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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 12, 2019 6:00am-7:01am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: a vaccine plea to parents: the head of nhs england warns that the school gates have become a breeding ground for myths about mmr. tokyo prepares to face its worst typhoon in 60 years as winds of more than 100 miles an hour head towards the japanese coast. good morning, typhoon hagibis is bearing down on japan good morning, typhoon hagibis is bearing down onjapan and likely to make landfall in the next few hours. i will have the full forecast for that and also the uk weekend weather in the next 30 minutes. the us threatens turkey with "crippling sanctions" over its military offensive in northern syria, as concerns are raised about a new threat from is fighters.
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england suffer their first qualifying defeat in ten years. they're beaten 2—1 by the czech republic, and will have to wait a little longer to qualify for euro 2020. plus, are we about to see sporting history over the next few hours? we'll be live in vienna following the progress of kenyan runner eliud kipchoge as he tries to become the first person to run a marathon in under two hours. it's saturday the 12th of october. our top story: there are warnings that the school gates have become a "breeding ground" for harmful myths about the safety of vaccinations against conditions like measles. nhs england chief simon stevens has spoken out after the latest figures showed a rise in the number of measles cases and fall in the take—up of all routine jabs for under—fives in the last year. simon jones has more. so we just so wejust do so we just do about there. the jab against measles mumps and rubella is, in the word of each microphone nhs's chief simon stevens, is easy,
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free, and can save lives but simon stevens is worried. what have you learned from your experience? the percentage of children receiving the first phase of the vaccine is down to the fifth year in a row in england. this is parents looking for information online are currently being confronted by fake news. writing in the daily mail, he wants: —— warns: borisjohnson boris johnson recently borisjohnson recently echoed his concerns. i'm afraid people have been listening to the superstitious mumbo—jumbo on the internet, anti—vaxxer stuff, and thinking that the mmr vaccine is a bad idea. that is wrong. here at the department of health they have been much discussion about what should be done to increase vaccination rates. the health secretary matt hancock recently said he was seriously considering making vaccinations
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compulsory for schoolchildren in england, but some in the medical profession worn but could make pa rents profession worn but could make parents suspicious. simon stevens acknowledges there has been a lively debate on the issue, though he stopped short of saying whether he believes vaccinations should be mandatory. he does, though, pledge that the nhs will make it easier for pa rents to get that the nhs will make it easier for parents to get their children vaccinated and he has welcomed a commitment by social media firms to counter misinformation online. simon jones, bbc news. japan is bracing itself for one of the strongest storms to hit the country in decades. typhoon hagibis is expected to make landfall near the capital tokyo at around 10am this morning with winds of up to 110 miles per hour. one man is already thought to have died after his car overturned in the gusty conditions. tens of thousands of homes are without power and residents in low—lying areas have been told to be ready to evacuate. we will get the very latest from our
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correspondent in tokyo in just a few moments time and those conditions, we understand, are worsening as we speak. at least one person has died and tens of thousands have been forced to flee their homes as wildfires rage around southern california. hundreds of firefighters have been battling to control the blazes, which broke out around los angeles earlier this week. the fires are being fuelled by winds of up to 60 miles per hour. authorities have opened shelters for residents who have been forced to abandon their homes. the united states has warned turkey that it's prepared to impose "crippling sanctions" if it continues to take military action against kurdish forces in northern syria. last night, it was revealed that us troops had come underfire from turkish positions, but turkey has denied deliberately targeting american soldiers. 0ur north america correspondent chris buckler has the latest from washington. tu rkey‘s turkey's invasion has been criticised and condemned but so far, the world is merely watching as conflict consumes northern syria. tens of thousands of kurds have fled
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their homes, their soldiers fought alongside the us against islamic state and they believe america could have prevented this. many feel betrayed. translation: these countries do not see what is going on, america, russian, iran, they do not see this. america says it is with us but america sold us out like russia did, they sold us out, we know they did. in the united states, there is growing concern about all of this instability. and that the islamic state group will try to take advantage. is says it was responsible for this car bomb attack. the trump administration has told tu rkey‘s attack. the trump administration has told turkey's president owed again that extremists cannot be allowed to escape within the chaos and the us is threatening to put sanctions against turkey if it crosses the line and its actions but some civilians have already been killed. we have a very good relationship
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with turkey, they are a nato park it —— partner and we do a lot of trade with them but we do not want them killing a lot of people. it is clear turkey is not deterred, it is committing more and more to this fight are leaving syria further scarred. as we mentioned earlier typhoon hagibis is about to make landfall on the japanese coast this morning. we can now speak to rupert wingfield—hayes, who's live in tokyo for us. just give us a sense of what the conditions are like. as you can probably see, that is tokyo behind me, you cannot see most of it but you can see the size is of shinjuku, but you cannot because we are under the leading edge of the typhoon and this is an enormous storm but it really covers most of the japanese archipelago so, you know, 1000 miles across, this storm, at its outer edges, and we have been seeing torrential rain that getting now for
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several hours already. that is expect to continue up to 1000 millimetres of rain, is it is expected to fall in some parts of japan today and into tonight so that swelling rivers, has the potential for causing landslides and flooding and is the real worry right now but later on today, the storm itself, the eye of the storm is expected to come on shore, south of tokyo, and it will be packing winds of up to 130- 140 it will be packing winds of up to 130— 140 kilometres an hour, close to 100 miles an hour, destructive winds and it is expected to pass right over the top of where i am in central tokyo sometime later tonight so central tokyo sometime later tonight so this is a very big storm, it has shut down pretty much the whole of greater tokyo, all transport is down, metro, railways, bullet train has been shut down, airports shut down, and of course all sporting fixtures, or most of them, across japan have been called off today, of course including the big rugby world cup matches, including england — france much that was meant to take
