Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 9, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

6:00 am
good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: eight days away from next weeks crucial brexit summit, the irish president warns that a deal will be "very difficult" to reach. partisan and unconstitutional — the white house refuses to co—operate with the impeachment inquiry into president trump. after an horrific accident left herjaw hanging on byjust a tiny piece of skin, we'll speak to 15—year—old emily and the surgeon who rebuilt herface. the cost of going cashless. fewer bank branches and atm closures threaten the end of cash. i'll look at those struggling to access their money. it's a big day at the rugby world cup.
6:01 am
scotland face a must win game against russia to keep their hopes alive while wales can qualify for the quarter—finals if they beat fiji. good morning. and it is another day of sunshine and showers. some of those showers are merging to give longer spells of rain, heavy with hailand longer spells of rain, heavy with hail and thunder, but they will be blown along quite quickly on gusty winds. they will have more in 15 minutes. good morning. it's wednesday the 9th of october. our top story: the irish prime minister has warned it will be "very difficult" for the uk and the eu to reach an agreement on brexit before the deadline of october the 31st. leo varadkar‘s comments come as european leaders accused the government of turning the brexit negotiations into a "stupid blame game." our political correspondent nick eardley is in downing street for us this morning. nick, what next for brexit? the tone of the conversation has really ta ke n the tone of the conversation has really ta ken a the tone of the conversation has really taken a turn. good morning.
6:02 am
it absolutely has. it was only a week ago the borisjohnson published his brexit proposals and by this stage he was really hoping that things would have taken off, that there would be some serious negotiations about what had to change, what were, and what didn't. that's not happening at all. and yesterday really gave us a flavour of just how yesterday really gave us a flavour ofjust how difficult it was going to be to reach any compromise by a week tomorrow when the european council meeting takes place. last night, the irish tee shot, leo varadkar, saying it was very difficult to see how a deal would be done by next week, but perhaps the main thing that happened yesterday was senior main thing that happened yesterday was senior sources main thing that happened yesterday was senior sources in the building behind me, number 10, was senior sources in the building behind me, number10, saying that the call with angela merkel had been very difficult, that she had made it clear that a new brexit deal was very unlikely, and that the two sides are still miles apart —— taoiseach. the tone is not good. and
6:03 am
at the moment it is hard to see how any kind of deal can be reached next week. so what happens if the talks to break down completely? good question. i think the simple answer is an almighty battle here at westminster, because the prime minister has said, repeatedly, continues to say, downing street continues to say, downing street continues to say, 31st of october the uk leaves european union, even if there isn't that new deal in place, to leave without a deal. parliament is completely disagrees. it has passed a law that is designed to stop that happening later that month —— this month. the government thinks there are some ways around it, we don't know exactly what they are, neither do mps and they are getting nervous about it. but if number 10 getting nervous about it. but if number10 did getting nervous about it. but if number 10 did suggest it was going to live without a deal think you can expect a number of things, including a huge fight in parliament to try to stop that happening. and potentially it is all heading back to the supreme court another massive legal battle over whether that's possible 01’ battle over whether that's possible or not. strapped in, it will be a
6:04 am
busy three or four weeks. we are ready. thank you very much. we are ready. coming up later on breakfast, we'll be joined by alastair campbell, the former director of communications to tony blair and the brexit party mep, lucy harris — that's at 7:10. that will be an interesting discussion. the white house has officially refused to co—operate with the impeachment inquiry against president trump, rejecting it as "baseless" and "constitutionally invalid". the inquiry is trying to find out if the president held back aid to ukraine to push it to investigate joe biden, who is running for the democratic presidential nomination. our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. a clash at the heart of american government. the white house flexing its muscle and refusing to have anything to do with the democrats' impeachment enquiry in the house of representatives. in an eight page letter, the presents lawyers as the enquiry violates fundamental fairness and lacks any legitimate
6:05 am
constitutional foundation. fairness and lacks any legitimate constitutionalfoundation. it accuses the democrats of seeking to "overturn the results of the 2016 election" and "deprive the american people of the president their fea rley people of the president their fearley chosen". the white house believe the enquiry is flawed because it is moving forward without a vote on the floor of the house of representatives. the first sign the administration was putting up a roadblock to the enquiry came when this man, gordon sondland, the us ambassador to the european union, failed to appear before the house intelligence committee. the democrats want to question him about his role in discussions with ukrainian officials which have led to claims that president trump asked a foreign power to investigate a political rival. the failure to produce this witness, the failure to produce this witness, the failure to produce these documents, we consider yet additional strong evidence of obstruction of the constitutional functions of congress, a coequal
6:06 am
branch of government. the white house is the impeachment process should be abandoned so the president can focus on leading the country and fulfilling his promises to the american people stop but with the country on the verge of a constitutional crisis, this is a tug of war that donald trump won't be able to ignore. peter bowes, bbc news. foreign secretary dominic raab has urged the us ambassador "to do the right thing" by the family of 19—year—old harry dunn, who was killed in a motorcycle crash in august. anne sacoolas, the wife of a diplomat, is believed to have been the driver of the vehicle that hit harry outside a us air base in northamptonshire but fled to america with diplomatic immunity. the bbc understands mr raab is due to meet harry's family later today to discuss the row. aisling mcveigh reports. present‘s premise is calling on the wife of an american diplomat to return to england to face charges in a deadly crash —— britain's premise. 19—year—old harry dunn was killed while riding his motorbike in august. a tragedy on a northamptonshire country road is now
6:07 am
making headlines in america. 19—year—old harry dunn was killed in august after his motorbike was hit bya car august after his motorbike was hit by a car travelling on the wrong side of the road. the accident happened here, outside a us military air base. anne sacoolas, pictured here 16 years ago on her wedding day to an american diplomat, is believed to an american diplomat, is believed to have been behind the wheel. the marriage means she is entitled to diplomatic immunity. two weeks after the crash in herfamily diplomatic immunity. two weeks after the crash in her family returned to america and live in this neighbourhood near washington, dc. now the foreign secretary, dominic raab, has met with us ambassador, woodyjohnson, and urged him to do the right thing by harry dunn and wave anne sacoolas's community so she can return to the uk for questioning. harry's family say they won't stop until they see justice done. we were just left to try to deal with the fact that we had lost harry and that we just were expected to get on with it. as the row over
6:08 am
diplomatic immunity continues, the story has struck a chord on both sides of the pond. at its heart, two pa rents sides of the pond. at its heart, two parents grieving the loss of their son. aisling mcveigh, bbc news. police have warned that extinction rebellion campaigners must vacate public areas like westminster and move to trafalgar square, or risk arrest. nearly 550 climate change activists have already been arrested in london over the past two days. our reporter keith doyle is in central london for us this morning. good morning. what has been happening overnight and what is the plan for today? yes, well, good morning from trafalgar square, right in the heart of london. anyone who knows this area would know it is usually packed with traffic at any time of day. but as you can see, today, this morning, it is a see of tense, with people just today, this morning, it is a see of tense, with peoplejust waking up, there are over 110th, food tents, well—being tents, and organised and
6:09 am
peaceful camp, i have to see. police have said any protesters who are in any of the other 11 sites that extinction rebellion are saying they are occupying over london, they will face arrest and prosecution. this is the only place that they are allowed protest. as you can see, it really is bringing the centre of london to a standstill. if we pan the camera around you can see more tents there. that is the road up to the west end. as we move around further here you can see, this is where the mall is, down into the mall. police have made 541 down into the mall. police have made 5111 arrests over the past two days. this is the third day of protests. the police say that it is taking up a lot of time to free people who have chained and glued themselves to various government buildings. the police say they will continue the process and all those people will be arrested. you can probably see behind me there is one of those
6:10 am
protesters. it is parked right at the top of whitehall. there are people chained inside that people all the way around it. protesters say they continue to action for the next two weeks and take it to other sites, including city airport in london. thank you very much. we had some waivers on the camera there. we got a good sense on the number of people there and the police presence as well. a teenager's jaw was so badly damaged in a horse riding accident her surgeon described it as the worst injury he had seen outside a war zone. fifteen—year—old emily eccles had herjaw split in half after a horse riding accident in august. it took surgeons 5.5 hours to rebuild herface using three titanium plates and more than 160 stitches. we will be speaking to emily and her surgeon we will be speaking to emily and her surgeon and her mum later on.
6:11 am
imagine being a parent and seeing that i'm wondering how will you rebuild my child's face? and he has done it. incredible story. iwas very sad when a heard this story this morning. the humpback whales seen swimming in the river thames over the weekend. yes, experts say it has died. it's thought it may have starved to death. there were already concerns for the welfare of the animal, which was first spotted near the qe2 bridge at dartford on sunday. the mammal was spotted lying motionless on mudflats yesterday. you see, you were concerned for that. i was concerned for it. better news for perhaps, one individual. it could be more than one. a syndicate. a single ticket—holder living here in the uk has scooped last night's euromillions jackpot — they've won £170 million — making them the country's richest ever lottery winner. £175 million. if it is one person...
6:12 am
if it is three people! the ticket—holder is yet to be named and it's not known if it's a single person, a family, or a syndicate, but they are now officially richer then singers sir tom jones and ed sheeran. do you know what, the beauty of it is, they might not even know it right now. that is a nice new tire you have this morning... apparently it has being claimed, the money —— tie. i think i have seen it before. cani tie. i think i have seen it before. can ijust tie. i think i have seen it before. can i just confirmed tie. i think i have seen it before. can ijust confirmed that i am not... no. i am in a syndicate. they haven't won it. other people might haven't won it. other people might have wanted. who is the name on that syndicate? to the other people in the syndicate get told? presumably when you sign up, one person does it. there are all sorts of rules, having looked into it, about honesty and... i thought media had one -- maybe you had one and they had told
6:13 am
yet. we each way individual tickets in my syndicate so maybe they could have. if scotla nd if scotland went today they will feel like they have won the lottery. it will feel like that for their fans. it is a huge a few days for scotland. they can turn it on, one much, perhaps, at best. and it is doing it consistently they have struggled with. they have to win three matches in a row to get into the quarterfinals. it is that simple for scotland. they must beat russia later this morning if they are to stand any chance of making the quarter—finals. wales can qualify for the last eight if they beat fiji. they are also in action today. watch out for this dreadful howler, gifting england's women victory against portugal, they needed some luck, the 1—0 win ended a run of five games without a win. andy murray lost a tough three—set battle at the shanghai masters and he wasn't happy with his opponent fabio fognini, who he told to "shut up".
