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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 12, 2019 8:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today. tokyo prepares to face its worst typhoon in 60 years, as winds of more than 100 miles an hour head towards the japanese coast. typhoon hagibis is hearing down on japan, likely to make landfall in the coming hours and i will have the full forecast on this powerful storm in the next half an hour. a vaccine plea to parents. the head of nhs england warns that the schoolgates have become a breeding ground for myths about mmr. the us threatens turkey with "crippling sanctions" over its military offensive in northern syria, as concerns are raised about a new threat from is fighters. england suffer their first qualifying defeat in ten matches.
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they're beaten 2—1 by the czech republic, and will have to wait a little longer to qualify for euro 2020. is a marathon possible in under two hours? kenyan runner eliud kipchoge is attempting to break that barrier right now in vienna. these are the live pictures. it's saturday the 12th of october. our top story. japan is beginning to feel the force of typhoon hagibis — one of the strongest storms to hit the country in decades. the massive typhoon is expected to make landfall near the capital tokyo at around 10am this morning, with winds of up to iio—miles—per hour. one man is already thought to have died after his car overturned and tens of thousands of homes are without power. here one resident captured images of a tornado
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japan's ichihara city. you get a sense of the conditions fair, extraordinary images, some houses, their roofs have been blown off by the wind. it has become to dangerous for a correspondent to broadcast but only if you send this. the skies have darkened considerably, it is mid—afternoon but dark skies, heavy rain falling in the japanese capital which is true of the greater tokyo area and further to the west, towards mount fuji they have had the largest i2 hour period of rainfall they have ever recorded down there and that is having an immediate knock on effect to rivers with flood warnings out for a number of rivers in the tokyo area, including the river running through a big, heavily densely populated southern part of tokyo, there is an evacuation order for
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people living near that river now so thatis people living near that river now so that is the real worry now, is that all of this rain, this massive amount of rain that is falling and continuing to fall is going to pour into the rivers and cause flooding potentially along coastlines as well which is why those evacuation orders are coming into effect. this is part one. later on, as night falls, the storm will come on shore bringing with it potentially destructive winds of up to 140 kilometres an hour, 100 miles an hour, which is going to come right across the top of tokyo later tonight. and that has the potential to cause physical damage to buildings, to pick up signs and debris on the road so it is dangerous to be out at that time and people should stay indoors, shut the door and stay safe. i haven't seen the city close down quite like this before. in the years that i've lived here no transport is running, the whole of the tokyo metro, the railway system completely closed
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down so it really has shut the whole pa rt down so it really has shut the whole part of this japan down and it's also close down a lot of sporting fixtures. we know the rugby world cup games going on at the moment, the big game today between england and france was cancelled, the practice for the formula 1 grand prix was cancelled but there is hope once the storm passes tonight, tomorrow, believe it or not, the skies here are expected to be clear, blue, then the world cup and other events blue, then the world cup and other eve nts ca n blue, then the world cup and other events can resume their schedule as usual. that was our correspondence, he sent that earlier. we are expecting the worst of the storm to be around 10am this morning, conditions are worsening so we will keep an eye on those for you. it is 8:04am. there's a warning that parents‘ chatter at the school gates has become a "breeding ground" for harmful myths about the safety of vaccinations against conditions like measles. nhs england chief simon stevens has
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spoken out after the latest figures showed a rise in the number of measles cases and fall in the take—up of all routine jabs for under—fives in the last year. simonjones has more. the jab against measles, mumps and rubella is in the words of nhs england's chief executive "simple and free" and it can save lives. but simon stevens is worried. what are the points you think people need to learn from your experience? the percentage of children receiving the first dose of the vaccine is down for the fifth year in a row in england. he says parents looking for information online are often being confronted by fake news. writing in the daily mail, he warns... the prime minister recently echoed his concern. i'm afraid people have just been listening to that superstitious mumbojumbo on the internet,
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that anti—vaxxer stuff, and thinking that the mmr vaccine is a bad idea. that's wrong. at the department of health, there has been much discussion about what should be done to increase vaccination rates. the health secretary, matt hancock, recently said he was seriously considering making vaccinations compulsory for schoolchildren in england but some in the medical profession warned that could make parents suspicious. simon stevens acknowledges there has been a lively debate on the issue, though he stopped short of saying whether he believes vaccinations should be mandatory. he does, though, pledge that the nhs will make it easier for parents to get their children vaccinated and he has welcomed a commitment by social media firms to counter misinformation online. simon jones, bbc news. the united states has warned turkey that it's prepared to impose "crippling sanctions" if it continues to take military action against kurdish forces in northern syria.
