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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  October 9, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy live in penzance, where we're looking at what life is like living in coastal towns, as bbc research reveals people in areas like this are likely to earn much less than if they lived inland. the main stories at two: in a highly unusual move, parliament will sit on saturday the 19th of october in what's seen as the last chance to get a deal before the end of october deadline. all thomas cook's stores are bought by hays travel in a move that could save 2500 jobs. we are locating keys for as many shops as we can, we probably can't starve them today, but certainly tomorrow we would like a lot of the
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shops actually open. two people have been killed in a shooting outside a synagogue in eastern germany. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with jane dougall. hi, simon. scotland have kept their hopes of progressing in the rugby world cup alive with a nine try win over russia, they will hope to join wales who have officially qualified for the quarterfinals with a win over fiji. and nick miller has all the weather. gusty winds and showers, we see it all behind you, and that is the picture across much of the uk at the moment. are there any changes coming 7 how moment. are there any changes coming up? how is that weekend shaping up? answers for those questions later on. some of us have just got to get through the next few hours, nick! also coming up, the extraordinary operation to fix this teenager's jaw after it was split in two in a riding accident.
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hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. we're live in penzance in cornwall, where we're continuing looking taking a look at what life is like in seaside communities as part of the bbc‘s coastal britain project. we'll be looking at why people here are likely to get paid much less than people living inland, how penzance is going plastic—free, and i'll be getting some tips on speaking the cornish language. mps will be called to parliament for a special sitting on saturday october 19th after next week's crucial eu summit. it's expected that if a brexit deal is agreed there, boris johnson will ask mps to approve it. if not, a range of alternative options may be put forward.
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the summit is considered the last chance for the uk and eu to agree a deal by the deadline of 31st october, something the irish prime minister leo varadkar has warned will be "very difficult" to achieve. nick eardley reports. it's uncharacteristically quiet here today. parliament has been suspended ahead of the queen's speech, mps are back in their constituencies. there is a frantic fortnight ahead in which we'll find out if brexit is happening this month and if so, what it looks like. after a downing street source said that a deal was essentially impossible, ministers were today trying to sound more optimistic. nothing is over yet at all, there is a european council meeting that will take place next week, there are plenty of bilateral discussions still taking place. we want to leave on october the 31st with a deal, but at the same time we are absolutely clear we will leave without a deal if that is the situation we are being put in, but we are prepared, come what may,
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to leave on october the 31st. yet the odds are still stacked against agreement. borisjohnson is expected to hold talks with the taoiseach tomorrow, perhaps a last chance to find a breakthrough. but leo varadkar doesn't sound wildly confident. part of the difficulty at the moment is the position of the uk government that northern ireland must leave the eu customs union and must be part of the uk customs union, no matter what the people of northern ireland think. that is their position at the moment, and that is where there is a grave difficulty for us. a message echoed in brussels. the proposal doesn't represent a satisfactory solution. optimism is in short supply. downing street had hoped to sign off a deal at a summit next friday. mps are preparing to be here the following day, their first saturday sitting since the falklands war. if boris johnson pulls a rabbit out of a hat, mps will vote on a brexit deal, but if not, they could be given
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a series of alternatives. perhaps even a choice between a no—deal exit and revoking article 50. either way, that saturday is likely to be a crucial point at which the next few months become a lot clearer. opposition mps have changed the law already to try and force a delay if there is no deal. ministers think there might be a way round it. obviously, we will be there on the 19th. the prime minister has an opportunity to announce he has obeyed the law, signed the letter, sent it to brussels to ask for the extension, which will give us time to work out a sensible relationship with europe. this government has staked its reputation on delivering brexit by the end of the month. in the coming ten days, we could find out if they can deliver. nick ea rd ley, find out if they can deliver. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. let's speak to our europe correspondent damian grammaticas, who is in brussels.
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the mood music, i don't think i've ever heard it quite so downbeat, all eyes on leo varadkar, ireland is now absolutely crucial. well, it is, but even more so, absolutely crucial. well, it is, but even more so, i think, it is london thatis even more so, i think, it is london that is crucial in this, because it is pretty clear now, and i would say it is not the next two weeks to find out whether there will be ideal, more likely next days, because the eu is now stepping into the process of preparing for that leaders' summit next week. there is a sort of stock—taking going on where we are in the negotiations. we are at the european parliament in brussels about to here from michel barnier and jean—claude juncker, who will about to here from michel barnier and jean—claudejuncker, who will be speaking to the parliament as it prepares for next week's's summit, and really the eu has been absolutely clear that the uk proposals are not acceptable, they are not going to back down from that position in the next ten days, the
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only possibility, then, is that the uk does some sort of about—face, it doesn't look like that is going to happen, but that is the glimmer of hope that my dress, that boris johnson might move to accepting the eu ideas and customs, but very unlikely to see that. michel barnier says a deal is still possible, difficult but possible, i think that is what he means. and the language, the town, very much a fear that we are entering a serious blame game. —— tone. are entering a serious blame game. -- tone. the eu, interestingly, does not want to enter into that sort of thing, the very clear message we are getting is the eu saying that they still want ideal, they are still open for talks, they still believe there is a way to get a deal, but they don't want to go further than that. that comes from the big blow—up that we had yesterday, and
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on that subject, interestingly, we have had a comment from germany, from angela merkel‘s office. yesterday, remember, they would not comment about those briefings by number ten, but today she says the german position in brexit has not changed, germany wants a deal in hopes that this can be achieved — no comment on the phone call yesterday, so comment on the phone call yesterday, soi comment on the phone call yesterday, so i sign, i think, they are trying to tone things down. war formulator, damian grammaticas in brussels, thank you very much. —— more from you later. a scottish court has delayed a decision on whether to sign a letter requesting a brexit extension if boris johnson refuses to do so. campaigners asked the judges to agree to enforce legislation passed by mps aimed at preventing a no—deal exit. the benn act requires borisjohnson to ask eu leaders for a delay if a deal has not been agreed by 19th october. judges at the court of session said they could not rule on the matter until the political debate has "played out".
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one of the uk's largest travel agents has agreed to buy all thomas cook's stores in a move that could save thousands ofjobs. sunderland—based hays travel has already hired more than 400 former thomas cook staff. the chain collapsed last month after failing to secure a last—minute rescue deal, leaving 150,000 passengers stranded abroad. our business correspondent emma simpson has the latest. two weeks ago, they shut the shops. the world's oldest travel agent had just gone bust. some 9000 uk workers were made redundant. here in nottingham, looking up and walking away. today, some good news. hays travel, the country's largest independent travel agent, has done a deal to acquire all 555 thomas cook outlets. the couple who own this business say they will be taking on as many former employees as they can.
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elated to get the deal over the line. but also to employ so many people, hopefully it will be 2500, people will have jobs very soon. to get them back in employment has been, well, we've already employed over 400 so far really, really quickly. so a lot of them have cried when we've offered them jobs, so it's really emotional. thomas cook stores will be rebranded as hays travel, a business that will now more than triple in size. but with all these shops remain open in the long run? we hope so. certainly that is the intention. that is the plan, and we feel that hays travel will be able to trade those shops hopefully at least as well if not better than thomas cook. we are an independent agent, and we, of all tour operators, we will
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always put the customer first. taking on these hundreds of stores is a big, bold move, especially given the rise in online bookings. it shows that despite thomas cook's demise, the package holiday is far from dead. it's very easy to book holidays online, but the fact that hays travel and other retailers were really interested in the thomas cook branches underlines how many customers still want to speak to a professional and get expert advice and be financially protected. hays travel says it aims to reopen as many shops as it can as soon as possible, but over the next six months much depends on what deals it can strike with landlords. emma simpson, bbc news. let's talk to the owners of hays travel, irene and john hays, who are in sunderland.
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john, i'm just wondering how difficult a decision that was to make, a huge one for you. yes, it is a big, important decision, we are not small to begin with, we are the uk's largest independent travel agent, with sales of 1.2 billion, so it is obviously still a very big decision, and it will double our size. it is approximately £1 billion worth of sales from these 555 branches that we are taking. we obviously did a very careful analysis, and we went very promptly to the civil aviation authority, our regulator, to run our plans past them, and we are very confident we can makea them, and we are very confident we can make a success them, and we are very confident we can make a success of this. irene, for those who have lost theirjobs
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with thomas cook, who are hoping now that they have a future, what is the message to them? well, the messages we would love to hear from you. we are determined to recruit as many of the talented people who worked for thomas cook into the hays travel family as quickly and efficiently as we possibly can. and i thinkjohn already mentioned in the previous piece that there are about 2500 in the thomas cook estate, and i am delighted to say that we have already appointed 597. we have about 120 offers. mind you, that has probably doubled since this morning. i don't know why the website is getting 3000 hits, but we have a recruitment website, we have a team of about 20 people taking calls, and we would love to hear from thomas cook staff. we have great admiration for the thomas cook brand, they are a key partner of ours, and they employed many talented people. and
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you about all smiles, perhaps understandably, but as you say, this isa understandably, but as you say, this is a much loved brand, thomas cook, how do you transfer that loyalty? shall i take that one? yeah. it is a much loved brand, and we felt really sad when it went down. we were are the largest third—party agent, and it was a really sad day when they went down. although staff had done nothing wrong, and one day they had ajob, and the nothing wrong, and one day they had a job, and the next day they didn't. in terms of loyalty, hopefully we inspire loyalty amongst both our staff and our customers, we are a sunday times best company to work for, and we are the largest, well, with investors in people large
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company top voted... very tired! we didn't do the deal until seven minutes to midnight. the lack of sleep coming in here now! yes, we are the number one apprentice employer in the country, and the award winners for that. so we do inspire a lot of loyalty but with customers and staff. i think one demonstration of that would be that 43% of our senior managers started with us as apprentices, and a huge numberof with us as apprentices, and a huge number of people have been with us for more than 20 years. we are not a big corporate, we are a family business, we value and empower our staff like nobody else, and that is probably one of the main differentiators. you probably one of the main diffe re ntiators. you know, probably one of the main differentiators. you know, we have been asked this morning, what is the difference between what hays travel can do the thomas cook did not, and there are two main areas, i will kick off the first one, which is the
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thomas cook, by the very nature of who they were, directionally sold thomas cook holidays. we are, you know, the largest independent, and what we are passionate about is our staff absolutely focusing on what is best for the customer, irrespective of who that is — thomas, tui, kuoni, any of the cruise brands, piutau, royal caribbean, it is what is best for the customer, and that has been a huge differentiating factor in our success, a huge differentiating factor in our success, and then john will talk about the difference that social media and the way we handle social media and the way we handle social media empowers our staff to bring personality and character, so we don't give them style guides, we don't give them style guides, we don't tell them what grammar to use, which grammar! what grammar!|j don't tell them what grammar to use, which grammar! what grammar! i will tell you what. .. which grammar! what grammar! i will tell you what... john will tell you about the marriage between digital and retail and why we believe the
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high street is not dead. if i can get a word in edgeways between u—turn, you are obviously thrilled with what is going on, you signed the dealjust with what is going on, you signed the deal just before with what is going on, you signed the dealjust before midnight, how did you celebrate? he is talking! we didn't celebrate, we would love to have celebrated, we hope to get the deal over the line yesterday afternoon and we were going to go out to one of our favourite restau ra nts, out to one of our favourite restaurants, but it was so close to midnight that we just went to bed and got some sleep and had to be up again first thing this morning. is but yeah, we will celebrate tonight, i think many congratulations to you, john and irene, thank you very much for joining john and irene, thank you very much forjoining us. people living in coastal communities are earning less than elsewhere in england and wales according to research carried out by the bbc. it also found that two—thirds of seaside areas had seen a real—terms fall
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in wages since 2010. the average annual wage in coastal communities is just over £22,000. that's more than £1,600 a year less than the average person working inland. and two thirds of constituencies in coastal areas have seen wages fall when inflation is taken into account. jon kay has this report. just a mile from the beach. the treneere estate, one of the poorest parts of britain. the coram family wanted to show us how they get by. we survive day by day. dad mike is a full—time security guard and earns 18 grand a year. he is paid on a friday, and it's soon gone. by monday morning i will be already into my overdraft. thursday, i could be asking my boss if she could sub me from next week's
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wages so i can put fuel in my tank to go to work. and that is every week in life. and then she will take that out of my wages, so next week i will be lower again. so it's a vicious circle? so we just start again, yeah. it's a familiar story here in penzance. a town literally at the end the line. analysis by the bbc has found that a typical worker in coastal areas like this earned just over £22,000 last year, whereas a typical worker inland earned more than 23,500. that's a difference of £1600. there are 12 grandchildren and seven adults. mike's wife amanda runs the household budget and has to make food last. it's a matter of you have to find the cheapest option to live. are you all right back there? she's a trained chef but can't find a job around here that pays anything like
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what she would earn inland. it is disgusting. i don't see how we should be paid so much less. i mean, you are going to get lower wages, it's a smaller place. but you can't afford to go out. where are you going to go? well, we do, mcdonald's. mcdonald's for a cappuccino. mcdonald's is our weekly treat, we get a cappuccino and go and sit on the beach because that's about all you can afford. the government says it is investing millions to boost coastal communities like penzance and level up the uk. but a lot of tourism jobs here are only seasonal. and other big employers like fishing, farming and mining have all been hit. the coram's daughter lucy dreams of getting a place of her own. energy would be £49 a month. prices round here are high. and even though she works 50 hours a week on the minimum wage, she feels trapped. it is so, so ridiculous. people further up have this money,
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and i would go and spend this money willy nilly, because you know, it's easierfor them because they earn more money up there. we don't earn so much down here. lucy now thinks she will have to move inland, splitting up the family who are cornwall born and bred. why should i have to move from my home to get more money? i don't see why we should be treated any different to anybody else. that wasjon kay reporting there on what it's like for one family to live on a low income. with me now is tamsin melville, who's the political correspondent for bbc south west. very easy for those of us who only come to towns like these in the summer come to towns like these in the summer months not to appreciate the seasonal nature of things, but what