6:14 am
we will be hearing from him later. and simone biles has done it again. she's won her 15th world championship gold medal and is now the most successful female gymnast in world championship history. she has been pulling of her double—doubles and triple—double ‘s. she is wonderful. i think she is the only genus who has two moves named after her. the double-double, a double somersault and then a double twist. think most people in the world will only do the two somersaults. two can do the two somersaults. two can do the two somersaults and then the twist. maybe two in the world. she is the only one can do the two somersaults and then the two twists. it is just coming up to a quarter past six. carol has a look at the weather for us. you tell us, but i don't think it will be great. today we are looking at a mixture of sunshine and showers. that will sum
6:15 am
up sunshine and showers. that will sum up the forecast for the next few days. low pressure continues to dominate our weather. as we head towards the end of the week, weather fronts coming in from the atlantic bringing some rain but the weather coming in from the atlantic also bringing in mild outside temperature was we should be roughly where we should be at this stage october by day and by night. today, a lot of showers already. some will merge to give longer spells of rain. some will be heavy and some will have hailand will be heavy and some will have hail and thunder. the black circles indicate the wind gusts and it is pretty windy, especially in the north and west and they showers will rattle through quite quickly. down a little bit with top temperatures 18. through this evening and overnight,
6:16 am
they will still be showers around. the ridge of high pressure coming in killing off some of them. but still some longer spells of rain moving quickly on the dusty winter. all this cloud starting to come in from the south—west heralds the arrival of this front. showers also quite heavy. on thursday, you can see the front coming in, bringing the cloud to southern parts of ireland through the night bringing rain. starting with heavy showers in scotland, a lot of dry weather and a fair bit of sunshine and the cloud builds as a weather front moves through, taking the stream with it. temperature wise, ten in the north and 17 towards the south. thursday into friday, the front goes through, the second part of that heads southwards bringing rain. the positioning could
6:17 am
still change but this is what we think. the ghost the first front, he comes the second one, more rain across scotland. —— here goes the first front. beyond that, the easiest way to describe it is u nsettled. easiest way to describe it is unsettled. rain at times, showers at times, windy at times but lots of sunny skies as well. i want to show interesting happening in the state. we have picked them but deliberately. today the top temperature will be 28 celsius by this evening it will start to plummet as a weather front starts to sink southwards. you can see the blue use appearing and tomorrow, the forecast will be cold, snow showers and —2. by friday it will be back up to ten and by saturday 19 degrees in
6:18 am
denver. that is fascinating. it is like the blue finger of doom. let's take a look at today's front pages. and there's really only one story in town — the so—called brexit "blame game". the telegraph reports on the phone conversation the prime minister had yesterday with the german chancellor, angela merkel, in which she reportedly said a brexit deal is now "impossible". it's an ominous headline on the guardian's front page — "the day the deal was doomed". however the paper also reports that the eu is preparing for an extension which could last until next summer. the express follows a similar theme — and writes that brexit was at a critical juncture last night. and it's "sabotage" at number 10 — the daily mirror leads on accusations by the shadow brexit secretary keir starmer, who says mrjohnson never wanted to secure a deal in the first place. also, a lot of front pages are showing this image of cricketer, ben stokes, with his wife clare,
6:19 am
who has tweeted this was a shared joke between the couple, and a way they show affection. he has been talking about that. she says she has become used to people making stuff up about me but of all the topic not to mess with domestic abuse has to be top of the list. it is an incredibly important issue. people suffer from it. what have you got? good morning. ifeelvery people suffer from it. what have you got? good morning. i feelvery small on the sofa today, i am surrounded bya on the sofa today, i am surrounded by a very, very tall man. have we ever presented together? carry on. by a very, very tall man. have we ever presented together? carry onlj will slouch. we are talking about the future of cash... is that a
6:20 am
future for cash? apparently not. get a lot of people who say that i can still get to the cash machine, particularly in rural areas but fundamentally it is costing money to maintain cash, whether it is cash machines, counter services and things like post offices and bank branches or indeed for the cash to be printed or minted in the first place. 11 billion transactions we made, down from 20 so halved in the la st made, down from 20 so halved in the last decade so it will decrease further in the next couple of years. the value of cash transactions coming down from £149 billion to about £50 billion so proves the cost of all of that and in some cases it isjust not worth of all of that and in some cases it is just not worth the effort. of all of that and in some cases it isjust not worth the effort. we will talk about that more. one story dominating the back pages, on the back of the times, the mirror, the
6:21 am
sun, tackling racism in football. england paying playing two games. if they are suggested subjected to any racism in that match in prague they will walk off the pitch. raheem sterling has spoken about this issue, how do you tackle it. there issue, how do you tackle it. there is clearly a fairly, certainly in the english squad, if they are subjected to any form of racist chance, they are seriously considering walking off the pitch. taking it in their home hand instead of living it to authorities. it would be a partially closed stadium. it isa would be a partially closed stadium. it is a genuine worry this could present itself again. nine out of
6:22 am
ten workers prefer to get up and go to theirjobs rather than state at home if they feel ill. i thought pulling a sick it was when you were not actually ill. i wouldn't know what you're talking about, louise. people going to work and well but, of course, one of the people says that has problems because you take your illness to work and not very productive. in schools as well. it is different when you are coughing in someone's here all day. you haven't got dogs. what about this? a beautiful gag at the. white dogs beat drugs. owning a dog can be more effective than medication... incredible study. the mortality rate
6:23 am
in patients who lived alone but had a dog was 33% lower than with those without a pet. if you have a dog, you do what, you might be naturally fitter and the person who did this study, said if this was a drug, it would make a farmer company very, very rich. —— pharmaceutical company. i could see how much people love their dogs, and encouraged into physical activity and the joke is that wolfereene this far more successful. look at the size of that dog! it has got like an a4 paper. for many people, getting behind the wheel for the first time can be a scary experience, and now concerns have been raised about the level of abuse new drivers
6:24 am
are facing on our roads. a survey of driving schools found that1 in 10 learners had given up completely due to the intolerance of other motorists. john maguire reports. if you really want to get past me, get around me. if you really want to get past me, getaround me. i if you really want to get past me, get around me. i am if you really want to get past me, getaround me. iam not if you really want to get past me, get around me. i am not going to block the junction. what is this quys block the junction. what is this guys problem? block the junction. what is this guys problem ? these block the junction. what is this guys problem? these videos are filmed on a dashboard camera and posted on line regularly by driving instructor, ashley nel. with more than 20 years experience under his seatbelt, he has seen it all. swearing at us, waving hands, using the horn and, to be honest, it is a lwa ys the horn and, to be honest, it is always that incessant need to overta ke always that incessant need to overtake us. today's research published by the insurer, marmalade, found that almost a third of driving instructors had witness road rage. no surprise. people look down on
6:25 am
driving skills and treat us like second—class citizens and it should not be like that. we are trying to doa not be like that. we are trying to do a job not be like that. we are trying to doajob and not be like that. we are trying to do a job and make the roads safer place. hi, charlie. how are you? today, charlie lee is at the jewel control and says learning to drive, already difficult enough, is made harder by the attitude of some drivers. they said right behind you, they go past you quite quickly and they go past you quite quickly and they think you are going slow but you are actually not. it is notjust the learner themselves, regardless of the person behind the wheel, even if it is of the instructor, when some drivers see l plate, they see red. this guy on the right-hand side, he is quite close. he is
6:26 am
positioning to the off side of the vehicle... he hasjust gone through a red light! that is a type of thing that often happens. you do not know that... i think you are onto something. one driver thinks they are totally different. one in ten has given up learning to drive altogether in this survey, as intolerance has forced them off the road. lots of you getting in touch already. do feel free. we will read some of those comments and will be talking to a driving instructor as well. if you are driving, you would have had to go through the process itself. having sat next to a learner
6:27 am
driverfor most of itself. having sat next to a learner driver for most of last year, i can tell you that is true. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alpa patel. around 50 households spent the night in emergency accommodation, after a major water main burst in north london. this was the scene in finsbury park yesterday morning. thames water says the problem has been temporarily fixed and supplies should now be restored. but it said there is a chance of further problems during the morning when lots of people will be using water at the same time. the metropolitan police has been told it will get funding to recruit more than thirteen hundred extra officers by the end of the next financial year. injuly the government pledged money to boost police numbers across england and wales by 20,000 over the next three years. but the mayor said while more officers are welcome, it's only a partial reversal of huge
6:28 am
cuts to the met since 2010. there's been a big rise in the number of people here in london deciding to become self—employed. the independent thinktank, centre for cities, found the vast majority of those jobs were in occupations like construction, cleaning and taxi driving. it also found there was a greater need for more training so people can adapt in the workplace more effectively. surrey‘s firecrews are going to be ballotted on strike action. the fire brigades union set a deadline of monday this week for surrey fire and rescue to reverse what crews call "ludicrous" cuts in night—cover. the fbu says seven engines and 70 posts are being lost as money is diverted to daytime fire prevention work. let's take a look at the travel situation now... on the tube — severe delays on the overground on the roads — still road closures around westminster — due to protests by extinction rebellion affecting routes in and around parliament square, trafalgar square, whitehall, the mall, the strand and horseferry road.
6:29 am
queen's drive is closed in both directions between seven sisters road and brownswood road because of flooding. and the a4 piccadilly underpass — remains closed out of town due to gas works. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. a rather cloudy start out that this morning but the cloud will start to break up and we will see some spells of sunshine. we are of course still at risk of one or two showers. the show was this morning, blowing through fairly quickly under that westerly breeze. we could see one or two more this afternoon and again, if you get one, they could be quite heavy but plenty of sunshine spells around. temperatures getting around 15 celsius. the showers below through on the westerly breeze quite quickly, continuing onto the evening but gradually fading away so we should get some dry weather. still
6:30 am
at risk of a shower but largely dry overnight. for tomorrow, because at risk of a shower but largely dry overnight. fortomorrow, because of that cloud starts to break up, we will see some sunshine first thing. gradually the cloud will increase. potentially it will bring a spot of rain tomorrow afternoon. temperatures state really unsettled with windy and wet spells through the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: we have the amazing story of emily eccles — the teenager whose jaw was so badly damaged in a riding accident, the surgeon who treated her said it was the worst injury he'd seen outside a war zone. we'll be able to see the incredible job he did later as they bothjoin us on the sofa. we're talking to actor claire goose about the new play she's starring in looking at parents
6:31 am
who shame their children on social media. and we meet the liverbirds — the world's first all—girl rock and roll group who have returned to play at the cavern club for the first time since the 1960s. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. good morning. first a summary of the main stories. the irish prime minister has warned it will be "very difficult" for the uk and the eu to reach an agreement on brexit before the deadline of october the 31st. leo varadkar‘s comments come as european leaders accused the government of turning the brexit negotiations into a "stupid blame game." yesterday, a downing street source said a deal was now looking increasingly unlikely following a phone call between the prime minister and german chancellor, angela merkel. foreign secretary dominic raab has urged the us ambassador "to do the right thing" by the family of 19—year—old harry dunn, who was killed in a motorcycle crash in august. anne sacoolas, the wife of a diplomat, is believed to have
6:32 am
been the driver of the vehicle that hit harry outside a us air base in northamptonshire. now, pressure is growing on the us government to waive her diplomatic immunity and allow her to return to the uk to face questioning. the bbc understands mr raab is due to meet harry's family later today to discuss the row. police have warned that extinction rebellion campaigners must vacate public areas like westminster and move to trafalgar square or risk arrest. nearly 550 climate change activists have already been arrested in london over the past two days. the protests are set to continue for the next two weeks, with 60 cities around the world taking part. the white house says it will not co—operate with the impeachment proceedings against president trump because it believes they're unconstitutional. the inquiry is trying to find out if the president held back aid to ukraine to push its government
6:33 am
to investigate joe biden, who is running for the democratic presidential nomination. we just told you about this, the fa ct we just told you about this, the fact it is coming up. a teenager's jaw was so badly damaged in a horse riding accident her surgeon described it as the worst injury he had seen outside a war zone. fifteen—year—old emily eccles had herjaw split in half after a horse riding accident in august. it took surgeons 5.5 hours to rebuild herface using three titanium plates and more than 160 stitches. we have some sad news now about the humpback whale that was seen swimming in the river thames over the weekend. yes, experts say it has died. it's thought it may have starved to death. there were already concerns for the welfare of the animal, which was first spotted near the qe2 bridge at dartford on sunday. the mammal was spotted lying motionless on mudflats yesterday. a single ticket—holder living here in the uk has scooped last night's euromillions jackpot. they've won £170 million, making them the country's richest ever lottery winner.
6:34 am
the ticket—holder is yet to be named and it's not known if it's a single person, a family or a syndicate, but they are now officially richer then singers sir tom jones and ed sheeran. if it is one person, think that would take them straight onto the sunday times ritualist. unbelievable. -- rich —— rich list. now here's a tale of endurance. meet the tiny penguin that ventured on a 1,500 mile swim from new zealand to australia on its own. the fiordland penguin, which comes from new zealand, was rescued by melbourne zoo and nursed back to health after its epic journey. once the bird was back on its feet the penguin was taken to a nearby beach, and released back into the wild. look at that. it is thinking i'm i could to go home now. we came in at the same time this morning. they notice you are walking a lot better... not so much like a
6:35 am
penguin. you were working like a penguin. you were working like a penguin of your physical exertions. my penguin of your physical exertions. my epic off—road marathon... i can mall walk. and less like a penguin. was it the penguin that reminded you? —— i can mall walk. was it the penguin that reminded you? -- i can mall walk. less modelling. are you going to need an abacus to work out what scotland need to do to get through to the next phase of the rugby world cup? they need the bonus points, they desperately need to win. you need an abacus. it could come down to it. everyone is totting up their points. it is very simple for scotland against russia, they must win later. asa against russia, they must win later. as a day for the home nations. wales can qualify for the quarter—finals if they beat fiji. meanwhile, scotland face russia in a game they can't afford to lose. it's all smiles now, but that could change very quickly. their head coach knows they must win to stand any chance of making the last eight. they will throw everything into
6:36 am
this. the last world cup for them in four years. or longer if they don't qualify for the next one. so we are expecting as good a performance as they gave against ireland. maybe even a level up. we can speak to our sports correspondent andy swiss, who is at the game for us. andy, we don't need an abacus just yet, but it is that simple for scotland. they must win later. that's right. this is a huge game for scotland to have any sort of chance. they simply have to beat russia here tonight. and, indeed, ideally, get a bonus point by scoring four or more tries. they should have enough to do that. russia are bottom of the group. they have lost all three of their games so have lost all three of their games so far. that said, scotland have made a lot of changes, 14 changes in total to the team that beat samoa,
6:37 am
without final group game against japan in mind. also a big day for wales. they can qualify for the knockout stage if they beat fiji. wales looked very impressive in their first two games. fiji wales looked very impressive in theirfirst two games. fiji did cause australia a few awkward problems in that opening game, even so problems in that opening game, even so wales will be confident of making it three wins out of three. organisers here are keeping an eye on the weather forecast. because a super typhoon is expected to roll in to japan over the weekend. it is expected to hit the tokyo — yokohama area. which is where england is due to play france on saturday and japan are due to play scotland on sunday. now, much as can be cancelled, teams will be given two points each. these are pivotal matches, particularly the scotland— japan game, which could determine who qualifies for the knockout stages. there have been suggestions that organisers are looking at rearranging the games are different venues and we should get an update on the world cup organisers in the next few hours.