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place today and many rugby fans disappointed by that but it is hoped that the rugby will be back on tomorrow once the storm has passed. it was a little bit more about the severity of the conditions because obviously, safety is paramount, you we re obviously, safety is paramount, you were talking about those sporting fixtures. but has to have been the decision—making process from the authorities. yes, there has been some unhappiness about why the rugby matches, particularly england— france were cancelled instead of postponed, but it isn't clear why thatis postponed, but it isn't clear why that is the case but a lot of people standing here in tokyo this afternoon right now may say it is just a bit of heavy rain so what is the worry? what i would say to people is wait until later on today. these winds, when they come in, when the eye of the typhoon comes into shore, the winds picks up very fast and they are very dangerous, they can pick up objects, throw them down the street, flying debris is the big concern if you are out on the street and the advice to everybody injapan is stay off the streets this
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evening, stay inside, be safe. tokyo isa evening, stay inside, be safe. tokyo is a place and japan a place you know well, rupert. how well—prepared are they for these sorts of conditions? japan is an extremely well—prepared conditions? japan is an extremely well—prepa red country for all sorts of events like this, typhoons come into japan regularly every year during the typhoon season. 0ne into japan regularly every year during the typhoon season. one this size doesn't been seen since 1958 but the flood defences along the rivers and coast are very good, but that does not mean they cannot be overwhelmed. but they are good. the real worry i think it all of these cases is with this amount of rain, is landslides. japan is a very mountainous country. it is a heavily populated country. landslides can be incredibly destructive. i've seen it before in the past with the villagers buried and districts and towns buried in previous years. it is difficult to prevent against that and when it comes, it is terrifying and when it comes, it is terrifying and it can cause great, great destruction. rupert, for the moment, thank you very much. we get a real
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sense there of the conditions expected to hit land at the major pa rt expected to hit land at the major part of the typhoon during the morning so we will keep a close eye on morning so we will keep a close eye o n eve nts morning so we will keep a close eye on events there. just coming up to ten minutes past six and some other news to bring you. a man arrested on suspicion of stabbing shoppers at the arndale shopping centre in manchester has been detained under the mental health act. the male, in his 405, was held on suspicion of committing a terrorism offence before being assessed by specialist doctors. let's get the latest now from our reporter dave guest, who's in manchester city centre for us today. dave, good to see you. tell us what happened. good morning. basically yesterday morning in the arndale centre behind me a man suddenly started lunging at people with a knife. 0bviously started lunging at people with a knife. obviously it took everyone by surprise and there was a certain amount of panic and distress at this and eyewitnesses said hejust appeared to be lunging at people randomly. in all, five people were hurt, three suffered stab wounds and the other two suffered more
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superficial injuries and thankfully none of those injuries were life—threatening. armed police were on the scene here within five minutes or so but before then, two unarmed community support officers actually attempted to tackle the man with a knife and he ended up chasing after them but as i say, armed officers on the scene very quickly and they brought him under control and they brought him under control and arrested him and he has now been detained as you say under the mental health act and this was treated as a potential terrorist incident because of the nature of the crime that was committed obviously, somebody running around with a knife in a shopping centre. of course shopping centres such as the arndale centre do have procedures in place to react should something like this happen and those procedures swung into effect very quickly at the arndale yesterday morning, shops immediately put down their shutters and people in the shops were told to go to the back of the store so they would be kept safe, the police were quickly on the scene and the man detained in police that they are satisfied that no—one else was involved in this and this was a loan operator. they are still keeping their minds open as to
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the motivation for this attack —— lone. 0f the motivation for this attack —— lone. of course the city is no stranger to the dangers of terrorism because you will remember in may 2017 at the manchester arena, just a stones throw from here, 22 people died when a suicide bomber killed himself there. dave, thank you very much. british and eu officials will continue brexit talks this weekend, amid rising speculation a deal is on the cards which could break the deadlock over the irish border. the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier gave the green light yesterday for intensive discussions between officials to start. let's get the latest on this now from our political correspondent john 0wen. morning to you. we are reaching a crucial time in these discussions andi crucial time in these discussions and i dare say there is a to what we will know as to exactly what is being discussed? i think that is right, first of all it is right to say that there is a significant contrast with where we are now verses where we were just a few days ago where these talks were thought to be in serious trouble, perhaps
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evenin to be in serious trouble, perhaps even in danger of imminent collapse. instead what we are seeing is an intensification of talks between the eu and the uk. i think the change in the mood music probably came about on thursday morning after a conversation between the irish taoiseach, leo varadkar, and boris johnson, a positive meeting after which both sides agreed they could now see a pathway to a deal. that led to speculation they could have been some kind of concession from the uk side on that really intractable question of whether there can be, under the customs status of northern ireland, after brexit. it is worth remembering that in previous proposals, borisjohnson committed the uk to leaving because —— leaving the customs union in its entirely including northern ireland and some speculation as to whether thatis and some speculation as to whether that is still the position of the uk 01’ that is still the position of the uk or not. it is also worth saying that there is an extremely difficult path, pathway to trade over the next few days to get the deal ready for
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the eu leaders summit on thursday and friday and then potentially through the house of commons on saturday. john, for the moment, thank you. england fans have been involved in violent clashes with police in prague, with several supporters arrested. there are some flashing images in the pictures we're about to show. thousands travelled to watch the three lions take on the czech republic in a euro 2020 qualifier — a game they lost 2—1. police said 14 foreigners were among 31 people arrested, and one england fan was left with head injuries that needed treatment. those are the main stories for you this morning. now for some record breaking news. this avocado has earned the title of the world's heaviest, weighing in at 5.6 pounds, the same as a small baby. it is bigger than an average 12—year—old's head.