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are the other issues that perhaps are the other issues that perhaps are unusual to coast towns like these? well, a lot of the issues you will see replicated across the country, anti—social behaviour has been an issue in penzance, people say it is something you see elsewhere as well, but very much an issue would be the low wages and very high housing costs, which is a real struggle for people. close to here we have got st ives, areas known for their second homes, and there is a lot of emphasis on that here about how people struggle to get on the housing ladder because of the high cost of housing down here, it isa the high cost of housing down here, it is a key issue. towns like st ives have tried to stop that, but what does it due to prices? how much does a youngster need to earn to buy a home? often people can't afford to get onto the housing ladder when they are down here, and that is key to an area like this, which was a brexit supporting area, constituency during the 2016 referendum, there is a conservative mp here, and he has
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beenin a conservative mp here, and he has been in place since 2015. in 1997 onwards there was a lib dem mp here, and at the next election they could bea and at the next election they could be a big battle between the lib dems and the conservatives, because there is just and the conservatives, because there isjust a and the conservatives, because there is just a 312 majority in the seat, it is definitely one we will be watching. a lot of work going on here to renovate, to smarten up these lido, and part of that is to keep people working through the air. that is right, it is definitely very much trying to keep an economy going throughout the whole year, and here, actually, people would ask why this was an area that was brexit supporting where this project has been eu supported, the local fish market could support... the weather just changing a bit! so why did people fail that was not anything for them? i think it might be that people feel this disassociation from the funding they are getting. really
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good to see you, thank you for that, i will let you get out of the rain! the heavens have opened! we have come here in october, at a time where a lot of bed and breakfasts, a lot of hotels are quiet, but this is the moment when many of them, this is where they decorate, get ready for the next season. i want to pick up for the next season. i want to pick up on the business side of a town like penzance. jess morris is the business improvement district managerfor the town business improvement district manager for the town council nice to see you, i can't apologise for the weather, it is your weather! tell me what it is for businesses here, that having the seasonal nature, what are the specific difficulties of that? from the point of view, maintaining an income throughout the 80s difficult, and from the business improvement point of view, we are continually trying to extend the season, but with penzance in particular, it is a market town, the land's particular, it is a market town, the lands end peninsula, so the
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businesses here also rely on the locals, so it is encouraging those locals, so it is encouraging those locals all the time into the town for that year—round coverage. we are lucky in penzance that we have got 80% independent businesses, so they are small businesses who are tailored to the visitor audience, trying to give something different, but also for the local audience. has been criticism of successive governments perhaps not understanding these difficulties, are they now get in it? from the penzance point of view, we have had a positive point from that in that we asa a positive point from that in that we as a town have been working collectively for seven years across all the agencies, both businesses and residential neighbourhood plans, and residential neighbourhood plans, and from that we were very successful this year in terms of being one of the first towns to go forward for the future high streets fund, so we are finally getting some cash down here, hopefully. tamsin
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was mentioning anti—social behaviour, which has been an issue, but you're also getting more money for the police than other areas. that is important. yes, the positive partnership is working there as well, we have got a community safety officer which has been employed through the councils, so we have courage through the councils, so we have courage to make people feel safer. from the anti—social behaviour aspects, you know, penzance is not a scary place to be, and actually it isjust, in terms scary place to be, and actually it is just, in terms of the anti—social behaviour, it is just a tolerance level... ! behaviour, it is just a tolerance level. . .! really behaviour, it is just a tolerance level...! really nice behaviour, it is just a tolerance level. . .! really nice to see you, just, thank you, i will let you get out of the rain, jess morris there. plenty more to come from penzance, you won't believe this, people are going to go swimming shortly, we will have a bit of that, but used to bring new, back to ben in the studio. thank you very much, simon,
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we will be back with you shortly, but i want to bring you up to date with events in turkey, because the turkish president, erdogan, has launched military action in syria. he says the military operation against kurdish fighters in north—eastern syria has begun. he said the aim is to destroy what he called a terra corridor on turkey's southern border. —— terror. there are reports of explosions rock in a border town, according to a cnn turk reporter in the area, the sound of warplanes has been heard, and a turkish security official as saying that the turkish operation in syria has been launched with air strikes which will be supported with artillery fire. and
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the kurdish lead syrian democratic forces, the sdf, as saying that turkish warplanes have carried out air strikes and that there is, quote, huge panic among people there. just to remind you the sdf, there. just to remind you the sdf, the organisation that was largely responsible for carrying out the attacks on isis, so—called islamic state, very largely defeating isis, well, they are now feeling that they had been betrayed by president trump, because you may remember that earlier this week he announced that he was pulling us troops out, although that has been shrouded in some confusion since his initial indication that troops were coming out. other military officials in washington saying it is just a redeployment. we can just show you the map there, the proposed turkish safe zone that they have been talking about establishing in northern syria along their border,
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and that is what they have been saying they want to establish in order to re—settle up to 2 million syrian refugees who are living in turkey. but it had been feared that with that announcement from president trump about the withdrawal of us troops that it would pave the way for turkish troops to intervene in syria. now, president trump had told the turkish government, the turkish president, m3, not to do that, that he would decimate their economy if they did that, but it looks like present —— president erdogan one has decided to act militarily. so the latest we are hearing from him in a tweet saying our turkish armed forces in the north of syria, with the syrian national army and against the terrorist organisations, our aim is to destroy the terror corridor which is trying to be established on our
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southern border and to bring peace to the region. that is what present —— president erdogan sing, announcing military action, saying that the aim is to establish in our southern border piece in the region. just to recap, turkish government official saying they have launched an attack in syria with air strikes supported by artillery fire. we will bring you much more from our correspondent along the border between turkey and north—eastern syria, but for now, let's go back to simon with the latest from penzance. simon. indeed, ben. a bit of a change of gear. ijust indeed, ben. a bit of a change of gear. i just have indeed, ben. a bit of a change of gear. ijust have a look behind me. that is the battery boys and bell's, who have decided it is a good idea to go swimming here in the lido. rather than than me! let's talk to susan stewart, director of the jubilee pool here. we were talking about the seasonal nature of
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business here. what can you do to try and get more people here for longer? ok, well that's part of our big plan. so jubilee longer? ok, well that's part of our big plan. sojubilee pool came into community ownership last year. we now have 1400 shareholders who all put money into a big redevelopment project we have got going. we have lots of new buildings upon the top terrace behind you, so a new cafe, a community space, and two treatment rooms, so community space, and two treatment rooms, so that will be open all winter with some selected winter pool opening this autumn! so for the brave in penzance, they are going to go and do inflatable wipe—outs, we will have a centre in the pool, so there is a lot coming in the year, but the big change will be our geothermal project. that is going ahead, is its? that is a small pool right over there. if that is up and running through the year, it means people are working through the year. just talk me through the plans for that. i will call it a game changer, which it really is, because as you
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say, penzance is a really seasonal economy. we have a really high proportion of people with part—time work, so they have five or six part—time jobs work, so they have five or six part—timejobs in work, so they have five or six part—time jobs in summer, work, so they have five or six part—timejobs in summer, almost nothing in the winter. this project will mean we are creating something like eight new full—time jobs across the year, which isn't many in number, but it is quite a significant change. we all go geothermal and nod our heads. how on earth does it work will stop we have hot rocks here in penzance. a well has been drilled which will bring water up at over 30 degrees, and we pump that into our new geothermal pool pump that into our new geothermal pool, which will be open all year round, so in the winter, you can sit in 35 degrees water. you will have stea m in 35 degrees water. you will have steam rising around your head. you can be one of ourfirst steam rising around your head. you can be one of our first guest if you like! it will be great, because some of it will bring in higher value tourism business. we can help to extend winter tourism or the shoulder seasons as we call it here,
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to start bringing winter tourism into penzance and support retail, hotels, leisure, restaura nt's. marvellous. thank you very much, susan. a brief lull in the weather. it doesn't matter in there! how warm is it there at the moment? 16? how warm is it, adam? its called! 16 degrees. lovely! that is your view. 0k, degrees. lovely! that is your view. ok, let's stay with the weather theme. nick miller, who i know would love to be there right now, but isn't. what's happening? listen, i love really active weather! i love the show is going through, and i love watching you and the showers and gusty winds! it is a little bit calmer in the studio here. i can tell you what is going on at the moment, starting with the radar picture. it is not news to you that there are heavy showers moving on through penzance. and across south—west england at the moment. these are the showers moving through in the past few hours. the big batches just spread across cornwall, and there are more showers
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to come through the rest of the afternoon, not just in to come through the rest of the afternoon, notjust in south—west england. a lot of them coming through into western scotland, but there they are rather more scattered elsewhere. eastern parts of the uk are more dry, and there is more sunshine in places. a view from lincolnshire earlier. the cows have taken to the ground, probably expecting some showers later on. not a bad assessment, given that it is low pressure close by at the moment, which is why it is so blustery and wet at times. but there are showers, moving on through quite quickly, thenit moving on through quite quickly, then it brightens up. but you may never be too far away from the next hour coming never be too far away from the next hourcoming in. never be too far away from the next hour coming in. just to play out the rest of this afternoon, the winds are rest of this afternoon, the winds a re really rest of this afternoon, the winds are really gusty, catch a shower, it could be heavy, really thundery. the chance of some hail mixed in as well, but you will notice these few are showers reaching down to watch particularly the eastern side of the uk. winds gusting around penzance, 40, 40 five miles per hour, especially of the showers move through. perhaps a little higher in western scotland, and it actually feels a bit cooler than it did
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yesterday. let's get into tonight, and some showers are going to fade away tonight. they are still rattling into western parts of scotland, if you are for northern ireland, perhaps northern england and west wales. many other places, though, will turn drier through the night. clear spells around. wednesdays up, so temperature is not going down too far, so around 6—9 celsius. something a bit different on the way tomorrow. a lot of fine weather to begin the day, still some showers around in scotland, but then we see this area of cloud with outbreaks of rain pushing northward through the northern ireland, north wales, northern england and then into scotland. rather more patchy for south wales and southern england into east anglia. temperatures topping at around 17. still quite blustery out there. taking a look at the big picture into the weekend, it will be dominated in england and wales by this weather front, providing some heavy rain in parts of wales, northern england at the midlands on friday, and another pulse of energy popping up that rain
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on saturday. so england and wales, lots of cloud and outbreaks of rain, whereas scotland looks to be staying into the sunshine and showers regime over the weekend. a selection of locations here. more is ever available online and through the app. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: turkish troops have begun an operation into northern syria, which could bring them into direct conflict with kurdish—led forces allied to the united states. parliament will meet for a special saturday sitting on october the 19th after a crunch eu summit seen as the last chance for the uk and eu to agree a deal on brexit. a scottish court has delayed a decision on whether to sign a letter requesting a brexit extension if the prime minister refuses to do so.
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independent travel agents hays travel has said it will save thousands ofjobs at thomas cook after a deal to buy all of the company's uk shops. let's get the sport. let's get the sport. let's go to jane at the sports centre, in the nice, warm, cozy studio, but i am not bitter! let's talk about scotland and some of the home countries at the world cup in japan. good morning? yes, simon, i'm jealous of you! i'd rather be where you are. it looks far more fun than the cozy, warm studio. anyway, let's push on with the sport. because wales have officially qualified for the quarterfinals of the world cup, but they were given an almighty scare. their opponents fiji started really well, scoring first, in fact, within four minutes. and then wales twice had to come from behind to eventually beat them 29—17. it has been said, they are now officially
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through to the next stage of the competition. our sports correspondent was watching in japan. wales always knew that fiji could be dangerous opponents, and they were given a real scare here in front of a raucous crowd. it was a thrilling game. wales had ten days to prepare for this game against fiji. they were undone insidejust four minutes against fiji. they were undone inside just four minutes when the man they call the boss, he was more like a runaway train when he scored the first try. in fiji wasted no time in scoring their second. so wales were reeling at this point. fiji looking a threat almost every time they went forward. but wales managed to regroup. josh adam scored two tries before the break to get them back on track. they took a narrow lead into half—time, and there was really no let up after the break. this is a bruising physical encounter. fiji were awarded a penalty try at midway through the second half. and just as you thought the momentum might be shifted towards the fijians, josh adams scored his hat—trick try, a
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wonderful off—load from jonathan davies to set him up, diving into the corner, and thatjust allowed wales to get a bit of a foothold into this game. liam williams added a bit of gloss to the scoreline with a bit of gloss to the scoreline with a fourth try, securing that bonus point, of course. wales is running out 29—17 winners, and they are through to the quarterfinals with a game to spare, but they have been through one hell of a battle here. meanwhile, as you mentioned, simon, scotla nd meanwhile, as you mentioned, simon, scotland have had a good day as well, because they have kept their quarterfinal hopes alive with a co mforta ble quarterfinal hopes alive with a comfortable bonus point win over russia. the scots must take four more points from their final match against hosts japan on sunday if they are to reach the last eight. here is our sports correspondent and the swiss. scorcher, and scotland's fans arrive knowing that heat was very much on. anything less than victory against russia, and their world cup hopes we re russia, and their world cup hopes were finished, so how about this for the perfect start? adam hastings,
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son of former captain gavin, settling any early nerves. russia needed a comeback, but instead found only calamity. first, horrible slipcase that if gifted hastings another, but if that was a touch embarrassing... watch this. george horne handed a try on a plate, barely 20 minutes gone, and scotland already out of sight. crucially, they needed a fourth try, and with it, vital bonus point. soon after the break, they got it in style. darcy graham's the break, they got it in style. darcy gra ham's brilliant the break, they got it in style. darcy graham's brilliant setting up horne once again, and it wasjob done. from there, russia were simply run ragged, with home going on to com plete run ragged, with home going on to complete an impressive hat—trick. thumping, morale boosting win for scotland, and a place in the quarterfinals could still be theirs. and so to what promises to be some showdown. scotland will now have to beat the hosts japan in their final group game, and even then, it could all come down to bonus points, but at least their world cup hopes are still alive.
