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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 11, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning — welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today: brexit hope ahead of more talks today as boris johnson and the irish prime minister say they're on the pathway to a deal. mps urge the bbc and ministers to come to an agreement to restore the free tv licence for the over 755 the e—cigarette industry launches a campaign to reassure millions of vapers in the uk, good morning — welcome despite concerns in the us. to breakfast with charlie stayt and mega munchetty. our headlines today: brexit hope ahead of more talks today as boris johnson and the irish prime minister say hmv is opening the doors to europe's biggest music store they're on the ‘pathway to a deal‘. today in birmingham, just months after the chain called in the administrators and announced mps urge the bbc and dozens of branch closures. ministers to cut a deal to restore the free tv formula one qualifying is postponed as typhoon hagibis licence for the over 755 approaches while scotland fans wait still a safe alternative to smoking — to see if their critical the e—cigarette industry launches rugby world cup game a campaign to reassure millions of vapers in the uk, against japan will go ahead. despite concerns in the us. the future for british carmaking. dyson gives up and as a new exhibition explores on electric cars — saying he can't make them underground spaces in london, we are
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financially viable, while nissan warns a no—deal brexit below ground. good morning. iam in would ‘jeopardise‘ its brand's future in britain. formula one qualifying leeds this morning for the annual is postponed as typhoon hagibis approaches while scotland fans wait to see if their critical light night festival, the uk's used rugby world cup game festival of arts and lights. i will against japan will go ahead. bring you a full forecast for today on the weekend in about 15 minutes. iam in i am in leeds this morning for the it's friday the 11th october. our top story. the british and irish prime leeds light festival. i will be taking a look at some of the installation here and bringing you a minister's say they're full forecast up shortly. on the pathway to a brexit deal, ahead of more talks today. the brexit secretary, the british and irish stephen barclay, will meet the eu's prime minister's say chief negotiator they're on the pathway michel barnier later. to a brexit deal, ahead of more our brussels reporter talks today. the brexit secretary, stephen barclay, will meet the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier later. adam fleming joins us. our brussels reporter adam fleming joins us. it really is. think about how things we re it really is. think about how things were looking for the first half of this this week. mr barnier saying things, adam fleming joins us. felt like yesterday after thl meeting this felt like yesterday after the meeting between the two prime ministers, a distinct change of tone. think how gloomy things had
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it was not looking good then boris been for the first half of the week johnson, the prime minister and the and in the meeting happened, and then that statement came out irish leader leo varadkar met for a few hours and then yesterday afternoon, the statement came out, yesterday afternoon and it seemed positive in comparison with what had surprising everyone with just how gone before. i have to say took positive it was, talking about how both leaders could see the pathway people here in brussels working on brexit by surprise. they do not know toa both leaders could see the pathway to a possible deal. i can see four what has been agreed between the two options that that pathway could be. number one, is it that the eu has leaders and what it might mean in relaxed what it is prepared to have what is going to happen which i find quite amazing in the brexit process the brexit deal, particularly when it comes to the irish border. they but we will get some information this morning because steve barclay, the brexit secretary will be here to wa nted it comes to the irish border. they wanted 100% certainty that our backup plan. are they prepared to see mr barnier and then mr barnier accept less than 100%? option number two, has the uk changed what it's will brief the other ambassadors at proposing for northern ireland and about lunchtime so hopefully some customs checks on how they'd operate information will start dribbling out in northern ireland. number three, about what has happened. the way i have they found third way, a see it, there are more options about compromise solution that no—one sort what could have happened here. did of four or as may be an old idea the eu move on what it's prepared to revived in a new way. option four. accept in the deal for the irish is this alljust diplomacy and
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border, have they gone from a solution that's 100% there in 100% politeness on both sides to try and guaranteed to one that is a bit less reverse the negative mood and make guaranteed? guaranteed to one that is a bit less guaranteed 7 has the guaranteed to one that is a bit less things seem more positivejust guaranteed? has the uk moved on our reverse the negative mood and make things seem more positive just to keep the show on the road. the truth is, people here in brussels that northern ireland with be treated. work on brexit full—time have no have boris johnson and idea. even some of the people in the northern ireland with be treated. have borisjohnson and leo varadkar come up with a new way through or is uk who are negotiating a revised brexit deal are not entirely sure what boris johnson brexit deal are not entirely sure what borisjohnson proposed. this just come up with a new way through or is thisjust all hopefully we will find out a bit come up with a new way through or is this just all about warm words, a bit of rhetoric because neither side more through the course of the morning because in about one hour, wa nts to bit of rhetoric because neither side wants to be blamed for this whole process going wrong. which one of steve barclay will be here to speak to mr barnier, the eu chief the four options? take your pick. we'll find out what option they have negotiator then mr barnier will go and speak to the ambassadors from gone for. one thing that hasn't the 27 other eu countries. i suspect maybe we will get a bit more detail changed is the deadline. in terms of about what being discussed and will be get a decision from mr barnier to the mechanics, the logistics, if something has changed, what might happen? the eu summit is on the 17th restart negotiations and restart them ina restart negotiations and restart them in a more intense and private and secretive way which is what you of october and that is where a need to do if you are going to get a revised deal will be signed or the revised deal. so many questions. eu will be wondering about what to
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do if there is a request for an taking us through. extension. loads of rumours in the bbc and the government need to find a way to save free tv brussels overnight. there may be an extra summit of eu leaders a couple licences for people over 75, according to a group of mps. of days before exit day on october the scheme comes to an end next year, 31. it gives you an example of how and the media select committee has criticised plans to only give free licences to those claiming pension credit. david sillito reports. febrile the atmosphere is here in brussels. the bbc and the government need to find a way to save free tv don't switch us off! licences for people over 75, the decision to restrict free according to a group of mps. license fees for the over—75s the scheme comes to an end next year, to those receiving a pension credit has and the media select committee has led to anger and protest. criticised plans to only give free the process behind the decision today licenses to those comes in for criticism. claiming pension credit. a group of mps questioned david sillito reports. the director—general of the bbc and the media select committee has now concluded the decision to restrict free the process by which the government passed on the £745 million cost was flawed. license fees for the over 75 is those receiving a pension credit has led to anger and protest. the there needs to be a funding formula where the bbc takes on some protest behind the decision today of the responsibility for this concession and the government, the rest as well. comes in for criticism. a group of the bbc has offered to pay mps questioned the director—general of the bbc and the media select for about a third of the free
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committee has now concluded the licenses but i think we should look process by which the government at how everyone is paying. and i don't think that can passed on the £745 million cost was be a cost that the bbc flawed. there needs to be a funding just takes itself or if it does, but clearly we have to look at how the bbc can make up the money it's formula by the bbc takes on some of investing because otherwise that money will still simply come out of other programming the responsibility for this because there is nowhere else concession and the government, the for it to come from. rest as well. the bbc has offered to the scheme in which the bbc decides who gets a free licence is absurd, pay for about a third of the free licenses but we should look at how it says, because the corporation eve ryo ne licenses but we should look at how everyone is paying. i don't think is now administering a welfare benefit. that can be a cost that the bbc the next negotiation over the finance, should they say, be open and accountable. ta kes that can be a cost that the bbc takes itself but clearly we have to the bbc agrees. look at how the bbc can make up the meanwhile, the government says the free licence money it's investing because otherwise that money will still simply come out of other programming fees for everyone over 75 should because there is no effort to come continue and the bbc should pay out of. the scheme in which the bbc but today's report decides who gets a free licence the says the bbc can't afford it and that the government will have to step in to is absurd, it says, because the corporation is administering a welfare benefit. the next help fund it. david sillito, bbc news. negotiation of the finance, should they say, be open and accountable. we'll be speaking to former chairman the bbc agrees. meanwhile, the of the bbc lord grade at 7:10 this morning. government says the free licence fees for everyone over 75 should continue in the bbc should pay but fears are growing of
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today's report says the bbc can't a humanitarian crisis in northern afford it and that the government syria. tens of thousands of people have fled their homes after turkey will have to step in to help fund began attacking kurdish forces. there's been international condemnation of the military action, but turkey says it's trying it. david sillito, bbc news. to create a "safe zone" for syrian refugees. we'll be speaking to former chairman two political donors with links to donald trump's private of the bbc lord grade lawyer, rudy giuliani, at 7:10am this morning. have been arrested on suspicion fears are growing of of trying to funnel foreign money a humanitarian crisis in northern to the republican party. syria. tens of thousands of people have igor fruman and lev parnas — fled their homes after turkey pictured here on the left — began attacking kurdish forces. are accused of trying to help there's been international condemnation of the military action, mr giuliani investigate the family but turkey says it's trying of the former vice to create a "safe zone" for syrian refugees. presidentjoe biden. mr trump insists he two political donors with links doesn't know the men. to donald trump's private lawyer, rudy giuliani, have been arrested on suspicion a teenager has been stabbed to death of trying to funnel foreign money to the republican party. igor fruman and lev parnas are accused of trying near stratford shopping to help mr giuliani investigate centre in east london. the family of the former officers found the 15—year—old boy shortly vice presidentjoe biden, after three pm on thursday the issue at the centre and believe he was either attacked of impeachment proceedings against president trump. on a bus, or shortly here's our washington after getting off. a second teenager, also 15, was found with stab injuries which are not believed correspondent chris buckler.
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to be life—threatening. igor fruman and lev parnus once welcomed into the white house and president from's ma largo resort as donors but now they are facing serious charges and many questions public health england says one about whether money came from. last com pletely public health england says one completely risk—free, de— night at washington dulles airport, cigarettes and vaping can help we address —— arrested igor fruman smokers quit. we will be speaking to and lev parnus on campaign finance —related charges as they attempted to leave the united states. the public help england. if you use the product, let us know what you think. white house has tried to play down any white house has tried to play down a ny co nta ct the winner of the nobel white house has tried to play down any contact donald trump had with peace prize will be the men but they were associates of announced later this morning. nominees are not traditionally announced, but amongst the bookie's his personal lawyer, rudy giuliani and they helped him in his attempts favourites to win the accolade are 16 year old climate activist to investigate mr trump's potential greta thunberg and new zealand's prime ministerjacinda ardern. the organisers say any talk of who is the favourite to win is "sheer guesswork". presidential rivaljoe biden and son hunter, who had business dealings in ukraine. i don't know those gentlemen. it's possible i have a if you meet someone shake their pick with them because i have a picture with everybody, i have a hands. it's funny one that.