6:38 am
thank you. we will be back with you injapan at the thank you. we will be back with you in japan at the next thank you. we will be back with you injapan at the next hour. it looks lovely at the moment. we know it could change of the coming days. take a look at this goalkeeping howler which gifted england's women victory over portugal. with the match goalless, the portugal goalkeeper dropped this cross, allowing beth mead to scored form close range. phil neville's side needed some luck, they were without a win in five matches. they got some more, this portugal free kick somehow staying out. wales's euro 2021 qualifying campaign had a welcome boost after they beat belarus 1—0. rachel rowe got the winner with around ten minutes to go in herfirst game back from a year—long injury. and from a tight angle, wales stay second in group c. it was tough, it was heated, and that was just the fiery exchange between andy murray and fabio fognini at the shanghai masters. he served for the match twice, but lost. he'd got annoyed with fognini, who'd made a noise during the match, which put murray off. he took it up with the umpire.
6:39 am
fognini came out top in the third set tie—break. after the match, murray said he wasn't having the italian talk to him that way on court. he wasn't saying anything to him. so i was obviously frustrated at that. he wanted to engage with me, fabio. they probably shouldn't have done. but i'm not having him talk to me like that on the court. —— eye probably. andy murray was not happy with that result. we love a dodgy statue. we love them. can you guss which footballer this is? you time starts now. it's in malmo, where his career started. and he's topless, celebrating a goal. sweden. zlatan ibrahimovic. yes. a
6:40 am
topless zlatan ibrahimovic. he is a man who has a fairly big ego. so perhaps we shouldn't be surprised. the ones obviously that are our favourites are the ones that don't look at all like the footballers. at i think that one is not bad. they interviewed him post match once after england played sweden. don't mean this in a bad way, but he has the significant hindquarters of any... really?! i was the significant hindquarters of any... really?! iwas thinking the significant hindquarters of any... really?! i was thinking how would you ever shove him off the ball. a huge blow. was he topless at the time? no. we will see you later. thank you. pressure is growing on the us government to waive immunity for a diplomat‘s wife, who fled the uk after a fatal car crash. foreign secretary dominic raab met with the us ambassador yesterday and urged him "to do the right thing" by the family of 19—year—old harry dunn, who was killed in a motorcycle crash in august. the bbc understands mr raab is due to meet harry's family later today to discuss the row. yesterday on breakfast,
6:41 am
harry's parents said ann sacoolas should return to the uk for questioning. every day is more of a battle that we feel it should be. we are having to go to bed at night with a new plan for the next morning to give us a purpose to get up in the morning to be able to look after his twin, who's lost his partner in crime. he's lost his twin ship. so it has really robbed us are being where we should be, which is six weeks into grieving and some kind of away, and we still feel like it happened yesterday, two days ago. those were harry ‘s parents talking to us yesterday. let's speak now to human rights lawyer mark stephens, who's in our london newsroom this morning. good morning. thank you so much for
6:42 am
joining us. they are in a desperate situation. we know the british government is trying to put pressure on the american government to waive this diplomatic immunity. how often does that actually happened? a waiver of diplomatic immunity happens in all a lot, actually. recently a chilean diplomat who was accused of murder, the chilean government waived immunity and of course the immunity belongs to the government and the country, not to the individual. and he went and stood trial at the old bailey. he was acquitted. and everybody went on their way. so, contrary was acquitted. and everybody went on theirway. so, contrary to was acquitted. and everybody went on their way. so, contrary to what is being said, it is not unusual. but there is a more fundamental question here, which as it has been put about widely that this person was a diplomat and therefore entitled to diplomatic immunity and therefore his wife was entitled to diplomatic immunity, in fact, his wife was entitled to diplomatic immunity, infact, he his wife was entitled to diplomatic immunity, in fact, he was not a diplomat. in order to be a diplomat
6:43 am
and to get the benefit of diplomatic immunity, you have to be appointed to one of about 400 posts by your home country. you have to go to the court of saint james home country. you have to go to the court of saintjames and home country. you have to go to the court of saint james and register as a diplomat and that's held that the foreign office, that register. and if you are on that register, and from the moment you are on the register, you get given all the powers and privileges of diplomatic immunity. now, mr sacoolas worked for the nsa in america, that is not a diplomatic post. so he fails on the ground. and, secondly, he did not register with the foreign office in london and therefore he fails on that ground. so diplomatic immunity is not applicable in this particular case. the foreign office, i'm sure you will be aware of what the foreign office said, confirming the individual concerned has diplomatic immunity under the vienna convention isa immunity under the vienna convention is a diplomatic relations... well,
6:44 am
they are just plain wrong. think it is important that poor family are not given more heartache and more grief by being mislaid in this way. and so he is not entitled to diplomatic immunity. there is a special form of immunity for people who work at the craft base and the other 19 spy bases, us eavesdropping bases that we have in this country, but it is in relation only to their work and that would be in the public interest. so the question is, did this accident occur while at work? eye also want to ask you as well, evenif eye also want to ask you as well, even if she had it or hadn't diplomatic immunity, could he make the choice if you wanted to just go back to the uk was yes, it is ethically up to her to come back. back to the uk was yes, it is ethically up to her to come backm she were an honourable person she would have done that. and i am sure that we all understand, because of a husband was my job, that we all understand, because of a husband was myjob, which had an element of secrecy around it, there
6:45 am
was an attempt to shield him from this. but what has happened is we have had what we lawyers call the streisand effect, that by whisking her effect from the rule of law and justice, effectively they have drawn more attention to mr and mrs sacoolas. and as a consequence of that the purpose of it has gone away. so the other thing that one should also bear in mind is that immunity only implies in the host country. so even if the foreign office were correct, and that mr and mrs sacoolas were entitled to immunity and immunity on this occasion, that in those circumstances, once they have gone back to america, immunity no longer applies stop so the family can go to america and sue mr and mrs or mrs sacoolas in that country, because she will not have immunity in either america or, indeed, any other third—party country like canada. america or, indeed, any other third-party country like canada. so they could, you say, they could go
6:46 am
to america to sue her, that would have huge implications financially. is that a difficult thing to try to do? it's obviously expensive. but in the circumstances where the british government have failed, effectively, to procure her return and obviously the political solution is the easiest one, i think the government and dominic raabe should be paying for this family to actually get justice. it's a basic human right to understand how your loved one died and you heard from harry's mother there how they get up every morning, they are in this kind of limbo situation. they can't move on with the grieving process. the law understands that. ordinary folk understands that. ordinary folk understand that. and it is important, as a basic human experience, part of the psychological trauma of dealing with these incidents, is to be able to move on. and if the only way they can do that is by going to the united states to sue mrs sacoolas, it wouldn't be about money, it would
6:47 am
be about getting the explanation that they have been asking for. hearing from her, what happened in those last moments. thank you very much indeed forjoining us. we do understand that his family are due to meet dominic raabe later this morning. if we get any update we will tell you a bbc breakfast. i know lots of you commented on that interview as well. let's find out what is happening with the weather, i have heard she has a wonderful rainbow to show us. for the next few days we're looking at sunshine and showers and windy for most of us. a noticeable breeze depending on where you are and that is because low pressure over the next few days is dominating our weather. look at the isobars, front moving through, enhancing the showers until later in
6:48 am
the week when we have an array of fronts bringing some rain. the wind coming in from the west, south—west, which is a mild direction so we're not expecting any problems with frost and temperatures roughly where they should be. quite a few showers already. through the day, some of those showers will merge to behaviour with thunder and lightning in them. you could see gusty winds that will blow the showers across from the west to these quite quickly. the other thing is that some of us may dodge the showers altogether and get away with a dry day. yesterday's top temperature was in q. this evening and overnight, we start off with some showers. the
6:49 am
ridge of high pressure killing some of them. but those coming in from scotla nd of them. but those coming in from scotland will merge to give longer spells of rain. the cloud building across the republic of ireland and thatis across the republic of ireland and that is heralding the arrival of this weather front. that is heralding the arrival of this weatherfront. during that is heralding the arrival of this weather front. during the course of thursday, it will be pushing north—east taking the rain with it. still quite a blustery day with it. still quite a blustery day with wind not as strong as today. many we start off on a dry day. the weather front, oblong front coming in bringing further spells of rain. ——a in bringing further spells of rain. —— awarm in bringing further spells of rain. —— a warm front. behind this, we will see some showers and some of those will prove to be heavy. thursday into friday, the warm front goes through. a cold front behind it and that would be sinking southwards likely to bring some rain. the positioning of all these fronts on friday could still change but this is what we think at the moment. the
6:50 am
cold front sinks south, taking its rain. still showery outbreaks of rain. still showery outbreaks of rain across scotland but in between, scotland, northern england and northern ireland, it looks dry with sunshine. ten in the north, 18 in the south. thank you very much, carol. barclays bank has come under criticism after announcing its customers will no longer be able to withdraw money from their local post office. ben's looking into this one for us. an interesting change this. barclays yesterday promised not to close any branches where it was the ‘last bank in town' for the next two years. but it did make changes to where customers can take out cash. that matters because there are already fewer places for people to access their money. the consumer group which? says that one in eight rural communities lost their
6:51 am
only free—to—use atm. the cash machine network link protected a number of cash machines and gave them so—called ‘special status' because they were so important to local people and businesses. but which? say 194 of those special machines actually closed between january last year and july this year. well, link says it does protect and replace machines in remote communities unless there is a post office nearby. that's because you can now withdraw cash at post office counters. but yesterday barclays became the first bank to opt out of that agreement. and so if you're barclays customer you won't be able to get your cash out at a post office from january. let's speak to catherine mcgrar she's uk managing director ba rclays. the post office say they are a worry about it while you making this
6:52 am
change? we're looking what our customers want from the bank and they want access to banking and also access to cash so what we are announcing is we're going to freeze the closure of over 100 remote branches and we are doing that because we are working with the local communities to understand how we can boost their demands. for example increased opening hours. the second thing we are announcing is we're changing the way our customers can have access to cash. we really wa nt can have access to cash. we really want customers to have cash in local communities in a way that is sustainable. doing that through the local retailer is important. when you local retailer is important. when y°u p0p local retailer is important. when you pop out to buy a loaf of bread, you pop out to buy a loaf of bread, you will be able to get cash back at your local retail but you do not need to buy that life of bread by the way. does this boil down to
6:53 am
cost? it is more expensive to offer face—to—face service because you have to subsidise the staff behind them? we know how precious access to cash is to our customers and we are investing and supporting access to cash. we are doing that in two ways. firstly we continue to offer four of the five services the post office offers and we are materially increasing our investment in post offices year on year. clearly we are supporting getting access to cash in local retailers and we think that will be important notjust for the customers, because it is really convenient, but to support local retailers. a local garden centre sent they would love to offer cash because they are open seven days a week and that they have easy access to parking. i want to focus on vulnerable customers. those are the ones left behind with moves like
6:54 am
affairs. the problem is, you are saying they will be able to pay over—the—counter but not take out over—the—counter. over—the—counter but not take out over-the-counter. this is so confusing. what we have done is we have had a look at all the customers using post office for cash. 99% of them already transacting within one kilometre of a free to use atm but we have also identified a group of potentially vulnerable customers and we will be writing to all the customers and individually calling those customers who can be vulnerable. we want to sit down and agree a solution that works with them. if what is most important for them. if what is most important for them is to get cash over—the—counter ata them is to get cash over—the—counter at a post office we offer a service where they can get a check and get cash over—the—counter. we are confident we can look after all of
6:55 am
our customers in the long—term. confident we can look after all of our customers in the long-term. do you worry customers will go somewhere else. 1.2 million cash withdrawals over counters in post last year, that is a lot of people. they can go to one of your other competitors. because we have had a look at how customers are transacting, we think we will put those solutions in place and the convenience for our customers, to be able to pop out of the local shop and get cash, we think will be very important. ok, we will see how that plays out. good to talk to you and explaining all that. quite significant changes there. thank you for your time this morning. let us know your thoughts stop it is an interesting one. a lot of people will get in touch based on the axis to money. berkeley cash backs is
6:56 am
great but income that let in some cases you have to buy something as well. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning: with new research showing people working in coastal towns earn less, we ask why seaside communities are falling so far behind?write strap in mixed case, including the time in the format of e.g. a very powerfulfilm, a very powerful film, silvia. a young girl who fell off her horse, smashed her jaw to young girl who fell off her horse, smashed herjaw to bit and we're going to speak to her, her and the surgeon going to speak to her, her and the surgeon who rebuild herface going to speak to her, her and the surgeon who rebuild her face and also, in terms of brexit, alistair campbell and brexit party mep under way in about ten minutes.