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once a football now, and fifa have responded to criticism that they we re responded to criticism that they were too slow to react after the death of the iranians football fan after the death of the iranian football fan sa har khodayari. she was arrested for trying to gain entry to watch a match and died after setting herself on fire. iran have now agreed to allow women to attend their world cup qualifier against cambodia this thursday — being seen as a hugley symbolic moment in sport. however, some feel fifa should have demanded iran make a change sooner. we are totally focused on making sure women can attend this match on october the 10th, and then working just as pragmatically with the federation and local authorities to ensure women can also attend local matches in iran going forward. we are firm and clear. we expect all women in iran to be able to attend football matches. joyce cook speaking to our sports editor there, and that is the sport. more for you in the next hour.
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jane, thank you very much. welcome to germany. police have arrested one person for two people we re arrested one person for two people were killed during a shooting outside a synagogue in the eastern german city of halle. police are unclear about the number of gun men involved in the attack and have asked people to take shelter. the attack took place on yom kippur, the holiest day in thejulie there jewish calendar. our security correspondent frank gardner has the latest. todayis latest. today is yom kippur, one of the holiest days in thejewish calendar for millions ofjewish people all over the world. the authorities in germany are still keeping an open mind on who is behind this. the fact that they have caught somebody, one of the assailants alive, is a plus. of course, that does not necessarily mean that he or she will talk, but the two sorts of areas of suspicion here arejihadist the two sorts of areas of suspicion here are jihadist and the two sorts of areas of suspicion here arejihadist and far the two sorts of areas of suspicion here are jihadist and far right extremist. only a few months ago, germany's interior minister... or
quote
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less tha n germany's interior minister... or less than that, actually, warned that the threat from far right extremism was just as serious as that fromjihad extremism was just as serious as that from jihad is on. germany has suffered attacks on both sides on prominent pro—migrant politician assassinated a while ago, germany has intercepted a number ofjihadist plots inspired by isis. so it faces a double threat. the fact that this took place in eastern germany may end up being significant, because there is quite a strong far right presence there in terms of violent far right extremism. there are also reports a turkish restaurant was targeted, that shots were fired at it and they hand grenade bounced off the door, according to one report. frank gardner, our security correspondent. now, collen rooney, wife of the former england captain wayne rooney, has claimed that someone wayne rooney, has claimed that someone using the social media of rebecca vardy has been using leaking
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social media stories to the sun. coleen says she planted false stories on her instagram account and restricted followers so only rebekah‘s account could see them. the stories later ended up in a newspaper. mrs vardy — the wife of england and leicester strikerjamie vardy — has denied that she leaked the stories. earlier, our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba explained what had happened. both of them have become big celebrity figures in their own right. coleen rooney, well known, has written magazine columns. rebekah vardy has appeared on shows like i'm a celebrity get me out of here and loose women. earlier, coleen rooney posted on instagram that she had been concerned about private stories looking out to newspapers, one newspaper in particular, and she had come up with a plan to see if she could figure out where this was coming from, and she restricted on her instagram account only one other recou nts her instagram account only one other recounts being able to view those particular stories, and then seeing if they ended up in a newspaper. none of her other friends, even though it was a private account, who could see all the other stuff. only
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one person's account could see the staff there were stories she was posting which she said then ended up in the newspapers, and she said that that account belonged to rebekah vardy. unsurprisingly, that account belonged to rebekah va rdy. unsurprisingly, lots that account belonged to rebekah vardy. unsurprisingly, lots of people on social media have interpreted that as being rebekah vardy herself, but of course, rebekah vardy has made clear in a reply, also on social media, that she absolutely denies that she has been passing any kind of stories about rebekah va rdy been passing any kind of stories about rebekah vardy the newspapers. she said she is heavily pregnant and upset that she has to even come out and deny this. she would never do this, and that she says over the yea rs, lots of this, and that she says over the years, lots of people have had access to her social media accounts and passwords, the assumption being that she is saying that it is somebody else who has had access to her accounts are not here, and she feels it is unfair that she is by many being blamed on this particular way. and also, criticising coleen
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rooney for not approaching her first before putting all this out into the public domain. you know what the weather is like in the winter at the seaside. it is wetter out here then it is in there! you may have seen there were some ladies in the pool a little earlier. we are wondering where they have gone. they are all over here, look! ijust wonder, what possesses you to wa nt to ijust wonder, what possesses you to want to go swimming in this sort of weather?! well, i think it'sjust the feel—good factor, social... weather?! well, i think it'sjust the feel-good factor, social... you are the battery belles. well, some of the battery to macro three. we come down to swim almost every day, related to the social side, fun... it is not necessarily looking fun right now! we did not plan the rain, but anybody comes whatever the weather, in the snow, in the
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winter. .. weather, in the snow, in the winter... some of us who are here!|j winter... some of us who are here!” just... who did i see dancing just now? was that you? what possesses you into a totally mad, i think! i know! i can see! it is a good place to be. this is an upside of living ina to be. this is an upside of living in a coastal town like this. i mean, it is fabulous, and it is important that things like this keep going. we are very lucky, actually, to be able to have this pool to swim in throughout the winter. we also swim in the sea every day. like you said, it is the feel—good factor. mental health, physical health... good for your mental health, yes. and do you all get on? yes! and it keeps you fit? is a matter yes, it keeps you fit. and you won't mind me saying, you are all barking mad as well! are you are all barking mad as well! are you are all barking mad as well! are you are going back in there? well, don't let me stop you. off you go, off you go. go on, ladies. come on! know, you can't hide there! in you
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go! anyway, that is the scene here. 0h, go! anyway, that is the scene here. oh, it has stopped raining. good on! they weren't really expecting to have to do that, but that is afternoon live. mind your back! right, i'm going to have to follow that somehow, but i'll tell you how. i will get business to get us out of this. how is it there? much more warm and comfortable here! here's your business headlines on afternoon live. staff at thomas cook's travel shops have been thrown a lifeline after the company's receivers sold all 555 outlets to hays travel. the new owners say they hope to employ a significant number of the 2,500 thomas cook shop staff who lost their jobs when the tour operator went into liquidation last month. the new head of the international monetary fund has warned that any kind of brexit will be "painful".
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kristalina georgieva said it will hurt not only the uk and european union, but also low income countries with economic ties to them. the us drug firm johnson &johnson has been ordered to pay £6.5 billion in damages to a man who said he was not warned that one of its anti—psychotic drugs could cause him to develop breasts. the case taken by a 26—year—old man is one of thousands pending in the state of philadelphia. full why would you want to go on holiday abroad when you full why would you want to go on holiday abroad when you can full why would you want to go on holiday abroad when you can just stick here in?! anyway, let's stick with a travel theme. what makes hays think it can succeed when thomas cook could not? a good question. many have been writing thomas cook's travel agency
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offers the weakest part of his business. hays clearly have confidence in the future of on street real travel agents. and as we said, they were not the only people interested. there were other bidders interested. there were other bidders interested in the shops. hays reportedly the only people interested in buying all the shops, and today, its leaders said it does not intend to close any of them at this stage. and of course, in an area with so many of us not needing to go into a travel agency to actually book a holiday, we either go online or book a package orjust assemble our own package by booking flights and a hotel, we do not need this, there is a sense that we do not need them any more in the age of the internet. but hays‘ managing directorjohn hays says that from his perspective, the internet as a friend and not a foe. i don't think in a retail store, thomas cook staff would say that the web was their friend, or hays travel staff would say the web as their
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friend, and we embrace social media, facebook and the web, but also linking personal service in the actual shops. well, from one part of the travel business to another, and the big question as to when the boeing 737 max will be airborne again. today, we heard from american airlines, the biggest airline in the us, and it says it plans to start flying them again in mid—january. that is actually a delay and when we had expected them to do so. this particular model ofjet has been grounded since march because of investigations into two fatal crashes which killed more than 300 people. let‘s cross live now to the new york stock exchange, where our reporter is following this story. vivian, this really is notjust a decision for american airlines, is it? safety regulators must give the plane the green light. that‘s right. we are hearing from american airlines that it plans to
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slowly reintroduce the 73 max back into its flight schedule from january 16 next year, but that is not a decision it can take unilaterally. it says it is in close talks with the aviation regulator here, the federal aviation administration, and it is confident the software updates required for the software updates required for the max can be completed by time. we hearing more indications the faa is nearing the end... sorry, we are going to pull away from there. let‘s take you tojunko junko who is talking in brussels. vital pre—brexit talks. —— jean—claude juncker. now, we have to do sketch out the pcs of a functional european union for the coming years. that means it is incumbent on us to ensure the negotiations on the financial framework be concluded. that in turn means that we must act decisively to
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fight climate change, and it also has as a prerequisite that we push for the stability of our regions, and support that. what is important, indeed, very important, that we have an agreement on the multi—annual financial framework. the summit next week on this point has to genuinely make essential progress, because people in europe have to be able to rely on europe running business properly. i am dissatisfied because there is a great deal of fuss between the member states, between the member states and the commission, between the commission and the parliament, and people are murmuring that we are not up to its, that we should talk less and make more decisions, because when it
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comes down to it, it is important that we ensure that european researchers can carry on their project. it is important that young people can start their erasmus exchange years people can start their erasmus exchange yea rs on people can start their erasmus exchange years on time. it is also important that the infrastructure projects that we have planned can be brought to fruition, and hence, the budgetary framework needs to be agreed on speedily. the commission started relatively early. if memory serves, it was march, april, may of 2018 when we put forward our official proposals on the new financial framework, but now, official proposals on the new financialframework, but now, we have had 18 months of debate without any advance. it is a shame we spent that much time and did not come to a conclusion, because if we wait until the end of next year it will be too
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late to ensure that everything that has been planned... jean—claude juncker their, talking to the parliament. we will keep an eye on that. we were expecting to hear from michelle eye on that. we were expecting to hearfrom michelle barnier at some point this afternoon as well, as the continuing confusion over the exact status of the brexit negotiations continues. but we will keep an eye on continues. but we will keep an eye o n eve nts continues. but we will keep an eye on events in brussels for you. just to remind you, we are broadcasting from penzance. this is pa rt broadcasting from penzance. this is part of the bbc‘s coastal britain series. we are looking at the issues that face those towns on all parts of the british coast, particularly those that are having issues with the seasonal nature of the work here, the difficulty that that brings, and here in penzance, there isa brings, and here in penzance, there is a real issue with homelessness, and a real issue over the price of housing, with many people around here having second homes, and that has had a major impact on people who we re has had a major impact on people who were born and bred here who worry about where they will live later in life. also, the issue of pay. lots
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of things to talk about, and we will continue to do that here on afternoon live, the bbc news channel and across the bbc throughout the day. let‘s now find out what is happening with the weather. very lively here in indeed. nick miller will tell us what is in store throughout the country. it is pretty much livelyjust about everywhere, but somewhat quieter if you look to the eastern side of the uk at the moment, compared with the rest of it, simon. lots of showers coming on, brisk south—westerly wind into western parts, and as if you need a reminder, here is a weather watcher picture from elsewhere in cornwall, and the show are rattling through. some rainbows around as well. low pressure to the north of scotland, the flow coming around that from the atlantic, and the moisture of the showers pepped up by disturbances moving through. not as many showers reaching across to eastern parts. you can see more of the land here, more places staying dry compared with elsewhere. the land obscured by the showers, running into north—west scotland, strong, gusty winds here, but really
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gusty winds around, some of the showers, and we have been experiencing some of the showers in penzance. 40, 40 five miles an hour, and more showers to come. there is a bit of sunshine occasionally too. the lion‘s share is across the east of the uk. tempe is a little bit down on yesterday, topped out at 18 yesterday, mainly around 13—16d. in tonight, actually, a lot of the showers are going to fade away. they are still there running into western parts of scotland, so no change there. it stays quite windy overnight as well, and temperatures dipping downjust into single figures for some of us, may be down to 5-6 figures for some of us, may be down to 5—6 in the chilly spots as we start the day tomorrow. a lot of dry weather to start the day tomorrow. still a few showers in scotland, but not as many. running into the north—west as you can see, then this weather system coming in from the atlantic, not really showers, but cloud and rain. northern ireland, parts of wales, northern england seeing that spreading in the day. southern parts towards east anglia,
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patchy rain, not amounting to too much. these are your average wind speeds in the white arrows. gusts around 30—40 mph, so still blowing out there. as the temperatures, pretty much where they are today. taking a look at the big picture into the weekend, still low pressure close by, but there is a bit of a difference. this weather front coming in this is going to hang around friday at the weekend across parts of england and wales, with heavy, persistent rain in places, whereas for scotland and northern ireland, we are talking mainly sunshine and showers. parts of scotla nd sunshine and showers. parts of scotland by sunday could see some of that rain heading in. scotland and northern ireland, further showers to come, longer spells of rain in england and wales. staying on settle, then, as we go into the weekend, and indeed into next week as well. —— staying unsettled. as always, more with their available online. that is the latest forecast for now.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy. today at three: turkey has launched a military offensive in northeastern syria, two days after us forces were withdrawn from the area. in a highly unusual move, parliament will sit on saturday the 19th of october in what‘s seen as the last chance to get a deal before the end of october deadline all thomas cook‘s stores are bought by hays travel, in a move that could save 2500 jobs. we are locating keys for as many shops as we can, we probably can‘t staff them today, but certainly tomorrow we would like a lot
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of the shops actually open. two people have been killed in a shooting outside a synagogue in eastern germany. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with jane dougall. wales full—back to guarantee their place in the rugby world cup finals, but scotland are not there yet, they still have to beat hosts japan to progress in the competition. thank you very much. and looking at the weather is nick miller. showers, as you well know, simon, with gusty winds, and if few changes coming up as we go into the weekend, and for some of us that means getting rid of the showers byjust bringing in rain instead. the full forecast on the way. also coming up, the extraordinary
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operation to fix this teenager‘s jaw after it was split in two in a riding accident hello, everyone, this is afternoon live, i‘m simon mccoy. good afternoon from here in penzance in cornwall, where we‘re continuing looking taking a look at what life is like in seaside communities as part of the bbc‘s coastal britain project. we‘ll be looking at why people here are likely to get paid much less than people living inland, how penzance is going plastic—free, and i‘ll be getting some tips on speaking the cornish language. but first, president erdogan of turkey has said the military operation against kurdish fighters
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in northeast syria has begun. in a tweet, the president said that operation peace spring was aimed at preventing what he called the "creation of a terror corridor across the southern border." in the past hour, warplanes have started to carry out strikes in the syrian town of ras al—ain near the turkish border. these pictures show turkish military jets taking off from a nearby airbase just after the offensive was announced by president erdogan. the decision by erdogan follows president trump‘s controversial decision to withdraw us troops from the area. the area is controlled by the kurdish—led syrian democratic forces, who are america‘s allies and who played a leading role in the fight against islamic state, but are regarded as terrorists by turkey. turkey says it wants to set up a 30km "safe zone" along the border to resettle up to two million syrian
