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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 14, 2019 6:00am-8:30am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: pomp and politics for the queens speech at westminster, but events in brussels could overshadow the prime minister's parliamentary plans. harry dunn's parents head to the us, but they say they won't meet the american woman involved in the crash that killed him unless she agrees to return to the uk. ticket to ride but not made of paper. train companies prepare to call time on physical tickets, with half of all rail passengers now choosing mobile options instead. in sport, a weekend of records. just a day after eliud kipchoge runs
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a marathon in under two hours, kenya's brigid kosgei shatters paula radcliffe‘s 16—year—old world record, quick—stepping up the leaderboard, we'll catch up with mike after his highest strictly score. good morning from the wellington downs whether king street by getting ready for the procession later on at parliament. the weather is not looking so great. rain and showers in the forecast today. we will see some dry conditions. more details in 15 minutes. it's monday the 14th of october. our top story. the first queen's speech of boris johnson's premiership will be unveiled today — with promises to introduce tougher sentences for foreign offenders,
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tackle violent crime, and invest more in the nhs. but events in brussels could still overshadow the prime minister's parliamentary plans with significant work still to do in brexit labour has called today's speech an "uncosted wish list", which the government has no intention of delivering. our political correspondent nick eardley reports. today, there will be pomp, and there will be pageantry. ..and there will be pageantry. but this week is mostly about politics. first up, the queen's speech — where the government will set out its priorities — delivering brexit, tackling violent crime, investing in the nhs. borisjohnson doesn't have a majority and can't promise it
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will be able to get these pledges through parliament. add into the mix the fact that he wants a general election and a lot of it feels more like a pitch to the country. and much of what is said today could well be overshadowed by what happens here. talks to try to find a brexit compromise continue in brussels, but there's been no breakthrough and time is running out. yesterday, borisjohnson told his cabinet there was a significant way to go, but he did still believe a deal was possible. others are far less confident. can borisjohnson get a new deal? can he persuade mps to back it and, if not, can they force him to delay our departure again? this week, answers to those questions should become clearer. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. let's hear more now from our political correspondent jonathan blake in westminster. it is quite an extraordinary week, hurtling towards this deadline. how realistic are these plans the government is putting forward?
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things today will not be quite as they seem. the splendour and spectacle of the queen's speech with a queen will read that speech which is written by the government, setting out the big plans for the parliamentary session ahead. they do have some big plans. we will hear a lot about law and order, tougher sentences forforeign lot about law and order, tougher sentences for foreign can —— criminals coming back from abroad. better protections for domestic violence plus everything from the environment to the railways in the health service. borisjohnson as we know leads a minority government. he simply doesn't have the numbers in the house of commons to get any of those big plans through and then there is the fact that we could be facing a general election very soon. the prime minister said he wants one. opposition parties want one and sooner or one. opposition parties want one and sooner or later, it's going to have to happen. then there is the big backdrop of the brexit negotiations which, as you are saying, continue
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in brussels. a slightly pessimistic round—up from the eu's cheap negotiator last night. thank you very much. after 7, after seven we'll be speaking to a government minister about the plans oulined in today's queen's speech. the family of the teenager killed in a crash involving an american woman have said they won't meet her unless she commits to returning to the uk. anne sacoolas has agreed to talk to harry dunn's parents, who have flown to the us to continue their fight for justice. our correspondent duncan kennedy sent this report from new york. harry's parents arrived in new york last night exhausted but convinced they had to come. they believe harry, who was killed in august, must getjustice, even in death. they've travelled to the us to meet anne sacoolas. she is the american woman who allegedly drove her car on the wrong side of the road before
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colliding with harry's motorbike in northamptonshire. we travelled with tim and charlotte as they flew to new york, leaving only a meeting with mrs sacoolas can begin to make sense with them. we felt like we've really got a breakthrough, we finally had confirmed that the immunity that we didn't think she had has been confirmed, that she doesn't have it. certainly since she absconded back to the usa. the statement from her lawyer is promising, that we we may be able to hopefully get a meeting put together. harry's parents have a very busy round of interviews here in new york today. their story that a mother and father trapped in a transatlantic total for justice is father trapped in a transatlantic totalforjustice is huge here. they say what they want to achieve from their visit is simply harry is not
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forgotten. lastly, donald trump made the death of harry dunn a presidential matter, posit fix promising to talk to mrs sacoolas. harry's parents want mrs sacoolas to return to the uk to answer questions from british police. they hope their trip to america will make that more likely. kurds in northern syria say the syrian government has agreed to send soldiers to stop the turkish invasion of their territory. syria said its army would deploy along the border to help the kurdish—led syrian democratic forces. it follows the us decision to pull all its remaining troops from the area — to avoid them being caught between opposing armies. a hearing into whether parents should be allowed to protest against the teaching of lgbt relationships outside a primary school will begin later. earlier this year birmingham city council issued a temporary injunction banning campaigners from demonstrating outside the school. the legality of that injunction will be decided at the city's high court.