6:57 am
time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alpa patel. around 50 households spent the night in emergency accommodation, after a major water main burst in north london. this was the scene in finsbury park yesterday morning. thames water says the problem has been temporarily fixed and supplies should now be restored. but it said there is a chance of further problems during the morning when lots of people will be using water at the same time. the metropolitan police has been told it will get funding to recruit more than thirteen hundred extra officers by the end of the next financial year. injuly the government pledged money to boost police numbers across england and wales by 20,000 over the next three years. but the mayor said while more officers are welcome, it's only a partial reversal of huge cuts to the met since 2010. there's been a big rise in the number of people here in london deciding
6:58 am
to become self—employed. the independent thinktank, centre for cities, found the vast majority of those jobs were in occupations like construction, cleaning and taxi driving. it also found there was a greater need for more training so people can adapt in the workplace more effectively. let's take a look at the travel situation now... on the trains cancellations and delays on southern services — between london bridge and west croydon due to the late finishing engineeriong work. and disruption too on south western trains between farnham and guildford again because of late finishing engineering work. on the roads — still road closures around westminster — due to protests by extinction rebellion affecting routes in and around parliament square, trafalgar square, whitehall, the mall, the strand and horseferry road. queen's drive is closed
6:59 am
in both directions between seven sisters road and brownswood road because of flooding. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a rather cloudy start out there this morning but the cloud will start to break up and we will see some spells of sunshine. we are, of course, still at risk of one or two showers. the show was this morning blowing through fairly quickly on that westerly breeze. we could see one or two more this afternoon. again, if you get one, they could be quite heavy but plenty of sunny spells around or at least brighter spells with a bit of cloud. the temperature today getting up to around 15 celsius. those showers blown through on that westerly breeze quite quickly, continuing into the evening but gradually fading away so we should get some drier weather. still at risk of a shower but largely dry overnight, with clear spells. minimum temperature between seven and 9 celsius. for tomorrow, because that cloud starts to break up, we will see some sunshine first thing. but gradually the cloud will increase through the day. at first turningthe sunshine hazy but then potentially thicker cloud
7:00 am
bringing us a spot or two of rain tomorrow afternoon. temperatures tomorrow, 17 celsius and then it stays really unsettled, windy with some wet spells through to the weekend. if you are heading out, do have a lovely morning. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now though it's back to louise and dan. good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: eight days away from next weeks crucial brexit summit, the irish president warns that a deal will be "very difficult" to reach. after an horrific accident left herjaw hanging on byjust a tiny piece of skin, we'll speak to 15—year—old emily and the surgeon who rebuilt herface. people who rebuilt herface. living in seaside people who rebuilt her face. living in seaside towns typically people living in seaside towns typically earn £1600 less per year
7:01 am
than those in land. we have a special report this morning. good morning. the cost of going cashless. fewer bank branches and atm closures threaten the end of cash. i'll look at those struggling to access their money. it's a big day at the rugby world cup. scotland face a must win game against russia to keep their hopes alive while wales can qualify for the quarter—finals if they beat fiji. good morning. today, once again, we are looking at a day of sunshine and showers. some of the showers heavy and thundering with some hail. but being blown along quite quickly on gusty winds. i will have more later. good morning. it's wednesday the 9th of october. our top story: the irish prime minister has warned it will be "very difficult" for the uk and the eu to reach an agreement on brexit before the deadline of october the 31st. leo varadkar‘s comments come as european leaders accused the government of turning the brexit negotiations into a "stupid blame game." in a moment we'll speak to our brussels reporter adam fleming but first our political correspondent nick eardleyjoins us
7:02 am
from downing street. nick, so where do we go from here? something which i guess we have asked a few times. we were talking yesterday about how things didn't look very good for getting a brexit deal at the big summit next week. over the course of the day they got even worse. and this morning they are not in a good place. there was a phone call yesterday between german chancellor angela merkel and boris johnson and it did not go well. downing street sources said afterwards that the conditions that the german chancellor was setting made it essentially impossible that it was going to be done. notjust now but at any point in the future, because of what she wanted. adding to the mix, that tweet from the european council president, donald tusk, saying that mrjohnson was engaging ina tusk, saying that mrjohnson was engaging in a stupid blame game and leo varadkar saying last night that
7:03 am
we re leo varadkar saying last night that were it was very difficult to see how they deal was going to be done next week. and it doesn't look good. one potential possible maybe breakthrough points could be tomorrow, when we think the prime minister is going to meet leo varadkar, the irish taoiseach, but as things stand at the moment there is not a lot of confidence in their that a deal is going to be done and there are not many people in westminster predicting one. nicks, thank you. great to talk to you. we pick up some of those thoughts. adam fleming is in brussels. eu leaders have insisted they still want a deal, but with both sides blaming each other, could we have reached a dead end? the language seems really extraordinary now. yesterday was a real rollercoaster with the reader from downing street about the call between boris johnson from downing street about the call between borisjohnson and angela merkel, which some people in the eu side said that does not sound like the angela merkel we know, is this some spin from number 10? the tweed from donald tusk, with some people from donald tusk, with some people from the eu side thought went bit far. at last night, by the end of the evening, you had a phone call
7:04 am
between boris johnson the evening, you had a phone call between borisjohnson and the irish prime minister leo varadkar which sounded tough and difficult, but a little bit more positive. think what has happened is that the technical tell, so when the officials are in the room talking about the details, i think they have as they can go on the current proposal. what needs to happen now is the politicians get involved at a higher level and change the ground rules or at least discuss changing the ground rules and that i think is why boris johnson will go and see the irish prime minister tomorrow. another problem raised, the president of the european parliament was in london yesterday, reminding everyone that the european parliament has to vote for a deal and they say they will not vote for a deal unless it looks very like the existing exit deal. so another vote —— box that needs to be ticked in this process. so much still to play for. thank you for that. we will shortly be joined by alastair campbell, former director of fumigation is to tony blair and the brexit party mep, lucy harris, to discuss those things on breakfast
7:05 am
inafew to discuss those things on breakfast in a few minutes' time —— former director of communications. foreign secretary dominic raab has urged the us ambassador "to do the right thing" by the family of 19—year—old harry dunn, who was killed in a motorcycle crash in august. anne sacoolas, the wife of a diplomat, is believed to have been the driver of the vehicle that hit harry outside a us air base in northamptonshire but fled to america with diplomatic immunity. the bbc understands mr raab is due to meet harry's family later today to discuss the row. aisling mcveigh reports. britain's prime minister is calling on the wife of an american diplomat to return to england to face charges in a deadly crash. 19—year—old harry dunn was killed while riding his motorbike in august. a tragedy on a northamptonshire country road is now making headlines in america. 19—year—old harry dunn was killed in august after his motorbike was hit by a car travelling on the wrong side of the road. the accident happened here, outside a us military air base. anne sacoolas, pictured here 16 years ago on her wedding day to an american diplomat, is believed to have been behind the wheel.
7:06 am
the marriage means she is entitled to diplomatic immunity. two weeks after the crash, she and her family returned to america and live in this neighbourhood near washington, dc. now the foreign secretary, dominic raab, has met with us ambassador, woodyjohnson, and urged him to do the right thing by harry dunn and waive mrs sacoolas's community so she can return to the uk for questioning. harry's family say they won't stop until they see justice done. we were just left to try and deal with the fact that we'd lost — that we'd lost harry and that we just were expected to get on with it. as the row over diplomatic immunity continues, the story has struck a chord on both sides of the pond. at its heart, two parents grieving the loss of their son. aisling mcveigh, bbc news. police have warned that extinction rebellion campaigners must vacate public areas like westminster and move to trafalgar square, or risk arrest.
7:07 am
)nearly 550 climate change activists have already been arrested in london over the past two days. our reporter keith doyle is in central london for us this morning. normally at this time of the morning that place would be packed with cars, keith. absolutely. this is right at the heart of london. anyone who knows trafalgar square would know that right now, during rush hour, there should be lots of traffic. but there is in. if we move the camera around you can see it as a sea the camera around you can see it as a sea of tents. this is one of 11 sites that the protest group extinction rebellion say that they are occupying across london. as you say, the police say this is the only place they are going to be allowed to continue their protest. any other place that they are protesting the police say that they risk being arrested and being prosecuted. the police are saying it is taking up a lot of time to arrest people, to
7:08 am
move them on. they are gluing themselves and chaining themselves to various government buildings. so it is causing a huge amount of disruption. one of the crew of extension rebellion is here with me this morning. adam, you are causing great havoc here, you are blocking up great havoc here, you are blocking up the centre of london, you are even blocking cyclists from coming through. that is not a way to win people over, is it? festival, we are not blocking cyclists. we are asking them to dismount this zone. myself and others have taken two weeks of annual leave to make sure we can ask the governor to act now, tell the truth, and come up with the solutions we need so there isn't climate breakdown and i may actually be able to have children one day. -- government. this protest they say is going to go on for another two weeks. as you see, the centre of london completely closed. you can see there is a hearse here with a person change on the inside of that. police and protesters all around us. it is looking michael doughty
7:09 am
westminster and downing street. ——it is blocking the road from westminster. they say they will continue with other areas, including city airport. the white house says it will not co—operate with the impeachment proceedings against president trump because it believes they're unconstitutional. the inquiry is trying to find out if the president held back aid to ukraine to push its government to investigate joe biden, who is running for the democratic presidential nomination. a teenager's jaw was so badly damaged in a horse riding accident her surgeon described it as the worst injury he had seen outside a war zone. 15—year—old emily eccles had herjaw split in half after a horse riding accident in august. we will show you the x—ray. look at that. it took surgeons 5.5 hours to rebuild herface using three titanium plates and more than 160 stitches. she will be here with her mum and the surgeon who did that incredible job in sheffield. i know a lot of
7:10 am
you are wincing seeing that, but she is ok and she has a good story to tell. and she wants the surgeon to get a knighthood for his incredible work. and imagine the team working with him. we will talk about that later. congratulations if you are the single ticket holder living here in the uk who skipped last nights euromillions jack point. —— scoop. they've won £170 million — making them the country's richest ever lottery winner. the ticket—holder is yet to be named and it's not known if it's a single person, a family or a syndicate, but they are now officially richer then singers sir tom jones and ed sheeran. hgppy happy days for whoever that is. it's not you? i don't know. let's return to our top story now. european leaders have accused the government of turning the brexit negotiations into a "stupid blame game", after a downing street source warned a deal was now looking "essentially impossible". we're joined now by alastair campbell, former director of communications to tony blair, and who's also an advisor to the people's vote campaign, and lucy harris, mep for the brexit
7:11 am
party. good morning to both of you. is this, lucy we will start with you, is this an elaborate game of love and who is bluffing who? yellow eye personally think it is an elaborate game of bluff. i think wallalong the european union has not been playing ball with us whatsoever. european union has not been playing ball with us whatsoeverlj european union has not been playing ball with us whatsoever. i don't think they ever really wanted a deal -- i think think they ever really wanted a deal —— i think all along. they did not wa nt —— i think all along. they did not want us to get out in the first place. they keep saying they do want a deal. alistair, what is your view? is the deal debt at this point?m is ridiculous to say the european union don't want a deal. european union don't want a deal. european union will be damaged by a no—deal brexit, just not as much as the uk well. what has happened is that i think borisjohnson well. what has happened is that i think boris johnson hasn't well. what has happened is that i think borisjohnson hasn't been that serious. he talks about intensive negotiations. the good friday agreement, that was intensive negotiations. this is a plan that was put forward very, very late in the day and it has got fundamental flaws stop putting customs checks on
7:12 am
the island of ireland, that has been a redline, notjust for the european union, but until now for the less government ——uk government as well. there is a veto over the company had a proposal he has put forward. friendly, i don't believe that anybody in the british government could ever have expected that this was going to be accepted stop what you think it has been put forward to be knocked back? ithink you think it has been put forward to be knocked back? i think what has happened with the whole brexit fast, and they really think it is becoming and they really think it is becoming a fast, i think i country is becoming a joke on the world stage. i think what has happened is the realities of the border and its complications, the workings of the single market, and the good friday agreement, which is international law, they have combined to expose the impossibility of doing this in the impossibility of doing this in the way thatjohnson the impossibility of doing this in the way that johnson has the impossibility of doing this in the way thatjohnson has put forward. under him, i'm afraid, talk about a blame game. laurenjohnson's whole life is a game. this is no longer about brexit and about britain. this is about borisjohnson clinging onto power. once an
7:13 am
election because he thinks he can get a majority with 85%. but they have to tell you i'm absolutely convinced, if we get a people's vote, and i think we well, your site is going to lose it. that is why he is going to lose it. that is why he is scared. i'm really curious about the people's vote. your own party has said they would honour the result of a vote if leave went anyway. what will you do? my party? liberal democrats. i've voted liberal democrats. i've voted liberal democrats. i've voted liberal democrats once, they are not my party. crosstalk. i don't support the revoke. and don't like referendums, but i think brexit been delivered by the referendum, if there is to be a democratic djere, which johnson accepts because there should be an election, i'd tell you october 19 will be bigger than the last one. i think more and more people are coming to see this is the only way to resolve this and far from it being undemocratic, it is undemocratic not to. canno pick up a
7:14 am