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picture with everybody, i have a lingering a handshake is weird, to be honest. they've been looking at picture with everybody here but somebody said there might be a picture at a fundraiser or somewhere when it can be negative. there is but i have pictures with everybody. in the first appearance in court, one. it starts with a handshake. it the ten were —— the in order to post $1 million in bail in order to be released. democrats will be watching the case closely as they continue to must be seen as an aggressive move. investigate the actions of donald trump. the east midlands and the south—west of england people showed high levels of are among the regions that will benefit most from an increase in school funding. a plan to boost spending by £7.1 billion by 2023 was announced last anxiety. a noted politicians perhaps month after years of lobbying by teachers. but while the money has been in that meeting there resident welcomed, campaigners have warned trump, they like these long it is not enough. handshakes to show warmth and as a we'll be speaking to the education secretary gavin way of demonstrating authority. the williamson at around quarter to eight this morning. let us know where you think the money needs to be spent in schools. more often you watch that, it begins with a slap. is enthusiastic a word a quarter of patients you use? handshake technique. let's with secondary breast cancer had to visit their gp three or more times before getting a diagnosis, according to a charity. (tx oov) breast cancer now says it's "unacceptable" that some people
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are not getting early access to treatments. gps say they're doing their best for patients but symptoms can be difficult to spot. be mindful. we shouldn't stop people from doing it altogether. sarah will the winner of the nobel have to weather for us a little peace prize will be announced later this morning. later. the bbc and the government nominees are not traditionally are being told to find a way announced, but amongst the bookie's favourites to win the accolade of keeping free tv licences are 16—year—old climate activist for people over 75the corporation had agreed to fund the scheme as part of its new charter agreement, greta thunberg and new zealand's but now says it can't afford it. it was previously paid for by the government, and now a group of mps says both sides need to get together prime ministerjacinda ardern. and sort it out. the organisers say any talk let's speak to the former bbc of who is the favourite to win is "sheer guesswork". chairman lord grade. now, they say first impressions are important, and it seems the way you greet people can have a significant impact thank you very much for your time. on your relationship. psychologists at the university of dundee discovered that shaking hands for longer than three seconds "negatively impacts the behaviour of the recipient" and people showed higher levels of anxiety. they noted that politicians are keen they said they need to bang hence on long handshakes to show warmth and a way of demonstrating authority, but it could potentially jeopardise the quality of their working and personal relationships from the start. together. the deal that was imposed
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on the bbc was all done in a great hurry. the implication of it as dawn. that there should be a free handshake is better. on the shoulder full of it's lengthy. it was quite licence fee the bbc could not afford to pay for it. they've done sterling work trying to find £250 million to interesting. lots of examinations contribute to the 750. i think the about handshakes. thoughts on that bbc is blameless in this, to be honest. it's interesting you use the one this morning? that was very word the agreement was imposed on them. they agreed. it was an manly. it's when you shake their agreement. there is a great hand and they give you their name, i misunderstanding about discussions over charter renewal and licence always forget the name. i'm terrible at it. charlie, i can remember that. fee. the government has all the cards. the bbc has no cards at all. but when you are concentrating on the government will try to get the what you are doing. you got to look
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bbc to accept what they are going to them in the eye. i can't bear a limp impose but the bbc is really no leveraging that negotiation. the handshake. so you are going to take us handshake. so you are going to take us through a whole bunch of results. government imposes what it wants to impose. people may or may not be interested in the detail of what it's causing a lot of disruption, these mps have looked it. for this typhoon. scotland's final world example, you've been involved with cup group games under threat. it's some of these discussions in the past. when senior bbc detect gives we re past. when senior bbc detect gives were speaking to this committee giving evidence, they said at that at risk. two games already cancelled oi'i at risk. two games already cancelled on saturday. disruption continues. the disruption continues, qualifying will take place on race point that funding licenses would day in suzuki. require unprecedented closure of the circuit lies 230 miles west services. bbc two, bbc news channel of tokyo where the typhoon is set to hit on saturday. practise is currently ongoing. scotland's final rugby world cup and radio5 services. bbc two, bbc news channel and radio 5 live. go back in time. group game in nearby yokohama on sunday is under threat. and local services. go back in time to when the evidence, during the agreement discussions, the mps noted that this analysis most recently was scotland's remote hopes for automatic qualification to euro 2020 are over after they were thrashed 4—0 in russia. radically different to what the bbc
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they'll now try to progress was in 2015. can ijust finished the point. that is what the mps have through next year's play—offs. said. in those meetings in 2015, and what they are saying now, . .. said. in those meetings in 2015, and what they are saying now,... as i understand it, the big change that there was heartbreak for northern ireland. they went ahead with just over ten was imposed on the bbc was that the minutes to go in the netherlands, bbc would take over responsibility but the dutch scored three times for any concessions to pensioners to win the match 3—1 and go top of the group. and it would be for the bbc to northern ireland slip to third behind germany. wales draw in slovakia. decide themselves how much they simone biles won all—around individual gold at the world gymnastics championships. would be prepared to spend to a record—extending 22nd medal provide those concessions. i don't at the championships. she still has four more finals to come. she is going to add to that middle tally. we are kind of running out of believe there was any guarantee by the bbc that they would continue to words to describe simone biles, she spend £750 million a year, giving every pensioner a free licence fee. isa the bbc couldn't have agreed because words to describe simone biles, she is a superstar. if she gets two more, she beats the all—time record. they knew then they couldn't possibly afford it without and she has formal opportunities. devastating the bbc‘s output. extraordinary. we will talk through, possibly afford it without devastating the bbc's output. one way you can analyse that, it sounds
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rubbish in negotiations but we are because even world champions, where we are is an important phase previous world champions are saying she has taken the sport to a phrase. i take the point. we are different place entirely. she has where we are and as it stands, next had new moves named after her. year, people over 70 five, that is people are saying she is being marked down because you have to the situation we are in so to avoid that happening, what should happen? submit the level of difficulty for one of two things. there are only your move that you are going to two sources of more money, there is produce. they are saying that what a big increase in the licence fee, she's done, she should have been the double percentage increase to marked up or marked with a greater meet the shortfall between 250 the bbc are putting in under 750 is degree of difficulty. i think required. all money from the they're worried that it they were to treasury or a combination of both of mark it up, then it will encourage those things. i think parliament is extremely unhappy across the, across others perhaps to do it because they will chase those extra points. that all parties that pensioners aren't going to get free licence fees. it could bring about injuries. it's that move when she lands with her after all, they are the people, we feet straight out on the floor, it other people, i am a pensioner, we rely so heavily and enjoy so much of
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looks like something out of the the bbc and rely on it so greatly. you are free to speak your mind. do matrix. it's you think the government should pay? matrix. looks like something out of the is it as simple as that? rewrite the matrix. it's the right time for it. we're going to leeds now. festival whole arrangement, not the agreement, the arrangement, the of light and art, isn't it? government coughs up and is that what you think should happen? it's that's right, good morning. leeds city centre. the light in night festival including about 60 going to be very hard to persuade installations of eliminated art. the treasury because there are many this behind me is called talk to the other competing calls on the skies. be looking more and chatting taxpayers' money. it may in the end to the artist but the weather if the government is willing to look forecast. a bit drizzly this morning at this, it may in the end be a combination of some payment from the treasury, taxpayers' money and an in leeds. we are looking at quite an increase, new rebasing of the licence fee. that seems to me the u nsettled in leeds. we are looking at quite an unsettled picture over the next few only way through it. i would like to see all the pensioners get a free licence fee. and if it comes to the days. very autumnal. heavy bursts of point of something having to go, something having to be cut because rain across much of the country. that's all down to the fact that it that clearly is still a possibility,
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is well and truly in charge. which bit do you think has to go?|j heaviest rain across northern england. heavy downpours further don't which bit do you think has to go?” don't think there is one single south across england and wales. thing that will solve the problem for the bbc. they will have to close heavy showers working into the west of scotland. bright with a further an awful lot of services, not least south and east. strong winds gusting local services which are so important to our democratic processes the localjournalism and the nations and regions the bbc about. provides is absolutely vital and needs more money, notjust money. it will feel cold where you are yes, the bbc can cut something else but they have already cut enough to exposed to the heavy downpours strong winds. there will be some provide 250 million which is a heck sunshine working in behind a cold ofa front across much of northern provide 250 million which is a heck of a lot of money. any more than england, northern wales later in the that and i think the licensee becomes not worth it if the bbc has day. later on tonight will be keeping the the rain across much of to reduce its services so i'm mutually supportive of the bbc. southern england, south wales, to. also showers for the west of let's remember it's the cornerstone scotland. but largely clear skies of the creative industries in this elsewhere and temperatures colder country which are a vital and than they were last night. single growing part of our economy. figures for medi northern areas. double figures for where we've got rain in the south. saturday starts there are some people who might hear what you say and say, let it pay for off with rain across southern
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england, at times into south wales, itself. there will be people the midlands, too. the rest of the thinking doubt. well the time for the debate was when the charter uk, nota the midlands, too. the rest of the uk, not a bad day, tomorrow. a few needs to be renewed or when there is showers in the far north—west and temperatures between 13— 16 degrees, a review of the bbc. that is not a cooler than they are today. some debate for today. there is a clock ticking and the pension issue has to heavy rain saturday night into sunday night, the next pulse of rain be resolved. yes, we may need a big working its way eastwards, soggy in the north on sunday. a little drier in the south and temperatures 13— 15 debate about the future of the bbc, degrees. things are going to stay what we want from the bbc and how pretty unsettled for much of the much people are paid to pay for the week ahead as well. now that is how bbc and so on and so on, but that is the weather is shaping up. this not an hour. we have to solve the morning i am here in leeds city pension guises. lord michael, thank you for your time. please send us centre for the light night festival. your thoughts as well about the bbc licence fee. sarah's over in leeds for us, this is the largest annual lights at the uk's largest annual arts and lights festival. festival, it has 60 installations. this is one of them, it's cold talk there certainly are a lots of dust to the skies. chris, you are behind make lots of lights around you, this piece of artwork. . alighting you up. good morning. the to the skies. chris, you are behind this piece of artwork! is very interactive. talk me through it? it's an interactive product, so,
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three different members of the annual leeds light night festival public can talk into it and your voice is translated into light and sound. so the idea is then that your includes 60 light shows. there are voice gets sent out as a pulse of lasers projected up in the sky, and there are also lots of interactive artworks as well. people can have light and as the sound shoots along, their photo taken with angel wings it gets fired up into the sky as behind them, for instance. these benches were first put in in 2017, well. how do you convert a voice but they've been so popular here in into light? we designed a load of leeds that they are now a permanent different algorithms ourselves to be feature. they are made by a german able to do that in a fairly complex artist, he is installed benches like way, and in a way, people can play this in cities around the world. this festival continues for two and enjoy themselves, actually days, it was kicked up last night by interacting with it. it shouldn't be an amazing eliminated parade right through the streets of leeds. so difficult, but the result should be spectacular. let's have a little go fantastic sense here with all these eliminations around the city. does than? does then? hello, good maxine's. it is a soggy start here morning. we've got a very soggy day in leeds. i'm standing underneath a shelter at the moment, there is ahead for many of us. so your voice quite a lot of rain in the forecast. is converted into light and then you an unsettled picture, some heavy
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had to get special dispensation to rain and some fairly strong winds around today as well. well, low is be able to shoot lasers into the sky? with aircraft flying around, well and truly in charge to the the light really depends on the north, but trailing weather fronts atmospheric conditions. today it is bringing breaks in the rain. atmospheric conditions. today it is a bit damp and soggy, lots of water heaviest across parts of northern england into northern wales as well in the air, for us that is great because it reflects and reflects all ona england into northern wales as well on a cold front working south and the little particles of water and some heavy downpour further south across england under, too. for the little particles of water and the planes can see that as well —— scotla nd across england under, too. for scotland and northern ireland today, heavies i was working in towards the it reflects an refracts. later we west, the could be some thunderstorms across western scotland. further companies across got linger northern ireland, —— will be looking at some of the other further showers across northern artworks in the city, but now back to naga and charlie. thank you very ireland, strong and gusty winds, much. i wonder what your voice with sound or look like? we'll record it and send it down. let's take a look 40-5 ireland, strong and gusty winds, 40—5 mph gusts of winds at times at the papers. with some heavy bursts of rain —— a number of of them lead with the brexit meeting 40-45. it's between prime minister borisjohnson with some heavy bursts of rain —— 40—45. it's certainly feeling colder and irish leader leo varadkar where you have got the heavy rain at thornton manor and blustery winds. some sunshine in wirral yesterday. returning from the north later in the day. into this evening and "irish eyes are smiling"