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last night it was revealed that us troops had come underfire from turkish positions, but turkey has denied deliberately targeting american soldiers. 0ur north america correspondent chris buckler has the latest from washington. turkey's invasion has been criticised and condemned but so far, the world is merely watching as conflict consumes northern syria. tens of thousands of kurds have already fled their homes. their soldiers fought alongside the us against the islamic state group and they believe america could have prevented this. many feel betrayed. translation: these countries don't see what's going on. america, russia, iran — they don't see this. translation: these countries don't see what's going on. america, russia, iran — they don't see this. america is here on the basis that it's with us. america also sold us out, like russia did. they sold us out. we know they did. in the united states, there is growing concern about all of this instability, and that the islamic state group
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will try to take advantage. is says it was responsible for this car bomb attack in the town of qamishli. the trump administration has told turkey's president erdogan that captured extremists can't be allowed to escape or regroup amid the chaos, and the us is threatening to veer sanctions against turkey if it crosses a line in its actions. but some civilians have already been killed. we have a very good relationship with turkey. they're a nato partner. we do a lot of trade with turkey. but we don't want them killing a lot of people. it's clear turkey is not deterred. it's committing more and more to this fight, leaving syria further scarred. chris buckler, bbc news, washington. at least one person has died and tens of thousands have been forced to flee their homes as wildfires rage around southern california. hundreds of firefighters have been battling to control the blazes, which broke out around los angeles earlier this week. the fires are being fuelled by winds of up to 60—miles—per—hour.
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authorities have opened shelters for residents who have been forced to abandon their homes. the hollywood actress jane fonda has been arrested at a climate change protest in washington. after refusing to leave the steps of the capitol building she was lad away by police in handcuffs. 16 others were arrested at the "fire drill friday" event which is held weekly by activists addressing the impact of climate change. the time now is 8:09am. there is a brilliant event taking place at this moment in time which started at 7:15am because no man or woman has ever run a marathon in under two hours before but it could change today. eliud kipchoge missed out by 26 seconds when he tried to break the barrier last year, but he's vying for a place in history again this morning. 0ur reporter ade adedoyin is vienna, where he set off just under an hour ago. where are you in terms of this
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circuit? it is going to be run 4.4 times so where are you and what are you seeing? i am about 100 yards from the finishing line, very near the point where the pacemakers who are taking him through this marathon course change over and he has got quite a cast list, stellar athletes, world champions, 0lympic champions, 0lympic silver medallists from rio are part of that group, the brothers who competed at the recent championships in doha are, they've extended their season to be part of history. he attempted to be the first athlete to run the marathon in under two hours and he has left nothing to chance. you might see on the tv screens if you're watching at home, the pace car illuminating a green light on the road which is to give the pacemakers and eliud kipchoge an idea of where they need to be to stay on course. he is on course at the moment but it is very early in the race. the pacemakers are running in a kind ofv
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early in the race. the pacemakers are running in a kind of vformation to act as a wind protection. and they've given him some slipstream, this is the kind of thing they are thinking about to get under the two—hour mark. thinking about to get under the two-hour mark. as you can see, that v shaped formation and protecting the runner in the middle and running that kind of slipstream. john, do you want to pick up on this? for people who don't follow athletics regularly, this is different because it is challenging what people thought was possible at all. yes, and that is something eliud kipchoge, his achievement in the sport, he is the olympic champion, he has won 11 of the 12 marathons he has run previously, but this is the legacy of his sport, he wa nts to this is the legacy of his sport, he wants to achieve something nobody has ever done before. he had a crack at this a couple of years ago when he ran at monza and he missed out by 26 seconds so this time around
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they've left no stone unturned in their preparation. that was in italy. now it is in vienna. why vienna cuisine at the conditions, i think a perfect race conditions, around 10 degrees, it is a very flat course which is going to be advantageous to try to keep that speed up but the time down. they have resurfaced parts of this course, they have tarmac to to try to help him, they have re—banked areas and they've chosen that area because it is flat and the biggest chance of him achieving his target. and the orange tramlines. it isn't a great spectator sport at times, the marathon but this is geared towards it, 20,000 spectators and you can see from that laser being projected, you know that is where those pa cesetters you know that is where those pacesetters have got to keep up with that to try to keep him in check with that target. and it is going to be fascinating viewing as he attem pts
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be fascinating viewing as he attempts it. watching with us... faye didymus who's a lecturer in sport and exercise psychology. these pictures are compelling. put some kind of context on what the edgeis some kind of context on what the edge is of the human condition, and what he is trying to achieve. edge is of the human condition, and what he is trying to achievem edge is of the human condition, and what he is trying to achieve. it is almost unbelievable, isn't it, to think you can run that distance in that time and i find the psychology fascinating because we have talked a lot about the conditions not being that exciting from a spectator point of view but the conditions being ideal but psychologically it is really difficult to run in a straight line and then back and forward again with no twists and turns, nothing interesting along the way, within the tramlines. that could be harder for him but you could be harder for him but you could say it makes it easier because he doesn't have a lock to focus on but i think the crowd is going to play a very important part today