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the record—breaking avocado is no more, though. it apparently made enough guacamole for 20 people. the pokini family, who grew it, say they hope to harvest more giant avocados in december. it isa it is a whopper. it is official. it is a whopper. it is officiallj it is a whopper. it is officiallj think it is a whopper. it is official.” think that would be bigger than my head. i don't think it would be bigger than your head. but we haven't got any more, it has now been sliced into pieces. we need to get somebody who is 5.6 pounds. we could do that, but it won't prove anything, because it is not necessarily the same density. it might be the same weight, but it wouldn't be the same size. just suggesting. here's alina with a look at this morning's weather.
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good morning to you. we are focusing on japan. we saw good morning to you. we are focusing onjapan. we saw rupert wingfield hayes, and the typhoon is coming in. how have we been pronouncing it? hagibis. you can see how it has been developing. notice the really defined eye. it has weakened slightly as it has approached japan, but don't let that full year. this isa but don't let that full year. this is a very dangerous storm, and it is a three pronged attack, really, because we've got some very dangerous waves. we got some damaging winds with speeds in excess of 100 damaging winds with speeds in excess of100 mph, and also damaging winds with speeds in excess of 100 mph, and also some torrential rain as well. we could well see 600 millimetres over a 24—hour period. so that is likely to bring some landslides, and it is hitting a highly densely populated area, so keeping a close eye on the tokyo area over the coming hours. we are expecting this typhoon to make la ndfall expecting this typhoon to make
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landfall in the next couple of hours, so that is evening timejapan time, and probably around perhaps mid to late morning our time. so we will keep an eye on it as we go through this morning. back home, i think nearly as severe, —— nothing nearly as severe but still u nsettled. nearly as severe but still unsettled. given that the rain is already quite saturated in places, this brings the risk of flooding and there are flood warnings in place tied into this frontal system. this isa tied into this frontal system. this is a cloud associated with it, draped all the way back in the endangered. it is going to continue to waive its way across the uk during the weekend. and today's focus of the heavy rains across southern parts of england and south wales. some of that rain already quite heavy across south—west england and south wales, and through the day which is its way eastwards. so really in a line from cornwall towards southern norfolk. to the north of this we've got some spells
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of sunshine for many. some showers across parts of wales, north—west england, the west of northern ireland, also for the highlands of scotla nd ireland, also for the highlands of scotland and into the northern isles. but for many, perhaps escaping the showers, mainly dry. the wind is not as strong as they we re the wind is not as strong as they were yesterday and temperatures generally around the mid—teens. perhaps we could get up to 16 or 17 across parts of the midlands and east england in the best of the sunshine. so through tonight, keeping an eye on our frontal system which by this stage will be starting to slowly put its way northwards, probably staying dry across northern ireland and much of scotland. some of that rain could get into southern scotla nd of that rain could get into southern scotland by the end of the night. where we have the rain, temperatures generally holding up into double figures, where we have clear skies, four or five celsius. it is a really messy picture tomorrow. 0ne four or five celsius. it is a really messy picture tomorrow. one way or another most of us will see some spells of rain, perhaps away from northern scotland and northern ireland, which could escape mainly dry. we have further spells of rain to come through tomorrow, slowly starting to slide its way eastwards. so eventually we will see something dry arriving across parts of wales, south—west england. it may take until the afternoon to arrive in eastern england. staying dry across scotla nd eastern england. staying dry across scotland and northern ireland and temperatures tomorrow generally around the mid—teens once again. it
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stays unsettled as we go into monday. here is the pressure chart. the uncertainty is the timing of this rain. getting off to a dry start before that rain starts to move into western and eastern areas as we go through the day. here is what we think is going to happen on monday. as i mentioned, after that dry, bright start, rain piling into northern ireland, parts of the western parts of the uk and eventually into southern and eastern parts of england. so yes, there is more rain in the forecast over the coming days. back to you. thank you very much. now on breakfast, it's time for the film review. hello, and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. what have you been watching? we have american woman starring sienna miller...
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animated fun with abominable... and will smith fighting himself in gemini man. let's start with american woman. sienna miller is debra, living in rust belt pennsylvania. she is pin balling endlessly between variously useless and occasionally abusive men and looking for security and love. one night, her teenage daughter goes out and doesn't come home. she is left holding her grandson with no idea what happened. here is a clip. it's been... it's been three days since we last saw bridget. she left home around 7:00. she was wearing a pink sweatshirt and white sneakers.
