see some really decent spells of sunshine throughout the day, but heavy showers to contend with as well.
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first thing this morning there may be just be a little bit of cloud down towards the south—east, but it's clearing away quickly. that is the remnants of the night's rain. plenty of sunshine, this line of heavy showers arrives. you may get a rumble of thunder, some hail mixed into the heavier ones. a westerly, south—westerly breeze, quite a brisk one. those salves will blow through quite quickly. the same scene overnight and in the evening, if you are showers perhaps, but showers out there. a brisk wind pushes them through. the minimum temperature reaches eight celsius. tomorrow, again, sunny spells, some showers around, quite a gusty, brisk breeze, 16 celsius the maximum. it stays rather unsettled but some sunny spells we're never too far away from a shower. iam back i am back in 30 minutes. goodbye for now.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: pressure grows on the us government over its refusal to waive immunity for a diplomat‘s wife, who fled the uk after a fatal car crash. we'll speak to the family of 19—year—old victim harry dunn. the prime minister brands extinction rebellion protestors "uncooperative crusties" as he calls on them to stop blocking london's streets. grammy and emmy award winner, harry connickjr will be
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here to tell us how he's recreating musical classics from the great american songbook. more help for vic limbs of fraud. to start victims. i look at plans to compensate people. andy murray's remarkable recovery from injury. the first major appearance in the grand slam in australia. showers heavy and thundering but running through quickly on a gusty wind. i will have more in 15 minutes. it's tuesday 8th october. our top story: the foreign secretary dominic raab has called on his us counterpart, mike pompeo, to allow a diplomat‘s wife to return to the uk and face police questions about a fatal traffic accident. 19—year—old harry dunn died in august after his motorbike was hit by a car near raf croughton,
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in northamptonshire, a military base used by the us air force. the main suspect, named as anne sacoolas, has left the uk and is protected from prosecution by diplomatic immunity. ben ando reports. a tragedy on this english country road that is spiralling into a diplomatic incident between britain and the united states. 19—year—old harry dunn died when his motorbike was struck by a car being driven on the wrong side. now the foreign secretary, dominic raab, has raised the issue with the us secretary of state, mike pompeo. the car was being driven by anne sacoolas, seen here on her wedding day 16 years ago, the wife of an american diplomat working at this us air base. two weeks after the crash, she and herfamily moved back to the states, under diplomatic immunity. i would like to think that, as a mum, she would at least try to put herself in our position and just wave the immunity herself and come and see us.
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i think that's about the only hope we have got. anne sacoolas is back at home in this neighbourhood near washington, dc. though diplomats and their families are immune from prosecution, that immunity can be waived. last year, the husband of a british diplomat in new york was arrested and charged with domestic violence, with the agreement of the government here. now, say harry dunn's family, it's time for the us to even that score. ben ando, bbc news. further details have emerged of the european union's objections to british proposals for changes to the irish backstop in the brexit negotiations. a major concern centres on the fact that neither side would introduce checks on the border between northern ireland and ireland. we'll hear from our correspondent chris page in dublin in a moment but first let's speak to our political correspondent, nick eardley, who's in westminster this morning.
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what can you tell us about latest developments? there is increasing concern in europe about some of the ideas that borisjohnson put on the table last week. the big one that has been discussed in the last 2a hours in brussels is concerned about the so—called stormont veto, the northern ireland assembly would have to give its consent to keeping arrangements slightly different to the uk so it stays closer to the european union. some are worried there is not enough clarity if they did not give that consent and are worried that plan is not going to work. back home, borisjohnson is same to the eu, we need to move on with this and get to the nitty—gritty and give us more detail about what you do not like. the truth is, these talks are not moving forward in any significant way. they are certainly not moving forward as quickly as the uk was hoping. it is
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about ten days until the prime minister was hoping that a new deal might be signed off that european council meeting. and the mix briefings we are hearing overnight about some in number 10 starting the blame game for these talks potentially falling apart in the next few days. at the moment it does not look good. it is not over yet, talks are continuing but the signs are not great. meanwhile, ireland's finance minister will unveil a no—deal brexit budget today. the plans will outline how irish firms will be kept afloat if the uk leaves the eu in a "chaotic manner". our ireland correspondent, chris page, is in dublin for us this morning. what is the reaction and preparation? the budget are critical in any capital city but this is no ordinary budget day in dublin.
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ireland is the most economically exposed to the effects of brexit so ministers here have been working on the assumption that there worse—case scenario would unfold and that is that the uk would leave the eu without a deal. in those circumstances, about 50 , 000 without a deal. in those circumstances, about 50,000 jobs could be lost and they could be a knock—on effect. the government will have to pay out money in welfare. the business lobby group has said that businesses will need more than £1 billion over three years in order to get them through this rocky period. a number of sectors are particularly at risk, farming, food processing, tourism and manufacturing. the finance minister will also have an eye on his domestic electric today because of this is almost certainly to be the last budget before a general election set to be held sometime next year. more than that, he would
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be hoping a message because out internationally from dublin to other capital cities that although ireland does not want a no dear brexit, if thatis does not want a no dear brexit, if that is what happens the country will be ready for it. president trump has defended his decision to pull us troops out of northern syria, but repeated his warning to turkey not to take advantage of the withdrawal. mr trump said he would "decimate" its economy, if ankara took actions he considered to be "off limits". turkey says it's completed preparations for a possible military operation in northern syria, warning that it could start at any time. police have arrested 280 people in london, as environmental campaign group extinction rebellion, begin their latest protest against climate change. key sites in london have been blocked including whitehall, horse guards parade and the mall, with some activists chaining themselves to vehicles and railings. the demonstrations are set to continue for the next two weeks, with protestors calling for urgent government action
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to reduce carbon emissions. we will be speaking to one of those protesters in just a few moments. a no—deal brexit could send government debt to its highest level since the 1960s, a leading economic research group has warned. the institute for fiscal studies said borrowing would likely climb to 100—billion pounds and total debt could soar to 90 percent of national income. this means the uk could be borrowing almost as much as the country earns ina year. the treasury says its rules on income and expenditure are under review. nhs england estimates 55,011 to 16 —year—olds have gambling problems. the chief executive simon stephen says the health service should not be left to pick up the pieces from internet services and put makers.