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is the headline on the front page of the metro, which says hopes tonight, the rain becomes confined tonight, the rain becomes confined of a brexit deal have been "revived" to southern england, south wales as after the 2.5 hour meeting. well. still a few showers across the more on that of course throughout western half of scotland, but for many of us it is looking clear and the morning this morning. dry, strong winds easing overnight the daily telegraph also focuses too. so many of us down into single on brexit, it says it has been told by a source that mr barnier will now "assess whether enough progress had figures, still mild in the south been made to justify the eu intensifying negotiations ahead where you have cloud and outbreaks of the eu summit next week". of rain. saturday morning then sta rts away from brexit, the sun leads of rain. saturday morning then starts up without rain across much on what it calls rebekah vardy‘s of southern england, at times it "wagony" over allegations she has will put into south wales, into the been selling stories about coleen rooney to the sun. midlands as well. temperatures naga snickers "tears for my brave rod" tomorrow, a little cooler than today. 14— 16 degrees for most us on is the daily mirror's saturday, less windy than today. front page headline. there will be some sunshine across the paper focuses on quotes northern parts of the uk. every rain from penny lancaster, who says her husband sir rod stewart's prostate cancer through saturday night into sunday, "turned out to be worse working eastwards. many of us, than first feared". it was recently revealed sir rod looking like an unsettled day spent more than two years undergoing without brexit heavy rain once treatment for the disease before again. but it does look drier in the being given the all—clear. south by sunday, certainly compared to the rain we are seeing today and and i've got victoria and john with tomorrow as well. temperatures cool us and i've got victoria and john with us to look at the inside pages. good are so about 13— 15 degrees on
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sunday. a bit of a mixed bag on morning to you both. i don't know about you. i don't know if you've bought a new car, but for a long time, we've been kind of turned off sunday, and autumnal fields of the diesel because of the emissions scandal, lots of concerns about what weather with low pressure in charge. it looks unsettled right through the is going on with extra charges and course of next week. back to you. congestion zones and the rest of it. sarah, thank you very much. we're going to do little exploring now. people have been turning to hybrids, all electric vehicles, though the curious news we got yesterday, quite late in the day from james dyson, which was picked up in the papers this is clapham south in central here in the financial times. his london. this is a scene you are familiar with? we are always fascinated by what happens abandoning his attempts to break into the car industry with electric underneath. this morning we're going vehicle —— he is. he put £2.5 exploring. shall be show you what down there? there is an exhibition billion aside to make this work but he says it isn't financially viable. that is really worrying, if you showing the abandoned and hidden spaces between the streets of our think about the industry and what it is pinning its hopes on. you've got capital. while the traffickers on quite a prominent entrepreneur and milling about, is danjohnson, down designer, engineer, saying this.“ there. tell us where you are? good it because he can't make the cards morning! i'm 40 metres down under cheaply enough that he can't make money out of it? this is it. the london's streets in one of london's old bomb shelters. you can see the interesting thing about all of this sort of signage here from world war
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is his as it isn't the battery technology which crucially is the ii. this is one of the abandoned places that teachers in this new bit that is really important for exhibition. chris nix is from london other industries as well. if people transport museum. what can we see in can make lithium batteries well and more cheaply, that is good news for this exhibition? it's a chance for the whole industry and things like people to get behind—the—scenes of energy conservation and climate abandoned tube stations and see what change. that is good news. but it is lying behind secret doors and isn't good news necessarily for the car industry and it makes me wonder grills that you walk past every time you use the tube. and also find out whether all of that stuff will. .. how they were used ingeniously for couldn't theyjust used suction? —— wartime shelter, things like growing micro herbs and it means that people have used suction? the technology? don't necessarily have to go to these spaces to experience them, but imagine the corner speed, they have good suction on the floor.|j can see just how fascinating they imagine the corner speed, they have good suction on the floor. i think this is one of the reasons why you are, the sides, the sounds, the are notan this is one of the reasons why you are not an engineer. you can always people's stories behind the places rely on eddie jones to come up with beneath the city. people cancer are places like this, but this is about and incendiary comment. his point giving access in the museum to these hidden spaces? that was micro, also was he should have got the points they needed earlier on. you should recreating spaces, so whether people have been on the tours before or
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it's their first experience of it, will let them get an experience of, explain why that is so painful for the scots, they haven't got this what you can hear now... that is an game, they may not have a match. they might not have a match on underground train. we are lower than sunday because of typhoon hagibis. the underground? about 60 metres they arguably should have gone into the quarterfinals in the last world cup, but there was a refereeing below. thousands of people could error. it would not have been a guaranteed win against japan. but shelter down here, this is about 1/16 of the size, there were 500 you want the opportunity. indeed. bunks in here alone. we had the and this one, it really quickly, i don't know if you are into vinyl, privilege of meeting and interviewing one of the people who but go down to the megastore opening lived here for two years as a child here when herfamily in birmingham today. the new boss in lived here for two years as a child here when her family home was destroyed. and we found out how life charge of hmv, he has opened a was down here, living in this massive store, it's 25,000 square incredible space. stories like that feet, it used to be a massive idea, we've been able to bring to life, that people experience some of these bunks and the exhibition. the he says the world would be a scary place with just amazon. is he entertainment, the living conditions, the toilet, the grimness of the reality of living in selling vinyl? a whole lot of stuff, somewhere like this. and people carried on living down here after the war because their houses were
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vinyl, cds, dvds. there have been a being rebuilt. it wasn'tjust civilians, people like the railways we re huge number of vinyl record stores civilians, people like the railways were being run out of down street station, winston churchill even took refuge there. you know, places like that have been doing a brilliantjob as well. yes, of course. having a that were vital to winning the war nice browser? thank you everyone. —— effort and keeping morale up and people save. and hidden little browser? a number of deaths, allegedly secrets like this place are all linked to e—cigarettes in the united states, has led to concern over the safety of vaping. so today the industry is launching around the country? it's that word, a campaign to try to reassure millions of vapers in the uk that it's a safe alternative to smoking. hidden. you get that feeling, should breakfast‘s graham satchell reports. millewa keep's health department ibe hidden. you get that feeling, should i be here? that is fascinating and issued an alert to tell people to there are places all over the country, former cold war bunkers, stop using those e—cigarettes immediately. it is being described second world war shelters, hopefully in america as an epidemic. 27 that linked to vaping. this is the this exhibition will draw a lot of that together and allow people to have a taste and carry on exploring. thank you, good to talk to you. good illicit market for thc vaping. this to be here. personally an undercover report shows why. interesting space to be, quite backstreet styles selling fluid
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creepy. it's a maze down here, this laced with cannabis. guaranteed to isjust one of 16 tunnelsjust in not kill you. *. most reported this one shelter alone. there were deaths had been linked to vaping eight of these shelters just this one shelter alone. there were eight of these sheltersjust in london. so there is all sorts of strange, weird, quirky places under unregulated home—made cannabis oil. the street that you would never even think of, you would never even today they started a print campaign imagine that here. this is the sort in national newspapers, it says what's happening in america couldn't of thing you can explore on a tour if you can make it. but if you happen here, because the uk industry can't, the exhibition is a chance to learn more about it. there are 180 is tightly regulated". we feel it is really important that the general steps back to the surface, chris has public and vapours can be reassured promised to hold my hand. dan, it's the products they are buying here in the products they are buying here in the uk are safe to consume, and that we are dealing with facts, not fascinating, and those archive pictures as well. really fascinating. you really enjoyed that. i like to learn more about places that you don't always get fiction. in the uk, all liquids have access to. to be tested and registered. but as still to come this morning: time goes on, there are also scientific studies are starting to suggest that vaping can cause some damage. can you guarantee that if someone damage. can you guarantee that if someone is vaping in the uk, that we have the education secretary,
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gavin williamson, to talk about proposals to school funding. so what they will be saved? what i can would you ask him about where £1.7 guarantee that, if, you are using vaping to get off smoking, that it billion of funding should go? the is far less harmful for you to vape suggestion from the government is and it is for you to smoke, nothing that the funds they are putting you now are sufficient to put the system that we do in this world is 100% backin now are sufficient to put the system safe. so this is your husband? yeah, back in place, and it's one of those issues, we know from doing a story this is terry. terry was 57, he died many, issues, we know from doing a story any issues, we know from doing a story many, many times, it really gets people going. you might be ready to at 57, he switched to vaping in his go to school this morning, or from the teaching profession. final year. doctors discovered oil on his lungs. he was diagnosed with time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. lymphoid pneumonia. his lungs were obviously damage to the smoking, but good morning from bbc london, i'm tarah welsh. using the e—cigarette, he was very two teenagers have been stabbed to death in the capital within a few susceptible to pick up other things, andi hours of each other. susceptible to pick up other things, and i think that was the straw that broke the camel's back, as far as it was. so, yes, in effect it was the a 15—year—old schoolboy oil that had done it. it killed him. was attacked as he got off a bus an inquest into terry's that said in stratford yesterday afternoon. and at around 8pm an 18—year—old
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was killed in camberwell. there've been no there is no evidence that vaping arrests in either case. a treatment trialled in south west london to help people with chronic directly caused his death. but his pain is thought to have saved the nhs £22 million. the escape—pain programme widow remains incredibly suspicious. was created by kingston use another method, use patches, use and st george's universities. chewing gum, don't use e—cigarettes. it's is a six—week scheme, using exercise to manage issues with hips and knees. we just it's now being used chewing gum, don't use e—cigarettes. wejust don't chewing gum, don't use e—cigarettes. we just don't know the long—term accross the country. effect. there is no scientific consensus that vaping is less i had suffered from osteoarthritis harmful than smoking, but the jury is out on the long—term effects of using e—cigarettes. graham satchell, bbc news. for over ten years. yes, after 8am this morning we will be speaking to public health england. and if you're a vaper, even when i could walk, get in touch and let us know what you think about a journey that should take me five these safety concerns. minutes would take me 20, 25, 30 minutes and i would be or if you are a smoker that was covered in sweat. and i gradually went from stage thinking about vaping and this has to stage and now i do cost some doubt in your mind. —— in ten minutes. next, check this out for a job advert. essex police is looking for people with investigative skills like coleen rooney.
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cast. it comes after she'd coming up on breakfast this morning: spent five months she's just become the first woman working out who was leaking stories to win five all—around to the press about her. world championships. simone biles is set to become in a tweet, essex police the most decorated gymnast has invited those of all time this weekend. with similar abilities to join its fast—track programme. we'll speak to british legend beth tweddle on why the american let's take a look at is the greatest. the travel situation now. time now to get the news, there's a good service travel and weather where you are. on the tubes this morning. good morning from bbc london. on the roads, in the west end, there are roadworks on shaftesbury avenue. they're causing delays northbound from high holborn to bloomsbury i'm sara wells. street. as the extinction rebellion protest two teenagers have been stabbed continues in central london, to death in the capital within a few all approaches to trafalgar square and parliament square are closed. hours of each other. in perivale, bidda—fud avenue a 15—year—old school boy, is closed in both directions was attacked as he got off a bus between tavistock avenue and wadsworth road after in stratford yesterday afternoon. a warehouse caught fire. and at around 8pm an 18—year—old now the weather with was killed in camberwell. elizabeth rizzini. hello. there've been no good morning. not the greatest day of weather today. yesterday wasn't too bad, but today we're returning arrests in either case. to that very unsettled theme. a treatment trialled in south—west london to help people with chronic pain is thought to have it's very windy and there will be saved the nhs £22 million. plenty of rain around at times, some of it heavy. the escape—pain programme now it is a mild start was created by kingston to the morning, temperatures at 14 and st george's universities. it's is a six—week scheme or 15 degrees, but it's using exercise to manage issues also a very wet one. with hips and knees. there'll be lots of rain around
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through the morning rush hour, lots of surface water from this. the rain turns a bit lighter, a bit more patchy as we head through the late morning, it's now being used but there's more rain to come into the afternoon. it's a very blustery day with gusts of wind up to 40 miles an hour. across the country. so it's windy and it's wet. i had suffered from osteo arthritis lots of low cloud around as well, top temperatures of 17 or 18 for over ten years. if i could walk, celsius. so, not feeling too cold. now, by the time we get something that would take someone to the evening rush hour, more rain in the forecast, ten minutes with take me 20, 25, 30 but winds will start to lighten through the evening. so lighter winds by tomorrow minutes and i would be covered in morning, but still possibly we're sweat. i gradually went from stage starting off the day with more wet weather. to stage a no i do in ten minutes. overnight lows between 10—13 degrees celsius, so a slightly cooler feel to things tomorrow. now, essex police as it is looking for people considering a career as a the winds will be lighter, but there'll be raining on—and—off detective who have investigative through the day. drier and a bit milder skills like coleen rooney. again by sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website it comes after wayne rooney's wife said she'd spent five months working at the usual address. out who was leaking stories now, though, it's back to the press about her. to naga and charlie. in a tweet, essex police has invited bye for now. those with similar abilities to join its fast track programme to become trainee sleuths. let's take a look at the travel situation now. hello — this is breakfast there's a good service with charlie stayt on the tubes this morning. and naga munchetty.