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because by looking at smiling faces and hearing cheering, it makes us feel like we are exerting less effort. i hope the crowds are big and loud to make this record. effort. i hope the crowds are big and loud to make this recordm effort. i hope the crowds are big and loud to make this record. it is and loud to make this record. it is a world's best. people say why isn't going to be a world record, why is it just the world's going to be a world record, why is itjust the world's best? 0fficially in the context of marathon running it isn't a world record because there are three things that are missing from this which would see it qualified as an official time. just pick up on the psychology theme, faye. in athletics, you have a marker, a time, distance, a height and people say you can't run a mile in underfour and people say you can't run a mile in under four minutes. and people say you can't run a mile in underfour minutes. we are not capable of doing that. 100 metres, you can't go under ten seconds. for the athletes, presumably, someone who is on the cusp, that in itself, he has a moment to be the first ever, and that is an extraordinary driver, isn't it? and i've listened
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to quite a lot of elliott guczoghy -- eliud to quite a lot of elliott guczoghy —— eliud kipchoge's press and the thing that sets them apart is the amount of drive and ambition he has got. and this tag line about humans not being limited, no limits, it is really inspiring. what difference does it make that this is not a race? i don't think it makes a huge difference for him. the point is he is trying to make history and he is trying to prove the fact there are no limits to what the human body can do and as you rightly said, charlie, few years ago it would have been almost beyond the realms of what we can believe to think someone could run this distance in less than two hours so goodness knows where we will be in the next decade, may be one hour and 50? who knows. we will leave you with those images. a lot of people have turned out to watch history in the making if it turns out that way, the green lines show
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whether he is on time. if they are on schedule, and my right to say it is 14 —— 9:14am? and they are on schedule. when they are falling behind, that line falls red. if they are on track, it stays green. so, hopefully it'll be finishing at 9:14am. come on, eliud kipchoge! here's alina with a look at this morning's weather. i know you are taking a look at the typhoon, typhoon hagibis injapan. and we've heard from the japanese meteorological society, they have issued a purple warning for the rain. there's three things to watch out for, the windy, rain and storm surge and we have seen in excess of 113 millimetres of rain in the tokyo
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area. we could see that across the central area of the island. it clears away north and eastwards over the next 24 hours but before it does so we the next 24 hours but before it does so we could easily see windy of 100 miles an hour, 600 millimetres of rain, so concern for flooding and landslides. back home, quieter but u nsettled landslides. back home, quieter but unsettled with more rain in the forecast this weekend and with the ground quite saturated, it brings a further risk of flooding, all the flood warnings are on our website. it is down to this strip of cloud, a frontal system draping itself all the way out into the atlantic and this weekend it continues to pulse across the uk and the focus of the rain is mainly across south—west england, south wales, crossed east anglia. this zone keeps the cloud and the rain. generally, as we head further north, things are dry with spells of sunshine with some shells
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around across the western side of northern ireland, north and western scotland, a few in the north of england and north wales but away from this band of rain it is a many dry day. the windy lighter than in recent days. temperature rise, 14-15, a little recent days. temperature rise, 14—15, a little bit higher in the best of the sunshine across the eastern and north—eastern parts of england. this evening and overnight, this band of rain starts to slowly move its way northwards, north as southern scotland overnight, looking dry across ireland, clearer skies in scotla nd dry across ireland, clearer skies in scotland so temperatures down to four or scotland so temperatures down to fouror5 scotland so temperatures down to four or 5 degrees and with the rain, nine or 10 celsius. a messy picture tomorrow. 0ne nine or 10 celsius. a messy picture tomorrow. one way or another, most of england and wales will see further spells of rain but it is looking mainly dry for northern ireland, central and northern scotland, save for one or two showers. this rain going through england and wales, it pushes north and east would so staying dry and
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brighter across these areas, it might take some time for the rain to clear from the south—east and east anglia. 14 celsius the top temperature. the new week is u nsettled, temperature. the new week is unsettled, france are close by and we have two to focus on, one pushing in from the rest, one pushing in from the south and east but most of us from the south and east but most of us should start dry with spells of sunshine. it is a chilly start to the week and keep an eye on these areas of rain moving into northern ireland, wales, south—west england and turning letter from the south and turning letter from the south and east across southern counties of england, looking drier and brighter the further north and east you are. if you're looking for something drier and brighter in the weekend, no chance. rain for most of us on most days, and it'll be feeling cooler as well. back to you, charlie and naga. the arndale shopping centre in manchester will reopen in the next hour, following yesterday's knife attack.