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a flotilla has arrived in new zealand to commemorate 250 years since captainjames cook first visited the country. one of the ships is a reproduction of cook's endeavour which set sail from whitby in yorkshire and headed for new zealand in 1769. there have been some maori demonstrations, alongside the celebrations, protesting over the treatment of indigenous people under colonial rule. when he arrived in hawaii, i think i remember this from a school lesson, he arrived on the day they were celebrating one of the deities and they thought it was him. they thought he was a king. i think he died in hawaii, ithink they thought he was a king. i think he died in hawaii, i think they stabbed him, stoned him and it could him. gosh stop there you go. thousands of climate change activists around the world are taking part in a two week protest, calling for urgent government action to reduce carbon emissions. an event in london, organised by environmental campaign
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group extinction rebellion caused significant disruption yesterday. activists set up blockades and some chained themselves to vehicles and railings. breakfast‘s tim muffett was there. snare drum marching the rhythm of london, radically altered. grievances, gridlock. theresa is a 61—year—old carerfrom scarborough. scientists have told us unless we change the way we're living, we're heading for a mass extinction. it's going to be a horror show. what about the disruption you are causing to ordinary people going about their everyday lives? yeah. we say we're very sorry, but it's the only way we can make our government pay attention. we're non—violent, direct action. we are all using the system that is being given to us. i drive a diesel van, i'm not proud of it, but it's the only way until our government can create better, cheaper public transport, bring out electric cars that are cheap. you're protesting,
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and you drive a diesel van? i do. that does seem kind of odd, to be honest. it does seem kind of odd, but i don't have a lot of money, and i can't afford to spend however much it is on an electric car. hiten normally crisscrosses london in his taxi, not today. what impact is this happening on your likelihood? well, just sitting in traffic, i think doing nothing, polluting the claimant, even more. polluting the climate, even more. if you get the emission test around this zone, it's going to be high, definitely. we're not moving. what's your message to the protesters? plastic bottles, all those things. we are trying to change, but you can't force overnight change, i would say, you know? as with previous protests, this one has celebrity support. none of us would need to be here if governments were doing what they needed to be doing, but they're not. many people say there is a level of hypocrisy because a lot of these people will drive cars,
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they will fly, i mean, you're a successful actor, no doubt you fly, or, do you fly? ifly when i have to but i'm trying to reduce flying. what extinction rebellion say is it's not about, it's very important to take personal measures, but there is a huge issue here, what they're calling for is government action. would you be arrested for this cause? well i would, but preferably not today, but i would be arrested if i needed to be. two weeks of protests are planned. it could be that the disruption has only just begun. we spoke to carolyn and claudia who slept overnight here. let's speak now to extinction rebellion campaigner, emily grossman who's in central london. we could see behind you some of the things you are trying to achieve. you have three main demands. co2 emissions reduced to almost zero in six years' time. do you think that is actually practically achievable?
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it does not matter whether it is practically achievable, it needs to be achievable. the uk government have really nailed us in bringing down emissions and if we do not get down emissions and if we do not get down to the levels advised by the paris agreement and the ipcc, we're going be in terrible terrible situation. we need to get down to come in that way before 2050 in order to meet this agreement. when you want the government to declare a climate emergency, the government say they have already done that in may. absolutely, they are paying lip service to it though. the uk invest more than all the other eu countries in fossilfuels more than all the other eu countries in fossil fuels subsidies and continued to do so. in the past five yea rs continued to do so. in the past five years at £250 billion in offshore fossil fuels, years at £250 billion in offshore fossilfuels, oil and years at £250 billion in offshore fossil fuels, oil and gas. years at £250 billion in offshore fossilfuels, oil and gas. we have just approved the plans to bring for new all fired... gas—fired turbines
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ata new all fired... gas—fired turbines at a power station. we are still going ahead with the biggest programme sent world war i. it is also about species loss. 1 million species across the world. we depend on them forfood species across the world. we depend on them for food and livelihood. we are losing the bees that pollinate the plants. we are losing both wa nts, the plants. we are losing both wants, one in five british mammals... sorry one in four, last year it was one in five. 250 million yea rs year it was one in five. 250 million years since we had levels this high and le sommer happen we had 97% of life on this planet was extinguished so we really need to do something now and the government has been accused of utter hypocrisy. they have failed to meet seven out of their 2a targets to bring down emissions, that was a report made by
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the government's panel of advisers injuly this year so it is really not happening. how'd you bring bringing —— balance bringing public attention to the disruption you are causing? i know thatis disruption you are causing? i know that is something you and many other campaigners have a lot about, and yet you are causing a number of issues which are really angering people and some people aren't listening to the message because of that. absolutely. we can do is apologise and say look, we're sorry we are causing disruption, but if you look at the science, i'm a scientist, we know if we don't do this that within ten, 20, 30 years' time, the disruption we will face here and across the globe will be far greater than anything today. you don't turn off your fire alarm in the middle of the night if you are going to die in the future, that is
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what we're doing. the prime minister referred to you and your fellow campaigners as uncooperative crusties with their hemp— smelling giveaway acts —— bivouacs. well that doesn't at all reflect this group of people. we've had professors of climate change, academics sign our agreements, we've had people from different backgrounds, different education levels, students, older people, we really do represent everybody. if you come down on the streets, you will see people who represent you, we are a load of hippies, of us are as well, but you've got people like myself, people like celebrities saying no, something has to happen and it has to happen now. our government is letting us down. what about the cost of the disruption? the police
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commissioner said the last demonstration back in april cost £7.5 million. absolutely. we know that. but the governor of the bank of england has also said that we are heading forfinancial of england has also said that we are heading for financial instability, and by the time that happens it will be too late. extreme weather situations are costing billions of billions of pounds across the globe of the time and those extreme weather situations are going to get worse and worse. they are going to be hitting us more and more. heatwaves a re be hitting us more and more. heatwaves are going to become 100 times more likely in europe because of climate change. we are also heading for a world where insurance agencies are saying we're going to become systemically uninsurable. people are going to be losing an awful lot more money in the future. what we're doing is reallyjust a drop in the ocean. thank you very much emily. emily is a campaigner
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for extinction rebellion. we will also be speaking to a member of the metropolitan police later. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. this is typhoon hagibis. it's heading towards the south coast of japan to south wants you by saturday —— south honshu. don't be full, it is weakening but it will still be a very strong typhoon. with sustained wind speeds of 103 typhoon. with sustained wind speeds of103 mph, and typhoon. with sustained wind speeds of 103 mph, and wind speeds of up to hundred and 50 miles an hour. it will deposit between 300 and 500 millimetres of rain. it will weaken as it pushes northwards. japan agency had categorise this as a violent typhoon. if it was a hurricane in the atlantic it would be the equivalent of a category five. another weather facts for you
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is what's happening in america. in end of and colorado, on wednesday, tomorrow cosmic temperature will be 26 degrees, on thursday it will be -2 26 degrees, on thursday it will be —2 with snow showers, a drop of 28 degrees as that goes through, introducing a colder plans of our. we've got neither of those scenarios in the uk. for many of us, we are seeing some beautiful sunrises to start with. over the next few days, the weather remains unsettled. it's often going to be windy and it is also going to be wet. what's happening is low pressure continues to dry our weather. we have a strong jet stream at the moment. here's the low pressure for the next few the isobars alone tell us it is going to be windy, particularly across the north and west. but the wind is coming from the atlantic, so either from the rest of the south—west, which means it is coming from a mall direction for us, as indicated by the others. no problems with frost orfog.
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the others. no problems with frost or fog. temperatures already in double figures, but you can see as we go through the day the amount of showers they develop. some of those will be happy and ungarie with somehow blown along on these gusty winds as indicated by the black circles. temperature—wise, if you are out of the wind and the sunshine, we are generally looking at11- sunshine, we are generally looking at 11- 17 sunshine, we are generally looking at 11— 17 degrees. roughly where we should be at this time in october. through this evening and overnight we will still hang onto a lot of showers, some of them being blown quite quickly on a gusty wind. there will also be some clear spells but also not so much wind for frost or fog, it's hard to say. later on, you can see from the isobars it is still going to be a blustery day, not quite as windy as we are looking at
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today, but still in the north—west we will have strong winds. again, those hours tending to merger times, giving some longer spells of rain. but they are showers, and you know, the nature of showers, some of them will mist them altogether. temperatures 11— 15 degrees. and the outlook after that? it remains u nsettled. outlook after that? it remains unsettled. when you are going to a forecast, blue and dan, you don't know how hard it is to say frost and fog, all right? look out for those fast and frogs, ok. some children in yorkshire are breathing in pollution, equivalent to a packet of cigarettes every week, while on the school run. the results of a study by the university of sheffield, has prompted the former government chief scientific adviser, professor sir david king, to say there needs to be quicker action to replace diesel and petrol cars with electric ones. luxmy gopal is in sheffield for us this morning.