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here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the british and irish prime ministers say they're on on the ‘pathway‘ to a brexit deal, on the tubes this morning. the trains, disruption bi ahead of more talks today. croydon on the trains, disruption between is croydon and purley affecting southern towns link and the gatling the brexit secretary, stephen barclay, will meet the eu's express services “— chief negotiator michel barnier southern towns link and the gatling express services —— gatwick. later, with less than a week to go until a summit of eu leaders the extinction rebellion protest continues in central london. which is seen as the last chance all approaches to trafalgar square to reach agreement before the brexit and parliament square are closed. also, expect possible restrictions at london city airport's access road. in perivale, bidda—fud avenue is closed in both directions between tavistock avenue deadline at the end of the month. and wadsworth road after a warehouse caught fire. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello. good morning. not the the bbc and the government are being told to find a way of saving free tv licences for people over 75. greatest day of weather today. yesterday wasn't too bad but today the corporation had agreed we are returning to that very to fund the scheme as part u nsettled of its new charter agreement, we are returning to that very unsettled them. it's very windy and but now says it can't afford it. there will be plenty of rain around at times, some of it heavy. it is a it was previously paid for by the government. mild start of the morning, the media select committee of mps says both sides need to work temperatures are14— mild start of the morning, temperatures are 14— 15 degrees, but together to find a solution. also a very wet one. there will be lots of rain around through the morning rush hour, lots of surface water. the rain turns lighter, more former bbc chairman lord grade said patchy as we go through the morning, there were limited options to find more money. one of two things. there but more rain in the afternoon. a very blustery day with gusty winds are only two sources of money. a big of up to 40 miles an hour. so it is
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increase in the licence fee, windy and it's wet. lots of low probably a double—figure percentage increase in the licence fee to meet cloud around as well, top temperatures of17— the shortfall between the 250 the cloud around as well, top temperatures of 17— 18 celsius. not bbc are putting in and the 750 that feeling too cold. by the time we get is required or money from the to the evening rush hour, more rain treasury or a combination of both of those things. i think parliament is in the forecast, but winds will start to lighten through the evening, so lighter winds by extremely unhappy across the board, tomorrow morning, but possibly starting the day with more wet a postle extremely unhappy across the board, apostle parties, that pensioners weather. temperatures between 10—13, aren't going to get free licenses. after all, they are the people, cooler tomorrow. there will be rain where the people, i'm a pensioner, where the people, i'm a pensioner, where the people who rely so heavily on and off throughout the day, drier and milderfor and enjoy so much of the bbc and on and off throughout the day, drier and milder for sunday. i'm back with the latest rely on it so greatly. from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. fears are growing of bye for now. a humanitarian crisis in northern syria. tens of thousands of people have fled their homes after turkey began attacking kurdish forces. saw was hello — this is breakfast there's been international with charlie stayt condemnation of the military action, and naga munchetty. but turkey says it's trying we'll bring you all the latest news to create a "safe zone" and sport in a moment, for syrian refugees. but also on breakfast this morning. a teenager has been stabbed to death keira knightley‘s latest role tells the story near stratford shopping centre in east london. of a whistleblower who tried to stop officers found the 15—year—old boy shortly after three o'clock the second gulf war. yesterday afternoon, and believe he was either attacked on a bus,
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she's been talking to louise about making a stand for something or shortly after getting off. you believe in. a second teenager, also 15, we're deep beneath was found with stab injuries which aren't thought the streets of london this morning as the capital's subterranean secrets are revealed. to be life—threatening. how safe are e—cigarettes? after reports claiming they're linked to a number of deaths in the us we'll hear how the vaping industry is fighting back. here's a summary of today's main the vaping industry is launching a reassurance campaign in response to a number of deaths in the united states allegedly stories from bbc news. linked to e—cigarettes. the uk vaping industry association says british standards are robust, and that products are highly regulated. public health england says whilst the british and irish prime not completely risk free there is strong evidence minister's say they're that vaping is effective in helping smokers quit. on the ‘pathway‘ to a brexit deal, ahead of more talks today. the five—year—old daughter the brexit secretary, of british—iranian woman stephen barclay, will meet the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe has returned to the uk. later, with less than a week to go gabriella has been living with her grandparents in tehran until a summit of eu leaders which is seen as the last chance and and visiting her mother in the notorious evin prison to reach agreement before the brexit since mrs zaghari—ratcliffe was arrested on spying charges more than three years ago. deadline at the end of the month. but nazanin and her husband richard ratcliffe decided to bring her back home to the uk the bbc and the government are being told to find a way so she can start school. of saving free tv licences for people over 75. now, they say first the corporation had agreed impressions are important,
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to fund the scheme as part and it seems the way you greet of its new charter agreement, but now says it can't afford it. people can have a significant impact it was previously paid on your relationship. for by the government. psychologists at the university the media select committee of mps says both sides need to work together to find a solution. of dundee discovered that shaking hands for longer than three seconds "negatively impacts the behaviour fears are growing of of the recipient" and people showed a humanitarian crisis in northern higher levels of anxiety. syria. tens of thousands of people have they noted that politicians are keen fled their homes after turkey on long handshakes to show warmth began attacking kurdish forces. and a way of demonstrating there's been international authority, but it could potentially condemnation of the military action, jeopardise the quality but turkey says it's trying of their working and personal to create a "safe zone" relationships from the start. for syrian refugees. two political donors with links to donald trump's private people believe long handshakes show lawyer, rudy giuliani, have been arrested on suspicion of trying to funnel foreign money warmth and authority. ijust think to the republican party. igor fruman and lev parnas — it's a power struggle. a lot of pictured here on the left — straining, as they were doing it. are accused of trying to help mr giuliani investigate the family of the former vice handshakes straining, as they were doing it. handsha kes are very presidentjoe biden. straining, as they were doing it. handshakes are very important in sport, aren't they? i like seeing mr trump insists he doesn't know the men. a quarter of patients handshakes between managers at the with secondary breast cancer had end of matches. they touch the face —— the winner of the nobel peace prize will be announced later this morning. nominees are not traditionally announced, but amongst the bookie's now. it's a handshake and... who am
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favourites to win the accolade are 16 year old climate activist greta thunberg and new zealand's prime ministerjacinda ardern. the organisers say any talk of who is the favourite to win i? you pick one. you go like this. i is "sheer guesswork". do like that and then they go, they do like that and then they go, they doa do like that and then they go, they do a bit of this. it's a bit of whispering in the air. any touchline now, they say first impressions are important, in the premier league, they always do it. it is to cement that bond the typhoon is affecting the right between them. can i get some water? to world cup. in the formula 1. but i felt so uncomfortable then. it's it isn't cancelled? the race is taking me handshake further.” going to go ahead on sunday but it's didn't mind about that. i felt just qualifying stop suddenly making uncomfortable about how uncomfortable about how uncomfortable he was. chris eubank, its presence felt. qualifying will ta ke its presence felt. qualifying will take base on race day. have you ever met chris eubank. he's thej qualifying will now take place on race day in suzuka. the circuit lies 230 miles west of tokyo where the typhoon is set got extraordinary hand grip. he to hit on saturday.the bbc‘s f1 reporterjenny is gow is there. well, this appears to be the calm looks straight at you. please stop. before the storm. typhoon hagibis is
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expected to be one of the worst he does that thing. maybe that adds we've seen in the history of japanese typhoon recording so while it's now dry and it was pretty much to the whole power struggle thing. no wind, we can feel it's becoming oppressive and f1 have decided along with the event organisers to as well as being an expert on postpone qualifying. it's not handshakes in sport, you are taking unheard of that it's unusual. it into weather predictions. talking normally practising qualifying takes place on saturday with a race on about this super typhoon which is sunday afternoon. now it will be at going to hit japan and has seen too ten o'clock qualifying on sunday. much is cancelled, could see that will be a challenge for the scotland cancel its match with japan. also affecting the japanese teams and drivers alike. the whole day basically spent in our hotel grand prix this weekend as well. rooms on saturday and they will come to the track and have one hour to qualifying will take place on race set the fastest lap around what is a very difficult suzuka circuit. a lot day in suzu ka qualifying will take place on race day in suzuka on sunday. the circuit lies 230 miles west of apprehension going into this of tokyo where the typhoon is set weekend of what will happen but to hit on saturday.the bbc's f1 hopefully the main thing is everyone stays safe. we are waiting on news reporterjenny is gow is there. well, this appears to be the calm before the storm. typhoon hagibis is expected whether scotland's game with japan to be one of the worst will go ahead on sunday. we've seen in the history
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not great news, their remote hopes of qualifying of japanese typhoon recording automatically for euro 2020 are over — they do still have the play offs so whilst now it's dry and there's pretty much to come though next march. they were thrashed 4—0 in russia. no wind, we can feel it's becoming oppressive and f1 have decided along scotland have lost four consecutive matches in all competitions with the event organisers for the first time since 2004. to postpone qualifying. it's not unheard of but it's unusual. normally practise and qualifying takes place on saturday with a race on sunday afternoon. for us, is to try and make sure that now it will be a 10 o'clock this is the very bottom and go from qualifying on sunday with the race four hours later. here and make sure we come up. able that will be a challenge to be very competitive and get for the teams and drivers alike. through the play—offs to give ourselves the chance to be in the same championships. they will have a whole day basically to spend in their hotel northern ireland will need four points rooms on saturday and they will come from their final two games against the netherlands to the track and have one hour and germany to come. to set the fastest lap around what is a very difficult suzuka circuit. they went ahead against the dutch so i suppose a lot of last night with just over 15 minutes apprehension going into this weekend of what will happen to go in rotterdam, only to lose but hopefully the main thing 3—1 with three late goals is everyone stays safe. not great news for scotland, from the home side. wales kept their qualification hopes their remote hopes of qualifying on track with a draw automatically for euro 2020 are over in slovakia. — they do still have the play offs they led 1—nil before to come though next march.
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conceding an equaliser. they were thrashed 4 —0 in russia. scotland have lost four consecutive matches in all competitions england manager gareth southgate for the first time since 2004. says they'll abide their manager thinks by uefa's rules if they encounter any racial abuse during the euro qualifiers in the czech republic tonight, and in bulgaria next week. england will qualify for the euros if they beat the czechs. they've hit rock bottom.. on wednesday tammy abraham said the players were prepared to come off the pitch if they were not happy. uefa's protocol for racial abuse ends with the officials abandoning a match if announcements there is of course a uefa process inside a stadium do not and we have to have faith stop the problem. in the process. there is of course a uefa process and we have to have faith in the northern ireland will need four points from their final two games process. and then everything else is to qualify, that wont be easy when they're playing netherlands and germany next. they went ahead against the dutch hypothetical because we don't know last night with just over 15 minutes the situation that we will be in. to go , only to lose 3— 1 with three late goals all that i will be in as a manager. from the home side. wales kept their qualification hopes but we are very clear. all of the on track with a draw in slovakia. they led 1—nil before conceding an equaliser. stuff on what needs to happen. we england can qualify with a win against czech republic wa nt stuff on what needs to happen. we want the players to be able to tonight — manager gareth southgate
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concentrate on football. says they'll abide by uefa's rules if they encounter any racist abuse later or against bulgaria next week. striker tammy abraham said the players are prepared to walk off. uefa's protocol for racial abuse the american simone biles won ends with the officials abandoning another world gymnastics title, a match if announcements her 16th in all, and 22nd medal at the championships. she'd already become the most inside a stadium don't stop it. successful female gymnast in the history of the championships this week with team gold, but clinched her fifth all—around there is of course a uefa process individual title yesterday. and we have to have faith she has another four individual finals to come. in the process. it means the world to me. and then everything else is hypothetical because we don't know the situation that we will be in. or that i will be in as a manager. i mean, for my fifth, that's kind of unheard—of, but we are very clear. but it's really exciting but we finished strong and we gave it our all, and it's just super exciting that i had the opportunity to do this. she just keeps breaking boundaries. if she is not inventing new moves, she is hoovering up medals. you mentioned hoovering again. it's a in terms of all of the staff, on what needs to happen. we want the players to be able thing, it's on my mind. to concentrate on football. more than 60,000 people simone biles is set to become the greatest gymnast of all time, after clinching a record—breaking are now reported to be five all—around world championships. if the american manages to bag two fleeing their homes as the turkish offensive against kurdish fighters more golds this weekend, in north—eastern syria continues. she'll be the most there's been international succesful in history.