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a large—scale security operation is in place in pakistan today, for the arrival of the duke and duchess of cambridge. it will be their first official visit to the country. kensington palace say it's also their most complex tour, due to political tensions and security concerns in the region. william and kate will visit organisations working with young people, and see how local communities are responding to the effects of climate change. it was an amazing weekend of record—breaking runs. critical moments of sport over the weekend. record—breaking runs. critical moments of sport over the weekendlj can moments of sport over the weekend.” can remember paula radcliffe breaking the marathon record. it took 16 years. there is brigid
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kosgei, she did it so quickly. and kipchoge yesterday, you spoke to him. the great in about talking to people like kipchoge, you just hang on their every word. it was really softly spoken, very considered and you just want to know everything that they are about to say. he was incredible. he said his family were at the ignition key, starting the engine to make him run. it wasjust gorgeous. that wasn't an official re cord gorgeous. that wasn't an official record but yesterday's really wants. kenya's brigid kosgei shatters paula radcliffe's 16—year world record, and radcliffe is at the finish line in chicago to congratulate her. that must be a tricky moment. i wonder how she feels about that. gareth bale saves wales again, in their euro 2020 qualifier against croatia. his equaliser means they can still make the finals without going through the play—offs,
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although they have to rely on other results. simone biles becomes the most decorated gymnast in world championship history. she now has 25 medals, 19 of them gold. and scotland are out of the rugby world cup, beaten by a relentless japan side, the first asian nation to make the quarter—finals. the japanese coach says they played for the families that lost people in that terrible typhoon over the weekend after they knocked out scotland yesterday. the scenes after that rugby match yesterday were incredible. did you see them on the street? a huge moment for them. wait for the tournament. great to have the hosts stalled out. let's take a look at today's papers. the telegraph says eu negotiators are "demanding" more concessions in order to secure a brexit deal. the paper says that's prompted
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fury among brexiteers. the picture is of prince charles meeting the pope. they were at a ceremony at the vatican where the english priest, cardinal newman, was made a saint. the guardian says borisjohnson is using today's queen's speech to introduce plans for tougher sentences for foreign criminals and child abusers. the picture is from the rugby world cup — the hosts japan knocked out scotland yesterday. the daily mail has more on the prime minister's plans to tackle crime. those who "sneak" back into the country after being deported will have theirjail terms increased from weeks to years under the proposals. the picture is the duchess of cambridge, who's visiting pakistan with the duke of cambridge. and the sun has the latest on the very public row between wags rebekah vardy and coleen rooney. the paper reports that jamie vardy has a ppa re ntly u nfollowed wayne rooney's instagram account. as if that is making use. well, it is for some people. either way, we
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are going to see our michael.” didn't recognise that name. magic mike as he is known stop wide it was a good night, he did very well. i saw him beforehand. is normally full of beans and ready to go. he was really nervous and very ill. he was seriously concerned that was going to be his last week. while they are showing you the vt of what they've done that week, it's a videotape. he was up done that week, it's a videotape. he was up on done that week, it's a videotape. he was up on the stage and he looked like the world was on his shoulders. he was brilliant. it must've been wonderful to be there. high drama, all sorts of sobbing at the end. those who don't know, one of the favourites went out. diane boswell,
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she was literally inconsolable for ages. i don't think of ever com pletely ages. i don't think of ever completely sobbing. it's talk about this first. quickly, good morning to you. banning air miles and stopping frequent flyers. this is an attempt they say to try and discourage us from taking flights because it suggests that by being in frequent flyer miles, people in these loyalty schemes are particularly damaging the environment because it can result in people taking extra flights to maintain their status. one story here, the use of digital
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tickets now. we're going to talk about this in the next hour or so. away from those sort of things towards digital tickets on your phone. this story suggesting someone did that with a bus ticket. but because the battery died she was fine nearly £500. we'll talk about those problems as train companies move away from that stop. we have garrett's out gate here. if you could give me a little hand here. gals expect gareth southgate saying, i'm watching what you do. whatever you do, whether it's on the picture off the pitch —— pitch, i know what's happening. that's afterjames madison was pictured at a casino saying he was too poorly to play. he