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good morning. that's right, i am at hunters by roundabout, one of the most congested of parts of sheffield. hundreds of schoolchildren will be travelling across the roundabout either by car on foot to get to their school behind me. they will be breathing in all these fumes and pollution. now ina all these fumes and pollution. now in a study that is the first of its kind, carried out by academics here in sheffield, they've looked atjust how much air pollution children are facing on the school run. ready to go? another day, another school run. and it's ready to go? another day, another school run. and its children, their lungs who are still developing, that are particularly at risk from air pollution and diseases linked to it. now academics in sheffield have analysed pollution levels on the school run by giving 45 families a monitoring device. green means good, the other means it's quite
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pollutional, red means bad, and purple means very bad. the study showed children are exposed to polluta nts showed children are exposed to pollutants equivalents of smoking 17.5 cigarettes a week, that's compared by comparing health statistics. i was really concerned, i spoke about whether i should move house, with my husband. some are worse than others. we experimented. three families going to the same school in three different ways to show which has the most exposure to air pollution. cycling, driving or walking? time to guess which was worse? walking! cycling! walking! before the results reveal all. the study so there doesn't mac shows the points —— study shows the
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concentration is the highest inside the car. that's quite surprising. they trap exhaust from cars in front of them, and tunnel them into this toxic box that is the car. the government has let down children in the country and has let them down very badly. because what we need is to speed up this transition to electric vehicles. the government is working across departments to tackle this really important issue, and don't forget that we are the first government to set net zero emissions by 2050, that is groundbreaking, and our clean—air strategy has been termed round breaking by the who. so we are definitely on the right track. see sheffield city council says it has measures including a clea n says it has measures including a clean zone, investing in green vehicles, and discouraging idling vehicles, and discouraging idling vehicles outside school zones. but for pa rents vehicles outside school zones. but for parents and these children, green and —— clean—air can't come
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soon enough. i am joined by one of the families featured in that report. how much of a concern is do you? —— is air pollution to you? there is a lot of traffic on the road, and it only increases by the time it is to walk down to school. but is also during breaks and lunch time. not just the drop—off. during breaks and lunch time. not just the drop-off. what about the statistic, it could be as bad as smoking 17.5 packets of cigarettes a week? i think that they really worrying factor for everybody. megan, you say your school is doing some things to tackle air pollution? both the junior school and senior school have plans not to — plans to reduce pollution. and i like, how
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bad is it for you when you walk to school? well, it's quite bad because no—one's walking to school yet and it gets worse through the day. by the time we walked to school, it's — there's a lot more cars than this. and it gets worse, doesn't it? marie, finally, the government is saying it is doing a lot of things. it's helping investing in green vehicles and in clean—air strategies, you think that is enough? no, i think strategies, you think that is enough? no, ithink there strategies, you think that is enough? no, i think there needs to be more done from a personal level up be more done from a personal level up to government level on when you use your car, turning your engine off, and having traffic cameras around schools. thank you very much. we will leave you now here with the traffic building up. it gets a lot worse later. thank you very much. still is a on breakfast this
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morning, 19—year—old harry dunn was killed when his motorbike collided with a car near raf broughton in northamptonshire. are you a suspect has left the country, she is protected by diplomatic immunity. we are going to hearfrom the protected by diplomatic immunity. we are going to hear from the victim's pa rents. are going to hear from the victim's parents. —— croughton. we will have the national headlines for you in a moment. good morning, from bbc london, i'm asad ahmad. activists from 'animal rebellion' — a movement linked to extinction rebellion — have spent the night occupying smithfield meat market in farringdon. they said they wanted the world famous market to share their "vision of a future plant—based food system". protestors held a minute's silence for what they said were "animals whose lives are lost" at smithfield, before selling
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pla nt—based products there. if you want to be a vegetarian, be a vegetarian. whatever. don't force other people. these are people who need to work, they need to earn a living, they need to have jobs. so it's not these people we're targeting at all, we are trying to send a message out to the government. well prime minister borisjohnson has called the protestors "uncooperative crusties", while the metropolitan police say they've made 280 arrests. yesterday whitehall, horse guards parade and the mall were among the places in westminster, brought to a standstill. two bridges were also blocked. children who are addicted to computer games are to be offered treatment on the nhs via skype. the service is being offered by the london—based centre for internet and gaming disorders. nhs bosses say it's in response to an "emerging problem". boats in the thames estuary are being warned today to keep a lookout for a whale that's been
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sighted near the dartford crossing. it's believed to be the first time in ten years that a humpback has been spotted in the river. experts say it appears to be in good health. it follows the visit of benny the beluga in the same area a year ago. let's take a look at the travel situation now. it's an unusually good service, which is good. no problems. on the roads, the extinction rebellion protests means parliament square, whitehall, westminster bridge, the mall, millbank, victoria embankment and the strand all remain closed. elsewhere, in bermondsey, druid street remains is closed due to a police investigation. and in mitcham, cranmer road closed for emergency repairs. now the weather with kate. good morning. it's a mild and bright start for many of us this morning.
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we'll see some really decent spells of sunshine throughout the day, but heavy showers to contend with as well. first thing this morning there may be just be a little bit of cloud down towards the south—east, but it's clearing away quickly. that is the remnants of the night's rain. plenty of sunshine, this line of heavy showers arrives. you may get a rumble of thunder, some hail mixed into the heavier ones. temperatures reaching 17 celsius. a westerly, south—westerly breeze, quite a brisk one. those showers will blow through quite quickly. the same scene overnight and in the evening, a few showers perhaps, but showers out there. a brisk wind pushes them through. the minimum temperature reaches eight celsius. tomorrow, again, sunny spells, some showers around, quite a gusty, brisk breeze, 16 celsius the maximum. it stays rather unsettled but some sunny spells, we're never too far away from a shower. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker.
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here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the foreign secretary dominic raab has urged his us counterpart, mike pompeo, to allow a diplomat‘s wife to return to the uk and face police questions about a fatal traffic accident. 19—year—old harry dunn died in august after his motorbike was hit by a car near raf croughton, in northamptonshire, a military base used by the us air force. the main suspect, named as anne sacoolas, has returned to the us. families of diplomats are protected from prosecution in their home country, by diplomatic immunity. further details have emerged of the european union's objections to british proposals for changes to the irish backstop in the brexit negotiations. a major concern centres on how neither side would introduce checks on the border between northern ireland and ireland. the prime minister's chief negotiator david frost has remained in brussels for further talks with the european commission. meanwhile, ireland's finance minister will unveil a no—deal brexit budget today.