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five people were injured in the incident. a man in his 405, who was initially arrested on suspicion of terror offences, has been detained under the mental health act. 0ur reporter dave guest is in the city centre for us this morning. good morning to you, bring us right up good morning to you, bring us right up to date. good morning, charlie. dro psy up to date. good morning, charlie. dropsy in the arndale centre opening up dropsy in the arndale centre opening upfor dropsy in the arndale centre opening up for business as normal. this place went into lockdown yesterday when that man started randomly stabbing people here in the centre of the arndale centre. 0bviously, there was a lot of panic and concern but the emergency services were very quickly on the scene to arrest and detain that man, police keeping an open mind as to what his motivation might have been and have been treating it as a possible terrorist incident. the centre is open, the message seems to be business is open. all the staff are turning up, they will be tense and frightened,
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they will be tense and frightened, the security is all over the place. we are asking manchester to rally around and support staff today. manchester councillors will be here all day. a lot of praise for the emergency services yesterday and the speed with which they responded, armed police here within five minutes. manchester, with its past experiences, has a finely honed plan in place. you saw the planning that we do for all these emergencies yesterday and it was in place yesterday, the minute the alert went out, everything was dropped and the emergency services were out, everything was dropped and the emergency services were here and all of manchester want to thank them for saving peoples lives. without that plan being in place, lives... we might have had a worse situation yesterday. we will learn from what has happened and we will revise the emergency plan. basically, all the shops basically locked down, shut down their shutters, kept their shoppers and to keep them safe, that is the procedure? part of the plan. you don't want to cause undue panic because that causes problems as well
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but we will review everything we have learned from yesterday and next week we will review our emergency plan. please, manchester, come down, these are all modestly paid workers, young workers. 25 cafe is in restaurants, come down, manchester, rally around these workers. all right, thank you very much indeed. business as normal in manchester, and that man detained under the mental health act. dave, thank you very much. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. let's look at the front pages. "johnson opens door to customs compromise" is the headline in the telegraph. it says there's mounting speculation the prime minister has made some concessions on his demands for the irish border arrangements after brexit. a lovely picture there too of gabriella, the daughter of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe, who's in an iranian prison, being reunited with herfather
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after returning to the uk. events in manchester yesterday dominating the front pages of course, and you can see some of the armed police on duty in the immediate aftermath of the event. that is in the i. in the mirror, also focusing what happened at the arndale centre. and the front page of the times newspaper, the prime minister backs clean air law. boris johnson is supporting the paper's campaign, to reduce pollution. paul horrocks, former president of the uk society of editors, is here to tell us what's caught his eye. good morning to you. one of the stories we are looking at is england health saying there is chatter around the school gates with school pa rents around the school gates with school parents which has lead in the fall in the take—up of vaccination is particularly the mmr, and a rise in measles cases, so you've picked up
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on this, and high street chemists might give these jabs. chemists do an awful lot, they play a big role in health care but now there is a plan to allow chemists to give the measles, the mmr vaccine to children, to try to reverse this terrible decline in the number of children who are being vaccinated. yes, there is rumour and misinformation, particularly on the internet, which has meant over the last year, 191 cases of measles which can be deadly in england, compared to 284 in 2017. cases are going up, more needs to be done to get children vaccinated, gps currently, give most of the vaccinations but now what is being said is let chemists do the same thing. there's always a problem getting appointments, and this should make it easier to get your child vaccinated. make sense. you picked up on the story linked to thomas cook. it is worth saying,
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this is a new law, it is worth saying but people think the business of getting people back, those people on holidays, that worked. people came back at the appropriate time, it was a system that work but there we re it was a system that work but there were questions as to why some of the aircraft thomas cook owned couldn't be used. the law, the insolvency law, states the minute an airline goes bust, all assets are frozen which means all the planes are grounded and we also saw pictures of row upon row of thomas cook aircraft at manchester airports sat there doing nothing. and common sense says use those planes to get those people. this looks like common sense is going to prevail and there will bea is going to prevail and there will be a change in the insolvency law which would allow the civil aviation authority a window of opportunity to get those planes back in action, get the cruise on—boa rd get those planes back in action, get the cruise on—board and go and bring back people who have been stranded abroad. an awful lot of people were
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left, 130,000 passengers were left, it cost £100 million to bring them back using different aircraft. why not use the aircraft that are doing nothing? makes common sense. as the former president of the uk society of editors, i'm not surprised you've picked out this story but why should we ca re picked out this story but why should we care about a spat amongst editors? you don't have to care about it but it is interesting. the fa ct about it but it is interesting. the fact is that paul dacre, a divisive figure, as the daily mail is from time to time, and a lot of people have different views on that, but he has hit out at his successor, a new editor of the daily mail, over a claim that a softer tone in the daily mail, which has been hard, has brought back advertisers. now, paul dacre in typical style in the financial times, has said that isn't true. actually, the 265 advertisers use a came back actually didn't. it
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is newspaper wars, they are common. here we have editor walls. they are reliant on people still buying the papers. absolutely, that is a fact. they need to appeal to certain dot to make the transition is due to the internet. local papers, regional papers have been badly affected by the rise of people viewing news on the rise of people viewing news on the internet. the mail online is very popular. it is all about that transition, and tone in papers is different to tone on the internet. 0ne different to tone on the internet. one other story we've probably got time for. william drops in for football and planned. lovely photograph. maybe it is a charm offensive by the royals now, as one brother is suing people, but, nonetheless, prince william actually went to this pub in london, i think it was very mental health charity,
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and he is pictured with a pint, chatting with frank lampard and others. it is just like an ordinary friday night at the pub, actually, nice picture story. very nice indeed. all, we will see you in an hour. what's coming up on the programme? we are going to keep track of eliud kipchoge. he is bidding to become the first person in history to run a marathon 26.2 miles under two hours. there he is in the white vest flanked by pa cesetters. in the white vest flanked by pacesetters. it is a very technical operation with laces on the ground for the pacesetters to follow, keeping pace, keeping on track, a specially designed course, tramlines he is keeping within to make sure the route is as efficient as possible. so if they are on track, which we know they are because we can see the green lines, not on this shot, but on the wider shot, if they are in
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the green lines, they are on track. he is on track to go under two hours for a marathon. due to finish, if it is all working out fine, at 9:14am. compelling watching, actually and we will keep up with that and the rest of the day's news, see you shortly.