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was in the casino, i don't want to be two men, but he was inside with the hood of his top up trying to remain anonymous. doesn't that make you stand out even more? gareth southgate saying, we are tracking you the whole time and we know what you're doing. i have got glasses and become a sally. do you like them? yes. do you know why -- white christmas has never been number one? bing crosby. his wife, i think, christmas has never been number one? bing crosby. his wife, ithink, his widow, is planning to rerelease it. 40 widow, is planning to rerelease it. a0 yea rs widow, is planning to rerelease it. a0 years after his death. and how do you like your porridge? salt, sugar? sleet. a bit of honey. not like
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cement. just right, like goldilocks. well, an english woman has beaten the scots by winning the world porridge making championships. the official rules. you can only use oatmeal, water and salt. really! you would like this, ben. there is a speciality title and the winner this year had oatmeal pecans and guernsey cream. now we're talking. you win the golden spittle. —— spurtle. that is what they traditionally used to stir it. flaxen tartan everywhere, people in the village helping to organise it. lady serving the porridge, volunteers washing up. the porridge, volunteers washing up. the porridge parade with bagpipes. the winner said it wasjust porridge parade with bagpipes. the winner said it was just magical. lisa williams from suffolk. she makes the finest porridge in the land. congratulations! excellent. i love porridge. do you know who used
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to make the best porridge ever? carol? i don't know she has ever porridge commission makes a great bacon sandwich. bill turnbull, formerly of this parish. he is to make porridge! he used to make porridge on the night before. and he would slow cook it through the night. well, according to this masterchef you stir continuously on a medium to low heat for 10—20 minutes. i think maybe he left mrs turnbull doing it, possibly. thank you very much, we will see you later. let's get the weather now, and carol's at wellington barracks this morning, where very special preparations are being made ahead of today's queen's speech. and they are having their special brea kfast and they are having their special breakfast this morning. well, i don't know if it is special. carol can tell us. i don't think they are having porridge this morning. that is chopper you are looking at, tucking into his breakfast. at the
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wellington barracks in london with the king street royal horse artillery, they are part of the procession for the opening of parliament. they will be firing the first world war guns in green park at 11 o'clock this morning. it is a a1 gun salute. six field guns and 200 -- a1 gun salute. six field guns and 200 —— and a1 gun salute. six field guns and 200 -- and 200 a1 gun salute. six field guns and 200 —— and 200 horses taking part in the procession, 150 of which are pa rt the procession, 150 of which are part of the king ‘s troop. they are gorgeous. it has been a hive of industry and here this morning as preparations have been getting under way. now, outside it is raining here in london. in fact, this week we are looking at rain at times, there is the risk of localised flooding, tricky driving conditions, but they will be some sunshine in between. not a lot of sunshine, it must be said. tuesday is looking not too bad. some of us, wednesday is not looking too bad either. you can see what is happening today on the pressure chart. a waving weather fronts coming from the south—east. that may move further north and east
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and i'm telling you, but it may not. another one coming across northern ireland, bringing rain. another across the far north—east of scotla nd across the far north—east of scotland which will turn my showery as we go through the day. we are starting off with some rain in the south—east. that is moving in the direction of the midlands, east wales, eventually getting to southern parts of northern england. rain also getting to northern ireland. later on it will get into northern scotland. in northern scotla nd northern scotland. in northern scotland turn more showery as it moves into the northern isles. as the rain clears away from the south—east it will be replaced by heavy, thundery downpours. driest conditions across north—east scotla nd conditions across north—east scotland and initially across parts of england. through this evening and overnight, you can see how that rain curls and across eastern parts of england and also potentially south—east scotland. we will still have some showers out towards the west. some mist and fog patches forming as well. not a particularly cold night for most of us. as we go through the course of tomorrow we say goodbye to that rain in the east, clearing off into the north sea, most of us will have a dry day.