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the plans will outline how irish firms will be kept afloat if the uk leaves the eu in a "chaotic manner". the irish government has warned economic growth could come to a near halt next year, putting up to 80,000 jobs at risk if the uk leaves without a deal. president trump has defended his decision to pull us troops out of northern syria, but repeated his warning to turkey not to take advantage of the withdrawal. mr trump said he would "decimate" its economy if ankara took actions he considered to be "off limits". turkey says it's completed preparations for a possible military operation in northern syria, warning that it could start at any time. police have arrested 280 people in london, as environmental campaign group, extinction rebellion, begin their latest protest against climate change. key sites in london have been blocked including whitehall, horse guards parade and the mall,
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with some activists chaining themselves to vehicles and railings. the demonstrations are set to continue for the next two weeks, with protestors calling for urgent government action to reduce carbon emissions. you have a breaking news story about tariffs. the department of international trade is looking at what happens on the 31st of dover if we live without a deal. what happens to all the tariffs in terms of things they charge for goods that come in and out of the uk. in march they put in place a plan of temporary rules until the big negotiations happen in march. they have clarified three key areas that they are worried about and they want to make sure business can continue
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as normal. they might seem oddly specific. reducing tariffs on big trucks entering the uk. it is about buying them. if i am a small haulage firm, primarily from the manufacturer in the eu, it would cost £50,000 more to do that in the old regime. they will lower the tariff. £85,000 and that price will stay steady and that is important for carbon emission. they can cut emissions by buying new trucks. clothing and this relates to sheep clothing from developing countries. in march they decided to scrap the ta riffs in march they decided to scrap the tariffs on some of these things and that may have put those countries in disadvantage. so they will have
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preferential access for developing countries so we can have access to cheap textiles. tariffs on bioethanol, partly useful fuel, cheap textiles. tariffs on bioethanol, partly usefulfuel, by your diesel. the government describing that as critical to infrastructure. if you delve into the details, it is also used in beer soi the details, it is also used in beer so i would quite rightly agree with them that the stuff used to make beer is critical national infrastructure site tariffs maintained rather than change. ——so ta riffs maintained rather than change. ——so tariffs maintained. this is to make sure british remains competitive at the end of october. and this is your favourite story of the morning.” the end of october. and this is your favourite story of the morning. i am invested in this story. a humpback whale, thought to be up to 10 metres
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in length, has been spotted in the river thames. the mammal was seen spouting water near the dartford crossing between kent and essex over the weekend. experts say the whale does not seem to be distressed and hope it finds its own way back to sea. lots of people have spotted it. it's even been nicknamed hessy online. i hope she can return home soon.“ you are watching, we wish you all the best. coming up on the programme, carol will have the weather. we have a special coming up shortly? we have a special coming up shortly? we have. unlike lots of other people, not only is she an athlete but doing to otherjobs. we start with news of andy murray. andy murray's remarkable return from injury continues apace. it's been confirmed that he'll play singles at the australian open in january. that will be the first time that he'll have played singles at a grand slam since major hip surgery earlier this year. he'lljoin the main draw in melbourne with a protected
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ranking of no.2, and restored physical powers, according to the tournament's official website. sounds like a marvel superhero! murray is currently playing the shanghai open and is through to the second round after beating argentina's juan ignacio londero. lots of speculation about the future of the manchester united manager old gunner solskjaer this morning. united are on a really poor run — their worst start to a league season for 30 years and they lost to newcastle on sunday. they play leaders liverpool next, and some reports suggest that solskjaer could be sacked if they lose that one badly. they cannot sit there honestly and say he does not look like a rabbit in the headlights. has he improved the team this season? no, he hasn't so, i mean, there's worrying, worrying times. how can you see united getting out of this slump? we've talked about lukaku, letting him go, and sanchez this that and the other. there's been huge mistakes made. i. . .after the result at the weekend and their performance, i really do fear for him.
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it is all getting a little bit sticky. another manager under pressure is tottenham's mauricio pochettino, and he'll be without his captain for the rest of the year. the club say that goalkeeper hugo lloris dislocated his elbow after falling awkwardly in their 3—0 defeat to brighton on saturday. he doesn't need surgery, but won't be available until at least the new year. plenty of women's international football to look forward to today, including wales, who are aiming to reach their first major tournament at the european championships in england in two years time. they continue their road to qualification against belarus tonight, having drawn 2—2 with northern ireland last time out. as hosts, england have already qualified so they're playing portugal in a friednly tonight. portugal in a friendly tonight. it's a testing time for phil neville's side — their defeat to brazil on saturday was their fifth match without a win, and there's growing pressure on the manager to turn theirform around. you can watch that match live on bbc four at 7 o'clock tonight.
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after that unprecedented summer of success, it's time for a new era for england's cricket team. after trevor bayliss' departure, the ecb have now appointed a new head coach. chris silverwood takes the reins having been involved in the england set up as a bowling coach this summer too. finally you might have missed a few of the new rules that have come into force in football this year. one player in northern ireland has found out the hard way about one of them. glentoran's striker darren murray was substituted in his side's match against cliftonville, but this season players have to leave the pitch at the nearest point, so they can't waste time. so when murphy didn't do that the referee followed him, and sent him off before he could leave the field. someone has got in contact that the referee did not do the same for other players as well. they got in
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contact with me as well. obviously annoyed. british shot putter, sophie mckinna described her experience at the world championships in doha as the best of her life. she qualified for the tokyo olympics, became the first british woman in 36 years to make a world championship final and threw a personal best. her reaction says it all — let's take a look back at a night she'll never forget. commentator: attempting to make sure and that is beyond qualifying, that isa and that is beyond qualifying, that is a lifetime best. what a wonderful shotput in the third round. shares of celebrating because she's in the finals tomorrow evening. absolutely fantastic. in the beginning of the season she threw a world champion qualify but because there was not a
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timing adequate, she had to come back for another meeting. she has qualified now. sophiejoins us now. welcome back. thank you. it has been a bit ofa welcome back. thank you. it has been a bit of a journey. got back yesterday. you said the best experience of your life. why was it so special? it was absolutely amazing to go for a personal best onto the world stage. the dream come true and secure an olympic qualifier which means my job true and secure an olympic qualifier which means myjob is a lot easier next year... you say it is easier but actually, what else do you do?” ama but actually, what else do you do?” am a gym instructor and i am a custody officer. i loved watching this but i had no idea until you brought this in how heavy it is.
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this but i had no idea until you brought this in how heavy it ism is four kilos, the weight of your average domestic cat. are you thinking of flinging a cat! definitely not. what are the rules? it has to be in contact with your neck until release and your elbow has to be high so it does not drop away from your neck and you have to stay within the parameters of the circle. you have two jobs you do alongside competing. in terms of funding, is it possible you might be able to go full—time? funding, is it possible you might be able to go full-time? it might be a possibility if i get offered funding from british athletics. i had to work to live as all of us do this year and it work to live as all of us do this yearand it can work to live as all of us do this year and it can be frustrating at times. i love the use of the time
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there, for extra distance laughter. you're trying to change use of the crust and get training in.” you're trying to change use of the crust and get training in. i train twice a day around my shifts and gym work. it is hectic and with the athletics come school visits so i try to do as much as that as i can. it is balancing the diary and making sure i have enough time.” it is balancing the diary and making sure i have enough time. i want to talk about the throw that wasn't your personal best. you almost seemed like you did not believe it. —— that was your personal best. training had been going well so i thought it could be a good competition for me but i didn't know it was gonna go that far. when i saw the distance come up, i put my head in my hands because i could not believe it. even my coach didn't know how to celebrate it because he was stunned as well. did you watch
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other people and think, i might try that. it shotput there is a spin or a glider. i cannot do spin, it makes me too dizzy and disorientated. you pick up and try and add on things. you know instantly if it is a good throw. hence my reaction was happening as the shot was flying. how did you get into it? my gran was a professional footballer. originally i was a 100m winter, back in the day. i was never going to be and then asher smith of the country so my mum said to give the shotput a go.