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refugees living in turkey. paul adamsjoins me paul adams joins me now from paul adamsjoins me now from the newsroom , paul adamsjoins me now from the newsroom, this is a major escalation, this is going to newsroom, this is a major escalation, this is going to be newsroom, this is a major escalation, this is going to be very concerning for those who are worried about a possible confrontation with allies of the united states and turkey. yes. i mean, we don't know yet the scale of this, turkey has obviously been very keen to give the impression that this is going to be a significant operation, and we know that this is something that president erdogan has been wanting to do for many, many months. at the moment, all we are seeing out the initial salvo is with artillery strikes and air strikes being launched from inside turkey, and we are not getting a whole lot of information about the nature of the targets being hit. they are taking place, as you mentioned in the town of ras al—ayn right on the turkish—syrian border, and it is one
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of the areas where the local kurdish authorities had been expecting the operation to begin, so we saw yesterday, for example, calls for civilians to go and set up themselves as almost human shields as “— themselves as almost human shields as —— intense along the border. we do not know if these people are being caught up in this. it is likely this operation will unfold as the operation a year and a half ago further to the west did, where the turks went in with some of their syrian allies, and they are still operating in that area. president trump controversially withdrew us troops, he warned turkey that they would be severe economic penalties if they stepped out of line. yeah, thatis if they stepped out of line. yeah, that is right, perhaps a mod for domestic consumption, because no sooner domestic consumption, because no sooner did that white house statement emerge late on sunday than
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congress erupted in howls of protest, particularly from his republican allies who are absolutely furious at the notion that the united states forces, who are still there in northern syria, might stand aside and let turkey do whatever it once against the kurds. in response to that perhaps, donald trump felt he needed to show that he was willing to restrain turkey. he said that the united states could destroy the turkish economy, typical sort of rather blustery language that donald trump is so fond of, and he was saying essentially that if the turks did anything beyond the bounds of what he, donald trump, felt was appropriate us now we do not know what he regards as the boundaries of appropriate, if turkey are simply intent on creating a narrow safety zone, as they call it, a buffer zone along the northern border to keep
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the kurdish lead fighters away from the kurdish lead fighters away from the border, then i suspect the united states will go along with that. should president erdogan proved to be more ambitious, should he have designs on more territory in north—eastern syria, and particularly if kurdish civilians get caught up in the mayhem and we see a large—scale loss of life, then i think donald trump will have to look at things differently. paul adams, thank you very much. ijust wa nt to ta ke adams, thank you very much. ijust want to take you to brussels, because the chief brexit negotiator michel barnier is speaking in the european parliament, let‘s just michel barnier is speaking in the european parliament, let‘sjust get a sense of what he is saying there. translation: in rejecting the backstop i sort of insurance, a safety net that we had come to an agreement with theresa may‘s government,, so that is one point. prime ministerjohnson acknowledges
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that regulatory alignment for goods is necessary between northern ireland and the eu. we agree on this point. but in order to resolve the issue of customs checks, the uk is simply proposing that together in the protocol, in the international treaty that we will have between us, simply to take measures so that we avoid any kind of physical infrastructure or checks on the border between ireland and northern ireland. obviously, we also want to achieve this objective, this is one of the objectives of the backstop, to avoid having infrastructure on the border, but what we are being asked for, in reality, is to accept asked for, in reality, is to accept a system that has not been properly developed, has not been tested, there will be controls spread out across ireland, and it will largely be based on exemptions and
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derogations, on technology that has yet to be developed, changes to international law through the common transit convention, and a new compliance system, but with none of the guarantees that should be set out in this protocol. ladies and gentlemen, what we need, we need to have the integrity of the single market and the customs union, and at the borders we need to have proper rigorous checks, all along our external border, the external border of the single market. in northern ireland as in any other area, we need operational, real controls, credible controls. we are talking about the credibility of the single
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market here, its credibility to consumers, to companies, and of course third countries that we negotiate agreements with, let‘s not forget them. so that is the first point of disagreement. secondly, what we need to find are legally operational solutions. through the protocol, we established a safety net which clarified the regime that would be applied in ireland. the safety net is something which is legally operational because it would be in force until we found a deal, oran be in force until we found a deal, or an alternative solution. by choosing to take away that safety net, by taking away the backstop and looking for alternative solutions during the transition period, so later on, the british proposal does not give us that same security, the
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safety net we have in the backstop. there are no real solutions for smes, for example, any british alternative proposal, apart from a general derogation. secondly, what would happen if we have thisjoint committee set up, as the british wish, where we would send all of theseissues wish, where we would send all of these issues that can‘t be resolved, what would happen if this joint committee can‘t find a solution during the transition period? the solution would then depend on the adoption of unilateral measures that would be taken by the uk or by the european union. there would, of course, then be a significant risk to the integrity of the single market, because the uk proposals would want no checks whatsoever between ireland and northern ireland, which would become two different jurisdictions. ireland, which would become two differentjurisdictions. the third point of disagreement, as things currently stand, is the british proposal on consent. we have found
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it very regrettable that stormont has been suspended over the last two and a half years without them having and a half years without them having a full voice in our negotiations. we have set out mechanisms, together with the british, to ensure representation of northern ireland. we are looking at an important role for the northern irish institutions to ensure that the good friday belfast agreement is respected. u nfortu nately, belfast agreement is respected. unfortunately, the british proposal as it stands simply as the implementation of the protocol based ona implementation of the protocol based on a unilateral decision from the northern irish authorities, who could decide right from the very start, so the day after ratification of your assembly for the withdrawal
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agreement, the northern irish authorities could unilaterally decide not to activate the proposed solution for northern ireland. even if it were to be implemented, every four years they could call this into question. ladies and gentlemen, members of parliament, the proposal of the british government, as things stand, is not something we can accept. it replaces an operational, practical legal solution by one that is simplya practical legal solution by one that is simply a temporary solution. there are other issues which are of concern, not with the withdrawal agreement but with the political declaration which goes alongside and is very important because it describes the steps that will follow after brexit. we hope with a deal, but even without a deal, we will have to rebuild everything that has
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been pulled apart, 44 years of integration and cooperation, we will have to rebuild our relationship in all of these areas, trade, university, education, fisheries, judicial cooperation, security. we are trying to set out what this future relationship will look like with the british government in his political declaration. the prime minister is asking us to simply focus on a very basic free trade agreement and no other options which we had left open any political declaration. he has also asked us to ta ke declaration. he has also asked us to take out references which we had agreed with theresa may on a very important point, which is the level playing field, so having some basic rules in place, a basic sense of fairness, of loyalty, of rules for
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labour, for the environment, for consumer protection. so that is what we are being asked to do. so this is the request that we have, and what that leaves us is the risk of having just a very basic free trade agreement where there is regulatory competition, perhaps social dumping, environmental damping, tax dumping, so on environmental damping, tax dumping, so on this particular point i think when we look at our future free trade agreement with the uk, that is going to have to be proportional in terms of the commitments made by the british government to have a fair and level playing field. i don‘t think anyone in london or anywhere else should be surprised that the eu
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is committed to getting operational, legally sound and sustainable solutions in this agreement. what is very simple, brexit when it happens, thatis very simple, brexit when it happens, that is something that is long—term. i have been saying this for three yea rs i have been saying this for three years now, brexit is creating specific, serious problems, first and foremost in ireland. so when we deal with these very immediate, serious and specific problems, what we need is, today, operational, legally binding solutions, not tomorrow, not in the future, and they need to be solutions for both parties here. so in this moment where we are now, we will remain calm, we will remain vigilant, and we will remain constructive, and we will be respectful of the united kingdom and those who need it. that
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is our approach, and we hope with this attitude on both sides, we will be able to come to an agreement that works for everyone. my team, our tea m works for everyone. my team, our team will be permanently cooperating with the european parliament, with the brexit steering group, i would like to think in particular guy verhofstadt, and together with all of the member states we will be available 24/7 in the upcoming days to try and reach an agreement. so michel barnier, among other things, saying that the uk proposals for a northern ireland border based on technology which he says is u ntested, technology which he says is untested, the mood music continuing to be downbeat. let‘s go to our europe correspondent damian grammaticas, who joins me europe correspondent damian grammaticas, whojoins me from brussels. not much positive there. no, not really at all, when you look into the detail, this is michel barnier laying out publicly what they have been saying in private to
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they have been saying in private to the uk negotiating team in the last few days, since that uk proposal was put on the table, and this is all of the eu objections to that, and they go way beyond, you were just saying it relies on technology, it goes way beyond that, because michel barnier explaining there that essentially what boris johnson explaining there that essentially what borisjohnson is asking them to do was to promise to have no checks on the border and then wait for a system as yet unknown to deal with that, and he sows from the eu point of view, that is simply unacceptable, it could not guarantee the free flow of economic exchanges in northern ireland. so that is really at the heart of this problem, theissue really at the heart of this problem, the issue of customs and how it can operate and this idea that boris johnson has tabled. that is why the negotiations have sort of fallen into these difficulties now and are not making progress, and michel barnier keane at the end to try to
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get out this message that we remain open 24 hours a day to try to find a solution, repeating his mantra about being calm and vigilant. we had a few minutes ago from jean—claude juncker, he also said that he didn‘t rule out a deal, would see what the next few days would bring, and before that the finnish leader, who will chair the summit, repeating the same message, hopeful but not expectant. damian grammaticas with the latest from brussels. a scottish court has delayed a decision on whether to sign a letter requesting a brexit extension if boris johnson refuses to do so. campaigners asked the judges to agree to enforce legislation passed by mps aimed at preventing a no—deal exit. the benn act requires borisjohnson to ask eu leaders for a delay if a deal has not been agreed by 19 october. judges at the court of session said they could not rule on the matter until the political debate has played out.
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more on the breaking news. us troops begun withdrawing from positions in northern syria on monday, which paved the way for this turkish operation against kurdish fighters in the border area. let‘s go to gary o‘donoghue, who joins me now from washington, many people saying this was inevitable after the decision by president trump. i think that is right. i mean, it was very much seen as a green light for ankara to conduct this operation, an operation they have been wanting to conduct for a long, long time. obviously, we‘re still waiting to see whether there has been an incursion yet, but from the border say that there has been mortar fire the border say that there has been mortarfire going in both directions, howitzers coming in from both directions, so we will see what happens on the ground. nothing so farfrom happens on the ground. nothing so far from the white house, the president was tweeting earlier this morning about the situation in syria, saying things like turkey
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must take over the captured isis fighters that europe refuses to have returned. now, that is a reference to some refugee camps, prison camps effectively, with isis fighters in them in that area that is going to be the scene of conflict, if you like, and! be the scene of conflict, if you like, and i could be 10,000 more possibly is fighters in those camps, and they are currently being guarded by kurdish fighters and arab fighters from the sdf, the syrian democratic forces, and if they get diverted to fighting turkish soldiers, there is a question about what happens to them. so all sorts of potential implications, and bear in mind here in washington, simon, the president coming under huge criticism from some of his staunchest supporters about his decision to pull back us troops from the border area here. lindsey graham, the republican senator, one of his biggest backers, saying it could be the biggest mistake of his presidency and could even breech his oath of office. gary o'donoghue, thank you very much for the latest.
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you are watching afternoon live. we are broadcasting from penzance, looking at the issues faced by people on council communities who would now seems are learning less than elsewhere in england and wales according to research carried out by the bbc. it also found that two—thirds of seaside areas had seen a real terms fall in wages since 2010. the average annual wage in coastal communities is just over £22,000. that‘s more than £1,600 a year less than the average person working inland. and two thirds of constituencies in coastal areas have seen wages fall when inflation is taken into account. well, with me to discuss this is derek thomas, who is a conservative mp for st ives here in cornwall. thank you forjoining us. the criticism is that successive governments have failed to understand the difficulties that council towns face. i think that is fair, and this problem is probably going back 50 years or more in my
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constituency, where wages have been about a third less than the english average, and it is down to skills. young people choose to go elsewhere to get trained, they choose to go elsewhere to getjobs, and that is what we must address and urgently. there are many issues that youngsters would point to, the main one being the fact that they can‘t afford housing around here, that is afford housing around here, that is a major issue. that is true, and we put huge pressure on people going to university, and that is not always easy, so actually we need to invest in skills, colleges provide a real opportunity, there is no shortage of work in construction, even if you look at the climate change crisis, thejobs look at the climate change crisis, the jobs created as a response to that, but we must get the training in place, we must be able to trade locally and provide the housing people need. do you get a sense when you go to westminster that they get it there, that they understand the unique problems of a seasonal business that has to operate here?” think there is certainly a growing
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understanding. for many years now, the government has provided a council community fund to try to address that imbalance, that in inequality. there is money coming into penzance for the high street fund, st ives and penzance can apply forup to fund, st ives and penzance can apply for up to £25 million, and that is about improving living standards, and there is work for us to do locally to say this is how we will address the problem, and then actually work with government and local councils to make it happen. when you are in your surgery here, what are the issues that people are concerned about? certainly housing, but it is aspiration and opportunity. are we saying to young people, don‘t choose to go away, choose to do good apprenticeships here? it is a good place to raise families, the school is fantastic, the health service is fantastic, beautiful quality of life, we have so beautiful quality of life, we have so much to offer, but if you can‘t in the money to pay the bills, you
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can‘t stay, and that is what we must address. not so sure about the weather! beautiful clean fresh air! great to see you, thank you very much, nice to see you. across the afternoon on the news channel and across the bbc we are looking at the issues that face areas around the coast, we were in great yarmouth early in the air, interesting to see many of the same issues, looking at ways of rejuvenating a town notjust in the summer months, one of because everybody is busy, where seasonal work, but also in the winter months and months such as now, where you don‘t need me to tell you that the weather can change and that can change the mood of a place as well. let‘s pick up on the issue of housing. gavin barker is the manager of a new citizen‘s panel on housing in penzance and a member of the progressive alliance for cornwall. lynne dyer is the manager of the growing links community project.