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hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. coming up before nine, alina will have the weather for you, but first a summary of this morning's main news. japan is beginning to feel the force of typhoon hagibis — one of the strongest storms to hit the country in decades. it is expected to make landfall near the capital, tokyo at around 10am this morning, with winds of up to 110—miles—per hour. one man is already thought to have died after his car overturned. tens of thousands of homes are without power and residents
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in low—lying areas have been told to be ready to evacuate their homes. here one resident captured images of a tornado lashing japan's ichihara city. several roofs of houses were blown off by the wind. we will keep you up—to—date with developments. 10am is when the worst of the typhoon is expected to hit tokyo. there's a warning that parents talking at the school gates has become a "breeding ground" for harmful myths about the safety of vaccinations against conditions like measles. nhs england chief simon stevens spoke out as the latest figures showed a rise in the number of measles cases — and fall in the take—up of all routine jabs for under—fives in the last year. the united states has warned turkey that it's prepared to impose "crippling sanctions" if it continues to take military action against kurdish forces in northern syria. last night it was revealed that us troops had come underfire from turkish positions, but turkey has denied deliberately targeting american soldiers.
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there are also fresh concerns about the threat posed by former is fighters being held in camps. at least one person has died and tens of thousands have been forced to flee their homes as wildfires rage around southern california. hundreds of firefighters have been battling to control the blazes, which broke out around los angeles earlier this week. the fires are being fuelled by winds of up to 60 miles—per—hour. authorities have opened shelters for residents who have been forced to abandon their homes. british and eu officials will continue brexit talks this weekend, amid rising speculation a deal is on the cards which could break the deadlock over the irish border. the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier gave the green light yesterday for intensive discussions between officials to start. england fans have been involved in violent clashes with police in prague, with several supporters arrested. there are some flashing images in the pictures we're about to show. thousands travelled to watch the three lions take on the czech republic in a euro 2020 qualifier,
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a game they lost 2—1. police said 14 foreigners were among 31 people arrested, and one england fan was left with head injuries that needed treatment. the hollywood actress jane fonda has been arrested at a climate change protest in washington. after refusing to leave the steps of the capitol building she was led away by police in handcuffs. 16 other people were arrested at the fire drill friday event, which is held weekly by activists addressing the impact of climate change. those are the main stories this morning. let's show you what's going on, with eliud kipchoge. it is interesting how the pacemakers are set up. it's been fascinating. we are hoping it's going to be a good morning for him as he tries to run the first ever sub two hour marathon. you are seeing the projects on the road from
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the car in front essentially keeping the car in front essentially keeping the time required to make that possible. it's interesting to see the formation they are running in, they want to reduce drag and increase his speed, different formations around him, sheltering a eliud kipchoge in the middle so he is protected, to maximise his speed to try and get them over the line in the sub—2 hours. sometimes when you see runners who are all obviously brilliant runners it's hard to grasp just how fast they are running. a moment ago i was watching and we saw some of the runners trying to keep the pace up trying to catch up because they are swapping over periodically. for a moment they have to sprint to get level. the speed and the pace consistently is amazing. 13 mph he needs to be running throughout this two hours, which is
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an oppressive pace. as you say, the pa cesetters a re an oppressive pace. as you say, the pacesetters are tagging themselves in and out. it is their presence which means it won't go down as an official world record. there are three things you need to be abiding by, one, it must be a race against other people, he needs to also run through dedicated drinks stations on the site of the course, which you see during a regular marathon. this isn't. what they are doing is bringing him the fuel nutrition and supplements you need via a bike. because of that assistance cannot condone as an official time. in the presence of the pacesetters don —— the assistance of the pacesetters mean it cannot go down as an official time. they are calling it the world's best time. lots of people have turned out to be on the day. 20,000 there to cheer him on. we know it is a circuit, 4.4
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times round a six mile circuit. perfect conditions. this is why vienna has been chosen, it's about 10 celsius. very flat. they are doing everything they can to try and ensure the record time is achievable. he is on target for —10 seconds, ten seconds better. last time he attempted it two years ago he missed the target by 26 seconds. heartbreaking missing out, but to do it now and be on target, potentially, and she of those much needed seconds off, fingers crossed. england have been made to wait in their attempt to book a spot at euro 2020, they were beaten 2—1 by the czech republic last night, ending a ten year unbeaten run in qualifiers. joe wilson was watching in prague. they call prague the city of 100 spires. it is also, someone counted, a city of 600 bars on a friday night. british police urged english
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travellers to remember they were here for football, not a stag do. czech police made their point in the old town. england's players arrived here at the stadium with confidence — after all, they'd been making these euro qualifiers seem easy. it was the fourth minute of tonight's match when raheem sterling burst forward for the first time, when the referee had a decision to make. well, penalty means harry kane. means this. commentator: no mistake! scoring is not england's problem. defending is england's problem. deal with this? no, they couldn't. the czechs were back in the match. many thanks. as news came through of some arrests in central prague, england were still level in the game, althouthordan pickford needed his agility. for england, there were opportunities. for harry kane, the second goal didn't come. well, not for england. as they chased a winner, england were undone again in defence.