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so my mum said to give the shotput a 90- -- so my mum said to give the shotput a go. —— dinner asher smith. so my mum said to give the shotput a go. -- dinner asher smith. the think you're not saying is didn't you come second after trying it for six weeks. yes, i came second at the national championships at school level. some people are saying you should probably seek at it. the flash stick with it. don't go dropping it on your toe. you have qualified for the olympics and you are now getting a training regime for tokyo? we're going to be about competitions for next year and the training leading up to the big event. we wish you all the best and we hope to speak to you before that. it's 7:45am. here's carol with a look
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at this morning's weather. we have got everything virtually going on. but for some of us it is a lovely day. our weather watchers have done us proud sending in some beautiful pictures of the sunrise. the forecast is unsettled. jet strea m the forecast is unsettled. jet stream is very active, a low pressure area dominating our weather. there will be showers and rain. you can see over the next few days the low pressure is dominating our weather. one look at those isobars, they are close together, that means it is going to be windy, and with gusty winds. winds are coming in from the atlantic, so that is mild for us. not a hint of blue, so no frosts in the forecast. we start off in double figures, a mild start. there is some sunshine to start. there is some sunshine to start the day. we do have showers coming our way through the course of the day. as is the way with showers,
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some of us will mist them all together. if you do because one, it will be blown away quickly on gusty winds as indicated by the black circles. strongest winds in the north and west of the uk. if you managed to stay out of the window in the showers, it won't feel too bad for this time of year, temperatures more or less bang on. 11— 17 degrees. we will still hold onto some of those hours, there could be some of those hours, there could be some thunder and hail as well tonight, that is quite quickly blown from the west towards the eased. not quite as mild as dots of the day as it is this morning for tomorrow, with all this wind around there aren't going to be any issues with fog. tomorrow, low pressure still dominating our weather, still quite windy as you can see from the isobars, less so in the south. a weather front coming in from the west enhancing those hours. some of those hours will merge to give longer spells of rain, bowing
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through quite quickly, a lot of us will mist them and stay dry. temperatures 11— 15 degrees. thursday and friday, a little bit more uncertain because of weather front is coming our way and their positioning —— weather fronts. front is coming our way and their positioning —— weatherfronts. it will be blustery, but not as windy. rain coming in across northern ireland and scotland, drierfurther south, and temperatures on thursday with less wind around, up to 18 degrees. that sounds nice. the way bank scam victims are compensated needs to become a permanent system, that's what consumer group 'which?'. and the uk's top seven banks are calling for this morning. ben is looking at that. quite a busy day today. this is an interesting one because it relates to bank transfer fraud. interesting one because it relates to bank transferfraud. this is
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where i get a request to send some money to someone who i think is my builder or my phone provider. but it turns out i have sent it to a wrong person, a fraudster. under the old regime it meant you wouldn't really get your money back because i'm the one that initiated the transaction. therefore i am judged to be at fault. but the amount lost last year in those games hit nearly £150 million. 78,215 victims of it last year, it's astonishing. many people feel they have nowhere to turn because they are the ones that started the transfer. this is what happened to vee from essex. when it came to payment details, i was referred to a booking date, they wanted the full payment. i made a
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bank transfer for the full amount. the next morning i hadn't received an e—mail, so alarm bells started to ring. igot an e—mail, so alarm bells started to ring. i got up the website, they informed me they hadn't sent me a booking request, so i immediately knew that i had been scammed. i felt sick to my stomach. you know? i had sent money to somewhere, it was awful. you can absolutely understand how she would feel. so for customers like her, this she get her money back? um, well, up until now, it was hit and miss. back? um, well, up until now, it was hitand miss. it back? um, well, up until now, it was hit and miss. it was a voluntary scheme set up, and the money for it was only here into the end of the year and that money runs out stop 'which?', the consumer group, is calling for the banks to create a compensation pot for people. there
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isa compensation pot for people. there is a temporary pipe for findings of this type of scam —— pot, that does run out by the end of year. the banks have proposed organising a 2.9 p banks have proposed organising a 2.9 p levy on transactions, which means these people could be reimbursed in these people could be reimbursed in the future. we are encouraging pay uk to encourage this proposal so victims are protected and reimbursed in the future. now that is the proposal, pay uk, the body that operates the payment systems between banks, it said it will decide by the end of the year whether it will comply and create this fund. some say we should just be more careful, maybe it is our own fault because we're the ones who those numbers in. dsb, one of the bank that has created its own fund and condensates -- tsb, created its own fund and condensates —— tsb, who compensate their own customers forfraud
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—— tsb, who compensate their own customers for fraud and refund guarantees, but i think it is worthwhile to think oliver's take care. ‘— worthwhile to think oliver's take care. —— all of us take out. maybe tra nsfer $5 to care. —— all of us take out. maybe transfer $5 to have you have transferred to. make sure you check, you know, just check a couple of grid? that is a very good idea. good morning if you havejust grid? that is a very good idea. good morning if you have just switched grid? that is a very good idea. good morning if you havejust switched on the telly this morning. the stirling prize will be awarded for the 'building of the year‘ this evening, and the bookies favourite is rather unusual — a small estate of council houses in norwich. it's the first time a council house has made it onto the shortlist, and as our arts correspondent david sillito has been finding out, it isn'tjust the rents that make them affordable.