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condemnation of the action, in a moment we'll be speaking but turkey says it's trying to the greatest british gymnast to create a "safe zone" of all time, beth tweddle. for syrian refugees. let's speak to lloyd russell—moyle, but first, let's take a look chair of the all party parliamentary at her signature move, "the triple double". group on north east syria who joins natalie pirks explains how she does it us from our brighton studio. it is jaw—dropping in its complexity. launching into the air at around 13 mph, she's up there for a little can you tell me what saw the feeling more than a second. it means biles has to move quickly to perform her two somersaults while twisting three you had seen this progressing? well, when we were on the ground, actually, it seemed that there had been an agreement between america, times simultaneously. turkey and the syrian forces and the kurds to allow a safe zone to be even other elite gymnasts are dumbfounded by the east developed which would have joint with which she does such a move. beth tweddle joins us patrols. and this was to ensure that now from stuttgart any of the nervousness of turkey was just how does she do it? what sets no longer there. there is no need herapart? just how does she do it? what sets her apart? a lot of people keep asking this. to be honest, i don't for turkey now, this invasion seems know what the answer is. if we did, every gymnast would be doing it.
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to be to be an excuse to try and that's a motivation. she is that repopulate the area with a different many times world champion, and i ethnicity which is a crime, not guess it's inventing all of these permitted under international law. new skills but she makes them look so easy. everyone stops to watch it, and it is because there is a long—running dispute domestically with turkey and the kurds but nothing particularly to do with the it's incredible. she has four more kurds in syria and that is a great shame. why do you think turkey is events to come over the course of the weekend. surely she is going to then able to say it's creating a safe zone and protecting itself? we smash that record? she looks calm know the domestically, in domestic politics, the president is and composed and is really enjoying struggling in turkey and there is a her gymnastics. she spoke about how need to create a sense of warfare she doesn't herself and you can really see that on the floor. i because that would do him better in think we'll see a more medals this the polls. unfortunately these things are part of domestic politics weekend. she is just but let's be clear, the other thing that kurds in northeast syria have think we'll see a more medals this weekend. she isjust 22 years old. we talk about breaking records now started to create is a real democracy of gender equality, this age, talking about the career ofa this age, talking about the career of a gymnast, how many more years multi—ethnic participation in the does she have and how many more parliament. they even have kind of
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medals could you win? that is parties that support extremist islam, parties that support assad in entirely up to her. our sport has huge impact on the body. it depends how much your body can their assembly and turkey has a take. we spoke to her yesterday and desire to not allow that to continue. the turkish army is said, would you come back to get a world title and she said, look i am doing what i do now. enjoying what funded, armed by german, american i'm doing. i guess the focus will be and british arms. it is a nato army. this is a nato invasion and this is what we must be therefore speaking taken next year. we know that after up what we must be therefore speaking up against. we must be saying to rio, she took a year out from the turkey, we will suspend those sport to go and enjoy life. even arrangements if turkey doesn't stop this illegal invasion. ok, what is more successful prior to rio. it the uk and the us's role in this will be entirely up to her. and we because obviously president trump has tweeted, saying we have one of saw the impact that you had on the sport of gymnastics. i guess it is three choices. send in troops, wind militaria, hit turkey hard financially with sanctions or bringing ina sport of gymnastics. i guess it is bringing in a new audience. these types of performances, individuals mediated deal between turkey and the such as yourself, it's brilliant for cards. so far, i'm not sure that has the sport. to have someone like been a cards. so far, i'm not sure that has beena uk cards. so far, i'm not sure that has been a uk government response. the
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simone with our sport. it's kind the uk government have been very weak on this. in parliament, parliamentarians across the chamber, world of sport. knows who she is and this is not a party political issue, how amazing she is. does droid non— was united across the chamber that we needed to stand up and support the kurds. they are our allies gymnastics fans, in our sport. imparting isis but what will now happen is that as turkey comes down, fascinating stuff. many thanks isis fighters will end up being indeed, beth, and i'm sure we will be speaking to you with the vault to freed and they will be free to roam come, the bars on saturday and the and cause real danger around the balance beam and floor on sunday. world. and that is a threat to us. great to speak to you this morning. we must step in. an agreement had out of the four, and the expectation is that she will get a couple. she already been broken between the us should. she is 22. 23 will pull and turkey, the kurdish fighters and is that she will get a couple. she should. she is 22.23 will pull her level with the record. 23, 24 on syrian forces. that agreement was saturday, 25, 26 maybe on sunday. destabilised by trump withdrawing unilaterally. trump given the green many more years ahead. we're talking light for turkey to invade. this is extremely dangerous and we, with the french, should be very clear that turkey should not go any further. there are a number of sanctions that vinyl. taking a step back. good
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congresspeople in the us have laid out and i believe we should be looking at similar things like that morning. talking all about what's going on in the music industry. and if they won't abide by those, we need to go further and look at something like a no—fly zone but we the biggest music store in europe opens today in birmingham. need to first of all look at the 35—year—old candian owner sanctions and sales that we are of hmv, who rescued 100 stores from adminstration this year, conducting. briefly, the un security is opening an hmv the size the biggest music store in europe council was due to meet on thursday opens today in birmingham. at the request of them. do you think anything will be discussed there?m the 35—year—old candian owner should be. it should be discussed not only at the security council but of hmv, who rescued 100 stores the north atlantic treaty council. where turkey is a member. we should the biggest music store in europe opens today in birmingham. the 35—year—old candian owner of hmv, who rescued 100 stores be extremely clear, we will not from adminstration this year, defend turkey on this and turkey has is opening an hmv the size now threatened to send millions of of a supermarket. its called the vault — refugees to europe if we don't abide more like a cavern — with 80,000 cds and 24,000 vinyl albums. by what they want. these are threats it's a brave move at a time when many retailers are closing & and underhand behaviour by turkey online streaming batters sales of physical entertainment products. dyson gives up on the and underhand behaviour by turkey and i'm afraid we must have the all electric dream. moral courage to stand up for our the billionaire businessman will no longer try to make an electric car. it's already cost them too
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allies we have consistently relied much and they can't make on in the fight against isis and money from them. they'd put £2.5 billion aside to develop the car and battery technology now, if abandoned, on in the fight against isis and now, ifabandoned, could on in the fight against isis and here & build them abroad. now, if abandoned, could face a the 500 people who were involved in the project will be moved massacre. thank you very much for to other dyson ventures. the ritz hotel in mayfair, london might be up for sale. the famous barclay brothers talking to us this morning. the good are reported to be thinking of selling it after receiving a number of offers from foreign buyers in the region of £800 million, which would make it the world's most expensive hotel. news is, in leeds, there is a fantastic festival. but i can see an umbrella. sarah is there this morning. good morning to you. good naga, the royal mint called. they we re morning, i've got my brother up this naga, the royal mint called. they were watching one hour ago and they morning. saw that solid gold debit card iam here disappeared down the back of your i am here in leeds city senior trousers. £19,000 and they would centre for the annual light, night like it back. i don't know what festival. this is a very stealthy you're talking about. ok, ok. i busy friendly piece of heart —— art, prepping. the world's first ever solid gold card. i don't know how angels of freedom. talk me through many they are going to sell. all what it's all about. —— selfie. was. they are going to have to make a replica after naga has pinched angels of freedom. talk me through what it's all about. -- selfie. it's about the inner beauties of people. one. no transaction fees, no
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not so much about taking the best foreign—exchange fees, you will have instagram shot. it happens to shell out for the card in the automatically but it's about reminding us who we really are.|j first place but itjust goes to show that you don't need debit cards came here last night and accuse of these days or credit cards made out ofa people lining up here to stand up. these days or credit cards made out of a stick which is an interesting one for the mint because they make the angel wings as well. i believe all the coins in the country. i think she is sitting on it.” they come all the way from israel. labour israel and all of the world, all the coins in the country. i think she is sitting on it. i don't wa nt think she is sitting on it. i don't want one of those gold cars. you many cities and many different countries. russia, all over europe would be so worried about putting that in an atm are not getting it back? it's not contract —— it's not and we are recruiting angels all over the world. even in the contact us. £19,000 and it's not vatican. they are very interactive, contact us. £19,000 and it's not people love having the photo taken. contact less. they can do better than that. how my going to get my that simple and intuitive in a way you don't need to explain, what two packet of mints? i don't know. pairs of wings can do a person. where to next? i guess the us. this contact —based. packet of mints? i don't know. contact -based. let's take a look at the weather this morning. sarah is outdoors in the weather. a wonderful is one of about 60 different eliminated installations here in leeds. the festival runs over two festival going on in leeds. days and it's the largest annual festival of light and art in the uk. good morning to you. i'm in leeds
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what about the weather this morning? city centre and i'm here for the things are looking a bit soggy here annual light festival. it is now in its 15th year here in leeds, and it's the biggest uk unusual festival in leeds. for our sunlight —— annual. —— arts things are remaining unsettled. so, and lights. one of these interactions is known as wavefield, heavy rain and also some quite strong, gusty winds for many of us it's outside a shopping centre here do the course of the day. a big area in leeds, it's a wave of seesaws, of low pressure our weather. low pressure is sitting to the north of the uk, we were trailing weather people go up and down on the fronts on a cold front across parts of northern england and north wales seesaws. it's very interactive, very this morning that is bringing some really heavy bursts of rain as well family friendly as well. and it continues across the city. down leeds. there is another installation as squally winds, too. we've also got some heavy downpours as well and cold voyage, which is 100 lit up since i was working in across western scotland that could well be origami style boats. people can happy with some hail and thunder mixed in as well. today the area of control them using their smartphones as well. stunning scenes here in rain will shift its way southwards and eastwards across england and wales cricket board bringing some leeds. it has been a soggy start to fairly gusty winds. gusty winds up the day but the rain is starting to ease. and it is unsettled across the to 40-45 fairly gusty winds. gusty winds up to 40—45 mph as the cold front sinks uk in the weather forecast today. we its way south. some sunshine working do have low pressure driving a
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fairly autumnal spell of weather. from the north find that rain, heavy rain through the course of the temperatures for most of us 14— 18 day and also some strong winds as degrees. and we will stick with well. low pressure is sitting to the north of the uk, but those trailing those hours for the western half of weather fronts are bringing some scotland. some sunshine for eastern scotla nd scotland. some sunshine for eastern scotland and northern ireland as spells are very heavy rain, well. into this evening tonight we particularly across england today. will keep the rain across southern england and south wales at times, heavy rain for parts of northern too. but elsewhere, mostly clear england, north wales as well. skies. if you showers across western further heavy showers further south scotla nd skies. if you showers across western scotland but it will be colder than of that. all of the salary rain it was last night, so temperatures would sweep its way southward that in the north down to single figures, eastwards a cross further south, looking at double would sweep its way southward that eastwards across england and wows. since i'm returning to the north of figures. saturday morning starts off that. for scotland and northern ireland, we are expecting some more sunshine here, so some dry weather. 5°99)” heavy showers wishing into southern figures. saturday morning starts off soggy, the rain pushing figures. saturday morning starts off seggy, the rain pushing into figures. saturday morning starts off soggy, the rain pushing into the midlands as well. the further north parts of scotland where there could be some hail and thunder mixed in there will be sunshine, temperatures with those heavy showers as well. cooler than today, about 13— 16 degrees. and we will still have a squally winds associated with a heavy rain today, we could see gusts few showers in the far north—west of wind up to 40—45 mph, stronger but some sunshine for northern ireland, northern england as well. by ireland, northern england as well. by sunday, we got more rain working around the coasts of wales where you northwards and eastwards across much have those heavy bursts of rain on of the uk, so another unsettled that cold front. temperatures today story. there was some uncertainty about the detail of sunday's rain. for most of us between 14— 18 degrees also. reasonably mild, but temperatures 13— 15 degrees, it
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would be a brighter day across the feeling cooler when you are exposed south and the strong winds that we to those gusty winds and heavy objects of rain. some abrasive got today will be easing through the sunshine in the north across the day. overnight, we are expected to weekend, too. so, it's an unsettled story over the next couple of days, see that been pushing across parts very autumnal with low pressure in of southern england, still a few charge. i'll have more in 30 heavy showers across the west of minutes. it looks miserable there, scotland, too. elsewhere, clear skies and a cold and i don't we saw doesn't it? last night. temperatures in the north wildly down into the mid— do you like the sympathy i had single figures —— widely. saturday, there, victoria? do you like the sympathy i had there, victoria ? move do you like the sympathy i had we still have that rain across much there, victoria? move on! you've got of southern england, south of england is also seeing some of that lots to talk about. i do. rain. temperatures somewhere between the retailer hmw is opening hmv‘s largest ever store, which is being called hmv vault, at dale end in birmingham victoria's 13- 16 rain. temperatures somewhere between 13— 16 degrees for most of us on here with more on that and the other saturday. then we are looking at main business stories. do you know the song let's get some heavy rain through saturday night into sunday morning. that rain physical? # let's get physical... why are you is quite widespread, i think, through the day, pushing its way is to do much of the uk. it will be a singing that? i'll tell you why. it bit of a drier, brighter day after a pretty soggy few days. temperatures isa singing that? i'll tell you why. it is a good song and there is a good by sunday about 13— 16 degrees. reason. the reason is hmv, stop it things turning cooler over the next