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this was a winning goal to re—inspire czech football, a defeat to remind england of their limitations. joe wilson, bbc news, in prague. no break for football focus. we will be reflecting on the internationals, that first defeat for england in a decade. because there is no premier league we are focusing further down the divisions. we sent mark clement to go and see the leaders in league 2, forest green, who take on exeter. i've got a clip for you from an interview with mark cooper, the boss of forest green. there is a lot of good young talent
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out there, boys that have not quite made it at the top level and boys that have dropped into non—league, who have not picked up by academies. presumably you are picking up a whole range of notjust talent ability but of people who have been tossed on the scrapheap got pulled back, thought they missed their chance. we relate to them as a broken toys. because they wouldn't have come to for the screen otherwise. it is something we have to try to fix and give them a platform to showcase that ability and they are doing really well at the minute. nice little feature on that today. it is non—league day to day so the encouragement is to go and watch non—league football. we are going to spend a day with national league north side curzon ashton. they have the son of dean saunders and trevor sinclair, both at their sons are playing for them. we got karen carney and john walters in the
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studio with us from midday on bbc 0ne. i'm sure we will talk about eliud kipchoge at some stage as well. you always come up with these nuggets. i think forest green are the first vegan club. idid vegan club. i did have a meat free slice there, it was very nice. it was interesting, callum wilson, in the england squad, he said when he was playing non—league football, he was playing non—league football, he said it used to be able to smell the burgers and fries as you are running up the touchline. that is the joy of running up the touchline. that is thejoy of non—league running up the touchline. that is the joy of non—league football. if you fancy it, get out there today. thank you. let's stop the rugby world cup now. —— let's talk. let's go to the rugby world cup
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injapan, where typhoon hagibis has led to cancelled games and left others in doubt. england vs france and new zealand are off, scotland's crucial match against hosts japan tomorrow is on as it stands. ireland play samoa in fukuoka later this morning and katie gornall‘s there for us. katie, your game is going ahead, so i assume you are katie, your game is going ahead, so i assume you are a katie, your game is going ahead, so i assume you are a fair distance away from the worst of it? we are at that 700 miles south—west of tokyo. even though there were initial fears at the start of the week the typhoon could be coming here since a change course we are away from the worst of it and we are preparing for rugby as you can see. the talk in the build—up to this match has not been about the typhoon, it has been about the state of the pitch. we in ireland training yesterday and eve ryo ne ireland training yesterday and everyone on the touchline could not believe how patchy loot. the players went out, they put their fingers underneath the turf, lifting up sections, chris farrell even managed to hide the bowl underneath a
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section of the turf. ireland say they have been given reassurances that the pitch is safe and playable but i think all the more reason that they will want to get off to good start here again samoa and try and get tries on the board. there is risk of the pitch deteriorating. qualification made a little more uncomfortable for ireland due to that loss to japan but they should expect to beat samoa today but they also need a bonus point, don't they? ireland don't have the luxury of resting their best players for this game because of that shock defeat to japan and that's what it named such a strong side, 11 changes from the win over russia. johnny sexton comes back in, conor murray, robbie henshaw for the first time in this world cup. a vital game for ireland because they know they have to win with a bonus point, four tries, if they are to keep it in their own
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hands and guarantee a place in the quarterfinal. anything less and they will be waiting on the result of scotland's game against japan tomorrow which, as we know, is under threat from the weather. ireland very much wanting to keep this in their own hands. what's the latest with regards to scotland's game. we've been hearing from scotland fans this morning, desperately hoping it goes ahead and they can get the chance to earn their spot in the quarterfinals but world rugby waiting until the last minute to decide whether it goes ahead. exactly that. the situation at the moment is a file and win here with a bonus point, if scotland's game gets cancelled that women scotland goes home because the cancellation would mean it was down as a draw —— that would mean scotland go home. world by would mean scotland go home. world rugby say they will do a pitch inspection in the yokohama stadium
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6am japanese time tomorrow and they will make the decision a couple of hours after that and there is the chance the game could be played behind closed doors. it's unclear what's going to happen but scotland are desperate for this game to go ahead. they've been quite critical of world rugby so far and believe there should have been more of a contingency plan in place, the potential to move cities or play on a different day. what world rugby have said response is they have to be fairto all have said response is they have to be fair to all teams and if they we re be fair to all teams and if they were to move scotland's game they would have to have moved the other two cancelled games. and they say they are prioritising the safety of players and fans. scotland are desperate for it to go ahead but it's a waiting game at the moment and will not know more until the full effects of the typhoon art felt and seen and what the after are like. we will bring that news to
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viewers tomorrow morning. thank you, katie. and as we know the japanese grand prix also affected, qualifying's been postponed. that will take place on the morning of sunday's race in suzuka. practice did get under way yesterday with valtteri bottas and lewis hamilton quickest for mercedes. the super league grand final takes place later today, in what is potentially one of sport's greatest ever fairy tales. salford red devils take on st helens at old trafford for the right to be crowned champions. the cash—strapped red devils were relegation candidates at the start of the season, but now they're on the brink of what would be an extraordinary success. leeds rhinos are the womens super league champions, after beating castleford in last night's grand final. leeds came from behind to win 20 points to 12. that completes the league and cup double for the rhinos after they won the challenge cup injuly. 0bviously keeping an eye on my talking to dan, it's like setting your treadmill to 21 and running