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so this is it! very nice. this is the living room. we've got the garden, my little girl abigail loves the garden. this little passageway helps to make so many friends. and who is this? this is the dog, rusty. i would never have imagined the council could have put through something like this. have a look at how thick these walls are. these are designed to be low energy. you aren't even allowed a letterbox in the door in case it let out heat. and they also made the most of the weather. one thing about it is, it's pretty sunny, and there is a reason, they have designed it that way. because the roof is our kind of
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really flat, which means even in the dark days of winter, even on december 21, if there is some sunshine, it will be coming down here and hitting the bottom of the window. another key feature is this. this to me is a snicker. coming from scarborough, it's a snicker. we call ita scarborough, it's a snicker. we call it a 'gennel‘. scarborough, it's a snicker. we call it a 'gennel'. these were the 12 story blocks of clouds, the first of britain cosmic skyscrapers. —— flats. -- britain's skyscrapers. for a long time, flats have been seen as the most effective way to make use of space efficiently. but these architects wanted to focus on sociability. i think we have a problem with a lack of social connectedness. this housing is thinking a lot about how we can encourage social connections, people
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meeting each other.” encourage social connections, people meeting each other. i think there are also ideas about how to encourage children to play outdoors, how to get to play areas without crossing roads and making that safe. and it's the most child friendly safe 5 pa ce and it's the most child friendly safe space that made all the difference for chloe and their partner louis, they are never going back to a flood. when you first walked into it, what did you think? i thought it was lovely, i'd love one. and, yeah, i've managed to get one, which is really good.“ one. and, yeah, i've managed to get one, which is really good. if you had the chance to buy it...?” one, which is really good. if you had the chance to buy it. . . ? i would buy it, yeah, 100%, iwould buy had the chance to buy it. . . ? i would buy it, yeah, 100%, i would buy it. they are all going to have a chance pretty soon, to buy them. i think that's true. under the right to buy scheme, yeah. it would be great if the government would reconsider the policy. we are here for the long run, ithink. policy. we are here for the long run, i think. so as soon you get the chance... we will buy it, yeah, then it will be ours. goldsmith street,
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warm, sociable, award—winning, affordable council housing. for now. davidson litho, bbc news, norwich. —— david still litho. so we will find out if the norwich housing estate has won the award. still to come on breakfast: 19—year—old harry dunn was killed when his motorbike collided with a car near raf croughton, in northamptonshire. a us diplomat‘s wife has been named as a suspect, but has left the country, and is protected from prosecution under diplomatic immunity. we'll hear from harry's parents just after 8am. we will also be speaking to harry notejunior, we we will also be speaking to harry note junior, we will see you in a few minutes for the national
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headlines. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm asad ahmad. activists from 'animal rebellion', a movement linked to extinction rebellion, have spent the night occupying smithfield meat market in farringdon. they said they wanted the world famous market to share their "vision of a future pla nt—based food system". protestors held a minute's silence for what they said were "animals whose lives are lost" at smithfield, before selling pla nt—based products there. if you want to be a vegetarian, be a vegetarian. whatever. don't force other people. these are people who need to work, they need to earn a living, they need to have jobs. so it's not these people we're targeting at all, we are trying to send a message out to the government. well prime minister borisjohnson has called the protestors "uncooperative crusties", while the metropolitan police say they've made 280 arrests. yesterday, whitehall, horse guards parade and the mall were among the places
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in westminster, brought to a standstill. two bridges were also blocked. children who are addicted to computer games are to be offered treatment on the nhs via skype. the service is being offered by the london—based centre for internet and gaming disorders. nhs bosses say its in response to an "emerging problem". boats in the thames estuary are being warned today to keep a lookout for a whale that's been sighted near the dartford crossing. it's believed to be the first time in ten years that a humpback has been spotted in the river. experts say it appears to be in good health. it follows the visit of benny the beluga in the same area a year ago. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there are problems on the circle, hammersmith & city due to a signal failure on edge ray road. —— edge way road. on the roads, the extinction rebellion protests
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means parliament square, whitehall, westminster bridge, the mall, millbank, victoria embankment and the strand all remain closed. elsewhere, in bermondsey, druid street remains is closed due to a police investigation. and in mitcham, cranmer road closed for emergency repairs. now the weather with kate. good morning. it's a mild and bright start for many of us this morning. we'll see some really decent spells of sunshine throughout the day, but some heavy showers to contend with as well. now, first thing this morning there may be just be a little bit of cloud down towards the south—east, but it's clearing away quickly. that's just the remnants of the light rain overnight. elsewhere, plenty of sunshine, them this line of heavy showers arrives. you mayjust get a rumble of thunder, some hail mixed into the heavier ones. temperatures getting up to 17 celsius. it's got quite a westerly, south—westerly breeze, quite a brisk one. so those showers will blow through fairly quickly. and it's the same this evening and overnight. fewer showers perhaps, but showers out there. some clear spells, that brisk, westerly wind as well pushing them through. the minimum temperature getting down to around eight celsius. so for tomorrow, again,
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sunny spells, some showers around, quite a gusty, brisk breeze, 15 celsius the maximum. similar conditions. it stays rather unsettled but some sunny spells, but we're never too far away from a shower. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today... pressure grows on the us government over its refusal to waive immunity for a diplomat‘s wife, who fled the uk after a fatal car crash. we'll speak to the family of 19—year—old victim harry dunn in the next few minutes. the prime minister brands extinction rebellion protestors "uncooperative crusties" as he calls on them to stop blocking london's streets. #in # in olden days a glimpse of stocking was looked on as something
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shocking, but now, god knows, anything goes... shocking, but now, god knows, anything goes... grammy and emmy award winner harry connickjr will be here to tell us how he's recreating musical classics from the great american songbook. preparing for no—deal. the government updates its plans for tariffs if we leave the eu without a deal. it covers clothing, fuel and vehicles. andy murray's remarkable comeback from injury continues. it's confirmed that he'll play singles at the australian injanuary, it'll be his first singles appearance at a grand slam since major hip surgery. todayis today is a day of sunshine and showers, some of the shower is heavy and thundery, but they will blow through quite quickly on a gusty wind. more in15 through quite quickly on a gusty wind. more in 15 minutes. more in 15 minutes. our top story. the foreign secretary dominic raab has urged his us counterpart, mike pompeo, to allow a diplomat‘s wife to return to the uk and face police questions about
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a fatal traffic accident. 19—year— old, harry dunn died in august after his motorbike was hit by a car near raf croughton, in northamptonshire, a military base used by the us air force. the main suspect, named as anne sacoolas, has returned to the us. families of diplomats are protected from prosecution in their home country by "diplomatic immunity". we'll be speaking to harry's parents, charlotte charles and tim dunn, in around five minutes' time. further details have emerged of the european union's objections to british proposals for changes to the irish backstop in the brexit negotiations. a major concern centres on the fact that neither side would introduce checks on the border between northern ireland and ireland. let's speak now to our political correspondent, nick eardley, who's in westminster this morning. good morning. this has been the area of concern from whichever side you look at it for quite some time? yes, thatis look at it for quite some time? yes, that is right. borisjohnson put new
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proposals on the table last week, the european union has been looking at them at an official level and they are not convinced. real concerns about the idea that the northern ireland assembly would have to approve the plans every four yea rs or to approve the plans every four years or so and i worry that would essentially give a veto to the assembly and to the dup, meaning it is not clear what would happen if they do not endorse what was on the table. likewise, back at home there is an explosive briefing in the spectator overnight published by the political editorjames forsyth, suggesting some in downing street andi suggesting some in downing street and i think talks with europe will break down in the next few days and they will try and blame europe for that. it does not suggest things are going well. number ten was really hoping this week progress would be made, there would be some sort of suggestion ideal could be done. at the moment that is not the case and it is looking good. nick, good to
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talk to you. nick, good to talk to you. the government has updated its plans for tariffs on goods and services, if the uk leave the eu without a deal. the plans cover clothing, fuel and vehicles that the government says would mean lower prices in the shops. the temporary regime will last for 12 months after brexit until a new, longer term plan can be agreed. president trump has defended his decision to pull us troops out of northern syria, but repeated his warning to turkey not to take advantage of the withdrawal. mr trump said he would "decimate" its economy if ankara took actions he considered to be "off limits". turkey says it's completed preparations for a possible military operation in northern syria, warning that it could start at any time. police have arrested 280 people in london, as environmental campaign group extinction rebellion begin their latest protest against climate change. key sites in london have been blocked including horse guards parade and the mall, with some activists chaining themselves to vehicles and railings. brea kfast‘s tim muffett
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is at whitehall for us this morning. good morning, tame. are they planning to stay where they are? yes, they are indeed for the time being. uncooperative crusties was the way the prime minister described protesters at an event last night. many of them have spent the night close to where he is, downing street, behind me. you can see all these tents along quite well. yesterday there were 280 arrests and huge parts of london were blocked off from lambeth bridge down to whitehall and the strand. the disruption was large. extinction rebellion say they want to see zero carbon emissions in the uk by 2025. they would like to see a citizens' assembly set up to bring that about. many people say those ideas are unrealistic. the group has promised 13 more days of disruption so for
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the next fortnight it would seem sites like this will be pretty familiar in london. we are hoping to speak to the metropolitan police later. how much do you know about the provisions? the police have been talking to protesters and so far it has been pretty peaceful. i was talking to many people yesterday and although there were arrests, many of the protests were peaceful in their nature. the people here are determined to make their presence felt and they apologise for the disruption they are causing, but they believe the point they are making is worth the disruption and the short term pain many will feel is worth it to get across the long—term message, which they believe more people should be paying attention to. we are hoping to speak to the police a little bit later. thank you. the institute for fiscal
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studies said borrowing would likely climb to £100 billion if there was no—deal brexit, and total debt could soar to 90% of national income, which means the uk could be borrowing almost as much as the country earns in a year. the treasury says its rules on income and expenditure are currently under review. nhs england is launching services for children and young people with behavioural issues which are linked to gaming, gambling and social media. it's esimated that 55,000 11 to 16—year—olds in the uk have gambling problems. the nhs chief executive, simon stevens, said the health service should not be left to "pick up the pieces" by internet firms and bookmakers. a humpback whale, thought to be up to 10 metres in length, has been spotted in the river thames. the mammal was seen spouting water near the dartford crossing between kent and essex over the weekend. experts say the whale does not seem to be distressed and hope it finds its own way back to sea.