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some showers coming across parts of wales, south—west england, into the midlands. they will be the exception rather than the rule. temperatures up rather than the rule. temperatures up to 60 degrees. by the end of tomorrow, already we will be watching another weather front coming into the west, with wind strengthening. overnight that is going to be pushing steadily from the west towards the east. through the west towards the east. through the course of wednesday it will clear a ll the course of wednesday it will clear all of the far north of scotla nd clear all of the far north of scotland and possibly still be lingering across parts of kent. behind that, something drier and brighter comes our way. beyond that, the outlook does remain unsettled. come on, carol, it is a monday. what is going on? i never know who is on anymore, and i can't see you anyway. to be fair, carole, we are all the same. i don't really mind. somebody cold charlie and get him in here, i'm going home. dan, you threw me,
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because you were on telly on saturday. carol, you are distracted by the horses. that is what we will put it down to. carol will be with us put it down to. carol will be with us throughout the morning on bbc the death of the teenage motorcyclist harry dunn is a tragedy that most of us here in the uk are now familiar with. that's largely down to the bravery of his parents, charlotte and tim, who have told their story to a number media outlets, including brea kfast. today they'll do the same in the us, where they want to raise the profile of their case. we'll talk some more about that in a moment, but first let's just remind ourselves of their fight for justice so far. she didn't mean to kill our son. it was an accident. i can forgive her for that. i can forgive herfor leaving. i don't know. the fact that you are having to fight and work so ha rd to you are having to fight and work so hard to find the answers to what happened, what does that mean for
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you, charlotte? we werejust happened, what does that mean for you, charlotte? we were just left to try to deal with the fact that we had lost, that we had lost harry. and that we were just expected to put —— to get on with it. but it is not right, the feeling in the pit of our stomachs that tells us this can't be right. just disgusted. let down by both governments. just really frustrated. we are going to speak to her really frustrated. we are going to speakto herand really frustrated. we are going to speak to her and see what we can come up with so that they can be some healing —— so that they can be. the diplomacy that we didn't think she had has been confirmed, that she doesn't have it. certainly since she absconded back to the usa. surely she must know what is going on now. deep down in her heart she must realise that coming back would be the right thing to do. as promised, let's get a bit more detail from the
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guardian's washington correspondent, david smith. thank you for speaking to us on the programme this morning. obviously, as we were saying, quite a lot of attention of the story in the uk. i wonder what sort of coverage it has been getting in the us? rather less so far, it has struggled to gain traction as a news story. i think partly due to timing, and that the donald trump administration produces this daily torrent of news, but especially now with the president facing an impeachment enquiry. also a huge controversy impeachment enquiry. also a huge co ntrove rsy over impeachment enquiry. also a huge controversy over his decision to withdraw us troops from northern syria. so it has been hard for much else to break through. he did get asked about this issue by reporters, he gave a brief and rather characteristically whimsical response when he started talking about his own mistakes driving on the wrong side of the road in the uk. otherwise, there has not been a
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great deal of attention and certainly not much said by any politicians, republican or democrat. that would really be crucial to putting some pressure on. do you think that will change after the round of interviews today? yes. i think there is a significant chance of that. i think for harry dunn's family, this is a very sensible step, to actually come to the united states and get some media exposure, partly because for any case, that would certainly intensify the political pressure, but i think especially in this one, the ultimate decision is likely to lie with donald trump himself, and he is a president who famously consumes a lot of television and has been known to make decisions based on that. so the family will
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—— will doa —— will do a round of interviews. if they appear on fox news, president trump is known to avidly watch that and tweet about what is said on it, and tweet about what is said on it, and often to be moved emotionally by what he sees there. so that could be the best way to get a direct line to the best way to get a direct line to the oval office. it will be interesting to see if that changes, in terms of his list of priorities, if president trump does see that at all. in terms of the special relationship between the us and the uk, how important is this issue to that, do you think, going forward? it is certainly one factor among many. it comes at a time when there has been some ups and downs, on the one hand, donald trump has been very positive about borisjohnson becoming prime minister and talking about their relationship. he also had quite a warm state visit to the uk not so long ago. of course, we