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that for two hours. give that a go this morning! if you so as not paying attention to just a month ago we were discussing anything but this got match that katie was saying, the decision will be made in the early of tomorrow morning. just hours before the match come effectively. and they still need to train to prepare as if it's going to go ahead. thank you, john. we do listen! must pay attention in class. scotland has become the first part of the uk to ban the sale of plastic—stemmed cotton buds. new regulations have come into force prohibiting the manufacture and sale of the items, as part of measures to reduce plastic waste. let's get more on this now from calum duncan, from the marine conservation society. this society. is a good move, isn't it? this society. is a good move, isn't mm this society. is a good move, isn't it? it is great this is a good move, isn't it? it is great news and testament to the hard work of our volunteers over 26 years going out in rain or shine
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collecting and counting rubbish on beaches. we've collected over 150,000 cotton buds around scotland alone over that time. we've been delighted to work with the charity on the cotton bud project which has successfully got lots of companies to switch to card. now there is a very welcome legislation which our data helped secure will make sure plastic stem cotton buds are a thing of the past around the beaches of scotla nd of the past around the beaches of scotland and elsewhere in the uk. if we get bands following suit in the other countries. a lot of this is about how they are disposed, not just the fact that a plastic, it is how they are disposed and ecosystem the enter. absolutely, regardless of what they are made from that should be binned in the bathroom. if viewers having been in the bathroom to put these items and
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other sanitary items, wet wipes etc, only the three ps should go then the toilet, pee, to and paper. cotton buds block screens, water pressure builds up on screen is a break and these items leak out where they can be mistaken for food and eating and washed up on beaches and spoil our beaches. we would encourage everybody to make sure they are disposing of even the card ones properly. what else needs to be done? this is very welcome, it comes on the back of the carrier bag charge as well and our data showed a 40% drop in carrier bags on beaches in the carrier bag charge as well and our data showed a 40% drop in carrier bags on beaches since that sense that came in. the next to be looking forward to that in scotland,
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april 2021, to include aluminium and plastic and glass bottles. we expect everybody in scotland is hoping and expecting that leads to a 90% reduction in, increase in recycling and reduction in the effects on the environment. we would like to see the other uk administrations follow suit so we can have harmonise deposit return schemes around the uk. there is also bands coming down the line on polystyrene items, cups, plates, plastic cutlery stirrers, all these items should be looked at and potentially also levies on coffee cups because an expert panel in scotland is looking at all this. this is just the first small step on a very big journey to stopping the plastic tide. thank you for talking to us this morning.
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here's alina with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. more rain in forecast this weekend. some parts of northern ireland and scotland may escape mainly but other areas already have saturated ground so more rain brings the risk of flooding. the latest flood warnings are on our website. this rain is tied into this cloud thatis this rain is tied into this cloud that is all the weight back into the atla ntic that is all the weight back into the atlantic and threw it this weekend it continues to pulse across the uk. the focus of the heaviest and most persistent rain is in a line from south—west england, southern counties of england, south wales and east anglia. to the north of this we are bright or sunny spells can showers, a far west of northern ireland, northern and western scotland, some for the far north of england. but generally away from the zone of cloud and rain things are
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drier and brighter and not as windy as recent days. good get up to 16 may be 17 for some eastern counties of england in the best of the sunshine. this evening and overnight here is our band of heavy rain that pushes northwards as far north as southern scotland by the end of the night. mainly dry, clearskies southern scotland by the end of the night. mainly dry, clear skies for northern ireland and further north across scotland. for much of england, wales and southern scotland there is more rain to come through tomorrow. messy pictures. that said, northern ireland is looking mainly dry apart from one to showers. northern scotland largely dry as well but a fair amount of rain for england and wales and southern scotland. slowly moving north and eastwards through the day. behind it, something brighter with spells of sunshine. still a chance of some showers. feeling slightly fresher
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tomorrow. a chilly nights going into the new week. mainly dry to start on monday but rain not too far away and two areas to keep an eye on court one moving in from the west and another coming in from the south and east. more rain for northern ireland, south—west scotland, wales, south—west england and south—east england as well. further north and east hang on to drier conditions. in the week ahead it stays unsettled. rainfor the week ahead it stays unsettled. rain for most on most days either in showers or longer spells on wednesday. when the times and feeling a little bit cooler. the number of people under the age of 21 recruited as so—called "money mules" has more than doubled in three years. fellow young people, knows as "herders" approach them on social media and promise them money or gifts in return for using their bank accounts to move money around. paul lewis from radio 4's money box
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programme has been investigating this and can tell us more. paul, how did you find this out? we had an undercover reporter who we nt we had an undercover reporter who went looking not for the money mules themselves but for the people who recruited them because we were curious about the chain of command and he found one and they are called herders because they heard the mules. he found one, he pretended he wanted to be recruited.