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it's even been nicknamed hessie online. we will have a quick look at the front pages this morning. the daily mail leads with the headline, face justice for my son. they are calling on the wife of a us diplomat to return to the uk to answer questions about the death of their son. the times is saying that the us is accused of double standards for refusing to waive diplomatic immunity. that is a picture of an extinction rebellion protest in trafalgar square. the guardian leads on brexit with a warning from the economic research group the institute for fiscal studies, which claims tax cuts and higher funding institute for fiscal studies, which claims tax cuts and higherfunding i needed to offset a no—deal brexit. it features a photo of the us
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business woman embroiled in a row over her connections to boris johnson. the telegraph, children's' lives are being wrecked by obsession is fuelled by technology. it carries quotes from one nhs chief who says tech companies are cashing in on these disorders, leaving the nhs to pick up the pieces. that is also a picture of extinction rebellion in london yesterday. that picture has been around a lot. sally was talking yesterday about the longstaff brothers. this is on the back of daily mail. this is sean and matty. he scored on his debut for newcastle against manchester united. a lot of newcastle fans delighted. sheer delight for what it means to score on your debut for your club.
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that is an adorable little picture. that is an adorable little picture. that is an adorable little picture. that is cute. i am sure they have been celebrating. newcastle and manchester united in a spot of bother in the premier league. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. and you are starting with a typhoon? yes, we think this typhoon will head towards the south coast of japan. it has been categorised as a violent typhoon. if this was a hurricane in the atlantic, it would be category five. typhoons, hurricanes and cyclones a re five. typhoons, hurricanes and cyclones are the same beasts, but they are called different things in different parts of the world. the sequence goes in a loop. you can see the kind of direction it is taken, pushing towards the south coast of japan by saturday we reckon. by that time it will have weakened a little bit, but it will still be packing a
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punch and it will have sustained wind speeds of 103 miles an hour and gusts up to 150 miles an hour and between 300 and 500 millimetres of rainfall. it will continue to weaken as it pushes northwards. that track could change, but that is the current thinking on where we expect it to be. for ourselves back at home, we have had some beautiful weather watchers' pictures in this morning of the sunrise. for the next few days we will see sunshine, but it will remain unsettled, often windy and wet with rain and showers. that is because we have an active jet stream and a potent area of low pressure with as for the next few days. because the isobars are tightly packed it means it will be windy, the strongest winds in the north and the west of the uk. it is coming in from the atlantic, which isa mild coming in from the atlantic, which is a mild direction for us, as indicated by the yellow. no issues
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this week with frost. this morning it isa this week with frost. this morning it is a mild start to the day and there is sunshine. but heavy showers in scotland and some are quite thundery at the moment. as we go through the day more of us will see those showers and blown along on gusty winds. some of them will have hailand gusty winds. some of them will have hail and thunder embedded in them and it will be gusty around the showers. if you manage to stay out of them and you are in the sunshine, out of the wind temperature is 11-17, out of the wind temperature is 11—17, more or less where we should be in october. overnight we hang on toa be in october. overnight we hang on to a lot of the showers, still those gusty winds with clear skies. if anything, temperatures a bit lower than this morning. tomorrow morning we will be starting at 8—10. tomorrow low pressure is still very much driving our weather and you can still see all those isobars, more tightly packed in the north, but blustery in the south. we are
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looking at a mixture of bright spells, sunshine and showers. the very nature of showers means you could miss them all together and have a dry day. temperatures 11 in the north to 15 in the south. for thursday and friday there is an element of uncertainty in the forecast because of the weather front and the positioning of it. you can still see the low pressure with us, but it will come in from the west and it will bring rain and across northern ireland and scotland and northern england. so in the north it will be brighter with some sunshine, but that could change. temperatures between 10—18. it's a pain no parent wants to experience and the family of harry dunn, who was killed
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when his motorbike collided with a car in august, say their lives have been left in tatters by his death. now they want closure and are pleading with the wife of a us diplomat, who is a suspect, to return to the uk to face a police investigation, after she fled to the states, protected by diplomatic immunity. harry's mum charlotte charles, and his dad tim dunn, join us now from west london. thank you so much forjoining us and talking to us about this. i want to know, charlotte, we know the prime minister and the foreign secretary have urged the us to reconsider their position. have you got any indication that things are changing? we feel really the fact boris johnson has now spoken up that we are getting somewhere. whether things are really changing yet, we'd like to think so, we would like to be hopeful enough to think that is the case. but we are just going to keep pushing until we definitely know that that is happening. we know
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it is very unusual for the us to waive diplomatic immunity, but are you also feeling a bit more optimistic now? yes, i am. like charlotte said, with borisjohnson coming out and saying what he said yesterday, it was nice to feel we we re yesterday, it was nice to feel we were getting the support we have been trying to get and maybe president trump we look at this. been trying to get and maybe president trump we look at thism you could talk to the president himself, what kind of message would you send him? i wouldjust ask himself, what kind of message would you send him? i would just ask him to think about us as a family and about the way the immunity is set up to protect a diplomat from danger and not the way it is being used to whisker away someone after she has
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caused an accident. i would ask him to look at it logically and the way they have used it we do not think is right. charlotte, have you had any contact at all from the family? nothing, absolutely nothing. i think thatis nothing, absolutely nothing. i think that is one of the hardest things we are having to deal with because now we have got a name and a face and still nothing. it just we have got a name and a face and still nothing. itjust seems inhumane. it just doesn't still nothing. itjust seems inhumane. itjust doesn't feel right. as a mother myself and many other people who have come forward with support for us all the way around the world now, even more support from the usa over the last 24 support from the usa over the last 2a hours, itjust... it is really distressing not to have any word from her being a mother herself.