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they both join they bothjoin me now, thank you very much for putting up with this! ijust want very much for putting up with this! i just want to pick up very much for putting up with this! ijust want to pick up on the issue of housing, it seems to be top of the list for people when they say, what is the problem here? yes, absolutely, and low—paid seasonal work, those two things feed into each other. what can be done? well, it is difficult. my role here is to address quite polarising opinions about homeless people in penzance. you have a small but vocal minority who feel that homeless people have chosen a particular lifestyle and they are responsible for themselves, and it is a police issue. and there is another side to this where people are largely positive and kind and wa nt to are largely positive and kind and want to do something for the homeless, so you have that issue, but behind that you have broader issues to do with low pay, the struggle to put food on the table while paying rent, and really what
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we are trying to do is have a broad, measured conversation, rather than a polarised argument or shouting match which you can get in open public forums. and that shouting match goes on whilst people are homeless on the street, what are you doing to help? well, we provide a hot meal every evening at the moment, seven days a week, for people who are rough sleeping, but also people who are vulnerable in housed, so people in the b&b situation, emergency and temporary accommodation, where they don't have access to a kitchen. what stories do they tell you? when you ask someone how... i mean, we could all very quickly find ourselves in that sort of situation, so what hope can be offered in a town like this? we need more supported housing, a better mental health service that helps people, preventative services like the youth service, all these things impact on homelessness for
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the future, and whether this is going to become a growing problem of this is something we can solve. at the moment i think it is something that we could solve if somebody comes and says what the actual problems are. are used the word hope advisedly, because one of the things that youngsters in areas like these don‘t have a hope of ever owning their home because of the cost of housing. most of our young people moved to bristol or exeter or london, you know, come back later on when they have made a bit of money. and when talking about the issue of homelessness, the issue of housing, do you sense that the politicians, that they get it, that there is a significant and unique problem in places like this. yes, i think they do in general get it, but they are slow to move on really addressing theissue slow to move on really addressing the issue seriously, and i think social housing has to be part of the mix, but some parties will embrace
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that more than others. good of you both to brave a very blustery day, thank you very much for coming on bbc news. let‘s catch up with the weather, very windy here, but the sun is trying to pull through, nick miller can tell us what is in store ona miller can tell us what is in store on a wider basis. i want to talk about the showers that you are dealing with so well, simon, i have the radar picture, the view across the south—west, showers have been pushing on across penzance, and i have been some thundery ones recently as well, just into the tip of cornwall, it may well be that the longer we go into the programme, the fewer showers arrive, there may be a tap on the way to deliver a bit more in the way of sunshine. i don‘t want to deliver false hope, but there may be something drier and brighter on the way, not less windy, mind you! showers across the western side of the uk, the latest rainfall picture does show that there are some all the way east, lightning strikes closer to norfolk, the east of
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manchester too, heavy and thundery damp —— downpours. sunny spells as well, though, cowes on the ground in lincolnshire, they may think that there are showers on the way. big picture, it is low pressure which is making for such an unsettled picture at the moment with sunshine and showers, and this is hanging around today, but there are weather fronts behind me and atlantic which will change the flavour of the weather a little bit, thursday, friday, into the weekend. this is how this afternoon is panning out, and other areas seeing plenty of heavy showers is north—west scotland, strong, gusty winds, but around south—west england too, some gusts, as we know, in excess of 40 mph, and particularly as though showers go through, very squally with those. temperatures are a little bit down compared with yesterday. now, a lot of the showers are going to fade away into tonight, some will continue in the west, more especially into western scotland,
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running down northern ireland, north—west england, but now gradually after midnight it is getting a bit quieter, so more in the way of dry, clear weather overnight, temperatures dipping down into single figures, some spots down to 5-6 into single figures, some spots down to 5—6 degrees. tomorrow we start with quite a bit of dry weather around, still some showers in western scotland, but here is your different flavour coming up, notice this area of cloud and rain moving in across northern ireland, if you hours of wet weather, north wales, northern england, spreading to scotla nd northern england, spreading to scotland during the day. south wales and southern england, cloud increasing, yes, the rain mostly patchy nature, temperatures as high as 17 celsius, though most of us will fall short of that. the picture going into the weekend does show the weather front hanging around, parts of england and wales cloudy conditions, further rain at times, on friday quite heavy rain, wales, northern england, parts of the midlands, rainfall totals will mount. in scotland, northern ireland, a mixture of sunshine and
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showers, in a few locations here, more as ever online. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: turkey launches a military offensive in north—eastern syria, two days after u—s forces were withdrawn from the area. the turkish president, reccep tayip erdogan, described it as a "peace operation." this is the scene live from qamishli on the syria turkey border. parliament will meet for a special saturday sitting on october the 19th after a crunch eu summit seen as the last chance for the uk and eu to agree a deal on brexit. a scottish court has delayed a decision on whether to sign a letter requesting a brexit extension if the prime
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minister refuses to do so. independent travel agents — hays travel — has said it will save thousands ofjobs at thomas cook after a deal to buy all of the company‘s uk shops. two people have been killed during a shooting outside a synagogue in the eastern german city of halle. police have arrested one person sport now on afternoon live with jane. a good morning for both scotland and wales injapan at the rugby world cup. certainly has been. wales twice came from behind to beat fiji and join england in the rugby world cup quarter finals, but scotland still have more to do, despite running in nine tries against russia to get a bonus point victory. in a moment, we‘ll hear from our correspondant andy swiss wales twice came from behind to beat fiji and join england
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wales always knew that fiji could be dangerous opponents and they were given a scare in front of a raucous crowd. wales had ten days to prepare for this game against fiji. joshua was more like a runaway train when he scored fiji‘s first try. fiji we re he scored fiji‘s first try. fiji were wasted no time scoring their second just minutes later. wales at this point thought fiji were really looking a threat every time they went forward. wales managed to regroup. josh adams scored two tries before the break and they took a narrow lead into half—time. there was no let up after the break. this isa was no let up after the break. this is a bruising encounter and they had a healthy try midway through the second half. just as they thought the momentum might be shifting the rods the fijians wales scored a try. they dived into the corner and that
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just allowed wales to get a foothold into this game. there is a bit of a loss to the scoreline securing that bonus point and wales ran out and they are through to the quarterfinals but they have been through one battle here. it is fairto it is fair to say scotland did so with a morale boosting victory. they got off to a perfect start when adam hastings scored two early tries to give them the initiative. russia didn‘t help themselves. a series of calamitous errors, including an intersection on their own line which... intersection on their own line which. .. scotland were intersection on their own line which... scotland were really out of sight after the first 20 minutes. after the break, they got that crucial fourth try and with it a
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bonus point when horne completed that hat—trick with another try. russia simply ran out of stream and scotla nd russia simply ran out of stream and scotland ran them ragged, nine tries in total. a disappointing end to russia‘s world cup. as for scotland, this revives their hope for reaching the knockout stage. it comes down to their final the knockout stage. it comes down to theirfinal group the knockout stage. it comes down to their final group game against the host japan. scotland know their final group game against the hostjapan. scotland know they their final group game against the host japan. scotland know they have to win that match and even then it could come down to bonus points but scotla nd could come down to bonus points but scotland know their hopes of reaching the knockout stage are still alive. great britain‘s men‘s gymnastics team are competing in the final of the world championships in stuttgart. we can cross live there now. it‘s russia who‘ve won gold. china second.britain in 5th place. the fact gb are in the final means they automatically qualify for the men‘s team event
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at the tokyo olympics. the gb team of whitlock, james hall, joe fraser, dom cunningham and giarnni regini—moran made a confident start on vault.britain will be hoping to improve on 2018 where they only took one medal — max whitlock getting silver on the pommel horse. max whitlock tops the pommel standings as he aims for a third world title on that apparatus.the team qualified in fifth place, with the top eight reaching the final and top 12 winning a place at tokyo 2020. we will keep you updated. we love a dodgy statue. can you guss which footballer this is? ? you time starts now. it‘s in malmo, where his career started. and he‘s topless, celebrating a goal. as you may remember, there have been a few questionable ones recently. think cristiano ronaldo. zlatan is widely regarded to be the greatest swedish player of all time.
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that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. let‘s get more on that situation in syria. there is a security council meeting over that me... it has begun in the last hour or so. in a tweet, the president said the operation was aimed at creating what he called... let‘s speak now to shashankjoshi, defence editor at the economist it comes in a period of heightened tension between turkey and its european allies. it comes just a
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week after a major us experts said contrary to president tran‘s statements, islamic state is not defeated. it still presents a nasty insurgency in these parts of northern syria, liable to come back if it isn‘t kept in check. the biggest implication of what we have seen biggest implication of what we have seen unfold today is that the central instrument for the us against isis on the ground, kurdish led syrian forces, all their attention will now be devoted to surviving against a turkish attack. initially a very limited turkish attack but it might turn into a bigger one in ways that might disrupt and jeopardise the campaign against islamic state, perhaps giving the group more space to
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reform in the region it was pushed out in the last couple of years. it has been seen as a stab in the back that the troops have been withdrawn? if you only have one american soldier with your kurdish group ina american soldier with your kurdish group in a border town, the turkish armed forces aren‘t going to bomb you. having one or 100 are far less important than having... the symbolic number have been withdrawn and the kurds are completely vulnerable to anything turkey may wish to do in that area. i would also say that now a very small number have been pulled out and now that turkey has come in it makes it far more likely that president trump will be able to do what he said he would do back in december 2018 which is get all the thousand plus forces in syria out of the country because
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as long as he feels that they no longer have allies on the ground and the kurds are not able to provide a ground force against islamic state, in president trump‘s eyes there is no point being in syria. what we are seeing is more realistically the end of the us presence in syria. what are we looking at in terms of the syrian conflict? are we near some sort of conclusion? not really. a lot of people think the assad regime has simply when the conflict... outside of damascus and in most parts of the country is fairly tenuous. there are huge amounts of crime and local militia dominating control on the ground. there is a
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major offensive led by syrian forces, backed by russian forces which is now home to the significant... the prospect of another major refugee flow that would affect turkey, europe, is very much alive and events like this mean that the kurds, having been abandoned by the americans, are more likely to find some sort of compromise with the assad regime which they would have to live with long term. that will profoundly complicate some of the diplomacy thatis complicate some of the diplomacy that is under way or a political settle m e nt that is under way or a political settlement of that conflict. there is the risk, of what we are seeing in the last hour, of civilian casualties and a lot of them?” think that is correct. i think the turkish armed forces to present a risk to that northern part of syria.
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ithink... of risk to that northern part of syria. i think... of course, we have seen the turks and the turkish military use very worryingly sort of force both inside turkey and outside and there are grave concerns about potential human rights abuses but we had to put that in the context of a much more significant tragedy occurring in the other parts of syria on a scale that is much more serious. thank you. police have arrested one person after two people were killed during a shooting outside a synagogue in the eastern german city of halle. police are unclear about the number of gunmen involved in the attack, and have asked people to take shelter. our security correspondent is frank gardner has the latest
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it today is one of the holiest days forjewish people around the world. the fact that they have caught one of the assailants alive is a plus. that does not necessarily mean that he or she would talk but the two areas of suspicion are jihadists and... warned that the threat from right—wing extremism and... a pro—migrant politician right—wing extremism and... a pro—migra nt politician was assassinated in germany a while ago and germany has intercepted a number of jihadist plots and germany has intercepted a number ofjihadist plots inspired by isis so ofjihadist plots inspired by isis so it faces a double threat. the fa ct so it faces a double threat. the fact that this took place in eastern germany may end up being significant because there is quite a strong far right presents in terms of far right
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extremism. there are reports that a turkish restaurant was targeted and that shots were fired at it and a hand grenade fired off the door. the sun has come out here in penzance. coleen rooney — wife of former england captain wayne rooney — has claimed that someone using rebekah vardy‘s social media has leaked stories about her to a tabloid newspaper. coleen says she planted false stories on her instagram account and restricted followers so only rebekah‘s account could see them. the stories later ended up in a newspaper. mrs vardy, the wife of england and leicester strikerjamie vardy — has denied that she leaked the stories. we might return to that story a little later on. we have business
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drama. some really good news about thomas cook? staff at thomas cook‘s travel shops have been thrown a lifeline after the company‘s receivers sold all 555 outlets to hays travel. the new owners say they hope to employ a significant number of the 2,500 thomas cook shop staff who lost their jobs when the tour operator went into liquidation last month. the new head of the international monetary fund has warned that any kind of brexit will be "painful". kristalina georgieva said it will hurt not only the uk and european union, but also low income countries with economic ties to them. the us drug firm johnson &johnson has been ordered to pay six—and—a—half billion pounds in damages to a man who said he was not warned that one of its anti—psychotic drugs could cause him to develop breasts. the case taken by a 26 —year—old man is one of thousands pending
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in the state of pennsylvania. the new owners of thomas cook‘s travel shops say they expect to keep them all open. 555 outlets have been bought by hays travel, a one time rival to the collapsed travel firm. and while many industry watchers have doubts about the future of traditional travel agencies in the internet age, there was more than one interested party. the winning bidder, john hays, told the bbc earlier that he sees the internet as a friend and not a foe. i don‘t think that in a retail store thomas cook would say that it is their friend. thomas cook would say that it is theirfriend. we thomas cook would say that it is their friend. we embrace social media and facebook and also link a personal service in actual shops. catherine shuttleworth is the chief executive of retail consultants savvy.