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she had her hair coloured a few days ago, so it's a little lighter now, a little more blonde. but not much. this is a mother's worst nightmare. to know that your daughter is out there somewhere and she's calling for you and you can't get to her... i'm sorry. she cries. i miss my daughter. so, on one level the film is about a missing person but it's actually, that's only one part of what it's about. the narrative jumps forward several years and we see the central character played by sienna miller further on in her life, still trying to find a suitable partner, and people like aaron paul plays an initially charming character. what happens is we see the weight of the trauma and the grief that she has carried
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with her as her own character develops and changes. i think the most remarkable thing is sienna miller is really terrific, that's not a surprise because she was really good in supporting roles in foxcatcher and american sniper. this is the first time she's been able to command the centre stage and she's terrific. she plays each section of the character's life completely convincingly. the second thing is, this is directed by jake scott, who does a very good job of backing off exactly when you think the drama is going to overplay its hand. what you get is a film that is very, very convincing about a lengthy period in somebody‘s life in which something is hanging over them.
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the thing it reminded me of slightly is things like atom egoyan's the sweet hereafter or exotica. atom egoyan is very good at making films that exist in the aftermath of something. i definitely got that feeling from this. is it upsetting? her central character is indomitable and has a vibrant spirit. yes, she is shouldering a huge burden, but the film is about, ok, this is the situation and life has to move on. you know it will keep returning to this central motif about this absence and what happened and how it happened, but the film is actually about her. when they were shooting it it was originally called burning woman. i'm not sure american woman is the right title. it is a film that is absolutely about the way a character develops over a lengthy period of time, and you believe every single frame of that performance. not least because it's very physical. it's not to do with the character saying, i think this, i feel this, it's to do with the way they stand,
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the way she holds herself and the tiny glances. and it has a very good supporting cast. i was immersed in it, i believed in the world. the problem is the trailers are necessarily selling it as a missing person thriller, and that is one element but it's not the element. it's about her dealing with this but life moving on at the same time. it sounds more interesting than the trailer allows. in their defence, it's a very hard film to trail because it's a hard film to explain. if you say it's a story of somebody growing over a long period of time, that wouldn't bring the audience in. an animation for your second choice. abominable is an occasionally thrilling, largely blandly charming story. a young girl befriends a yeti creature who is escaping from a wealthy eccentric voiced by eddie izzard, sounding like eddie izzard brilliantly. her and her friends agree to take the yeti to the highest point on earth.
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the creature has magical powers that enables it to turn landscape into something completely different. there is a sequence which we are seeing now in which this boat travels through a flowery field which then turns into a giant wave, there is a lovely sequence in which they climb up on a giant buddha statue. there are individual moments that made me think, that's beautiful and breathtaking. i don't think it's massively original. people have compared it to how to train your dragon. i always think about the bigfoot movie missing link, which had a more sturdy feeling to me. i think it will do well with a fairly undemanding audience. there are certain moments in which i thought, that's beautiful, they are using the technology really well. it has some great moments. gemini man, i want it to be really good because it is ang lee,
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who is so interesting and does such great work. no. will smith goes head—to—head with his digitally conjured younger self. he is a retiring assassin who finds he can't retire because he is being pursued by a young hit man, who weirdly seems to know his every move. it's almost as if he is being followed by his younger self. here is a clip. stop right there! who are you? i don't want to shoot you! fine. don't shoot me. mind if i shoot you? did i show you a picture of me? yeah, you look old.
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you take one step closer, you're going to leave me no choice. gunshots. there's some decently executed action sequences. this project began in the late ‘90s when it was first thought up and then they thought, we don't have the technology to do this. it turns out now they do, but it's like thejeff goldblum thing, you're so eager to see whether you could, you didn't stop to think whether you should. fundamentally, one big problem is i saw it in high frame rate 3d, which is this kind of high frame rate format which makes you think you're watching something which looks like behind—the—scenes footage. it's so real it looks like it's not a movie,
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which is really bizarre. secondly, it's kind of distracting because even when you see what they've done with the cgi, there is a computer—generated character, it's impossible not to sit there thinking, that's technologically quite interesting. my biggest problem is this. while you've got mary elizabeth winstead injecting a much—needed human note, ang lee for me is a storyteller. tell stories, stop worrying about the technology and whether or not we can push back 60 frames a second, just do the thing you did before, which was be a great storyteller. i have no problem with technology, but technology for its own sake feels like the tail wagging the dog. it is true that most of the ideas i have seen before, it is a sub—blade runner idea about body and soul and most of the time you're sitting there thinking, just tell me a story like you used to. i'm sure he'll listen to you. yes, i've got him on speed dial. the farewell is a lovely story.
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have you seen it? yes. isn't itjust the most brilliant thing? i did love it. i mean, i really, really loved... is it awkwafina? by the end was she just slightly too much stroppy teenager. she was meant to be 31 in the film and was behaving like a stroppy 17—year—old, but overall i really liked it. i thought it was one of the most honest depictions of family relationships, the way there are secrets and lies, very, very mike leigh. i thought it was really touching and really funny and really moving, and i knew nothing about it when i went to see it other than the title, which i have to say is not... i love the thing "based on an actual lie", which is a great tag line. now, a dvd, a musical. hitsville: the making of motown, which is a documentary about the making of motown. it's very, very authorised. it's not warts and all, but it's worth it for the interviews,
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not least because you get them standing by a piano mis—remembering their own history. at one point he said, so—and—so recorded a song, the other one said, i bet you 100 bucks it was the other guy. they ring someone up. that kind of stuff was really wonderful, and i laughed more watching their interviews than i have watching many of this year's so—called comedies. enjoy your cinema—going. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. japan is bracing itself for one of the strongest storms to hit the country in decades.