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yes, i can't get my head around it. it doesn't sit well with me. you talk about the response from people around the world. this is such a tough time for you, does that in any way help you through this?” tough time for you, does that in any way help you through this? i think help is a strong word for it. we feel very supported and we are extremely grateful. we have had many, extremely grateful. we have had any extremely grateful. we have had many, many words of comfort, but nothing is going to really help us... charlotte, we havejust lost you. we cannot start to grieve. it is very difficult. i am so sorry, we have just lost you, but i will carry on talking to you. also from the embassy point of view have they been in touch with you? have they sent anything to either of you? they sent
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usa anything to either of you? they sent us a letter dated the 17th of september. it was a good few weeks after we had lost harry. that letter seemed to coincide with 48 hours earlier that harry's second dad, stepdad, is a us citizen himself. we had absolutely nothing prior to that point. that seemed to prompt a letter from woodyjohnson, point. that seemed to prompt a letter from woody johnson, but point. that seemed to prompt a letter from woodyjohnson, but apart from that we have had absolutely nothing. we have had nothing from the raf base at croton, we have had nothing from the mod. we were just left to try and deal with the fact that we had lost harry and that we we re that we had lost harry and that we were expected to get on with it. but it is not right. something does not sit quite right. the feeling in the
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pit of our stomachs tells us this cannot be right, hence why we are doing what we are doing. she has in some ways a choice, doesn't she? she could make a choice to come back to the uk, tim, would you urge her to do that? we would like to think so. we think she must have had a choice, she is her own person. she must know what is going on now. she must deep down in her heart realise coming back would be the right thing to do. i have heard it said that you have considered at least going to america yourself. is that something you still might consider? yes, we talked about it this morning. we feel may be we might have to go as far as that if we do not get the answers from the government and the foreign & commonwealth office soon. this has
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had such a devastating impact on yourfamily, the had such a devastating impact on your family, the fact you are having to fight and work so hard to find the answers to what happened, what does that mean for you, charlotte? pain day and night. you want to grieve, you desperately want to grieve. the whole family desperately wa nts to grieve. the whole family desperately wants to grieve. but we can't. every isa wants to grieve. but we can't. every is a battle, every day is more of a battle tha n is a battle, every day is more of a battle than we feel it should be. we are having to go to bed at night with a new plan for the next morning to give as a purpose to up in the morning, to be able to look after his twin. he has lost his partner in crime, he has lost his twin ship. it
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has really robbed us of being able to be where we should be, which is six weeks into grieving in some kind of way. we still only feel like it happened yesterday, two days ago, because we are stuck with what should have been a clear—cut case. it is so far from it. i know you have talked a little bit about what harry was like and he would have wa nted harry was like and he would have wanted to know the answers, witty, tim? absolutely. that is one thing harry was, we have talked about his fun loving nature and his caring side, but he hated anything not being correct. he didn't like anything that was underhand. he was always one for the truth and making sure everything was done right, that was one of his traits, yes. charlotte, how do you best remember
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him? a cheeky smile, big bear hugs. he would always know when you needed that extra bit of comfort if you had had a bad day at work. and obviously his passion for riding. every time you saw him he either had barely any clothes on if he was in the house, and when he was dressed it was just in biker gear. he barely went out without his motorbike. he lived to write. he worked hard five or six days a week to be able to have his passion for riding and his passion was so strong. a lot of that passion came out in his bighearted nature as well. we really admired that. we loved that. we really miss him. thank you so much for talking so beautifully about your son as well.
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best of luck. thank you. thank you. very powerful words, the parents of harry dunn this morning. let's bring you some other news today. let's bring you some other news today. the metropolitan poice say its response to climate change demonstrations in london will be robust, after 280 people were arrested during protests organised by environmental campaign group extinction rebellion. last april, more than 1,000 protesters were arrested, after similar events brought some parts of the city to a standstill. the deputy assistant commissioner of the metroplitan police, laurence taylor, joins us now from central london. thank you for being with us and good morning. i know you were listening to that last interview as well and it is heartbreaking what the families are going through, but on to other matters. in terms of trying to other matters. in terms of trying to get london to work, how are you facing the challenge with the extension rebellion protesters on the streets of the capital? good
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morning. we have got a very robust please action plan in place and we have arrested over 320 people. that isa have arrested over 320 people. that is a fifth in day one compared to the numbers we arrested in april. we are anticipating more protests today and we have large numbers of police officers coming into central london to help us manage the disruption. we have got a number of tense inroads and we have found that people have glued themselves within the tents and they have locked themselves to the tense and it will make ourjob more challenging and take time to clear some of the disruption we are facing today. back in july, richard walton said the police should invest a soft touch approach to extension rebellion rather than coming down ha rd rebellion rather than coming down hard on them. it is a really fine balance from your perspective in terms of getting that action and the assertive nature of your pleasing right, and yet not going over the line. that is right. the pleasing
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responsibility is to provide that balanced approach. what is important is that whilst protest is a fundamental human right, that does not give you the right to disrupt other people's lives to the extent they are. people's livelihoods are being damaged, we had over 50 bus routes cancelled yesterday and i know stories of people struggling to get to work. it is important the protesters u ndersta nd get to work. it is important the protesters understand that impact. today we have put conditions on the protest under the public order act where people can only lawfully protest at trafalgar square on the pedestrianised area off the road. anybody else protesting in the westminster area linked to extension rebellion are committing an offence and they will be arrested. do you feel you are in control of these protests ? feel you are in control of these protests? these things do take time and we have got a robust policing approach. we have arrested an awful lot of people. once you arrest people you have to take them through
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custody and that takes a long time. the protesters we are arresting are being advised not to help us and not to provide their details, which is taking longer to process through custody. as we take peace officers off the streets, there is fewer that we have to make those arrests. we have gone to other forces. we have asked for additional assistance for officers to come to the capital to help us, but it is very disruptive and frankly police officers should not be sucked into london, we should be policing the rest of london and doing all the things we ought to be doing. you talk about the arrests in april and there were more than 800 charges, but how many were convicted? at the moment they are still proceeding through court and over 250 people have received a criminal record and they have been convicted through court. of those 880 plus charges they are still progressing and we expect that number to go
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progressing and we expect that numberto go up. progressing and we expect that number to go up. in terms of the challenges you face as a police force, iam not challenges you face as a police force, i am not asking you to give us an arbitrary number, but where does this rate in terms of the extension rebellion protest?m does this rate in terms of the extension rebellion protest? it is a really challenging thing to the police. we have to provide that balance, but it sucks in an awful lot of resource which should and could be policing other communities in london. it causes a huge disruption to people and it is affecting people's livelihoods and it costs a lot of money. the protests in april cost over £16 million and people need to understand the impact this has. they have to protest responsibly. go to trafalgar square, stop disrupting the roads and allow us to carry on pleasing the capital. lawrence taylor, from the met police, talking about extension rebellion protesters who are in london and will be there for the next few days. now the news,
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travel and weather where you are. more showers forecast not only today that over the next few days. staying pretty unsettled, some sunshine in between showers but some fairly gusty winds. through today, a few bands of showers, you will notice the first one in south—west england, the first one in south—west england, the midlands, into eastern england by lunchtime, pushing into the far east of england later this afternoon. a scattering of showers elsewhere, particularly for northern ireland and scotland, where there will be strong winds for all others but particularly in the west of scotland. your maximum temperatures today are about 13 to 17 degrees. this evening and tonight is first band of showers clears away, more than coming to mainly northern and western areas and we will run the
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clock right throughout wednesday, most any spells and showers, quite blustery conditions and a bit cherry than today. goodbye. —— and a bit more chilly than today.
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this is worklife from bbc news, with sally bundock and david eades. 17 airline bankruptcies in 2019, strikes and high fuel costs. but easyjet flies high. live from london, that's our top story on tuesday 8th october. the budget airline is benefiting from pilot strikes at rivals british airways and ryanair. but with fuel prices high and the global economy slowing, is the industry in for a hard landing?

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