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you two, the biggest music store in few days, and i think as we look at europe today, in birmingham, the the week ahead, we've got some 35—year—old canadian owner of hmv fairly autumnal and fairly up—and—down, changeable, unsettled weather along the way. back to you. rescued 100 stores on administration this year, it's asign of weather along the way. back to you. rescued 100 stores on administration this year, its opening a store the size of a supermarket. it's cold the a sign of the times, isn't it? volt, it's like a cabin. 80,000 cds let's turn to the issue of and 24,000 vinyl albums. physical education. for years teachers have been calling for more cash for schools. last month ministers announced they would increase spending by more entertainment products. there we go! than £7 billion by 2023. it's very brave when retailers are now, a breakdown of how the money closing out online streaming has but will be spent in the first year has now been revealed. heard the sales of physical and city but while the investment has been welcomed, campaigners have warned it's not enough. products. pedal cars are still the the education secretary gavin majority of new cars sold, although the fastest growing is electric and williamsonjoins us. hybrid. it's surprising why dyson is good morning. morning. good to see you this morning. you want to outline the big numbers which may or saying they aren't making electric may not compute in peoples' minds, but give us a sense of what the vehicles anymore. they put £2.5 amount you are talking to about now billion into the project, they were going to make them here and abroad. equates to in real terms? amount you are talking to about now equates to in realterms? currently we spent £850 million a week on our these people involved in the project scores. that is going for the next will be moved on to other products,
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it may be vacuum cleaners, who financial year is going to invest in knows? not hoover -- hoovers. i have £900 million a week. in the year after that it will go to £950 million a week, and thereafter that it is going to go to 1000 million a week. so you see a big increase. just coming that to that in a a song about that. design says it second. —— back to that. what you will be unsustainable —— nissan says have outlined is technically true, the numbers are going up, but the it will be unsustainable if the uk backdrop is, an independent but is such zone is what you are doing is just getting us back to where we leaves without a deal. that affects we re just getting us back to where we were in 2009. what we've seen... but the thousands of people employed by the thousands of people employed by the carmaker. and you are talking about what you would do if you won the lottery? yes. maybe you could thatis were in 2009. what we've seen... but that is true, isn't it? we've seen open upa the lottery? yes. maybe you could open up a home for abandoned animals in the ritz. the ritz in mayfair are the best investment in schools regeneration, and every year we increase more money on our schools. reportedly thinking about selling it, it's in the region of £800 —— fora increase more money on our schools. —— for a generation. but it's a big investment. we've seen rising million, which would make it the world's most expensive hotel. well, standards, especially for children in disadvantaged backgrounds, that
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that's — that's covers my plan has been increasing everything we are. that is good news. but i have to confess, having been married to a because the euromillions lottery is only £170 million. the debt. i been teacher and having a brother who was in possession of something, very, a teacher, things are tighter in very precious. it's the grand schools and they could use the extra money. with the prime minister coming into hisjob, he wanted to opening? this was a special delivery make sure we dealt with that issue. we are putting extra money there. from the royal mint a few hours ago. you say you get it from your brother and your wife who work in the i've been terrified. this is, i'll schools factor, intervene, i got get it out, and buffed it up, you you, "a bit tight". this is a thought this was a jacket, no it's subject that resonates very just a buffer for a gold card. it is a solid gold 18 carat gold card. strongly. we asked some people to get in touch. a teacher told us she there you go. amazing. this is the started herjob in september, to get first in the world, assuming you got her class ready, she personally enough money in the bank, there is a limitless spending on this card. no spent, he actually, he or her, spent £800 of their own money buying transaction fees, foreign exchange fees, it will set you back 18700 and resources as the school has no money. she buys children's snack 54—— food herself, razor ingredients to fees, it will set you back 18700 and
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do cooking, own exercise books, own 54 -- £18,750. would workbooks, continued —— hazel, no fees, it will set you back 18700 and 54 —— £18,750. would you like to handle it? is a gold card made com pletely handle it? is a gold card made completely out of gold? there are this is a new thing from the royal workbooks, continued —— hazel, no work —— workbooks, continued —— hazel, no work — — pays workbooks, continued —— hazel, no work —— pays for, no work— life mint. they want to move with the balance, and she says she is times, ina mint. they want to move with the times, in a cashless society they ultimately on her knees and it is can do something really impressive. so this is the card here. it doesn't not even half term. that is not have a chip, but you could put it in right. i'm not comfortable with that. that is why we have taken action into coming into this role, to make sure we get extra money into an atm. this doesn't belong to every single school. i don't want to someone? i can't show the number? hear stories like that because i don't think it's right. the biggest impact we can have on each hour's education is the teacher that stands at the front of the classroom, "lm cardholder". inspiring those children and someone? i can't show the number? "lm ca rdholder". does someone? i can't show the number? "lm cardholder". does it work at the motivating them. that isn't the story i want to hear read out. cutpoint? ' please don't get my that's why we're making sure that every single school in the country card', yeah. -- at the cutpoint? i is going to more money. you know, i can only act in order to make sure that i get what schools need. i want think it's a bit grows. —— cash to continue to drive up those standards. but, you know, iam point? i think it's a little bit
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trying to ensure that that money gets through to every single school. grows, really. there you go. he's and adjust those challenges. the money that is being increased, if already got one. he just doesn't that brings us back to 2009 levels, like to brag. i'm quite happy to have that. it's quite heavy. is it 2009-11 that brings us back to 2009 levels, 2009—11 levels, according to the disappearing down the back of those institute of fiscal studies. when trousers? thank you, victoria. see you say you want this to improve, it could be decades before this you later. goodbye. there are i'm improves. because you are already going ten years backwards. what we getting that back from you! are seeing is people funding has in 2003 actor keira knightly joined protest marches against the iraq war. continued to increase. the amount of it's quite timely, because for her money and amount of gas going into latest role she is playing a gchq schools. the schools can't spend it, whistleblower who tried to stop the every year the schools can't spend that money. this is why we have announced, we are telling every invasion. single school about the extra money official secrets tells they are getting today, the the story of katharine gun indicative amount that is going to who exposed an operation every single school, right across by the united states to blackmail the country. and we're taking the time to do that because we want to members of the un security council into authorising the war. give them the confidence. i sat with she's been speaking to louise. a head teacher just give them the confidence. i sat with a head teacherjust yesterday give them the confidence. i sat with a head teacher just yesterday and they were saying that they were concerned about a £270,000 cost of this is about catherine gunn and she
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extra pension provisions. now, what worked at gchq and she found a piece we're saying to schools is that is of information which he passed on, didn't she? it was an incredibly not just brave thing to do. did you know much we're saying to schools is that is notjust going to be covered for next year, is going to be covered about her? no, i knew nothing. and i for the year after that and the year after that. if we don't give them rememberthe about her? no, i knew nothing. and i remember the lead about her? no, i knew nothing. and i rememberthe lead up about her? no, i knew nothing. and i remember the lead up to the 2003 war the confidence and assurance which and a totally didn't know anything they haven't had before, under this government or the labour government, about this. you are a spy. you work then they have the ability to plan, for the british government. no, but most importantly the ability to about this. you are a spy. you work forthe british government. no, i work for the british people. i do focus on teaching. i'm keen to get not collect information so the some thoughts in from people who've government can lie to the british people. she released a memo from the gotten in touch with us. you could nsa that asked for help in looking speak to a head teacher effectively now, helen longton howarth. "please for information into the members of could you ask, when will we start to the un security council so that they see the promised additional funding could basically blackmail them into that was recently announced, september 2020 is too late. schools voting for the war in iraq. so it are desperate now." this is a head teacher reminded of the comments we was a very explosive memo that she released, and she released it in had a moment ago from the unidentified teacher cold h who said order to try to stop the war with they are spending their own money. iraq happening. she didn't manage to so, today, monday of next week, stop it and it did happen. what you there would be teachers spending their own money, head teachers think about what she did, it's quite a moral dilemma at the heart of the spending their own money, to keep story. would i be brave enough to do their own schools going. they spend
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their own schools going. they spend that? i don't know. that's what's the money that is coming out of their own pockets, you're the extraordinary about this story. you realise that most people don't, most education secretary. next week, if someone has got enough pencils, there not enough stock in the people look the other way. and it's classroom, do they spend their own understandable to look the other way money or not? what we're doing... because you want to save yourself and you don't want to completely derail your life. you have and you don't want to completely derailyour life. you have nothing to gain and everything to lose. this could result in a prison sentence. do you want to risk it all? whether sorry. should they spend their own money to keep the school going or you agree with what you did or not? we are doing financial whether you don't, there are a lot of people who say if you work with settle m e nts not? we are doing financial settlements starting from april next the intelligence services you sign an oath, you sign the official year, that is where the extra money secrets agreement, you do not mix comes from. which is why i'm asking about it now. i would hope that it is in about it now. i would hope that it documents. otherwise the whole of isina about it now. i would hope that it is in a position where they would have to. are you telling them not to our intelligence services could not do that? what i'm focused on is what work. and that is a valid argument. but equally, if you do know there i could deliver. seriously, iwant has been illegal acts, then what are you to answer the question. if they you supposed to do? you also wrote that essay about being a mother, area you to answer the question. if they are a teacher, the next week, next time, i'm going to have to fork out, that essay about being a mother, that was very honest. it was, wasn't they would like to hear from you it? you wrote about the expectations that they don't have to do that, of being a mum, and only six weeks that they don't have to do that, that you would provide the money after the next one. yammer, can i now, next week of the week after, so
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they don't have to do that. we've just say, this is about the third time since a given birth since i already provided a financial that are meant for this year, i can only have had may have rust, luke breust provide it for the following year, and that is what we're doing. that's may have. i was in my pyjamas and why we've got the extra money in this is somebody else's just so it terms of, it is going to be kicking is all smoke and mirrors today, which i'm happy about, —— luke in from april, and that is why we are seeing every single school in the country increasing, seeing the amount that comes to them increase. brushed my hair. i have six hours from when i leave the house to get and we've also had an issue, we've also had an issue where there are a back, basically, ifi lot of schools around the country from when i leave the house to get back, basically, if i get back, i that have been funded at much lower got to get back before 6:30pm. the levels otherwise. and it hasn't a lwa ys levels otherwise. and it hasn't always been based on need. it's being based more on geography. so only thing that could stop us is the what we're trying to do is ensure extinction rebellion, but i thought that there is a basic minimum, so my husband about that, that's ok. every secondary school is going to there is some milk that i would love get a every secondary school is going to geta minimum every secondary school is going to get a minimum of £500,000 doesn't not £5,000 per pupil, —— £5,000 per to use, it in the freezer, but it is there. i'll let you go because i'm pupil, not £5,000 per pupil, —— £5,000 per pupil, and it is going to rise. we really worried for you. and then i are wanting to give people the got to get to the premier, and then confidence, head teachers the confidence, head teachers the the baby. it's really wonderful to confidence where financial see you. you are fitting us into settle m e nt confidence where financial settlement is going to be. time is
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your very, very busy life. thank you a lwa ys settlement is going to be. time is very much. she has written and spoken a lot always tight. so you say april, next year. this week, next week, head about that about being a mum on sat, teachers are going to continue and its challenges, it's great to see. incrediblyjuggling. and keeping spending their own money to calling out the smoke and mirrors. it's just before seven a.m.. we are give schools going that is a fact, talking to gallagher and williamson isn't it? we're getting money into soon “— schools as quickly as possible. but next week, next week... when you go talking to gallagher and williamson soon —— garran. lots of question around schools, you can see the marks about the spending cuts over sense of the opportunity that they the next ten years or so, i would have to do the right financial planning, the confidence they have like to know your experiences of in order to be able to know how they can manage their budgets that are, your schools, if you are a teacher and by getting this information to ora your schools, if you are a teacher them as early as possible budgets or a parent, let us know how the funding is working out in a practical sense. please get in touch. now to find out wherever you better, they can plan better as to are in the country. we'll see you at how they are going to spend the money. not only for next year, also for how they will continue spending the money for this year as well. we 7am. have to leave it there. i'm sorry, good morning from bbc london, i'm gavin williamson. it's very good of you to be on our sofa this morning and taking questions from people who have been talking to us this
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tarah welsh. morning. my pleasure. we will see you a little after eight a.m.. two teenagers have been stabbed good morning from bbc london, to death in the capital i'm tarah welsh. two teenagers have been stabbed within a few hours of each other. to death in the capital a 15—year—old schoolboy within a few hours of each other. was attacked as he got off a bus in stratford yesterday afternoon. a 15—year—old school boy, and at around 8pm an 18—year—old was attacked as he got off a bus was killed in camberwell. in stratford yesterday afternoon. there've been no and at around 8pm an 18—year—old arrests in either case. a treatment trialled in south west was killed in camberwell. there've been no london to help people with chronic pain is thought to have arrests in either case. saved the nhs £22 million. a treatment trialled in south west the escape—pain programme london to help people with chronic was created by kingston and st george's universities. pain is thought to have saved it's is a six week scheme using exercise to manage issues with hips and knees. the nhs £22 million. it's now being used accross the country. i had suffered from osteoarthritis for over ten years. the escape—pain programme even if i could walk, was created by kingston and st george's universities. something that would take someone ten minutes with take me 20, 25, it's is a 6—week scheme 30 minutes and i would be using exercise to manage issues with hips and knees. covered in sweat. it's now being used accross the country. i had suffered from osteoarthritis and i gradually went from stage to stage and now i do for over ten years. in ten minutes.