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typhoon hagibis is expected to make landfall near the capital tokyo at around 10am this morning, with winds of up to 110 miles per hour. one man is already thought to have died after his car overturned in the gusty conditions. tens of thousands of homes are without power, and residents in low—lying areas have been told to be ready to evacuate their homes. we will be monitoring the situation there this morning, including some of the problems it is caused to sporting fixtures as well with our sporting fixtures as well with our correspondent in tokyo this morning. there are warnings that parents' chatter at the school gate have become a "breeding ground" for harmful myths about the safety of vaccinations against conditions like measles. nhs england chief simon stevens spoke out as the latest figures showed a rise in the number of measles cases and fall in the take—up of all routine jabs for under—fives in the last year. at least one person has died and tens of thousands have been forced to flee their homes as wildfires rage around southern california. hundreds of firefighters have been battling to control the blazes, which broke out around
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los angeles earlier this week. the fires are being fuelled by winds of up to 60 miles per hour. authorities have opened shelters for residents who have been forced to abandon their homes. the united states has warned turkey that it's prepared to impose "crippling sanctions" if it continues to take military action against kurdish forces in northern syria. last night, it was revealed that us troops had come underfire from turkish positions, but turkey has denied deliberately targeting american soldiers. there are also fresh concerns about the threat posed by former is fighters being held in camps. british and eu officials will continue brexit talks this weekend, amid rising speculation a deal is on the cards which could break the deadlock over the irish border. the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier gave the green light yesterday for intensive discussions between officials to start. the hollywood actress jane fonda has been arrested at a climate change protest in washington.
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after refusing to leave the steps of the capitol building, she was led away by police in handcuffs. 16 other people were arrested at the fire drill friday event, which is held weekly by activists addressing the impact of climate change. those are the main stories. john is here with sport. england have been doing a good job up until now in qualifying. in all qualifying campaigns, it is fair to say, have not lost in ten years but despite scoring a penalty, they took the lead so it was shaping up nicely for them but the defeat means they have had to wait to qualify for next yea r‘s had to wait to qualify for next year's euros. what was the score? 2-1. year's euros. what was the score? 2—1. defensive issues, something that southgate will hope is just a blip. england are made to wait in their attempt to book their spot at euro 2020 beaten last night. the 2—1 defeat ends a 43—game unbeaten run in qualifiers. joe wilson was watching in prague. they call prague the city of 100 spires.
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it is also, someone counted, a city of 600 bars on a friday night. british police urged english travellers to remember they were here for football, not a stag do. czech police made their point in the old town. england's players arrived here at the stadium with confidence — after all, they'd been making these euro qualifiers seem easy. it was the fourth minute of tonight's match when raheem sterling burst forward for the first time, when the referee had a decision to make. well, penalty means harry kane. means this. commentator: no mistake! scoring is not england's problem. defending is england's problem. deal with this? no, they couldn't. the czechs were back in the match. many thanks. as news came through of some arrests in central prague, england were still level in the game, althouthordan pickford needed his agility. for england, there were opportunities. for harry kane, the second goal didn't come.
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well, not for england. as they chased a winner, england were undone again in defence. this was a winning goal to re—inspire czech football, a defeat to remind england of their limitations. joe wilson, bbc news, in prague. in terms of a wake—up call, i think we have had a lot of plaudits, i think we have always maintained that there is a lot of work to be done to bea there is a lot of work to be done to be a really top team, and i think tonight was clear evidence of that. we have to respond in the right way. whilst england's winning run in qualifying came to an end, better news for andorra. it's been a long time coming but after 21 years, they've finally got their first qualifying win. they'd lost each and every one of their 56 european qualifiers before beating moldova 2—1 last night. it's only their seventh win in all competitions since joining fifa and uefa in 1996.
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very exciting moments for athletics this morning. the kenyan distance runner eliud kipchoge, who won the london marathon for a fourth time this year, is going to try to become the first man to run a marathon in less than two hours. he tried it once before, a couple of years ago, and missed out byjust 26 seconds. he goes off at around 7:15 this morning in vienna. of course, we will keep a close eye on how he gets on. mo farah has accused the media of treating him unfairly as he faced questions over the ban handed out to his former coach. alberto salazar‘s been given a 4—year ban from athletics for doping violations. farah is in chicago to defend his marathon title, he's neverfailed a drugs test, and says there is an "agenda" against him. there is a clear agenda to this, i've seen this many, many times. i don't know where you are going with it and don't know where you are going with itandi don't know where you are going with it and i have seen it with raheem sterling and lewis hamilton. i cannot win, whatever i do. as i said, there is no allegation against me, i've not done anything wrong.