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would you be as optimistic as the people at hays? thomas cook have been there the longest. they had their first store in the 1860s. they have some of the best deals on the high street and that will allow hayes to really improve. —— hays. that will allow hayes to really improve. -- hays. is important --... we do not know how much was paid or if there was a discount incentive behind it. iwonder, might the receivers get more money if they had
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sold to a different type of business like a coffee shop? i think the question is who would have bought 555 stores. even coffee shops do not need that. there will be very few retailers who have that big of a programme. they would have been able to move as quickly as hays travel. quite clearly they understand the market and want to reach out to some of the people who were involved with thomas cook and think they can sell more holidays. i think they will have a pretty good deal with the receivers and they will be pleased because it is off their hooks. we don‘t seem to know yet whether the thomas cook brand will survive or will be replaced by hayes travel but i wonder whether it might be tarnished by the affairs of the last months. yes, they have been on the front page news so i think it is difficult but i think it is still
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one of the most famous names in british holidays so time will tell with what hayes travel want to do with what hayes travel want to do with it. lots of people have kept theirjobs and more jobs are being created. lots of contradictory statements about brexit and about the us china trade war are confusing markets today. murmurs of more concessions from brussels. barnier pouring more cold water on prospects for a deal.pound falling against euro but gaining marginally against us dollar. farther afield, concerns about us china trade deal after us blacklisted a range of chinese companies but newswire bloomberg reported beijing was still open to a trade deal. that‘s all from me.
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we‘re in penzance as part of bbc news‘ exploration of communities in coastal britain. musicians here in cornwall are leading the fightback to help keep the cornish language alive. there‘s been a revival in singer—song writers from across the county and further afield, singing in cornish. sarah gosling has been finding out why some bands are embracing the ancient language. i‘m sarah gosling and i present bbc news introducing where we showcase... since i‘ve been doing the show i have noticed a really happy increase in the amount of artist singing in cornish. think of
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cornish, and you might think of folk music and old blokes with beards. there are a few bids dotted around but in terms of the music it is about as contemporary as it gets. this is the new live music festival. i think it is that anchor to art history, past and future. the celtic language was derived from brett on but if it wasn‘t from recent efforts it would have died out completely. we have about 300 fluent speakers... the music scene in cornwall is quite buoyant. there are many groups coming through which is fantastic to see generally. some thing entire songs in but othersjust
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see generally. some thing entire songs in but others just use it a little bit full stop it all helps. this girl is half english half... she released an album all in cornish. yellow mac and there is something about the cornish language for me. about its survival. it is fascinating because it has been up against the wall. people across the cou nty against the wall. people across the county are taking time to learn the language. we are on the end of england. it is a way of identifying us and! england. it is a way of identifying us and i think it gives as a lift. while cornish might not be com pletely while cornish might not be completely safe as a language yet, the efforts of guys like this helps.
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i would like to learn a little bit. you have seen bands performing? yes. why is it important to hang on to languages like this it is important to hang on to our culture and heritage. from that flows the music, other customs like dancing and other things so keeping the language alive also keeps the structure of all other things going. it is a struggle
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though. we are seeing singer—songwriter is who are trying to do their bit but unless you get youngsters to get interested it becomes a dying language. in every aspect the language usage is difficult. you need to get it into schools and it is a mammoth task but at the same time it is a real community effort and it weighs has been with cornish so it is an inspiring thing so you think how are we going to do this together? in penzance we are working with ten schools here and we have teachers on board and community groups who are really responding to that challenge. do you have a walk in the shops and try starting with speaking cornish to see if anyone understands?” tried that in london but here there are some places where you know it will work but not completely
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randomly. the probability is quite low. there is a lot of focus on cornwall and we see things like poldark on the television, does that help? part of it is branding cornwall and the culture. there is a cost implication, isn‘t there? if you want to bring the language to the fore then you want your signs in it, will there ever be a moment by the cornish lang which will be able to do that? it is quite interesting with the internet and the way digital media works. it is actually quite affordable now to do things in cornish, it isjust quite affordable now to do things in cornish, it is just the upfront setting up but things like websites and films, you can do the voice—overs quite cheaply now which
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you could never have done ten or 20 yea rs you could never have done ten or 20 years ago. is it easy to learn? no but you can have a go. thank you. time for a look at the weather. some heavy downpours again this afternoon. they are mainly across the western side of the uk and some are pushing further east but relatively few showers. some will escape dry. there may be some heavy and thundery showers and a little bit cooler than it felt today. the showers keep rattling into western parts of scotland as we go through the night. if few feeding into north—west england. many other
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places become dry overnight. a few showers around scotland to begin the day but the main weather features coming in and outbreaks of rain spreading north eastwards. a few showers following on behind. still some brisk winds and temperatures around about the mid—teens but some spots getting 1017 may be even 18 celsius.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy in penzance, where we‘re looking at some of the issues facing coastal towns in britain. first, though, the main news today at four. turkey has launched a military offensive in northeastern syria. president erdogan says he wants to create a safe zone and "destroy the terror corridor" on its border. kurdish forces say turkish warplanes are hitting towns and villages on the border, sparking panic among the civilian population. the european union brexit negotiator michel barnier says reaching a deal with the uk ahead of october 31st will be very difficult. translation: the proposal of the british government, as things stand, is not something we can accept. it
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replaces an operational, practical, legal solution by one that is simply a temporary solution. all thomas cook‘s stores are bought by hays travel in a move that could save 2500 jobs. two people have been killed in a shooting outside a synagogue in eastern germany. police have arrested on person. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with jane dougall. wales remain unbeaten at the rugby world cup after their hard—fought victory over fiji, through to the quarterfinals, but scotland have the tough task of beating host japan if they want to do the same, that is up scoring nine tries in their match against russia. jane, sorry, it is cold here! nick miller has been
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looking at the weather. yeah, it is another day for dodging the downpours if you can, gusty winds as well, but if few weather changes coming up, and for some of us, rather than showers, just rain in time for the weekend. i have got the full forecast coming up. allah shall see you later, thank you very much. —— i shall see you later. also coming up, the extraordinary operation to fix this teenager‘s jaw after it was split in two in a riding accident. hello, everyone, this is afternoon live.
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our main story, from penzance, where we are continuing to look at life in seaside communities, more reports from here later, but our main story isa from here later, but our main story is a breaking story. president erdogan of turkey has said the military operation against kurdish fighters in northeast syria has begun. in a tweet, the president said that operation peace spring was aimed at preventing what he called the "creation of a terror corridor across the southern border." this afternoon warplanes started to carry out strikes in several syrian towns near the turkish border. no casualties have been reported so far. these pictures show blasts hitting a small compound in a border town called tel abyad. this is the scene live in another border town, ras al—ayn. the decision to launch the offensive follows president trump‘s controversial decision to withdraw us troops from the area. the area is controlled by the kurdish—led syrian democratic forces, who are america‘s allies and who played a leading role
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in the fight against islamic state, but are regarded as terrorists by turkey. turkey says it wants to set up a 30km "safe zone" along the border, to resettle up to two million syrian refugees living in turkey. let‘s speak to our washington correspondent gary o‘donoghue. hejoins me now, gary, of course there all follows what president trump did the other day, which many people in the region described as a sta b people in the region described as a stab in the back. yes, certainly the kurdish forces, the syrian kurds, described it as that. effectively, what he has done his move to some us troops that were along that border area, not many of them actually, but he has moved them away from the border. he has said he is withdrawing the entire us military presence in syria, about a thousand troops in the north—eastern segment,
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he has said he is bringing them home. we don‘t think i‘ve actually left yet, but the difficulty with evacuating the border area is that it gave a green light clearly to ankara, and that is what president erdogan is taking advantage of now. it has drawn huge criticism from the president‘s opponent and his allies in this country. one of his staunchest supporters, republican senator lindsey graham, in the last few minutes, urged president trump to change because, he says this is a disaster in the making. let me read you this one tweet, pray for our kurdish allies who have been shamelessly abandoned by the trump administration, this move ensures the re—emergence of isis. and why he is saying that is because, in this area, simon, there are these prison camps with thousands of former is fighters in them, and they are being guarded by the syrian kurds. now,
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they are going to be diverted away from that to take on turkish forces that might be coming across the border, obviously that raises the question of potentially thousands of is fighters getting out. when president trump made this decision, of course, he said that if turkey reacted in a way that displeased him, there would be huge economic consequences. yeah, he said he would right to right the turkish economy. there has been no reaction immediately from the white house or indeed from the state department or the pentagon or the national security council so far as to what has happened, but i imagine there are some pretty frantic meeting is being organised and set up as we speak. we will see exactly what the president has to say, he has had plenty to say on a bunch of other things, but nothing on this since the news broke that the turks were starting to hit some of those border towns with artillery. we will see what comes out. but there will be
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enormous pressure. we know that the un, there is talk of an emergency meeting at the un, the french and british are trying to organise that, and there is also some cross—party effort here in washington to start looking at bringing sanctions into play against turkey. at the weekend, when this news was announced, there was even talk of trying to put pressure on nato to suspend turkey from nato. yeah, and given the international difficulty is that this could possibly cause, a lot of people will be looking to how russia reacts too. yes, i mean, russia has already said that it expects the integrity of syria to be maintained, thatis integrity of syria to be maintained, that is a threat. the interesting thing we are hearing, we know that these aryan kurdish forces, the sdf has arabs in it too, but i have asked the us to guarantee the airspace, which would obviously make it harderfor turkey to
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airspace, which would obviously make it harder for turkey to conduct any operation if they were unable to use their aircraft. we understand, certainly from some of our collea g u es certainly from some of our colleagues at cbs that the us is only guaranteeing to use aircraft to look after its own forces on the ground and is not going to engage any turkish planes that might be running bombing raids into that part of syria against the sdf forces in the syrian kurds. gary o'donoghue, thank you very much, the latest from washington, dc. mps will be called to parliament for a special sitting on saturday october 19th, after next week‘s crucial eu summit. it‘s expected that if a brexit deal is agreed there, boris johnson will ask mps to approve it. if not, a range of alternative options may be put forward. the summit is considered the last chance for the uk and eu to agree a deal by the deadline of 31st october, something the irish prime minister, leo varadkar, has warned will be "very difficult" to achieve. speaking in the last hour, the eu‘s chief negotiator, michel barnier,
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said the eu was currently not in a position to reach an agreement with the uk. ladies and gentlemen, members of parliament, the proposal of the british government, as things stand, is not something we can accept. it replaces an operational, practical legal solution by one that is simply a temporary solution. there are other issues which are of concern, not with the withdrawal agreement but with the political declaration which goes alongside and is very important because it describes the steps that will follow after brexit. we hope with a deal, but even without a deal, we will have to rebuild everything that has been pulled apart, 44 years of integration and cooperation, in all of these areas — trade, university, education, fisheries, judicial cooperation,
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security. let‘s speak to our europe correspondent damian grammaticas, who is in brussels. on the face of it, it would appear that any talk of a deal is dead! well, simon, yeah, we are in the european parliament and we were listening to exactly what you heard there, michel barnier laying out in 90w there, michel barnier laying out in gory detail why he says he can‘t accept the uk proposals as they are, and you are right, essentially there are no discussions going on today in brussels, the process has ground to a halt, because as michel barnier said, from the eu point of view, mr johnson‘s plan on the table doesn‘t work. we explained to parliament that it asks the eu to waive customs controls at its border, do that by waiving the need for lots of checks,
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to put eu faith in technology that was neither tested nor defined no actually working yet. he said that it would require the eu to accept a system not with properly developed or tested, that would have none of the guarantees that the eu would need, and that is sort of where we are stuck, and that is why now we are stuck, and that is why now we are going to see a frantic flurry of meetings this evening, the prime minister‘s chief negotiator will be here tomorrow, the brexit minister, the pm will meet the irish prime minister, but where does this go? nobody is very sure. you use the word frantic, and yet it all seems very deliberate, michel barnier‘s use of language very deliberate, as we saw, nobody wants to be seen to be, i don‘t know, losing it or getting cross or trying to blame anybody. yes, and particularly the eu side. after that little eruption that we had yesterday between bt
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sides, today the eu, i think, has sort of stepped back, had a look, drawn its breath and decided, no, it wa nts to drawn its breath and decided, no, it wants to calm the waters. as we heard jean—claude juncker say, he still thinks a deal could be possible, but that is how more than anything. but they don‘t want to be encouraging anything towards no—deal, they don‘t want to be fanning the flames of any briefing wall. they do want to try to keep things calm, because even if we are heading inexorably, it seems, towards an extension of the whole process , towards an extension of the whole process, the eu realises that means more talking, and it is all going to have to carry on, even if there is no resolution in the next few days. damian grammaticas in brussels, thank you very much. jessica parker as our political correspondent in westminster. any reaction there to what we are hearing from brussels?