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even when i could walk, a journey that should take me five next, check this out. minutes would take me 20, 25, essex police says it's looking 30 minutes and i would be for people considering a career as a detective who have covered in sweat. investigative skills like coleen rooney. it comes after wayne rooney's wife said she'd spent five months working out and i gradually went from stage who was leaking stories to stage and now i do to the press about her. in a tweet essex police has invited it in ten minutes. those with similar abilities next, check this out to join its fast—track programme. for a job advert. essex police is looking for people with investigative skills like coleen rooney. it comes after she'd there's a good .ervice spent five months on the tubes this morning working out who was leaking stories in the west end: roadworks to the press about her. on shaftesbury avenue are causing delays northbound from high holborn in a tweet, essex police to bloomsbury street. has invited those the extinction rebellion protest with similar abilities continues in central london. to join its fast—track programme. all approaches to trafalgar square and parliament square are closed. let's take a look at in perivale, bidda—fud avenue the travel situation now. is closed in both directions between tavistock avenue and wadsworth road after a warehouse caught fire. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. on the roads, as the extinction rebellion protest continues now the weather with in central london. all approaches to parliament square elizabeth rizzini. and trafalgar square are closed. finsbury park: queen's drive hello. is closed in both directions good morning. not the greatest day between seven sisters road and brownswood road due of weather today. to a burst water main. yesterday wasn't too bad, but today we're returning to that very unsettled them. in perivale, bidda—fud avenue is closed in both directions
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it's very windy and there will be between tavistock avenue and wadsworth road after plenty of rain around at times, a warehouse caught fire. some of it heavy. now it is a mild start to the morning, temperatures at 14 or 15 degrees, but it's also a very wet one. now, the weather with there'll be lots of rain around through the morning rush hour, elizabeth rizzini. lots of surface water from this. the rain turns a bit lighter, hello. good morning. not the greatest day a bit more patchy as we head of weather today. through the late morning, yesterday wasn't too bad, but there's more rain to come but today we're returning to that into the afternoon. very unsettled theme. it's very windy and there will be plenty of rain around at times, some of it heavy. it's a very blustery day with gusts now it is a mild start to the morning, temperatures at 14 of wind up to 40 miles an hour. so it's windy and it's wet. or 15 degrees, but it's also a very wet one. lots of low cloud around as well, there'll be lots of rain around top temperatures of 17 or 18 through the morning rush hour, celsius. so, not feeling too cold. lots of surface water from this. the rain turns a bit lighter, now, by the time we get to the evening rush hour, a bit more patchy as we head more rain in the forecast, but winds will start to lighten through the late morning, but there's more rain to come through the evening. into the afternoon. so lighter winds by tomorrow it's a very blustery day with gusts morning, but still possibly we're of wind up to 40 miles an hour. starting off the day with more wet weather. so it's windy and it's wet. overnight lows between 10—13 degrees celsius, so a slightly cooler feel lots of low cloud around as well, to things tomorrow. top temperatures of 17 or 18 the winds will be lighter, celsius. so, not feeling too cold. but there'll be raining on and off now, by the time we get through the day. drier and a bit milder to the evening rush hour, again by sunday. more rain in the forecast, i'm back with the latest but winds will start to lighten from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. through the evening. so lighter winds by tomorrow morning, but still possibly we're plenty more on our website
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at the usual address. 01:00:02,627 --> 2147483052:06:46,028 now though, it's back 2147483052:06:46,028 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 to naga and charlie. starting off the day with more wet weather. overnight lows between 10—13 degrees celsius, so a slightly cooler feel to things tomorrow. the winds will be lighter, but there'll be raining on—and—off through the day. drier and a bit milder again by sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. meanwhile, plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today... brexit hope ahead of more talks today as boris johnson and the irish prime minister say they're on the "pathway to a deal". mps urge the bbc and ministers to come to an agreement to restore the free tv licence for the over 755. the e—cigarette industry launches a campaign to reassure millions of vapers in the uk, despite concerns in the us.
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hmv is opening the doors to europe's biggest music store today in birmingham. it comes just months after the chain called in the administrators and announced dozens of branch closures. formula 1 qualifying is postponed as typhoon hagibis approaches, while scotland fans wait to see if their critical rugby world cup game againstjapan will go ahead. and going underground, we are down one of london's former world war ii bomb shelters as a new exhibition opened exploring the capital's hidden and secret and abandoned underground spaces. iam in i am in leeds for the leeds light night festival, the uk's largest annual festival of art and light, looking at some insulations and to bringing you a full forecast for today and the weekend in about 15 minutes. it's friday the 11th october. our top story.
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the british and irish prime ministers say they're on the "pathway" to a brexit deal, ahead of more talks today. the brexit secretary, stephen barclay, will meet the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, later. our brussels reporter adam fleming joins us. i understand there were meetings scheduled for atm this morning but what do you know? all of the journalists and cameramen are standing at the european commission hq waiting for stephen barclay to drive in, i think he is a couple of minutes late but he will be having brea kfast minutes late but he will be having breakfast with michel barnier where we think he will put on the table to michel barnier any new ideas that borisjohnson michel barnier any new ideas that boris johnson presented michel barnier any new ideas that borisjohnson presented yesterday michel barnier any new ideas that boris johnson presented yesterday to the irish prime minister, leo varadkar. i had to say, people here in brussels that work on brexit and have observed every twist and turn of the process for the last two yea rs we re of the process for the last two years were ta ken by of the process for the last two years were taken by surprise last night because the statement that emerged from the meeting between
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borisjohnson emerged from the meeting between boris johnson and leo emerged from the meeting between borisjohnson and leo varadkar was so positive, that was quite unexpected because the mood had been very gloomy before that. they found themselves asking, what could possibly have changed to have made the two leaders say they could see a pathway to a possible deal? the way i look at it, there are only four options available. firstly, did the eu relax what it is prepared to have in the brexit deal when it comes to the irish border? could they live with a solution that is not 100% ready? secondly, has the uk but changed its opinion about how northern ireland should be treated when it comes to customs and the eu's customs rules? number three, if there is a new option and nobody has thought of that somebody has come up with or an old option that has been redone to apply differently. or option four, was all of this just a bit of rhetoric and diplomacy, a bit of international politeness to try and get the show back on the road?
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hopefully we will find out some more details after stephen buckley has his breakfast with michel barnier and then michel barnier will go to another meeting here in brussels —— stephen barclay. he will talk to the ambassadors of the 27 other eu countries and we will see where it goes from there. thank you very much. the bbc and the government are being told to find a way of saving free tv licences for people over 75. the corporation had agreed to fund the scheme as part of its new charter agreement, but now says it can't afford it. it was previously paid for by the government. the media select committee of mps says both sides need to work together to find a solution. earlier on breakfast former bbc chairman lord grade said there were very limited options to find more money. one or two things come only two make resources over more money. one is a big increase in the licence fee, probably a double percentage increase in the fee to meet the shortfall between the 250 that the bbc are putting in that the 750 that
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is required, or money from the treasury or a combination of both of those things. i think parliament is extremely unhappy across the board come across all parties, that pensioners are not going to get a free license fees. after all, they are the people, we are the people, i'm a pensioner, we other people who rely so heavily and enjoy so much of the bbc and rely on it so greatly. an iranian tanker has reportedly been hit by a missile attack in the red sea. the national iranian tanker company said there were explosions on the vessel which was around 60 miles from the port ofjeddah in saudi arabia. it said that the two main oil tanks on the ship had been damaged and the oil was spilling into the sea. no crew members were injured. the east midlands and the south west of england are among the regions that will benefit most from an increase in school funding. a plan to boost spending by £7.1 billion
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by 2023 was announced last month after years of lobbying by teachers. earlier the education secretary gavin williamson told us he understands how teachers feel i recognise, i have to confess that ido i recognise, i have to confess that i do occasionally get it in the area being married to a teacher and having a brother as a teacher, things have been a bit tight in schools. they have needed a bit of extra money and coming into thejob, with the prime minister coming into hisjob, we with the prime minister coming into his job, we wanted to with the prime minister coming into hisjob, we wanted to make with the prime minister coming into his job, we wanted to make sure we dealt with that issue so we are putting extra money in. fears are growing about humanitarian crisis in syria. tens of thousand people have fled their homes after turkey began attacking turkish forces and there has been international condemnation of the action but turkey said it is trying to create a safe zone for syrian refugees. a teenager has been stabbed to death near stratford shopping centre in east london. near stratford shopping officers found the 15—year—old boy shortly after three o'clock yesterday afternoon, and believe he was either attacked on a bus, or shortly after getting off. a second teenager, also 15, was found with stab injuries which aren't thought to be life—threatening. the vaping industry is launching
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a reassurance campaign in response to a number of deaths in the united states allegedly linked to e—cigarettes. the uk vaping industry association says british standards are robust, and that products are highly regulated. public health england says whilst not completely risk free, there is strong evidence that vaping is effective in helping smokers quit. the five—year—old daughter of imprisoned british—iranian woman nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe has returned to the uk. here's gabriella arriving back with herfather, richard ratcliffe. she's been living with her grandparents in tehran and visiting her mother in the notorious evin prison since she was arrested on spying charges more than three years ago. her parents decided to bring her back to the uk so she can start school. it is eight minutes past eight. sarah is in leeds with the weather atan art sarah is in leeds with the weather at an art and light festival. i
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think it is clearing. and john will have the support. a number of deaths, allegedly linked to e—cigarettes in the united states, has led to concern over the safety of vaping. so, today the industry is launching a campaign to try to reassure millions of vapers in the uk that it's a safe alternative to smoking. breakfast‘s graham satchell reports. milwaukee's health department issued an alert telling people to stop using those e—cigarettes immediately. it is being described in america as an epidemic. that is now 27 deaths linked to vaping in 22 states. every day a new report of someone dying or being hospitalised. this is the illicit market for thc vape oil. this undercover report shows why. back street stalls selling fluid laced with cannabis. most of the reported deaths have been linked to vaping unregulated, home—made cannabis oil and the panic now gripping america has prompted the uk vaping industry to act. today they have started a print campaign in national newspapers. it says...