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this allegation is about, let's be clear here, about alberto salazar. we've spoken a lot about the super typhoon hitting japan. it means there's just one game going ahead at the rugby world cup today — england against france and new zealand versus italy both cancelled but ireland's final pool game against samoa goes ahead, despite concerns over the pitch which has been relaid leading to worries it could cut up. you can see it there — centre chris farrell able to bury a ball under it. a bonus point win for ireland would guarantee their place in the quarterfinals. we have been given all assurances by world rug by we have been given all assurances by world rugby that it is safe to play on and that is all that we can ask for and obviously i do not want to predict anything or cause any more controversy, i suppose, at this stage, and we just try to back the players, trust that the pitch will do itsjob players, trust that the pitch will do its job and players, trust that the pitch will do itsjob and at players, trust that the pitch will do its job and at this stage, so we're trying to alleviate any concerns while we are out there. but thenit concerns while we are out there. but then it is just a matter of wait and see. scotland's crucial match
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against the hosts japan on sunday remains in the balance because of the typhoon. the scotland camp are unhappy at the lack of contingency planning from tournament organisers. the scottish rugby union may consider legal action if the decisive game doesn't go ahead. gregor townsend's side facing elimination from the tournament if the game is cancelled. we don't want to get into some kind of legal arm—wrestle with rugby, we don't want to criticise world rugby but we do believe we are being timed out in the competition and being turned out is not a comfortable place to be and it is collateral damage that, scotland will be collateral damage, and it is not something that we are prepared to sit back and take. leeds rhinos are the women's super league champions after beating castleford in last night's grand final. leeds came from behind to win 20—12. two tries from fran goldthorp and this from ellie frain secured the win, which completes the league and cup double for the rhinos, after they won the challenge cup in july. the men's super league grand final later today has set up potentially one of sport's greatest ever fairytales. salford red devils take on st helens
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at old trafford for the right to be crowned champions. the cash—strapped red devils were relegation candidates at the start of the season, but now they're on the brink of an extraordinary success. stuart pollitt reports. how long does it take to travel three miles from salford to old trafford ? three miles from salford to old trafford? the three miles from salford to old trafford ? the answer for three miles from salford to old trafford? the answer for red devils's rugby fans is decades. for now, it is all about getting your hands on a ticket. i told roar. but you were determined not to miss this mrmark no you were determined not to miss this mr mark no way. amazing, it is so unbelievable. you never thought it would happen? never in my lifetime, no. the scarf has got to go. well. sheuey no. the scarf has got to go. well. shelley and alan are diehard fans, never normally miss a match but instead of packing for old trafford,
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they are off to barbados after booking a holiday at the start of the season. never for one minute did we think we will get to the finals, not in the play—offs. we think we will get to the finals, not in the play-offs. you must be the only people who want to swap salford for barbados. we must, that is it! it is devastated actually! i cannot wait for my holiday but this time, i have mixed emotions that i am going away. salford open the by am going away. salford open the rugby league cup final against castleford. .. it is 50 years in salford were in a majorfinal. 0ffered salford were in a majorfinal. offered in the league champions and warrington other challenge cupholders. they won a league title in the 70s but three years ago, had to rely on this miracle drop goal to avoid relegation. has he got it? he has done it! he has done it! to understand how unlikely this journey has been for salford here are three fa cts has been for salford here are three facts of the start of the season they were among the favourites relegation, their budget is the
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second smallest in the league, and the odds of reaching the grand final where100 to one. the odds of reaching the grand final where 100 to one. this is leicester city times 100, it really is, we have had a couple of close shave is probably in the last few months, close and we have scrambled together and made sure that we have stayed afloat. what a story this year. it isa afloat. what a story this year. it is a massive big buzz around the city at the moment, about three months ago that something clicked and that is confidence since porter means a lot and when you start to it becomes a habit. hi, mate. we have come a long way to pick these up. superfan come a long way to pick these up. super fan chris has flown back from brisbane for the big game. thanks, mate. jumped on a plane via dubai, beenin mate. jumped on a plane via dubai, been in the country for about two or three hours. with the time and investment? i think even just to see them walk out tomorrow will be worth it. chris's journey, like them walk out tomorrow will be worth it. chris'sjourney, like salford's has been a long one but as they approach theirfinal has been a long one but as they approach their final destination, this has now become one of the sporting stories of the year. stuart pollitt, bbc news, salford. those bad time to book your holiday.
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you would never have dreamt you would be expecting your team to make it through to the grand final but they have done it and they will be where? bahamas? bobo does? whatever it is. if they do cause an upset, sa lfo rd , it is. if they do cause an upset, salford, it will be a genuine upset and i'm trying to think of big u psets and i'm trying to think of big upsets in sport. it could well be up there, potentially relegation, they we re there, potentially relegation, they were in the class of going down next season. just a thought about this race, this extraordinary race that will be happening while we're on this morning, it is the first time and attempt, first time a human has runa and attempt, first time a human has run a marathon on and under two minutes? two hours! that would be! wrong number in my head. what did you have for breakfast! that will be achieved for the first time today? he tried to years ago and he misted by 25 seconds. 0h! can you imagine how disappointed you would be. by 25 seconds. 0h! can you imagine how disappointed you would bem he's going around a course, 4.4 laps, i think,
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he's going around a course, 4.4 laps, ithink, around he's going around a course, 4.4 laps, i think, around this course, starts at quarter past seven and we will follow it all morning? at 915 he wants to be wrapped up. showered and home. and that is great, a big feat of endurance, what a human is capable of? we will find out this morning. john, thank you. six days of climate protest in london and 1100 people have been arrested and one weaker than to come and while the extension rebellion demonstrators say the destruction they have brought to the capital is necessary to highlight climate change they have been accused of leaving police resources stretched with officers pulled away from other resources . with officers pulled away from other resources. streets blocked, planes delayed. sometimes, silent. sometimes, noisy. this week's protests by extinction rebellion have had a big impact on many in london. they should get out of the way. they should get lost. they should go out and find something
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better to do. she hasjust been to see her friend better to do. she hasjust been to see herfriend in hospital but was delayed because of protesters blocking the road. that you have been to visit your friend in hospital and you were two hours late because of the protest? definitely. definitely. i am very angry. it is very frustrating. i am telling you. because i am not quite happy after being late to see my friend. i am sorry. it is very sad. we are getting all this kind of protest every now and then. and they are using it to vandalise a lot of things. the police should do more but the police are too busy. they should be clearing them away that they, the whole prison is packed full already. climate change! save the planet! it has been a really challenging and complex operation for us. we're not against protest and everyone has the right to protest but what this protest groups are doing is unlawful. is causing misery to thousands of people and
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disrupting people's lives, it is preventing us from doing other policing across the capital, it is meant that we have had to bring in many, many offices into central london who could and should be working in the local communities. we are unable to spend as much time with them is as we would like, it means we are only responding to urgent and critical events across the capital. you have made your point, 0k, however, we have a job to do. cheering and applause. it is a continued response to sound the alarm about the ecological emergency. it is far certain, far more furious than we thought, we cannot negotiate with nature.” spoke with someone who was delayed for two hours to visit a friend in hospital due to the protest and she was furious and what do you say to her. sorry, but the disruption would be nothing, will be nothing, to what we will face in a few years time, fa st forward we will face in a few years time, fast forward ten years, what is the disruption we cannot feed our
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children? once our season start to change, we will not have the ability to produce food in the way that we have done! organisers have said there will be another week of protesters like this, just here in london but in other cities in the uk and abroad. so who should be arrested then? people sitting on the road and other people are responsible for this crisis. who is? corporations. personally i have no problem with people protesting and i think it is good that people express what they want in life and for our children but i think there are better ways to go about it and look at how many petrol and diesel run vehicles are about to come down here to look after the police to ensure their safety. passionate, at times unpopular, these protests have made their mark. tim muffett, bbc news. here is alina with a look at this morning's weather.