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obviously those comments from michel barnier havejust come obviously those comments from michel barnier have just come in the last few moments, and mps are not in parliament because it has been suspended ahead of the queen‘s speech, but i suspect that their reaction might be quelle su surprise! it has become very clear that the eu are not very keen on what boris johnson that the eu are not very keen on what borisjohnson has put forward asa what borisjohnson has put forward as a replacement for the backstop, and there is a lot of talk here about that session of parliament on saturday, that we expect on the 19th of october. if borisjohnson has secured a deal at the eu council summit, he will put that before mps, and it looks like he might have a good chance of getting that through. but if he doesn‘t have a deal, there is talk instead of putting alternative options to the house of commons, to mps, such as revoking article 50, such as going forward no deal. those options are unlikely to get a majority, and the prime minister‘s game may be to show that mps cannot agree on any alternative
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plan as he tries to move on towards that election. not everybody is this game, are they? he has had a visit from a group of his own mps. yes, ahead of this theoretical election that we expect at some point in the coming months, lots of discussion about what might go in a conservative party manifesto as regards to brexit. if borisjohnson has failed to secure a deal on the terms that he hopes, would he say, right, we have to go for no—deal in a general election manifesto? not eve ryo ne a general election manifesto? not everyone in his party is happy about that. he has had a visit today from a group of one nation tories, seen asa a group of one nation tories, seen as a relatively moderate group, demanding that no—deal is not the only option put in a manifesto, and we had a quick word with that group as they left downing street earlier. did you layout to the prime minister that you would not accept a no—deal manifesto? we had a very constructive meeting discussing about the manifesto and the negotiating position. how are we
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going to get a deal? he is still trying to get ideal, and we support him very much in that endeavour. should he not get ideal and a general election on the horizon, would you not support a no—deal manifesto? let's see first, he is trying very hard to get ideal, and we are supporting him in doing that. damian green from the one nation group sounding pretty diplomatic following his meeting with the prime minister, but no doubt there will be tension in the conservative party as to what would go in their manifesto should this general election come around the corner, but also worth mentioning as well, i am sure there would be tension in the labour party about their manifesto is regarding brexit. we know the current policy as they would look to renegotiate a deal, put it back to the people within six months, have a special conference in order to decide the party‘s position, but there are certainly mps in the labour party who would prefer to see a referendum before a general election, they think the issue needs to be isolated on its own. jess, jesper parker, thank you very much for that you‘re watching afternoon live,
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these are our headlines. turkey has launched military action against kurdish fighters in north—eastern syria. its planes are reported to have struck civilian areas close to the border. the european union brexit negotiator michel barnier says reaching a deal with the uk ahead of october 31st will be very difficult. all thomas cook‘s stores are bought by hays travel — in a move that could save 2,500 jobs. in sport, whales are guaranteed a spotin in sport, whales are guaranteed a spot in the rugby world cup quarterfinal. —— wales. scottish jobs are kept alive after they scored nine tries against russia in their bonus point when, they need to be to host japan to qualify. and great britain‘s men have come fifth in the final of the world gymnastics championships, russia winning goal.
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reaching 50 means gb automatically qualify for the tokyo olympics. back with more on those stories have to have that. —— reaching fifth. one of the uk‘s largest travel agents has agreed to buy all thomas cook‘s stores in a move that could save thousands ofjobs. sunderland—based hays travel has already hired more than 400 former thomas cook staff. the chain collapsed last month after failing to secure a last—minute rescue deal, leaving 150,000 passengers stranded abroad. i‘ve been speaking withjohn and irene hays, co—owners of hays travel, about their decision to purchase thomas cook. it is a big, important decision, we are not small to begin with, we are the uk‘s largest independent travel agent, with sales of 1.2 billion, so it is obviously still a very big decision, and it will double our size. it is approximately £1 billion worth of sales from these 555 branches that we are taking. we obviously did a very careful
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analysis, and we went very promptly to the civil aviation authority, our regulator, to run our plans past them, and we are very confident we can make a success of this. irene, for those who have lost theirjobs with thomas cook, who are hoping now that they have a future, what is the message to them? well, the message is we would love to hear from you. we are determined to recruit as many of the talented people who worked for thomas cook into the hays travel family as quickly and efficiently as we possibly can. and i thinkjohn already mentioned in the previous piece that there are about 2500 in the thomas cook estate, and i am delighted to say that we have already appointed 597. we have about 120 offers. mind you, that has probably doubled since this morning.
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i don't know why the website is getting 3000 hits, but we have a recruitment website, we have a team of about 20 people taking calls, and we would love to hear from thomas cook staff. we have great admiration for the thomas cook brand, they are a key partner of ours, and they employ many talented people. and you are both all smiles, perhaps understandably, but as you say, this is a much loved brand, thomas cook, how do you transfer that loyalty? shall i take that one? yeah. it is a much loved brand, and we felt really sad when it went down. we were their largest third—party agent, and it was a really sad day when they went down. all those staff had done nothing wrong,
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and one day they had a job, and the next day they didn‘t. in terms of loyalty, hopefully we inspire loyalty amongst both our staff and our customers, we are a sunday times best company to work for, and we are the largest, well, we‘re the investors in people large company top voted... very tired! we didn't do the deal until seven minutes to midnight. the lack of sleep coming in here now! yes, we are the number one apprentice employer in the country, and the award winners for that. so we do inspire a lot of loyalty both with customers and staff. i think one demonstration of that would be that 43% of our senior managers started with us as apprentices, and a huge number of people have been with us for more than 20 years. we are not a big corporate, we are a family business,
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we value and empower our staff like nobody else, and that is probably one of the main differentiators. police have arrested one person after two people were killed during a shooting outside a synagogue in the eastern german city of halle. police are unclear about the number of gunmen involved in the attack, and have asked people to take shelter. he attack took place on yom kippur, the holiest day in thejewish calendar. to german foreign minister has just said that it shooting hits us in a hard, we must all act against anti—semitism in this country. that is from the german foreign minister in the last few moments. with the latest, here is frank gardner, a security correspondent.
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today is yom kippur, one of the holiest days in thejewish calendar for millions ofjewish people all over the world. the authorities in germany are still keeping an open mind on who is behind this. the fact that they have caught somebody, one of the assailants alive, is a plus. of course, that does not necessarily mean that he or she will talk, but the two sorts of areas of suspicion here arejihadist and far right extremist. only three months ago, germany‘s interior minister... or less than that, actually, warned that the threat from far right extremism was just as serious as that from jihadism. germany has suffered attacks on both sides, a prominent pro—migrant politician assassinated a while ago, germany has intercepted a number ofjihadist plots inspired by isis. so it faces a double threat. the fact that this took place in eastern germany may end up being significant, because there is quite a strong far right presence there in terms of violent far right extremism. there are also reports a turkish
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restaurant was targeted, that shots were fired at it, and a hand grenade bounced off the door, according to one report. frank gardner talking a little earlier. people living in coastal communities are earning less than elsewhere in england and wales according to research carried out by the bbc. it also found that two—thirds of seaside areas had seen a real terms fall in wages since 2010. the average annual wage in coastal communities is just over £22,000. that‘s more than £1,600 a year less than the average person working inland. and two thirds of constituencies in coastal areas have seen wages fall when inflation is taken into account. jon kay has this report. just a mile from the beach. the treneere estate, one of the poorest parts of britain. the coram family wanted to show us how they get by. we survive day by day. dad mike is a full—time security guard and earns 18 grand a year.
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he is paid on a friday, and it‘s soon gone. by monday morning i will be already into my overdraft. thursday, i could be asking my boss if she could sub me from next week‘s wages so i can put fuel in my tank to go to work. and that is every week in life. and then she will take that out of my wages, so next week i will be low again. so it‘s a vicious circle? so we just start again, yeah. it‘s a familiar story here in penzance. a town literally at the end the line. analysis by the bbc has found that a typical worker in coastal areas like this earned just over £22,000 last year, whereas a typical worker inland earned more than 23,500. that‘s a difference of £1600.
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there are 12 grandchildren and seven adults. mike‘s wife amanda runs the household budget and has to make food last. it‘s a matter of you have to find the cheapest option to live. are you all right back there? she‘s a trained chef but can‘t find a job around here that pays anything like what she would earn inland. it is disgusting. i don‘t see how we should be paid so much less. i mean, you are going to get lower wages, it‘s a smaller place. but you can‘t afford to go out. where are you going to go? well, we do, mcdonald‘s. mcdonald's for a cappuccino. mcdonald‘s is our weekly treat, we get a cappuccino and go and sit on the beach because that‘s about all you can afford. the government says it is investing millions to boost coastal communities like penzance and level up the uk. but a lot of tourism jobs here are only seasonal. and other big employers like fishing, farming
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and mining have all been hit. the corams‘ daughter lucy dreams of getting a place of her own. energy would be £49 a month. prices round here are high. and even though she works 50 hours a week on the minimum wage, she feels trapped. it is so, so ridiculous. people further up have this money, and i would go and spend this money willy nilly, because you know, it‘s easier for them because they earn more money up there. we don‘t earn so much down here. lucy now thinks she will have to move inland, splitting up the family who are cornwall born and bred. why should i have to move from my home to get more money? i don‘t see why we should be treated any different to anybody else. that wasjon kay reporting there on what it‘s like for one family to live on a low income. with me now is nicole broadhurst, who is the mayor of penzance.
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thanks forjoining us. the perception, of course, many coast towns is what holiday—makers say, the reality, as we saw there, can be very different. what are the main issues here. incomes are so much lower, and to do anything is more expensive because you have to go further to do anything, you have to buy things in bigger quantities to make sure you don‘t go out so often, and we have a problem with seasonal work, which is one of the reasons why the average income is so much lower. people work during the season, and it is hard to get through the wintertime. season, and it is hard to get through the winter time. got one of the things we are trying to do is make penzance a year round time, so when the pool is up and running, it will be open in the winter, we are trying to have more events, there is the business improvement districts, and we do a lot in the winter, and when you live here, there is a lot to do, but other people do not know about it. the pool is not necessarily inviting
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at the moment, but one of the ways you will do that is a new geothermal project, just explain how things like that have a knock—on effect. project, just explain how things like that have a knock—on effectm you are coming to penzance, you might come in a similar or the seasons either side, but the sea is freezing, so if we have something that warms the pool up, it will be beautiful to set in a warm pool on a cold day, and it means that more people will come just to have that experience. when i checked into the b&b, the lady is said to me, please stop being so negative, a lot of people come to penzance, we should focus on the positives. everyone is working towards making the positives more well—known, there was a problem, or perhaps a perception of a problem with anti—social behaviour, and we had everyone in to talk about that and started introducing partnership working with the cornwall council, and it is less hectic than it was the summer before, and we seem to be doing something about it, perceptions do
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change. i saw him earlier, i think you heard we were in town! also, i am wondering if national government gets the difficulties that seaside towns have. successive governments have been criticised for a lack of help here. i think they do not get it, people say you live in such a beautiful place, what is the problem? we beautiful place, what is the problem ? we have beautiful place, what is the problem? we have the same problems as someone problem? we have the same problems as someone living in hackney, but because we are so as someone living in hackney, but because we are so far away from the centre of things, it is harder to make that clear and get the funding we need and deserve. the trouble with the seasonal nature of this, whatever project you do, such as this one, you can‘t escape the fact that months such as october, november, december, january can be pretty grim. but there is so much to do that does not involve being out of doors, beautiful attractions, shops, beautiful museum, gallery, so many things you can do that i think we have to be better at getting the message out there, this is a place to come all year round, and it is beautiful any time of the year.
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there is an issue about housing, many young people won‘t be able it is ourjob as a local council to make sure it is actually affordable. there is no way you can afford a house that costs hundred thousand so we need to make sure they are actually affordable. we have had all seasonis actually affordable. we have had all season is pretty much in the last few hours but the sun is poking its way through their and it frankly is just beautiful to be on this part of the coast on the very tip of south west england. let‘s‘s find out what it is like when you are. some heavy downpours again this afternoon. they are mainly across the western side of the uk. some are pushing further
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east on gusty winds but further east in england there are first few showers. the showers may be thundery and it may feel a little cooler than it did yesterday. some gusty winds with the showers that keep rattling into western parts of scotland as we go through the night. a few feeding into north—west england and many other places become dry overnight and temperatures around six to nine celsius. a few showers around scotla nd celsius. a few showers around scotland to begin the date but this is the main weather feature coming in. outbreaks of rain spreading north eastward. a few showers following behind, still some brisk winds and gusts are going to be higher. temperatures round about the mid—teens but some spots getting to 17 or may be 18 celsius. that is your latest.
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this is bbc news. our latest headlines: turkey launches a military offensive in north—eastern syria, two days after us forces were withdrawn from the area. the turkish president, reccep tayip erdogan, described it as a "peace operation." the european union brexit negotiator michel barnier says reaching a deal with the uk ahead of october 31st will be very difficult. independent travel agents — hays travel — has said it will save thousands ofjobs at thomas cook after a deal to buy
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all of the company‘s uk shops. two people have been killed during a shooting outside a synagogue in the eastern german city of halle. police have arrested one person. sport now on afternoon live. good afternoon. wales twice came from behind to beat fiji tojoin england in the rugby world cup quarter finals, but scotland still have more to do despite running in nine tries to beat russia. in a moment, we‘ll hear from our correspondant andy swiss who was watching in shizuoka, but first here‘s katie gornall who watched wales in oita. wales always knew that fiji could be dangerous opponents and they were given a scare in front
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of a raucous crowd. wales had ten days to prepare for this game against fiji. joshua was more like a runaway train when he scored fiji‘s first try. fiji wasted no time scoring their second just minutes later. wales at this point thought fiji were really looking a threat every time they went forward. wales managed to regroup. josh adams scored two tries before the break and they took a narrow lead into half—time. there was no let up after the break. this is a bruising encounter and they had a penalty try midway through the second half. just as they thought the momentum might be shifting the rods the fijians wales scored a try. they dived into the corner and that just allowed wales to get a foothold into this game. there is a bit of a gloss to the scoreline securing that bonus point and wales ran out and they are through to the
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quarterfinals but they have been through one battle here. a scorcher and scotland fans arrived knowing that the heat was very much on. anything other than victory against russia and their world cup hopes were finished as to how about this for the perfect start. russia needed a comeback, but instead found only calamity. firstly horrible slip gave another and if that was a touch embarrassing, watch this. george horne handed a try on a plate. ba rely horne handed a try on a plate. barely 20 minutes gone and scotland we re barely 20 minutes gone and scotland were already out of sight. crucially, they needed a fourth try and with it a bonus point and soon after they break they got it in style. setting up home once again and it was job style. setting up home once again and it wasjob done. from there,
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russia simply ran ragged and they went on to get a hat drink and it was morale boosting for scotland to score a place for the court —— mecca in the quarterfinals. to what promises to be some showdown, scotla nd promises to be some showdown, scotland will now have to beat the host japan in their final group scotland will now have to beat the hostjapan in theirfinal group game and even then it could all come down to bonus points but at least their world cup hopes are still alive. great britain‘s men have come 5th in the final of the world gymnastics championships in stuttgart. the team of max whitlock, james hall, joe fraser, dom cunningham and giarnni regini—moran will now automatcially qualify for the tokyo olympics. russia won gold for the first time since the break—up of the soviet union, overtaking china — the top men‘s gymnastics nation for the last 20 years —on the final rotation. japan took bronze. the usjust missed a podium place.