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what is happening in america couldn't happen here because the uk industry is tightly regulated. we feel that it is really important that the general public and vapers can be reassured that the products they are buying here in the uk are safe to consume, and that they are dealing with facts and not fiction. vaping in the uk is controlled by an eu directive. all liquids have to be tested and registered. there are restrictions on advertising and selling to under 18s. but, as time goes on, there are also scientific studies starting to suggest that vaping can cause some damage. can you guarantee that if someone is vaping in the uk, that they will be safe? i can guarantee that if you are using vaping to get off smoking, that it is far less harmful for you to vape than it is to smoke. but nothing that we do in this world is 100% safe. so, this is your husband? yeah, this is terry. glynis's husband was 57
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when he died in 2010. he had smoked since he was 15 but, in the last year of his life, he switched to vaping. he became ill and was admitted to hospital. doctors discovered oil on his lungs. he was diagnosed with lymphoid pneumonia. his lungs obviously were damaged through the smoking, but using the e—cigarette, he was very susceptible to pick up other things and i think that was... how can i put it? the straw that broke the camel's back? as faras, like, yes, in effect, at the end of the day, it was the oil, the e—cigarette that done it. it killed him. an inquest into terry's death recorded an open verdict and there is no evidence vaping directly caused his pneumonia, but glynis remains deeply suspicious e—cigarettes. if people want to stop smoking, use another method. use the patches, use the lozenges, use the chewing gum. don't go onto e—cigarettes
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because you just don't know the long—term effect. there is now a scientific consensus that vaping is less harmful than smoking but the jury is out on the long—term effects of using e—cigarettes. graham satchel, bbc news. martin dockrell from public health england joins us now from our edinburgh newsroom. thank you for talking to us this morning. people are asking, when they see these reports in the us, and what has been happening, if they think it's safe? you can understand why people are in such a panic from the way stories are coming across from the us but as your clip made clear, this is not an outbreak associated with the regular nicotine e—cigarettes but more cannabis vaping which is very different. we have had about 27 deaths from cannabis vaping in the us in the
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past couple of months. we have had no deaths at all associated with the regulated e—cigarette products we have in the uk. what about the more than 1000 cases of a long illness being linked to vaping by us health authorities? really serious but linked to vaping cannabis products. and that is a concern. it is something we are keeping under tight scrutiny here in the uk to be fair, investigators are not linked the illness to any particular product or compound product they said they think contain thc, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, pose a risk but they have not linked it yet. what they have done is they see a very clear pattern of who is at risk. right from the start was clearly young, largely men, who were
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reporting vaping cannabis products. it does not seem to be related to the 9 million adults in the us who are they think nicotine products. you can see that in some state it is 95% or more of the cases associated with biologically demonstrated exposure to thc. i really want to stress that the centre for disease control and prevention, the cdc, has advised people and it has not made... it has not linked the illnesses to any particular product or compound and it has advised, so not just or compound and it has advised, so notjust thc, or compound and it has advised, so not just thc, but or compound and it has advised, so notjust thc, but it has advised people to stop using vaping products ore people to stop using vaping products or e cigarettes regardless of whether they contain nicotine or marijuana. that is the advice that typhoon hagibis has given but they
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have also reported that the overwhelming majority of people, if you do a little search on the internet for cdc vaping, it will ta ke internet for cdc vaping, it will take you straight to their website and show you the portions are people who have been exposed to thc. it is quite right that we don't know if it is the thc that is causing the problem. it might be something else and it could well be something else in the thc vaping from it might be something called vitamin e acetate which seems to be added to many of the products or there might be some other kind of contaminant that has got in on a rogue wave. but this is a sudden outbreak in a very specific population and it is very different from the kind of we are seeing in the uk. it is really important in the uk. it is really important in the uk. it is really important in the uk to focus on the real risk and the uk to focus on the real risk and the real risk is not in nicotine contained in e—cigarettes. they are bigger later much more strictly than
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in the us. the real risk in the uk is among people using these thc vaping devices. it might not be the thc causing the problem but there is something in these devices that is causing the problem. in the number that were found in this country but sorry in the seven or eight at you said we re in the seven or eight at you said were linked to thc, not these thousands in the united states. sorry, i certainly didn't mean to say that any products were identified in this country. but there were thousand cases in the us we re there were thousand cases in the us were people who were overwhelmingly exposed to thc products have had this lung disease and that is very different from the situation in the uk and from nicotine e—cigarettes which are regular to buy our medicines regulator, the mhr rate. it's much more tightly regulated in the uk. as the tobacco control lead
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for public health england, i imagine you are told about all studies that are of significance and has been a small study where uk scientists found that vaping could lead to changes in the lungs immune cells. the fact is that there is a risk, some risk, when it comes to smoking e—cigarettes so for them to be promoted as a safe alternative to smoking cigarettes, perhaps is not the wisest advice? we have always said that e—cigarettes are not com pletely said that e—cigarettes are not completely safe but far, far safer than smoking. the bbc kindly sent a cab to pick me up to bring me to the studio i wasn't completely safe, there are risks in traffic. but with e—cigarettes, it is not 100% safe but remember 28 cases, deaths in the
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us, but in the uk from smoking, 220 deaths every day. that is the scale of risk. e—cigarettes are far, far less harmful. no deaths recorded in the uk linked to the regulated nicotine contained in e—cigarettes that are approved by the mhra. it is reassuring and those products are way safer put my advice to the british public is the same to my brothers and sisters and nephews and nieces and my friends who smoke, it is way better to stop smoking completely, 50% of people at least you are lifelong smokers will die from smoking related illness. there is no suggestion that vaping nicotine is anything like that risk. martin dockerill, thank you very much for talking to me. it is 18
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minutes past eight this friday morning. looking ahead to the weekend. sarah's over in leeds for us, at the uk's largest annual arts and light festival. good morning. morning, i'm in leeds city centre and the leeds like nike festival, the largest one of its type in the uk, now in its 15th year —— the light night festival concert there are interactive things here and live performances, one of whom is called the flying violinist and she is suspended from a ceiling in a shopping centre here, doing 12, mesmerising dress that doing tom . all the time —— twirls. she will be performing later on today. there are also about 60 installations of art, laces in the sky, we have the
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angel wings behind me, lots of people coming and taking selfies here and there are big projections on some of the most iconic buildings here in leeds. it is a free festival and it goes on for over two date and it is the uk's largest annual light and art festival. we have had a bit of rain around this morning, it is starting to ease but the weather across the uk, were looking at an u nsettled across the uk, were looking at an unsettled picture. not just across the uk, were looking at an unsettled picture. notjust today but through the weekend. lopressor is driving things at the moment. some spells of heavy rain —— low pressure. we have low pressure sitting to the north with some trailing weather fronts bringing outbreaks of rain. the heaviest rain this morning is across northern england and north wales. further southin england and north wales. further south in england and wales, also heavy showers. in scotland and northern ireland, some heavy and frequent showers in the west of scotla nd frequent showers in the west of scotland with some hail and thunderstorms mixed in a bit further
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south and east, you have some sunny spells in scotland and northern ireland with a couple of showers but the wind is a real feature. ireland with a couple of showers but the wind is a realfeature. 40—45 mph gusts, particularly on that cold front with a heavy rain sweeping the south and east. temperatures for most between 14 and 18 degrees. still reasonably mild but it will not feel perfectly pleasant when you are exposed to the winds with the heavy outbreaks of rain put up some sunshine returning to northern england later on, northern and ireland and scotland also having some brighter weather but overnight we will have further heavy rain in many southern parts in particular, and perhaps some further north as well. showers continuing for the west of scotland to clearer skies elsewhere so a colder night with temperatures well into single figures for many areas first thing saturday but it will remain mild in the self where you have the cloud and rain. saturday morning starts with rain in much of southern
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england —— mild in the south. it could put into south wales and the midlands but further north, not bad, less windy than today with some sunshine but a few scattered showers, especially in the western pa rt showers, especially in the western part of scotland. a little cooler so temperatures between 13 and 16 degrees for most but less windy and they could be some dry weather, especially in the north. overnight on saturday into sunday, some heavy rain and on sunday they moved north—eastwards across the uk. a bit drier in the south by sunday but temperatures of 12—15d. an unsettled outlook over the next couple of days, there will be some rain but also a bit of sunshine in between. thank you very much. what have you got for us?l what have you got for us? a bit of good news. hmv was facing administration but a 35—year—old canadian swooped in and took up 100
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stores and everybody has been wondering what he would do with them. ican wondering what he would do with them. i can tell you that the biggest music store in europe opens today in birmingham. the new owner rescued the stores is opening this hmv which is the size of a supermarket conduct is called the bolt and it has 80,000 cds, 24,000 vinyl albums and it will also act as a distribution centre and there are plans for gigs there as well put it isa plans for gigs there as well put it is a pretty brave move at a time when many retailers are closing an online streaming has battered sales of cds and dvds. a bit up great on —— update on jeptoo. they said that bookings are healthy and have seen more demand from customers since the collapse of thomas cook —— from jet2. local media has reported that an explosion has set an iranian owned oil tanker
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on fire. this was nearjeddah in saudi arabia but it has caused an oil spill and as a result, global oil spill and as a result, global oil prices have spiked, up about 2%. last month prices jumped the most in 30 years went two attacks hit the biggest petroleum to sing facility as well as a nearby oilfield in saudi arabia. —— processing facility. before i go, i will have to get this back... i don't know what you're talking about! the £19,000 debit card that i know are down the back of those very fetching trousers! just explain exactly what it is. before we get in trouble! this is the world's first solid gold debit card. sorry... you have had so much coffee! i have had three and no food! the first solid gold debit card. it has been made by the royal
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mint. get it out so everyone can have a look. this is a demonstration one, it will not work. it doesn't work?! what is the point of me stealing it? because it is worth 19 grand! it is a solid gold and pretty heavy. in them it would work in an atm... no contactless. it should be soft if it is a solid goal. please don't! i will get in trouble! it is bonkers. in a world with rising homelessness in the uk and things like that, they are making this. but there is demand. people have already ordered them. they go on sale today around the world and i'm sure this is more of an international product, if we're honest. it is going to be in the middle east, where the money is. that kind of thing. presumably you have the money to spend on the
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ca rd you have the money to spend on the card in the first place. there is no spending limit because it is a debit ca rd spending limit because it is a debit card so whatever you have in the bag you can spend on it put it we will make sure that goes back to the appropriate place! we have an interview with keira knightley coming up. one of the things she talks about is juggling the work life balance because she now has a baby, and talking about how that works out. she has written about it quite a lot. she has called out a few things in the industry when it has not been sympathetic to new mums, mums or dads with babies. going to be an interesting interview and she has been talking about her new film, a whistle—blower before the gulf war. the search is on for the bbc sporting unsung hero of the year. we'll speak to last year's winner and tell you how you can vote. it is one of the great awards at the
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sports personality of the year, and they go to the people who don't get they go to the people who don't get the attention. and we will be talking to an unsung hero. we will see you in a few minutes. let's find out what's happening where you are. more rainfall in the forecast this morning. we have had a lot of it in the last months or so. most of the rainfall this morning across england and wales where it will also be windy. showers continuing across scotland. the wave is from a waving front. imagine flicking a rope and it waves, this is what is happening to the weather system so it will move north and south in the next few days bringing heavy outbreaks of rain across england and wales. this morning the rain is particularly heavy across wales, northern england and particularly the pennines and west wales where we could see 40—70
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millimetres of rain by the end of the day which could cause flooding issues. furthering in the south—east of england, easing off slightly before this band of rain moves in from the north. further north, sunny spells eventually. heavy and thundery showers in the west of scotland. 20—50 millimetres he could cause issues. and windy, with gusts around coastal areas at around 50, 55 mph. those are the temperatures today, 15—18, maybe 19 celsius. tonight, the rain continuing to move into the south—east of england. showers affecting the north—east of scotla nd showers affecting the north—east of scotland but they will ease off slightly and not as frequent as the last 48—hour is. temperatures across northern areas, seven, eight celsius. milderfurther northern areas, seven, eight celsius. milder further south, 10-13. celsius. milder further south, 10—13. during saturday, the rain in the south—east will work north—east again. for much of north wales and northern england it will remain dry with some sunshine. some showers in
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the west of scotland. maximum temperatures on saturday, 14—16. on the pressure chart you can see the rain spreading north as we go through sunday. a further low pressure system moving on from the west and it will remain unsettled through the weekend.
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this is worklife from bbc news, with ben bland and david eades. mind the gap — the gender pay gap. globally it's still a yawning chasm. what's the solution? live from london, that's our top story on friday 11th october.
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on the international day of the girl, we'll ask how we get more women from classroom to boardroom. also in the programme — the pound jumps after what are described as "positive" brexit talks between the uk and irish pms.
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