point for you, lucy, there are so many ifs and buts —— canno pick up a point? if there wasn't a deal... crosstalk. i don't believe there is time now. if there was no deal what they due the brexit party? do you stand back then? what we are advocating for. i'm in, everybody always wants a deal, but if we cannot have a deal then obviously no deal is the only option available. what we do? we have already negotiated, we have already told the conservative party that we are willing to step back if they are going put no deal back on they are going put no deal back on the table. if there were to be a general election you wouldn't stand against them? no, we would allow the tories to take, not stand against tories to take, not stand against tories incense down south, while they let us have a clear run itsines in the north. it is like a game. -- seats down in the south. politics has to be, especially when the
7:15 am
majority of people want to see boris johnson in number 10 again, he is doing so well in the polls. he is a pro—brexit man. he wants brexit through. think a lot of people want to get brexit done. in what planet is borisjohnson doing well on any level?! well, he has a 13 point lead in the polls. because the labour party and the lib dem. the parties that are opposed... everybody wants an election just so they can have a say. i think having a general election will resolve a lot of these problems. because we have a dysfunctional parliament, which nobody can actually get anything past. we should have a general election so we can formulate and understand where we are currently. the reason they honestly do believe now this will not be resolved by an election, politics is so unpredictable there could be another hung parliament and the brexit that was promised is being exposed as undeliverable... it is very curious... the people that want a second referendum of the people who
7:16 am
lost in the last one. no, i'm sorry, this is where you are wrong.|j lost in the last one. no, i'm sorry, this is where you are wrong. i think it is appropriate to have a referendum, m40 is time we had the last reverend. you are being very dismissive. a lot of people have had the last —— m40 '5 time, like with the last —— m40 '5 time, like with the last reverend. you say you don't like referendums, but you want a people's vote. we are in this mess. we are in this mess because david cameron called the referendum, not because the country needed or wanted it, but is not a problem in his own party because of the rise of nigel farage and ukip at the time. i hate referendums. i hope this is the last one ever. but what has been exposed... this is the point. they don't agree with the lib dem is coming on and saying let usjust revoke it. ithink coming on and saying let usjust revoke it. i think devoto took place and now people have had three and a half years, the country has done nothing else, and we should say to the people do you still want to proceed on this basis? and i think they will say no. the reason we are in this mess is because people like
7:17 am
my good so next to me who have been causing a lot of trouble behind the scenes advocating for a second referendum, frustrating the will of the people, undermining the will of the people, undermining the will of the people... the will of the people changes and it is changing. polls suggest that we are static. every single pole... everything one. lucy, you talked about you would like to get to the point where it is there general election. alistair, where would you vote in a general election? i live in a safe labour sees and i will vote labour because i will, like millions of people, i will make a judgement according to what the outcome will best facilitate people 's outcome will best facilitate people '5 vote. outcome will best facilitate people 's vote. if you are not in a labour seat would you change your vote? 's vote. if you are not in a labour seat would you change your vote ?|j would probably vote olympic dam and i could see myself in scotland to get rid of a tory and i think people will think like that. i will be
7:18 am
voting for labour. thank you for disagreeing so amicably. my knees are disagreeing so amicably. my knees a re really cold disagreeing so amicably. my knees are really cold now. they cannot see the fact that make thank you both very much indeed and so many people discussing this at home. such a topic of conversation, discussion, in families around the whole of the uk. if the pair review have probably because people to shut their tvs. we like talking about brexit a lot but also about the weather. this is london this morning. the houses of parliament. the millennium will, the
7:19 am
london i... it is certainly the thames. that is a beautiful sunrise. how will it be today? a lovely blue sky and some of us starting off on that note but for others we have heavy showers. for the next few days sunshine and showers and also wendy for most of us. low pressure driving our weather. look at the isobars, the fa ct weather. look at the isobars, the fact they are close together tells you it is going to be windy. at the end of the week, more fronts coming in bringing rain. a mild direction for the winter, so we're not expecting any problems with frost and daytime temperatures roughly where they should be at this stage in october. heavy showers moving across the bristol channel. more
7:20 am
showers moving across scotland, northern ireland and in fact you could catch a shower almost anywhere. it will be blown across quickly on gusty winds. because they are showers, not all of us will catch them. temperatures down a couple of degrees on yesterday. as we head on through the evening and overnight, we will hang onto quite a few showers, then a ridge of high pressure building killing off some of the showers but it will take in and turn heavy across south—west scotland. an existing coming in across the republic of ireland introducing some cloud. a warm front, it will continue to push steadily north eastwards and bring some rain. we start off on a dry note for many. showers across scotla nd note for many. showers across scotland tending to ease through the
7:21 am
morning. there will be replaced by cloud and then rain, coming in from the south—west and pushing north—east. we will see the return of showers. temperatures are starting to rise. ten in the north, 17 as we push further south. the warm front pushes away during the course of those the evening and on friday this cold front starts to sink south. the timing and position could change but this is what we think at the moment. rain will start to move to the south—east. in between something dry and brighter. ten in the north, 18 in the south. thank you very much, carol. people living in coastal communities are earning less than elsewhere in england and wales according to research carried out by the bbc. it also found that two—thirds of seaside areas had seen a real terms fall in wages since 2010. the average annual wage in coastal communities is just
7:22 am
over £22,000. that's more than £1,600 a year less than the average person working inland. and two thirds of constituencies in coastal areas have seen wages fall when inflation is taken into account. so why is this happening? jon kay is live in penzance for us this morning. good morning. the sun about to rise just beyond saint michael's in cornwall. lots of people in coastal communities have long suspected they get paid less for doing the same job as people who live in land and this research by bbc news suggests they are right at least for the typical worker. as for why, it is complicated. factors like seaside towns relying on tourism so work is seasonal. no big centres so not much
7:23 am
competition keeping wages low. connectivity and transport. we thought we would ask what it is like to live on lower ages and i have been speaking to one family who live nearby. just a mile from the beach, the tree near estate, one of the poorest parts of britain. this family wanted to show us how they get by. we survived, day by day. $18,000 a year and paid on a friday. it is soon gone. by monday morning i will be into my overdrive. —— she will take
7:24 am
that out of my wages. we just start again. it is a familiar story here. a town literally at the end of the line. analysis by the bbc has found that a typical worker in coastal areas like this earns just over £22,000. whereas the typical worker in land and more than £23,500, difference of £1600. there are 12 grandchildren and seven adults. mike's wife, amanda, runs the household budget and has to make food loss. you have to find the cheapest option to live. she is a trained chef but cannot find a job around here that pays anything like
7:25 am
what she would earn in land. around here that pays anything like what she would earn in landm around here that pays anything like what she would earn in land. it is disgusting. i don't see how we should be paid so much less. i mean, you're going to get lower wages, but you're going to get lower wages, but you cannot afford to go out. mcdonald's? a cappuccino and go and sit on the beach. the government says it is investing millions to boost coastal communities and level up boost coastal communities and level up the uk but a lot of tourism jobs here are only seasonal and other big employers like fishing, farming and mining have all been hit. their daughter dreams of getting a place of her own. prices around here are high and, even though she works 50 hours a week on the minimum wage, she feels trapped. it is so, so ridiculous. people further up have
7:26 am
this money and i would go spend this money willy—nilly. but it is easy for them, they earn more money. we do not earn it that much done here. lucy now thinks she will have to move inland, splitting up a family who were cornwall born and bred. why should i have to move from a home to get more money? why should we be treated any differently to anybody else? thanks to the family for sharing their very personal story about how they deal on low wages and coastal britain today but the government would say this is the kind of project that could make a difference. this is currently undergoing a bit of a makeover and turning one of the pools into a geothermal hot pool open year—round and the idea is that if you can bring tourist here year—round, that keepsjobs going bring tourist here year—round, that keeps jobs going year—round and that
7:27 am
keeps jobs going year—round and that keeps the coastal economy going but of course not every coastal town or city as anything like this acidity so city as anything like this acidity so it will depend on where you live whether it works. i have the whole pool to myself this morning but i have not got my trunks which is a bit of a shame, maybe next time. john, come on! how can you leave that pool. you never go anywhere without speedo, my friend. as soon as you saw it, i am in the, cossie on. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now to get the news, travel, and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alpa patel. around 50 households spent the night in emergency accommodation, after a major water main burst in north london. this was the scene in finsbury park yesterday morning. thames water says the problem has been temporarily fixed
7:28 am
and supplies should now be restored. but it said there is a chance of further problems during the morning when lots of people will be using water at the same time. the metropolitan police has been told it will get funding to recruit more than 1300 extra officers by the end of the next financial year. injuly the government pledged money to boost police numbers across england and wales by 20,000 over the next three years. but the mayor said while more officers are welcome, it's only a partial reversal of huge cuts to the met since 2010. a new study by london zoo and imperial college london suggests that the culling of badgers could increase the risk of spreading tb to cattle, rather than controlling it. the research found that culling drove badgers much further afield. the government and the national farmers union argue that the controversial practice is effective. this year 63 thousand badgers are allowed to be culled. there's been a big rise
7:29 am
in the number of people here in london deciding to become self employed. the independent thinktank, centre for cities, found the vast majority of those jobs were in occupations like construction, cleaning and taxi driving. it also found there was a greater need for more training so people can adapt in the workplace more effectively. let's take a look at the travel situation now... on the tube — all clear on all lines at the moment in lewisham, elaine close. still road closures around westminster — due to protests by extinction rebellion affecting routes including parliament square, trafalgar square and whitehalland in finsbury park — queen's drive is closed in both directions between seven sisters road and brownswood road because of flooding. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a rather cloudy start out there this morning but the cloud will start to break up and we will see some spells of sunshine.
7:30 am
we are, of course, still at risk of one or two showers. the show was this morning blowing through fairly quickly on that westerly breeze. we could see one or two more this afternoon. again, if you get one, they could be quite heavy but plenty of sunny spells around or at least brighter spells with a bit of cloud. the temperature today getting up to around 15 celsius. those showers blown through on that westerly breeze quite quickly, continuing into the evening but gradually fading away so we should get some drier weather. still at risk of a shower but largely dry overnight, with clear spells. minimum temperature between seven and 9 celsius. for tomorrow, because that cloud starts to break up, we will see some sunshine first thing. but gradually the cloud will increase through the day. at first turningthe sunshine hazy but then potentially thicker cloud bringing us a spot or two of rain tomorrow afternoon. temperatures tomorrow, 17 celsius and then it stays really unsettled, windy with some wet spells through to the weekend.
7:31 am
i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now though it's back to louise and dan. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the irish prime minister has warned it will be "very difficult" for the uk and the eu to reach an agreement on brexit before the deadline of october the 31st. (tx leo varadkar‘s comments come as european leaders accused the government of turning the brexit negotiations into a "stupid blame game." yesterday, a downing street source said a deal was now looking increasingly unlikely following a phone call between the prime minister and german chancellor, angela merkel. pressure is growing on the us government to waive immunity for a diplomat‘s wife, who fled the uk after a fatal car crash. (tx foreign secretary dominic raab met with the us ambassador yesterday and urged him ‘to do the right thing' by the family of 19—year—old harry dunn, who was killed in august. the bbc understands mr raab is due to meet harry's family later today to discuss the row. earlier on breakfast one human rights lawyer told us that harry's
7:32 am
parents should travel to america to pursue the case. pa rt part of the psychological trauma of dealing with these incidents is to be able to move on. and if the only way they can do that is by going to the united states to sue, it wouldn't be about money, it would be about getting the explanation that they have been asking for. hearing from her what happened in those last moments. police have warned that extinction rebellion campaigners must vacate public areas like westminster and move to trafalgar square, or risk arrest. nearly 550 climate change activists have already been arrested in london over the past two days. the protests are set to continue for the next two weeks, with 60 cities around the world taking part. the white house says it will not co—operate with the impeachment proceedings against president trump because it believes they're unconstitutional. the inquiry is trying to find out if the president held back aid
7:33 am
to ukraine to push its government to investigate joe biden, who is running for the democratic presidential nomination. a teenager's jaw was so badly damaged in a horse riding accident her surgeon described it as the worst injury he had seen outside a war zone. 15—year—old emily eccles had herjaw split in half after a horse riding accident in august. it took surgeons 5.5 hours to rebuild herface using three titanium plates and more than 160 stitches. and she is going to be here a little bit later, also her surgeon. what an incredible job that is. amazing, isn't it. we have some sad news now about the humpback whale that was seen swimming in the river thames over the weekend. we were talking about that yesterday. experts say it has died. it's thought it may have starved to death. there were already concerns for the welfare of the animal, which was first spotted near the qe2 bridge at dartford on sunday. the mammal was spotted lying
7:34 am
motionless on mudflats yesterday. this time yesterday i've probably missed an update on the stirling prize. a council estate in norwich has won the stirling prize for the uk's best new building. goldsmith street is made up of almost 100 low—energy houses and flats, and is the first social housing project to win the award. judges were impressed with its ecological building standards, which keep residents' heating bills down to just £150 a year. congratulations to them. and also congratulations to a single ticket—holder living here in the uk has scooped last night's euromillions jackpot — they've won £170 million — making them the country's richest ever lottery winner. the ticket—holder is yet to be named and it's not known if it's a single person, a family, or a syndicate, but they are now officially richer then singers sir tom jones and ed sheeran. richard and sir tom jones and ed sheeran. i am richard and sir tom jones and ed sheeran. iam not richard and sir tom jones and ed sheeran. i am not sure why they have picked those two. —— britcher than.