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that was a 17—year—old mule heard at trying to recruit our undercover reporter. people are offered large amounts of money to do this? he was being offered large amounts. we think he is not going to get £10,000. normally they get a fraction of what is laundered or either just fraction of what is laundered or eitherjust paid in gifts. school pupils told us that they see it as easy money. they are taking a big risk. they do risk prosecution, although that is unusual. if caught they will certainly lose their bank account and find it very hard to get one in the future and if you don't have a current account you cannot get a student loan so it could damage them for a long time. and evenif damage them for a long time. and even if they are not caught, which is more likely, they will find, they
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could find that they are defrauded themselves by the people they thought were going to pay them. how widespread is the problem and what are the banks doing about it? it is very widespread, the six farmers we spoke to said everyone in their school knew it was going on —— their school knew it was going on —— the six—formers. we think the figure the banks have isjust a small fraction we think the figure the banks have is just a small fraction of what's going on. it's a big problem that parents should be very aware of. thank you very much. in19 minutes... i'm in 19 minutes... i'm really excited about this! we could see a record. no man or woman has ever managed to runa no man or woman has ever managed to run a marathon, 26.2 miles in under
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two hours and it could all be about to change. eliud kipchoge missed out by 26 seconds when he tried to break the barrier last year. right now in vienna he is trying to do that and we can go to live images. just to give you a sense of what's happening, the run is happening and as they come up each time on the circuit court four times round the specially designed circuit, the changeover the runners who are keeping time with him, the green lines you see in front of them are the markers, the timekeeping markers. if they are on the green line they will make it under two hours. i was going to say the green box you saw a show that they are on target for the projected time of one minute 59.49. -- for the projected time of one minute 59.49. —— one hour 59.49.
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i'm joined now by faye didymus who's a lecturer in sport and exercise psychology. this is about what humans can achieve, it's come down to that. we are really pushing the limits of what is possible with the human body. it's really exciting to think he is nearly three quarters of the way through and we are on track to break that two hour marathon. this is everything about his psyche, isn't it? he is about pushing the limits of the human body. and the mind. that's it. when you see him running he looks so focused and so in that the zone, completely with it and embracing the moment which i think it will be important. also important psychologically is he is surrounded by incredible runners who have had amazing achievements themselves. yeah, and they are running alongside him, olympic champions, world champions. they have gathered an
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elite crack team, if you like, to try and get this done because he give this a shot a couple of years ago an estate by 26 seconds. lots of preparation, time and effort and energy to get what the line at this time at —— missed out by 26 seconds. the even rees offered some of this track, banked some of the corners —— resurfaced some of the track. it is all about margins. ten second leeway. no wiggle room at all. some of the pictures, 20,000 fans to support him, that will help a great deal. they are doing the circuit, this route around the park. he's looking good at the moment. he had a slight sticky patch a short while ago. they were saying and commentary he looked like he was struggling a
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little bit. but you will have those highs and lows. pick upa highs and lows. pick up a bit on the pace of the run at, consistently over such a long period of time, it looks so relaxed, as it always does. they are making it look very easy but they are running at 13 miles per hour. we can only dream of getting to that speed, most of us. one of the key things is the pacing strategy they've got with the lasers and with the world—class athlete around him. colleagues of mine in the car nikki school sport have done quite a lot research around pacing strategies and the steady pace they are maintaining will be really key. the pacesetter is justjoining. are maintaining will be really key. the pacesetter isjustjoining. we will keep with it. we are hopefully 15 minutes away from it happening. we will see you shortly.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today. tokyo prepares to face its worst typhoon in 60 years, as winds of more than 100 miles an hour head towards the japanese coast. good morning, typhoon hagibis is bearing down on japan good morning, typhoon hagibis is bearing down onjapan likely to make la ndfall bearing down onjapan likely to make landfall in the following hours, and all have the full forecast in the next half an hour. —— i will have the full forecast. a vaccine plea to parents. the head of nhs england warns that the schoolgates have become a breeding ground
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