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it is wet here, isn't it? i know you will keep us up—to—date with what is happening with the typhoon injapan, as well. but we are also suffering with a little bit of rain. yes, nothing is extreme for us in the uk, but there is more rain to come, and some of us have the ground already saturated. even just a small amount of rain now will see that we could see some localised flooding in places. all the details of that are on our website. it is all tied into this strip of cloud which trails out into the atlantic. this frontal system will be with us all weekend and the focus of the rain, mainly, todayis and the focus of the rain, mainly, today is across southern counties of england and south wales. already some of that rain is quite heavy across devon, cornwall, into south wales, and that heavy and more persistent rain will continue to track its way eastwards in a line from devon and cornwall towards southern parts of norfolk. to the north of this, some spells of sunshine, heavy showers especially across northern and western scotland. some showers across northern ireland, one or two across
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northern england and north wales. to the north of this rain band, a good deal of sunshine and the wind is not as strong as they have been recently. still quite breezy for some western and northern coast of scotland. temperatures typically around the mid—teens. we could see a little bit higher across some eastern parts of england in the best of the sunshine. here is our rain through the evening and overnight. it's a push its way further northwards, weather conditions eventually arriving into northern england and southern scotland. it stays dry for much of northern ireland and southern scotland, save for a few showers still lingering in the north. bridges down to around four or five celsius. where we have the rain, staying closer to double figures. it is a really messy picture tomorrow. more fronts around, this is a front i was talking about through today and it slowly starts to track its way northwards and eastwards. for much of england and wales tomorrow we will see some outbreaks of rain, also arriving into southern scotland stop mainly dry for northern ireland and southern scotland, and as that rain clears its way eastwards through the day we will see some spells of sunshine returning. but it
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will be a cooler feeling day tomorrow. temperatures for many not much higher than 12 or 13 celsius. could get 14 or 15 in the sunshine across southern parts of england. still a very messy picture as we go into monday. more fronts to deal with. some uncertainty as to the timing of these. it looks like most of us will start mainly dry with some sunshine, but the rain will be moving into parts of northern ireland, wales, western parts of england, and eventually through the day into south—east england as well. so one way or another over the coming days most of us are going to see more spells of rain. naga and charlie, back to you. now on breakfast, it's time for click. hello, and welcome to a special edition of click. not top gear, although there are shades of that, i have to say, but this week, we're not talking
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about petrol cars like these. we're talking about electric cars like these. not hybrid, not hydrogen or anything else. this week, it is pure electric. sure, there are other ways to power your car which are good for the environment. go check them out by all means but this is the year that all—electric has really taken off. more people are thinking about evs than ever before so in this show, we're asking, is now the right time to switch? we'll look at the cost of buying and running them, how far they can go and ask if they're as clean and green as they might seem. ok, dan has been to see europe's all—electric fight—back at this year's frankfurt motor show. there was really only one big question for the big execs at the huge german car companies at the world's biggest motor show. why are they 10 years behind tesla in offering us an all—electric car?
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we are not each time the fastest or the earliest but if we come, we come, we come very strong. tesla, a company that has been solely focused on electric vehicle production, you have to give them credit for blazing the trail, but if you look at other entries on the marketplace, from other companies that also do normal cars, so to say, this is really the first time you're getting long—range, fully usable, everyday usable electric vehicles coming from mainstream manufacturers. right, so they wanted to ace it. well, the stakes are high. electric may only represent less than 3% of all new car sales last year but vw have taken a close look at them and reckon it's the future. well it's obviously not real. these cool designs are actually for the future, maybe. each car manufacturer brings out some concept ideas.