7:35 am
esteemed company. good morning. it is do or die for scotland. it is quite simple for scotland. a big day ahead. it is on the line. a big day for all of the home nations in action at the rugby world cup. wales can qualify for the quarter—finals if they beat fiji. meanwhile, scotland face russia in a game they can't afford to lose. it's all smiles now, but their head coach knows they must win to stand any chance of making the last eight. they will throw everything into this. the last world cup for them in four years. or longer if they don't qualify for the next one. so we are expecting as good a performance as they gave against ireland. maybe even a level up. we can speak to our sports correspondent andy swiss, who is at the game for us. andy, consistency is something scotla nd andy, consistency is something scotland have often found difficult,
7:36 am
down hard to come by. they desperately need it now with a must win game in the offing here. that's right. as you say, this is a huge game, really, for scotland to have any chance of qualifying for the knockout stage. they have to beat russia. and they really have to get a bonus point as well by scoring four or more tries. now, they should have enough to do that. russia are currently bottom of the group. they have lost all three of their matches so have lost all three of their matches so far. that said, scotland have made an awful lot of changes, 14 changes from the team that beat samoa. they are resting a lot of the key players, with a crucial final group game againstjapan on sunday in mind. it is also a big day for wales. they can qualify for the knockout stages if they beat fiji. but everyone here is talking about the weather at the moment. a super typhoon is due to arrive injapan
7:37 am
over the weekend. it is due to hit the tokyo— yokohama area, where england play france on saturday and scotla nd england play france on saturday and scotland play japan on sunday. games can be cancelled because of the weather, in which case both teams get two points, but clearly these are important matches, particularly scotla nd are important matches, particularly scotland and japan, which could decide who goes through to the knockout stage. there are some suggestions the organisers are even looking at rearranging these fixtures at different venues to make sure that they go ahead. and we are expecting an update from the organisers of the next couple of hours. we will be keeping a close eye on that. andy swiss with some very excitable fans. enjoy it. laughter. andy is enjoying it, they are enjoying it. he could not see. i think you are always aware. the perils of live tv. take a look at this goalkeeping howler which gifted england's women victory over portugal. with the match goalless, the portugal goalkeeper dropped this cross, beth mead scored.
7:38 am
phil neville's side needed some luck, they hadn't won in five matches. they got some more, how this free kick stayed out? ? they got some more, how this free kick stayed out? england won 1—0. wales's euro 2021 qualifying campaign had a welcome boost after they beat belarus 1—0. rachel rowe got the winner with around ten minutes to go in herfirst game back from a year—long injury. and from a tight angle, wales stay second in group c. it was tough, it was heated, and that was just the fiery exchange between andy murray and fabio fognini at the shanghai masters. murray twice served for the match, but lost in the second round. he played some of his best tennis. and got annoyed with fognini, who shouted during a point. he felt it was a blatant attempt to put him off. and he took it up with the umpire. fognini won it on the
7:39 am
third set tie—break. murray wasn't happy with the italian's behaviour. he wasn't saying anything to him. so i was obviously frustrated at that. he wanted to engage with me, fabio. i probably shouldn't have done. but i'm not having him talk to me like that on the court. there we go. andy murray not happy. my there we go. andy murray not happy. my guess it shows that the fire still burns in his belly to try to get back to the top. there was plenty other. telling him to shut up about encore, those are strong words, i guess. you obviously want to do what he can to get back to the top ——on court. to do what he can to get back to the top --on court. it seems he is on his way. thank you. earlier this year, the prime minister unveiled plans to recruit a total of 20,000 additional police officers in england and wales at a cost of more than £500 million. the announcement injuly drew criticism with some blaming a rise in violent crime on the loss of a similar number of officers since 2010, as part of
7:40 am
the government's austerity measures. we can speak now to the minister for policing, kit malthouse. thank you very much. good to talk to you as ever. can we suffer those numbers? pledge of an extra 20,000 officers when in the last ten years, as we said, around 22,000 posts have been cut by your own party. so actually we're not even, if those 20,000 are recruited, are not even at the figure we were at a decade ago. today we are announcing the first slug of 6000, as you might know, were being recruited and distributed across the country. people will learn later on today how many there local forces getting. and this 20,000 on top of 3000 that were baked into the financial settlement for policing last year. so that the two together over the next three yea rs we two together over the next three years we should end up about 23,000 up years we should end up about 23,000 up on where we were. and that's in response to changing crime. back in 2010, you will remember, we were
7:41 am
dealing with a massive financial crisis, we civilly couldn't afford to do everything we wanted to do. yet crime was falling. since then we have seen significant changes in crime. we have to be agile. people have said to us that they feel a need to have a greater police presence on the streets. so we have acted and that is why we are recruiting 20,000. today's announcement is about where those various numbers of police officers will go. g'day ask about the breakdown shows more than 1300 of those officers will be in london —— could i ask. there are 200 for the whole of merseyside. there have been some bbc investigation on those figures. in terms ofjustifying the disparity, when crime is rising at a higher rate outside of london for some crimes, why there are so many officers for a place like london? obviously the capital city with a huge population, but not so many for summer huge population, but not so many for summer like merseyside. obviously the populations are very different. and police funding is on an agreed formula basis. we have allocated
7:42 am
these offices on the basis of that formula as well. i would not, frankly, to have discretion to send them all of the country, but it has to be done on a legallyjustifiable basis and the formula was the quickest way we could get out there, with the numbers, to allow release forces to recruit. this isjust with the numbers, to allow release forces to recruit. this is just the first year, if a 6000. we have another 14,000 to come in the next two years. another 14,000 to come in the next two yea rs. we'll another 14,000 to come in the next two years. we'll be talking to the whole policing family about what the allocation of those police officers should look like. what we have said though is that the first 6000 which will be distributed, fairly, we think, across the country, they have to be territorial policing. that is going to frontline, on the streets, uniformed police officers who will create, we hope, a greater sense of space and presence in community so people feel safer. do you can see that. i know you so you are responding to a need, you are responding to a need, you are responding to a need, you are responding to any that is created by the cuts from your own party, that is why there is such a whole in the number of police on the street. there is no direct connection
7:43 am
between the two... how can they not between the two... how can they not bea between the two... how can they not be a direct connection between the cutting of police officers and the need for more police officers?! i'm about to explain to you. in 2008 of the deputy mayor for policing in london at a time when police numbers we re london at a time when police numbers were at an all—time high and money was being spent like water by gotten browner than prime minister. having said that, still had a huge spike in knife crime. there was a significant rises 20,008 and 2012. took a huge effort to get on top of that. we managed to do so. since then crime continue to fall. and as i say, back in 2010 and beyond we were running a deficit of over 150 billion. it is now, after many years, a decade of ha rd now, after many years, a decade of hard work by the entire country, it has been tough, it is below 50 billion so we can afford to invest in some of the things we want to. you will have seen schools, hospitals, and police is where we are going. so hopefully it is a bright future for policing. because in between crime has changed. for example we have seen the rise of the horrible phenomenon of county lines which didn't exist ten years ago. a
7:44 am
change in the drugs market which is causing violence and harm across the country. and we have to respond to that and be agile in doing so. there is plenty we would like to talk to about this morning, i could speak about this morning, i could speak about police officers for quite some time. it is a huge we can break the negotiations as well. so angry comments yesterday. do you feel, having heard that, that negotiations are over? absolutely not, no. we are obviously reaching a criminal point in brexit. if there were ever a time for george or rather than war war, it is now. it is the briefing, the vicious briefing that characterised much of mrs may's time. i hope. and get into serious technical discussions about whether we can make this work or whether the eu think it can work and then we can get a deal by the time we get to the eu council. the prime minister has made an open and generous offer. he has moved very significantly to compromise with the eu to find a way for us to get what we need, which is
7:45 am
to leave the eu, and for the eu to be satisfied that we are doing so in a way that satisfies the requirements. now is the time for them to engage sincerely without our work it out. maybe you could answer what donald tusk was saying, tweeting to the premise. he says you don't want to deal, you don't want an extension, you don't want to revoke. what you want? mr tusk spent quite a lot of time on twitter i would rather he spent time looking at the offer the uk has made which is generous and a compromise, to see if we can make it work. we both have a duty towards a people we serve to reach a compromise and that is what we are reaching for. what would you say to those who claim and we put this to alistair campbell earlier, and many people agree on that, it has merely been put forward to be flown back and be rejected. that is total nonsense. i am somebody who spent quite a lot of time trying to work out compromises
7:46 am
on the eu. back injanuary, i produced with a group of other mps, a plan we thought might fly. i sat down with borisjohnson and david frost in the closing date of the leadership campaign to talk about the strategy and tactics required to get a deal. the prime minister's desire to get a deal is absolutely true and verifiable in history as well as now and what we need is for the eu to engage with it, sit down seriously and see if we can make it work. after that call yesterday, number 10 said work. after that call yesterday, number10 said mrs work. after that call yesterday, number 10 said mrs michael had made it clear that based on the prime minister's plan, a deal was overwhelmingly unlikely. there are technical discussions need to happen and need to continue. we have to push these to the eu council in the hope that the two sides can put down the side of briefing instinct and
7:47 am
talk about coming together in a compromise to get us out of the eu inner civilised and rational way. yesterday, on the programme, we spoke to harry dunn's parents, the young man killed in august. dominic raabis young man killed in august. dominic raab is meeting hopefully with those pa rents raab is meeting hopefully with those parents later on today. what sort of pressure should we be putting on the us government to try and find a resolution here? we should be putting enormous pressure and i know at the very highest level, conversations are being had to make sure justice is done conversations are being had to make surejustice is done for conversations are being had to make sure justice is done for that conversations are being had to make surejustice is done for that poor family. it is a terrible, terrible incident. the allegations against the individual concerned a very serious and i think she should come back and face british justice and i hope and believe that senior members of the government are making that point very clearly to our american friends. thank you for your time.
7:48 am
you're watching breakfast and real signs of autumn. good morning everybody. a beautiful weather watchers picture from greater london. the forecast is as it has been for the last few. showers, some heavy with thunder and hail. low pressure is dominating a pressure currently and you can the isobars packed closely together, meaning it is going to be windy and whether front is coming our way into the week introducing some rain but the week introducing some rain but the wind is coming from the south—west or west, a mild direction for us so we are south—west or west, a mild direction for us so we are not south—west or west, a mild direction for us so we are not anticipating any problems with frost and daytime temperatures should be roughly where you would expect them to be at this stage in october. a lot of dry weather, heavy showers along the bristol channel towards the gospel. through the day, lowing from the
7:49 am
east with gusty winds. not all of us will catch a shower and if you managed to miss one and in the sunshine will not feel too bad. 11-15 sunshine will not feel too bad. 11—15 degress, down a couple of degrees for some of what we had yesterday. yesterday the top temperature was in london and 18 degrees. overnight some of the show as they some mileage particularly in south—western scotland where they will be heavy. —— some merge. whether front for tomorrow will come our way, bob front so as well as introducing some rain it will also introduce some mild up air. a lot of mild weather. but this front will replace with mild rain. temperature
7:50 am
was, and in the north, a milder17 as we push down to the south. we lose our warm front thursday evening alcohol front starts to sink southwards. —— our cold front. at the moment we think the cold front will bring rain south and east. in between something dry and brighter with sunny skies. temperature wise, ten in the north, 18 in the south. a little bit of sunshine here and there. the search for the sunshine. barclays bank has come under criticism after announcing its customers will no longer be able to withdraw money from their local post office. ben's looking into this one for us. this is part of that ongoing debate.