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we love a dodgy statue. take a look at this next one and see if you can guess who this footballer is? you time starts now. it‘s in malmo, where his career started. and he‘s topless, celebrating a goal. yes, it is zlatan ibrahimovic. as you may remember, there have been a few questionable ones recently. think cristiano ronaldo. zlatan is widely regarded to be the greatest swedish player of all time. that‘s all the sport for now. britain and france are now suggesting there should be a debate
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on this and the un but what is your initial reaction? i think we have to be concerned. it is quite clear that what has happened is the turkish government has taken the opportunity of the us troop withdrawal and the effective nod that was given by president trump in abandoning our kurdish allies and has taken the decision to to take action against them. we saw what president trump did the other day, he was described as carrying a stab in the back as those in the region, what do you think the fallout of that will be?” in the region, what do you think the fallout of that will be? i think the consequences could be very severe because the kurdish forces will now have to turn to defend themselves and therefore there is a possibility that the isis forces that were very
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much on the back foot may be able to regroup in some way. it is also perfectly possible that the action will see further regional between perhaps syrian troops and further east towards iraq. this is a matter of great concern, particularly because turkey is a very important nato ally so to have an ally acting in this way is concerning. what should the uk government to? the uk government should use its voice to make sure that turkey realises the consequences of it‘s actions. to be blunt, there is not a lot the uk government can do other than speak because we are somewhat distracted as you may have noticed with other issues and it would require the prime minister to have the ability to focus on several things at the same time. what is your reaction to
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what president trump did because he was warned at the time that this could be a consequence of it? he couldn‘t have been more clear and many of the former seven commanders we re many of the former seven commanders were extremely clear as well is were intelligence chiefs and it cannot be a surprise to anybody that the forces who joined as and served alongside our own infighting isis and bringing that terrible cult to and bringing that terrible cult to an end, bringing the much more under control, would now be facing the might of the turkish army, one of the largest armies in nato. what is your assessment of where we are in the syrian conflict. it is very difficult to say what happens next. it seems clear that the assad regime
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is back in control and the price that it is back in control and the price thatitis is back in control and the price that it is exerting over the population is enormous but unsurprising. there does not seem to be any real possibility for anything else so what we effectively have got is the iranian government regime in damascus very much back in control. we‘ve been in penzance all day as part of bbc news‘ exploration of the challenges and opportunities facing communities in coastal britain. i‘m joined by sarah ransome and justin leigh.
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sara, looking at the issues. when i checked into the bed—and—breakfast last night, the lady said please don‘t be negative but there is the perception here that there are some real don‘t be negative but there is the perception here that there are some real problems don‘t be negative but there is the perception here that there are some real problems unique don‘t be negative but there is the perception here that there are some real problems unique to don‘t be negative but there is the perception here that there are some real problems unique to this don‘t be negative but there is the perception here that there are some real problems unique to this area, because of its distance from london. some areas people feel like they aren‘t at the end of the line because this is where the line ends or begins depending on your point of view. if you live here there can be that sense of isolation when you go from west cornwall and you look at westminster, it can seem a few hundred miles away and very remote to what is going on down here. i spoke to a lot of people today about how they feel about what is going on in westminster at the moment and a lot of them were saying to me that we just lot of them were saying to me that wejust do not lot of them were saying to me that we just do not get it. just get on with whatever. many people here said
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we just want what we said in the referendum to be dealt with. others will be saying we want another referendum so it is much like other parts of the country where there is a real mix of emotion but a strength of emotion here as well. this county has a history of independence in its politics and its still really wants to feel like it has that independence. it is very difficult when you are so far away to feel that you can have any influence in westminster. justin, you are cornish. what are the differences when you cross that border because it must be difficult to get that balance right? i had someone being interviewed this morning as part of the bbc coverage and they have moved to cornwall from another part of the country and said when they were driving down they got to exeter and realised that was the last big city.
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there is plymouth as well but exeter is the capital of devon and beyond that you do find a very different way of life in cornwall. there is something very different about coming into this county now. when you come even further west as we are today, this is the last big town in the west of cornwall. you do feel that much further away and we have to be mindful of the way we cover both areas and try and balance that cove rage both areas and try and balance that coverage as both areas and try and balance that coverage as well. if we spend too much time in cornwall or devon we have to try and balance the cove rage. have to try and balance the coverage. the unique nature of cornwall is that it is very independent. because it is a peninsular, it has see all around it, it feels very separate to the re st of it, it feels very separate to the rest of england and the rest of our region. we have to be mindful of that and respect that. the environment is usually an issue for that reason? it is. there is a lot
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of enthusiasm and interest in all things environmental. if you come here to somewhere like penzance, just two years ago it was designated the first plastic free community. to do that they had to satisfy a number of criteria, not least having a strategic plan, people getting involved, education and that sort of thing but they were the first and since then, hundreds of other communities around the uk have followed. where pan sense lead, other communities are following —— penzance. some of the work that they have been doing here, the beach clea ns, have been doing here, the beach cleans, the businesses that have come on board for single use plastic and the report from exeter university said 90% of those businesses that they talk to and that got in touch and were part of the survey said they had a massive impact, huge positivity in what they
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had done. one fifth of people who they talk to now reuse their plastic bags and have one of these, a recycla ble bags and have one of these, a recyclable coffee cup. there is a real impact and it is spreading. where people can, communities can work together. small steps make big changes. you are presenting the programme from here tonight. we are looking at some of the issues you cove red looking at some of the issues you covered today and i'm very mindful of something you said earlier that we should look at the positives here as well. there are many issues living somewhere as remote as this but there are many benefits like how beautiful the scenery is. people spend hundreds of pounds coming on holiday here. there are many attractions, the culture, the artistry, the number of people who have been attracted her to paint and draw. there are many benefits to this area and we will be celebrating a lot of that tonight as well.
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we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm. tadgh is here — in a moment he will be telling us what‘s hot and what‘s not in the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live: turkey has launched military action against kurdish fighters in north—eastern syria. its planes are reported to have struck civilian areas close to the border. the european union brexit negotiator michel barnier says reaching a deal with the uk ahead of october 31st will be very difficult. all thomas cook‘s stores are bought by hayes travel in a move that could save two and a half thousand jobs.
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here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. staff at thomas cook‘s travel shops have been thrown a lifeline after the company‘s receivers sold all 555 outlets to hays travel. the new head of the international monetary fund has warned that any kind of brexit will be "painful". kristalina georgieva said it will hurt not only the uk and european union, but also low income countries with economic ties to them. the us drug firm johnson &johnson has been ordered to pay six—and—a—half billion pounds in damages to a man who said he was not warned that one of its anti—psychotic drugs could cause him to develop breasts. the case taken by a 26 —year—old man is one of thousands pending in the state of pennsylvania. first this hour, to a rare piece of good news. the new owners of thomas cook‘s
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travel shops say they expect to keep them all open. they employed around 2,500 people before they closed last month when thomas cook went into liquidation. we‘re told a significant number will be offered theirjobs back and this was the scene when some employees learned the news. they are open and we just have to go and contact them. what‘s been happening on the markets? plenty of contradictory events on the big market themes of the moment. on brexit, there was a report in the times this morning suggesting that brussels was preparing more concessions to keep a deal alive.but later, eu chief negotiator poured cold water on that. on the us china trade war:
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signs of escalation this morning when washington put a raft of chinese companies on a trade blacklist. later beijing said it was still open to a deal. craig erlam is senior market analyst at oanda. focus on the good news: thomas cook, rare to hear about someone taking a punt on so many high street outlets what did investors make of it? when you're talking about expansion of this kind of magnitude on the high street, thatjust adds an extra layer. in the future, we will be looking back at this because
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of the size and risk they are taking. obviously, it is a massive relief for those who would have lost theirjobs. it will be interesting to see what hays has in store for all the stores around the country and how they are going to drag people away from the internet and back into the shops. lets look at those contradictory reports of whether there is scope to do a deal between now and october the 31st. we saw the pound falling against the euro but gaining against the dollar. what is going on? we saw a bit of a softening of the dollar across the border so i don‘t think we can read too much into it. i think there is just a lot of anxiety. we are seeing a lot of posturing in the media from both sides but i think boris johnson‘s team is hitting it particularly hard. both sides don‘t wa nt to particularly hard. both sides don‘t want to be blamed in the case of an ideal and now we are three weeks
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away i think we will see a lot more of this. the meeting with the eu is a week away where we are hoping a deal can be agreed it seems that we are very deal can be agreed it seems that we are very much... i think the pound will be very volatile and if it looks like no deal is on the table then we could suffer a lot more. we are hearing... what is happening with the us and china? very mixed m essa g es with the us and china? very mixed messages from dilley mcrae depending who you are hearing them from. a tea m who you are hearing them from. a team from the white house are adopting some very conventional measures in these negotiations. it seems every time we do see a negotiation between the two teams, donald trump gives us a surprise by either sanctions or the 28
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companies. i‘m not optimistic about the meeting later on and i don‘t think many people are because china seems to be intent on a limited trade deal, donald trump once a comprehensive one and he has a year which in his head gives him time to pressure the chinese economy. coleen rooney — wife of former england captain wayne rooney — has claimed that someone using rebekah vardy‘s social media has leaked stories about her to a tabloid newspaper. coleen says she planted false stories on her instagram account and restricted followers so only rebekah‘s account could see them. the stories later ended up in a newspaper. mrs vardy — the wife of england and leicester strikerjamie vardy — has denied that she leaked the stories. earlier, our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba
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explained what had happened. both of them have become big celebrity figures in their own right. coleen rooney, well known, has written magazine columns. rebekah vardy has appeared on shows like i‘m a celebrity get me out of here and loose women. earlier, coleen rooney posted on instagram that she had been concerned about private stories leaking out to newspapers, one newspaper in particular, and she had come up with a plan to see if she could figure out where this was coming from, and she restricted on her instagram account only one other accounts being able to view those particular stories, and then seeing if they ended up in a newspaper. none of her other friends, even though it was a private account, who could see all the other stuff, only one person‘s account could see the staff there were stories she was posting which she said then ended up in the newspapers, and she said that that account belonged to rebekah vardy.
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unsurprisingly, lots of people on social media have interpreted that as being rebekah vardy herself, but of course, rebekah vardy has made clear in a reply, also on social media, that she absolutely denies that she has been passing any kind of stories about coleen rooney to the newspapers. she said she is heavily pregnant and upset that she has to even come out and deny this. she would never do this, and that she says over the years, lots of people have had access to her social media accounts and passwords, the assumption being that she is saying that it is somebody else who has had access to her accounts and not her, and she feels it is unfair that she is by many being blamed in this particular way. and also, criticising coleen rooney for not approaching her first before putting all this out into the public domain.
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i have been treated, why is he reporting on gossip. two people, minor celebs, it is not as though we are short of real news at the moment. we have been in penzance today and full coverage across the bbc is one of our coastal british series has been looking at is the problems but also the solutions. one of the solutions that we have been talking about is the geo— thermic pool that they will build here at the lino. it is quite fascinating the lino. it is quite fascinating the technology that could change things and it creates an atmosphere where penzance have a year—round season and that is very much the aim here. standing in this weather, as we have done all day, it has been great to be in penn‘s aunts and the people are warm and friendly ——
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penzance. some heavy downpours again today. there are some sunny spells to be had to. the showers will... the lion‘s share our towards... amount not be too long to wait before the next hour comes around. the low pressure is driving the weather across the uk at the moment. we are seeing these of showers moving through on gusty, blustery winds. a lot of the showers are towards the west but some are travelling east. not too many across eastern parts of england. frequent showers running into north—west scotland and the strongest winds around 50 mph. 40, 40 five miles per hour. it is feeling a little bit cooler than
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yesterday and some spots are reaching just a few degrees of 18. some showers will still be running into north—west parts of scotland and push into northern ireland and north—west england but many other places will dry. the wind stays up so places will dry. the wind stays up so temperatures are not going up too far most in the range of 69 degrees. still some showers around it, particularly in scotland. some are turning particularly hazy and this area of rain moves in up to scotland. rather more patchy. average wind speed. gusts are still going to be a bit higher and temperatures pop at around 17 celsius. more cloud around eventually tomorrow, rather than
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showers, the chance of seeing occasional rain. the big picture for friday to the weekend is that england and wales, close to this weather front more likely to see cloud and outbreaks of rain. some that could be heavy at times. particularly on friday in parts of northern england and wales. the weekend, into next week, it is staying unsettled with low pressure nearby.
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today at 5... turkey launches military action across its border against kurdish fighters, in north—eastern syria. it‘s being claimed turkish warplanes are targetting towns and villages sparking panic among civilians. the military assault follows president trump‘s decision to pull us troops out of the area. now the uk and france are calling for a special session of the un security council. we‘ll have the latest. the other main stories on bbc news at 5... parliament is to hold a special saturday sitting, on october 19th, after the eu summit that week, seen as the last chance to avoid a no—deal brexit. european leaders say they‘ll continue to negotiate, but that the blame game has already begun, in london.

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