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interestingly on the volkswagen stand, they were all electric. the real car they were launching was the id.3, a sort of electric golf, with a 205— to 340—mile range depending on the exact model, with prices starting from a competitive 30,000 euros. and a first from vw. they will guarantee the battery for eight years, meaning that if it loses more than a quarter of its full charge when new, they will replace it. but will car buyers trust a firm that swindled the world when it lied about the illegal level of harmful emissions its own diesel car spat out? we invested a lot, really to fulfil our commitment to the co2 targets and it's notjust only the co2 targets during driving. for example, the battery cells after a normal life cycle of a car, which is mainly eight years, nine years, the battery cells are still healthy and you can use them, for example, for a second life.
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we will offer the customer in, not all, but most of the european countries, we are able to offer contract to use green energy also during the driving. audi hasn't done much in the way of electric for the past 10 years either, although now they have this. sorry, that's another concept car. now they have this. they've started with the popular style family suv but at more than £70,000, can many families afford it? yeah, i think there is this perception in the market that i have to pay more of the electric version of the same size vehicle than i would for gas or diesel. i think what you are going to see is, at least at audi, we're going into a lot lower segments in order to make electrification much more affordable.
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sure there are. the e—tron started selling this year and has a range of 320 miles and will be joined by a sportier, more expensive electric gt model next year with a mid—range suv, think sort of q3, slated for 2021. even the good old—fashioned black cab, here seen in white, has made the jump to electric, with 20,000 expected to sell across europe next year, costing drivers less to run. i wonder if taxi fares will fall too. and then there were the sports cars. lamborghini told me they have no intention of releasing an all—electric model any time soon. ferrari, who weren't showing, have a hybrid plan for 2022 but not all—electric. so it fell to porsche to take everyone's away, and they did. the taycan is porsche's first all—electric car and it shifts.
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0—62 in 3.2 seconds with a range of up to 279 miles and a guarantee on the battery. ok, it's £115,000 but that's a 12k saving on its petrol performance equivalent, the 911 actual turbo. good value, maybe, but i have a feeling that it's that vw that'll turn out to be super competitive as an entry model for most. talking of competition, we saw porsche's entry into the electric car market in dan's report there but we wanted to test for ourselves just how quick an electric car could be. so we've set up a race. this is a lamborghini hurricane super trofeo. its v10 petrol engine delivers over 600 horsepower. it's up against a saloon car from tesla, the model s. it sports all—wheel drive but it's
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twice as heavy as the lambo and it sells for about a third of the price. our short drag is just enough for both cars to reach 62mph, the industry standard for measuring acceleration. both cars are in their fastest set—ups and whatever happens today, we recommend you don't try this at home. we have several safety measures in operation. most of all, johnny is a professional racing instructor here at drift limits. he does this day in and day are to scare the living daylights out of members of the public. in the passenger seat will be mark, ensuring fair play and probably screaming his head off. and who can we get to give one of the finest sports cars a run for its money in a tesla? it's only top gear's the stig! i'm sorry, the stig wasn't available so i'm standing in. is that 0k? it's only...click‘s lara lewington.
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drivers, start your engines. epic, dramatic music. elevator muzak. ready! i'm a passenger here. myjob is really simple. ijust have to observe... whoa! i did brake a bit early but i so clearly won. i'm no expert but that was no contest. thank you, i was not expecting to beat you. oh, my word! what?! i know! i can't believe it, absolutely smashed me. that was so much fun.
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that was brilliant. congratulations. johnny, commiserations. listen, you're a professional racing driver. in your opinion, why did that beat this? i know, it's absolutely mad, isn't it? i couldn't believe it. it all boils down to the fact that that is electric so the power band is completely linear, it's always there, it's instantaneous. to be fair, in the lamborghini, i've got three gears to travel through but that, straight—line, boom, all the way. excuses, excuses. thanks, johnny, for doing the test. right, this is vicky parrott, hello, vicky parrott is a long time motoring journalist and now you specialise in electric cars, and you are here to answer some of your questions, so let'sjump in the jag. so vicky, earlier we heard that battery warranties are eight years, which i guess is good news, but do you think it should be the worry of the owner that these batteries might not last much longer than that?
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do you think in the future we might start leasing cars instead of owning them? uh, no more so than we do already, a lot of people lease cars, whether they are electric or not these days, and i would add, most electric cars have battery warranties of eight years or 100,000 miles, but that does not mean you have to throw the car away after that. battery life is proving to be very good in electric cars, and the warranty is there for peace of mind, it does not mean that after eight years your car won't work any more. we received quite a few questions from reviewers saying they live in apartments or blocks of flats, they don't have private parking, they park on the street, how do they charge an electric vehicle? if you can't charge at home, if you don't have offstreet parking, or some apartments do have hubs these days being built in, then i'm afraid you just have to check. zap—map.com is great for telling you where chargers are, and you just have to decide whether you can rely on those public chargers are not. here is a popular question, i want to know the answer as well,
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how much does it cost to "fill up" an electric car compared to a petrol tank? on average a 50 kw/h battery, it will cost about £7 to fill up, at a normal domestic charger at your house. how many miles would you get for that? it depends, the new renault zoe will do about 200 miles in real—world driving, and that has a 52kw/h battery, so that works out at about 3/4p per mile, and an equivalent diesel or petrol car will look more like 11— 15p per mile. so it is usefully cheaper, it is half, if not a third cheaper. have we got enough charging stations in the uk? we have a lot of charging stations in the uk, i think it stands at about 10,000 station and 26,000 actual charging plugs. i think probably we need more, certainly in rural parts, especially, but it isn't that bad an infrastructure these days. vicky, thank you for your time, and some of the ride,

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