7:51 am
in city centres there are plenty of options but in a rural areas it is more difficult. barclays made quite a change. barclays yesterday promised not to close any branches where it was the ‘last bank in town' for the next two years. that is important because so many have been closing. but it did make changes to where customers can take out cash. that matters because there are already fewer places for people to access their money. the consumer group which? says that one in eight rural communities lost their only free—to—use atm. the cash machine network link protected a number of cash machines and gave them so—called ‘special status' because they were so important to local people and businesses. but which? say 194 of those special machines actually closed between january last year and july this year. well, link says it does protect and replace machines in remote communities unless there is a post office nearby. that's because you can now withdraw
7:52 am
cash at post office counters. yesterday barclays became the first bank to opt out of that agreement. and so if you're barclays customer you won't be able to get your cash out at a post office from january. they have been telling me it will offer different services, may be cashing a check over—the—counter or cashback at a local retailer but nonetheless, some significant transactions happen over—the—counter. transactions happen over-the-counter. what we have done is we have had a look at all our customers are using the post office for cash so firstly 99% of them are already transacting on a one kilometre atm. we have found a group of potentially vulnerable customers
7:53 am
and what is important for them is to continue to get cash over—the—counter at the post office. we offer service where they can write a cheque and get cash over—the—counter. we have solutions in place that will work for all of our customers and end of the long—term. our customers and end of the long-term. write a check, remember that? they can also get cashback at a local retailer but nonetheless, the point is, if you don't like it move. quite a substantial number of matt barkley ‘s you can move to another bank that still offers that service. —— steel at berkeley ‘s. they turned down a contract with the beatles manager brian epstein. knocked back the manager of the kinks. and said no to touring with chuck berry. they were four girls from liverpool who became known as the world's first all—girl rock and roll band, and they did it all on their own terms — even whenjohn lennon told
7:54 am
them "girls can't play guitar". why are you looking at me! why are you looking at mam why are you looking at me! it is an old—fashioned phrase. now their story is now being brought to the stage and breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been to meet the last surviving members of the liver birds. let me introduce you to absolute legends. my name is mary and i was the bass player. admittedly legends you probably have not heard of.|j the bass player. admittedly legends you probably have not heard of. i am sylvia saunders, the drama with the live births. is it fair to say you we re live births. is it fair to say you were one of the first all—female rock ‘n' roll bands? were one of the first all—female rock 'n' roll bands? i would say the first in the world. definitely. there were four girls who shook the world but when they started out in liverpool's cabot club, they were written off by four boys who definitely did. john turned around and said, girls don't play guitar!
7:55 am
how very their here. and drums, i think he meant as well. you proved him wrong! we had to go from one end of the country to the other and then we played all over europe, with the searchers, the rolling stones, the kinks. but not the beatles. the beatles manager wanted to sign them but they turned him down, chuck very‘s manager wanted them to two other states with him. —— chuck berry. but they turned him down stop now they are back where they started. the best rock 'n' roll story never told has finally made it to the stage at the liverpool playhouse theatre and the cabot club. what a story! it is
7:56 am
incredible. i found myself club. what a story! it is incredible. ifound myself in rehearsals going, did i make that 7 rehearsals going, did i make that t rehearsals going, did i make that up? but that happened, thejimi hendrix happened, the kinks happened. why won't we aware of them, they should be globally recognised. yes. after a few short yea rs of recognised. yes. after a few short years of starting, sylvia met a man, had a baby, the bad split, until now. any regrets? no. not at all. we had a fabulous time. we started as for friends and we finished as for france. it is great to be back at the cabinet again. 55 years it has taken us and i bet you thought we would all be on the zipper frames!
7:57 am
you were brilliant! how did that feel? after 55 years? what do you think? jayne mccubbin, bbc news. that is just lovely. that isjust lovely. what a bunch of women. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. an amazing story coming your way in ten minutes, don't go away. good morning from bbc london, i'm alpa patel. around 50 households spent the night in emergency accommodation after a major water main burst in north london. this was the scene in finsbury park throughout yesterday. thames water say the problem has been temporarily fixed and supplies should have been restored. but they warned there is a chance of further problems during the morning, due to a high demand for water. the metropolitan police has been told it will get funding to recruit more than thirteen hundred extra officers by the end of the next financial year.
7:58 am
injuly the government pledged to boost police numbers across england and wales by 20,000 over the next three years. but the mayor said the move was only a partial reversal of huge cuts over the last 9 years. a new study by london zoo and imperial college london suggests that the culling of badgers could increase the risk of spreading tb to cattle, rather than controlling it. the research found that culling drove badgers much further afield. the government and the national farmers union argue that the controversial practice is effective. this year 63,000 badgers are allowed to be culled. there's been a big rise in the number of people here in london deciding to become self employed. the independent thinktank, centre for cities, found the vast majority of those jobs were in occupations like construction, cleaning and taxi driving. it also found there was a greater need for more training so people can adapt in the workplace more effectively. let's take a look at
7:59 am
the travel situation now... on the tube — all clear on all lines at the moment on the trains — great western railway service is cancelled between slough and windsor and eton central due to a broken down train. still road closures around westminster — due to protests by extinction rebellion affecting routes including parliament square, trafalgar square and whitehall in finsbury park — queen's drive is closed in both directions between seven sisters road and brownswood road because of flooding. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a rather cloudy start out there this morning but the cloud will start to break up and we will see some spells of sunshine. we are, of course, still at risk of one or two showers. the show was this morning blowing through fairly quickly on that westerly breeze. we could see one or two more this afternoon. again, if you get one, they could be quite heavy but plenty of sunny spells around or at least brighter spells
8:00 am
with a bit of cloud. the temperature today getting up to around 15 celsius. those showers blown through on that westerly breeze quite quickly, continuing into the evening but gradually fading away so we should get some drier weather. still at risk of a shower but largely dry overnight, with clear spells. minimum temperature between seven and 9 celsius. for tomorrow, because that cloud starts to break up, we will see some sunshine first thing. but gradually the cloud will increase through the day. at first turningthe sunshine hazy but then potentially thicker cloud bringing us a spot or two of rain tomorrow afternoon. temperatures tomorrow, 17 celsius and then it stays really unsettled, windy with some wet spells through to the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today... eight days away from next week's crucial brexit summit, the irish president warns that a deal will be "very difficult" to reach.
8:01 am
after an horrific accident left herjaw hanging on byjust a tiny piece of skin, we'll speak to 15—year—old emily and the surgeon who rebuilt herface. good morning from beautiful cornwall, a wonderful place to live but we are asking why it is that people who live in our coastal communities get paid less. the cost of going cashless. fewer bank branches and atm closures threaten the end of cash. i'll look at those struggling to access their money. it's a big day at the rugby world cup. scotland face a must—win game against russia to keep their hopes alive whilst wales can qualify for the quarter—finals if they beat fiji. once again today is a day of sunshine and showers. some of the shower is heavy on thundery with hail, but it will move through quickly on gusty winds. more later. it's wednesday the 9th of october — our top story...
8:02 am
the irish prime minister has warned it will be "very difficult" for the uk and the eu to reach an agreement on brexit before the deadline of october 31st. leo varadkar‘s comments come as european leaders accused the government of turning the brexit negotiations into a "stupid blame game." our political correspondent nick eardley is in downing street for us this morning. the language seems to be extraordinary. what's next? an excellent question, louise, because number ten was hoping that by this point things would have moved forward. whereas actually we seem to be going backwards. notjust leo varadkar saying it's going to be very difficult to get a deal at that big summit of european leaders next week, it was the call with german chancellor angela merkel yesterday which number ten sources said the conditions being attached to any brexit deal were essentially impossible for the uk to agree, not just now but ever. then there was
8:03 am
retaliation from donald tusk, the european council president, saying borisjohnson was engaged in a stupid blame game. it doesn't look good at all. one potential possible, something to look out for, the prime minister meeting irish taoiseach leo varadkar tomorrow and it might be a chance to say, we only have one week left to sort this, so let's try to get something on the table. but there are not many people at number ten, or in westminster or in brussels either who think this will end well. nick eardley, thank you. foreign secretary dominic raab has urged the us ambassador "to do the right thing" by the family of 19—year—old harry dunn, who was killed in a motorcycle crash in august. anne sacoolas, the wife of a diplomat, is believed to have been the driver of the vehicle that hit harry outside a us air base in northamptonshire but fled to america with diplomatic immunity. the bbc understands mr raab is due to meet harry's family later to discuss the row. aisling mcveigh reports. britain's prime minister is calling on the wife of an american diplomat
8:04 am
to return to england to face charges in a deadly crash. 19—year—old harry dunn was killed while riding his motorbike in august. a tragedy on a northamptonshire country road that's now making headlines in america. 19—year—old harry dunn was killed in august after his motorbike was hit by a car travelling on the wrong side of the road. the accident happened here, outside a us military air base. anne sacoolas, pictured here 16 years ago on her wedding day to an american diplomat, is believed to have been behind the wheel. the marriage means she is entitled to diplomatic immunity. two weeks after the crash, she and her family returned to america and live in this neighbourhood near washington, dc. now the foreign secretary, dominic raab, has met with the us ambassador, woodyjohnson, and urged him to do the right thing by harry dunn and waive mrs sacoolas's immunity so she can return to the uk for questioning. harry's family say they won't stop
8:05 am
until they see justice done. we were just left to try and deal with the fact that we'd lost... that we'd lost harry, and that we just were expected to get on with it. as the row over diplomatic immunity continues, the story has struck a chord on both sides of the pond. at its heart, two parents grieving the loss of their son. aisling mcveigh, bbc news. police have warned that extinction rebellion campaigners must vacate public areas like westminster and move to trafalger square, or risk arrest. nearly 550 climate change activists have already been arrested in london over the past two days. the protests are set to continue for the next two weeks, with 60 cities around the world taking part. the white house has officially refused to co—operate with the impeachment inquiry against president trump, rejecting it as "baseless" and "constitutionally invalid". the inquiry is trying to find out if the president held back aid to ukraine to push its government
8:06 am
to investigate joe biden, who is running for the democratic presidential nomination. our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. a clash at the heart of american government. the white house flexing its muscle and refusing to have anything to do with the democrats' impeachment enquiry in the house of representatives. in an eight—page letter, the president's lawyer says the enquiry "violates fundamental fairness" and "lacks any legitimate constitutional foundation". it accuses the democrats of seeking to "overturn the results of the 2016 election" and "deprive the american people of the president they've freely chosen". the white house believe the enquiry is flawed because it is moving forward without a vote on the floor of the house of representatives. the first sign the administration was putting up a roadblock to the enquiry came when this man, gordon sondland, the us ambassador to the european union, failed to appear before the house intelligence committee.
8:07 am
the democrats want to question him about his role in discussions with ukrainian officials which have led to claims that president trump asked a foreign power to investigate a political rival. the failure to produce this witness, the failure to produce these documents, we consider yet additional strong evidence of obstruction of the constitutional functions of congress — a coequal branch of government. the white house says the impeachment process should be abandoned so the president can focus on leading the country and fulfilling his promises to the american people. but with the country on the verge of a constitutional crisis, this is a tug of war that donald trump won't be able to ignore. peter bowes, bbc news. we have some sad news now about the humpback whale that was seen swimming in the river thames over the weekend. experts say it has died — it's thought it may have starved to death. there were already concerns
8:08 am
for the welfare of the animal, which was first spotted near the qe2 bridge at dartford on sunday. the mammal was spotted lying motionless on mudflats yesterday. now, here's a tale of endurance — meet the tiny penguin that ventured on a 1500 mile swim from new zealand to australia on its own. the fiordland penguin, which comes from new zealand, was rescued by melbourne zoo and nursed back to health after its epic journey. once the bird was back on its feet, it was taken to a nearby beach, and released back into the wild. to swim all the way back home again? we don't know. it's done it once. a single ticket—holder living here in the uk has scooped last night's euromillions jackpot — they've won £170 million — making them the country's richest ever lottery winner. the ticket—holder is yet to be named and it's not known if it's a single person, a family or a syndicate, but they are now officially richer then singers sir tom jones
8:09 am
and ed sheeran. i don't think that's combined. quite a few people suggesting what they would spend the money on. one viewer says to move to ireland, donate to charity and buy a horse. says to move to ireland, donate to charity and buy a horselj says to move to ireland, donate to charity and buy a horse. i love this ron paul. pay off my mortgage, credit card and car loan. jason says a home in new york, one in london and a plush new pad in the midlands. one other person said, a new haircut. now for an amazing story. earlier this year, 15—year—old emily eccles was left with injuries so bad that her surgeon described it as the worst he'd seen outside a war zone. she'd been out riding when the accident happened, which split herjaw and left her holding herface in her hands. it's grim news but an incredible story. after hours of surgery emily's face was rebuilt. shejoins us now with her mum
8:10 am
michelle and surgeon ricardo mohammed—ali. thank you to all of you for coming in. emily, if you hadjust thank you to all of you for coming in. emily, if you had just switched on your tv, prepare yourself to see the x—ray in a moment. emily, from your perspective, where were you, what happened, and we will try to unravel this incredible story. what happened, and we will try to unravel this incredible storylj what happened, and we will try to unravel this incredible story. i was just riding with a friend, i am not a horse rider, i'm not an experienced rider. iwasjust a horse rider, i'm not an experienced rider. i was just having fun, as you do and it was a complete freak accident, no one's fault. you fell off your horse, it got spooked. it got jittery and fell off your horse, it got spooked. it gotjittery and then it got spooked by a car exhaust or something around. as it ran away from the group where we were, it kind of like wiped up against a wooden fence post. and, yeah... this
8:11 am
is the x—ray, this is what the accident did to your face. it's grim to think about at 8.10. iwas at 8.10. i was holding the skin of my face in my hands. i am feeling a little bit squeamish. i'm sorry! just putting it out there. we will speak to ricardo in a moment. you manage to fix it, incredibly. as a mother come you don't want to hear that phone call about the accident. where were you? my husband and i had gone to visit his father. we have dropped emily off with a friend, she was supposed to be going on holiday with her friend the next day. my husband was due to do a charity bike round the next day so we were travelling on the motorway and we got a call to say there was an accident. we didn't know what kind
8:12 am
at the time. the friend's father was ina at the time. the friend's father was in a state of shock and we could hear it was very serious. we went round the motorway roundabout a few times until we established where emily would be taken. but very luckily she was taken to the sheffield children's, and ricardo was on call. would you like to pick up was on call. would you like to pick up the story from there? you know she is on her way and presumably you are preparing. i got a call from one of myjuniors are preparing. i got a call from one of my juniors and are preparing. i got a call from one of myjuniors and they said we have a patient coming in and the draw has been separated from the face. i said, you can you repeat that? it's not often you get a call like that, you might get a fractured mandible or cheekbone, upper jaw and you might get a fractured mandible or cheekbone, upperjaw and lower jaw. i came to the a&e at the sheffield children's hospital. i saw emily there with herjaw basically
8:13 am
hanging. the injury had basically separated the lower part of the face. the left side of the jaw was separated, the entire bony segment, as you can see on the x—ray. it was only retained by some skin. so the nerves that moved the lower lip were separate on both sides. the nerves that supply sensation to the lip we re that supply sensation to the lip were also cut deeply on both sides. and how long ago was this? eight weeks. it's amazing you're here. people watching might not even be able to see you have a slight scar on the left side of your face. the make—up lady has done wonders! but it is amazing. it's all down to the surgery it is amazing. it's all down to the surgery team and ricardo. and eve ryo ne surgery team and ricardo. and everyone that worked with me after. it's amazing, that's why i want to share the story. it's notjust down to me and my parents and brother.
8:14 am
it's down to everybody who has chipped in to help. we were saying earlier, five and a half hours in surgery. earlier, five and a half hours in surgery. had you done a procedure so dramatic with that part of the body before? not in a child. we don't see that in kids usually. i am feeling squeamish, but i don't do yourjob. can you see a way to fix it? you basically go back to first principles. you look at what you have got and what you have to build on. you start with the bony structure, build a foundation and then put the muscles, nerves and skin back together. you look at it but you can see through what you need to do to start rebuilding. it's incredible. i want to know as well, it could have affected you in so many ways. how does it feel, for example? it feels weird. i can't
8:15 am
feel my bottom lip properly. it's like pins and needles. that's because of the nerve damage, being ripped out. but other than that it has become normal now. i can't remember what it was like to have it normal. can i ask you, did you look at yourself when you delete to make it happen. could you look a mirror? no, for the next five days i avoided looking in the mirror in the bathroom in the hospital. i didn't wa nt to bathroom in the hospital. i didn't want to look at my phone screen or anything. when you swipe across on the camera i was trying to avoid it because until i knew i was going to get better i didn't want to see how it looked. from a mother's perspective, you are on the motorway and hear about this awful accident that has taken place. when you get to the hospital and see that x—ray, we are looking at it and think it looks terrific, but when you see it asa mum, looks terrific, but when you see it as a mum, and then ricardo is trying to solve it with a five and a half
8:16 am
hour operation, what were you going through as a family? it was horrific. you going to automatic pilot because you don't want to show. when we first saw emily, you have seen the ct scan, but you haven't seen the horror of what it looked like. with the flesh. sol think we went in to automatic pilot. but the professionals that were in a&e, the staff that had warned us what she looked like, everybody, the wrap around ca re what she looked like, everybody, the wrap around care we had from the point of the emergency responders initially, the ambulance staff, air ambulance, then the people in a&e, the radiographer, critical care, everybody did so much for us that it just helped so much, dealing with the horror. you kind of look back and think, they did so much to stop us from realising the critical...
8:17 am
the seriousness? yes. and ricardo has such a lovely manner about him. he told us about the severity in terms we could understand. he said he had several plans, if one didn't work. so we trusted he would do everything he could. white and we get the idea from what you say, it's not one person it's the whole team. and you have written to buckingham palace as well. it was me and my mum talking about, how do we thank him? whenever you think anybody from the surgery whenever you think anybody from the surgery team, especially ricardo, he says, it's just my surgery team, especially ricardo, he says, it'sjust myjob, it's what surgery team, especially ricardo, he says, it's just myjob, it's what i do. but it's more thanjust says, it's just myjob, it's what i do. but it's more than just a job. it's saving peoples lives and getting them back to normality. so we thought we would write to the queen to try to get him an honour or some sort of professional recognition. and she back. i'm reading it here. looking at the
8:18 am
outcome of the surgery from the photographs, the letter will be sent on the honours and appointment secretary at. i'm sure you say you arejust doing yourjob, but emily and her family arejust doing yourjob, but emily and herfamily and many arejust doing yourjob, but emily and her family and many others will be watching and thinking, it's an incredible job. be watching and thinking, it's an incrediblejob. to remain that be watching and thinking, it's an incredible job. to remain that calm, andi incredible job. to remain that calm, and i know you are trained for yea rs, and i know you are trained for years, but to keep the family at ease while you are doing such a complicated piece of surgery. it's not only myself, it is a team. if the ground crew didn't bring emily in on time then that makes a difference. so we had the air ambulance which brought her in. then the wonderful staff in a&e, keeping her calm. it's everybodyjust gelling together to make it happen. tell us about... it's staggering that it happened only eight weeks ago. presumably there will be ongoing recovery and appointments. it's remarkable the recovery emily
8:19 am
has made. on the 3rd of october it was two months and the swelling has gone down and the jaw is functioning and she is back to eating and drinking as normal. she is keen to go skiing but i have said she has to wait for months. she is trying to pushit wait for months. she is trying to push it to three months. my goodness! we will not shirk the responsibility is to get her back to normal. the surgery as part of it but there comes a lot after that to get her back to normal and that's the end result of what we do. get her back to normal and that's the end result of what we dom won't put you off doing anything.” still want to ride a horse again, definitely. what do your schoolmates think of it? god knows. they have been so supportive. even people i haven't spoken to properly since primary school, they say, i'm here if you need me, even if it is a chat in the middle of the night when i was in hospital, they were there. and as well as trying to get a knighthood, you are supporting the hospital that has done this for you.
8:20 am
they need a helipad to make sure people like you in the future can go straight there to a&e. people like you in the future can go straight there to me. because of my case, we had the air ambulance there. it would have been really useful, but because it was saturday, they have to land in the park opposite. so they had to wheel me out from the park and get across the road. not having a helipad, that would save so much time. obviously it wouldn't have made that much difference for me, but for some people it would be the difference between life and death. you are amazing! and thank you all. thank you for your amazing work and thank you for your amazing work and thank you for your amazing work and thank you for telling us your story. wow. i can't get my head around looking at the x—ray and then thinking, it's only eight weeks ago and then you are sat here talking and with your very proud mum as well. what a story. we told you it was a good one!
8:21 am
here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. what a story, and lovely to see emily on the sofa. absolutely right, amazing. and she's looking beautiful as well. we have a mix of sunshine and showers and gusty winds, those winds blowing the showers quickly from west to east. we have seen a good packet of showers as we go through the early hours of the morning to stop some of them have been thundery, setting the trend for today. once again we are looking at heavy and thundery showers with some hail. some of us will miss that altogether and hang on to will miss that altogether and hang ontoa will miss that altogether and hang on to a dry day. showers enhanced by the weather front moving from west to east. the isobars are close together, we have gusty winds, the strongest of which across the north and west of scotland. for those missing the showers, some of these showers is emerging to give us longer spells of rain. you will also notice the gusty winds. even in the afternoon, gusty winds, strongest across the north and west of
8:22 am
scotla nd across the north and west of scotland with exposure. some eastern areas staying dry but even with the wind you can see showers moving to the east. northern ireland and northern england, a mix of sun and showers. some heavy and thundery. the same for the rest of england and wales, some of them missing the showers altogether. temperatures 11-16 showers altogether. temperatures 11—16 today, down on the top temperature yesterday, which was 18 in london. through the evening and overnight, hang on to showers for a time. then a ridge of high pressure building in to kill off some of them. then rain moving across scotland, some merging to give longer spells of rain across south—west scotland. gusty wind, no issues with fog or frost. wet weather showing its hand across the republic of ireland tomorrow and pushing steadily east through the day. after a bright start, cloud building and rain coming through. behind the band of rain we are once again looking at bright spells, or indeed some heavy showers. friday is
8:23 am
a messy picture. we think at the moment the weather front sinking south will bring rain across england and wales with showers merging across northern england and scotland with longer spells of rain but in between there will be dry spells. that could change so keep watching the forecast. i want to show you something quite interesting that's happening in denver, colorado. as we push over to the western parts of the midwest of america, this blue plume is sinking south. in denver today the temperature will be 28 with sunny skies. by tonight the temperature will drop to around 1 degrees. tomorrow the temperature will be —2 with snow showers. that's a30 will be —2 with snow showers. that's a 30 degrees drop on today. as we head into friday and saturday, the temperature recovers, friday, 10 degrees and 19 on saturday. to psy—tu rvy.
8:24 am
so many comments coming in at about the interview with emily and her mother and the surgery from ricardo. it reminds us what an incredible thing the nhs is, what an incredible service. and it's the teamwork as well, how many people were involved. and the surgeon was quick to point out, he was just at the centre of it, and here was emilyjust eight weeks on. day three is dawning for the extinction rebellion protesters who are camped out in central london, but today police are giving them a ultimatum — leave public areas and move to trafalgar square, or face arrest. nearly 550 people have been arrested over the last two days already. our reporter keith doyle is in central london for us this morning. we can see you are in trafalgar square. a lot of tents and people, but no cars. no cars. and anyone who knows trafalgar square, as many people in the country will, will know this is the very centre of london and it's usuallyjam—packed with cars at any time of day, and
8:25 am
particularly during rush hour. but walking round here, a camp has been set up. there are well over 110ths. a lot of people getting out of this morning. they have been camping at several sites all over london. you have been camping all night? we are with animal rebellion. it wasn't too bad last night. it is a light—hearted and peaceful camp here. people are being very friendly. there are 11 sites around london that the protesters say they are occupying. the police have said they can't occupy them, this is the only place, trafalgar square is the only place, trafalgar square is the only place, trafalgar square is the only place they are allowed to hold their demonstration. i am joined only place they are allowed to hold their demonstration. iam joined by two people who are at the demonstration. tell us why you are here. you are a retired teacher. is this something you would normally
8:26 am
come to? no, it isn't. ifirst learned about global warming when my two oldest children were four and one. that was 30 years ago. there have been 30 years of reports from the intergovernmental panel on climate change. we have a national advisory committee on climate change thatis advisory committee on climate change that is saying very clearly that the british government is not doing enough. all i want, all i want the government to do is tell the truth and pay attention to the science and act now. thank you for speaking to us. you are part of the crew here. i have seen a lot of people this morning not happy with the way you have closed off the centre of town and roads. people are trying to get to work. some cyclists have been forced to get off their bikes. this is not a way to win people over. we haven't forced anyone to get off a bike. we have built a cycle lane and are encouraging people to go slowly through. we are in a climate
8:27 am
emergency with biodiversity breaking down. when i was a kid i would go on a long drive with my parents and we would have lots of insects covering the headlights. i challenge you to go on the headlights. i challenge you to goona the headlights. i challenge you to go on a two hour drive now and for that to be the same. i would encourage londoners to come to trafalgar square and experience the clean airarea. trafalgar square and experience the clean air area. thank you, adam. the camp has taken over the whole of trafalgar square. there is no way any traffic will get through. the protesters say they will go to other sites around london including city airport out in east london. from trafalgar square, back to you. we will have more on that throughout the news bulletins through the day on bbc news. still to come — we'll have the weather with carol and the sport from john.
8:28 am
as you might‘ve guessed from the picture behind me, more ranges —— rainbows in the weather today because of sunshine and showers. rainbows in the weather today because of sunshine and showersm will be windy today around western coast of the uk. the showers are most frequent in western scotland, heavy and thundery here, if few showers across england and wales, but some showers in east is parts of england and wales. there will be very gusty winds today. temperatures a little bit lower than yesterday. through tonight, more showers and
8:29 am
those most frequent again across scotla nd those most frequent again across scotland and into north—western areas of england. temperatures into single figures but then as we go through thursday, seeing again a bit more cloud around, showers but more persistent rain in northern ireland and scotland.
8:30 am
this is worklife from bbc news, with sally bundock and karin giannone. counting the cost of caring for the elderly to relatives and economies around the world. live from london, that's our top story today wednesday the 9th of october. a new report puts the cost of workers leaving the uk economy to care for a relative at nearly $1 billion dollars a year and that doesn't account for the physical and mental cost. also in the programme.

36 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on