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fairly recently had the row over the british ambassador to the us, kim darek, who effectively left his post. and in general, trump especially is emerging as quite a transactional president, not paying a great deal of attention to historical alliances. so i don't think, and certainly so far, there is not much sign of him particularly doing the uk a favour on this one. he has been pretty ruthless about it, as i thinkjohnson has noted. however, it is still possible that perhaps an emotional appeal will get through to him. it does appear that there might be some sort of legal wrangling, doesn't it, about whether asa wrangling, doesn't it, about whether as a caller still has diplomatic immunity, and also, we will be
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speaking to the lawyer for the pa rents speaking to the lawyer for the parents later in the programme, whether they will meet her. —— anne sacoolas. there is a suggestion they want, unless you will come back to the uk to face charges? there has been a lot of conflicting reports over the last couple of weeks over this. the latest indications are that the uk is now saying that she no longer has diplomatic immunity, and according to the uk, america agrees with that. also, signs that anne sacoolas, well, she has issued a statement, saying how sympathetic she is to the family and grief stricken, and indeed that she is willing to meet them. but legally, it now seems to be a situation where the uk would actually have to prosecute and actually charge her with something in order to do that, to seek extradition. the home secretary suggested on tv on sunday thatis secretary suggested on tv on sunday that is unlikely. she stopped short of saying they would do that. the
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us, i think, of saying they would do that. the us, ithink, would prefer some more informal arrangement to try to settle it, rather than a prosecution or perhaps the family pursuing a civil claim within the us. it looks like an attempt will be made to nip that in the bud. david smith, the guardian's washington bureau chief, thank you forjoining us this morning. and we will be speaking to the dunn family lawyer at 8:10am. right now, let's get the news, travel and whether where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm sonja jessup. bbc london has learnt that the department for transport is giving "serious consideration" to shortening the proposed high speed 2 line, and scrapping plans to tunnel to euston. instead it would end at old oak common in north—west london. hs2 is meant to create faster journey times and free up space on the existing rail network. the department for transport says it won't comment, but the mayor says reducing the scheme would be bad
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for the capital. we each have a station at houston, but also old oak common. if the government tries to shortchange londoners, it will be ultimately the country, businesses and family, that are shortchanged. i have asked the government in the review to make sure they recognise the benefits to the country by london getting the investment it needs. and you can see the full story on inside out london. that's at 7:30pm tonight here on bbc1. two black men who claim they were framed by a detective in a notorious case of alleged police corruption have had their cases referred to the court of appeal. winston trew and sterling christie were among a group known as the oval four, arrested at the underground station in 1972. they spent eight months in jail for assaulting a police officer and attempted theft. now the criminal cases review commission says evidence about the "integrity" of the officer will form the basis of an appeal.
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a new exhibition's opened at the museum of london about the krios people. they're part descended from african slaves, and fought for britain in the american war of independence in exchange for freedom. many of them came to london to seek a new life, but were then sent to sierra leone. let's take a look at the travel situation now. the metropolitan line has minor delays between rayners lane and uxbridge. that is after a signal failure. on the roads, some closures to make you aware of this morning — parliament square and the roads arounf stjames' park are shut ahead of the state opening of parliament. buses are being allowed throughout the moment. and the piccadilly underpass remains closed towards knightsbridge because of gas works. time for the weather with sara thornton. good morning to you. after a wet weekend we have more rain in the forecast for a good deal of today and many times this week as well. we started early rain this morning. it
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will clear up a little bit later on. we will see some heavy showers and they could be quite heavy. we have a met office weather warning through this afternoon and into the evening. here is the initial belt of rain, particularly up towards the west and north—west. later the sunny spell start to come through, but without the risk of some heavy showers. a top temperature of 17, not too chilly for this time of year. showers continuing through the first pa rt showers continuing through the first part of the night. starting to clear up part of the night. starting to clear up into tomorrow morning. it will be quite a bit misty and murky, with low cloud around, to start us off tomorrow. generally it will be an awful lot drier and not too chilly either. as we get through the day tomorrow, little band of showers to work their way across us. there will bea work their way across us. there will be a lot more in the way of dry weather. some sunny spells, perhaps a smidge cooler than today. here is forecast looks for the week. you can see plenty of rain, and it will be windy at times. that's all for now. there's more from me in around half an hour, and plenty more news, travel and weather on our website at the usual address bbc.co.uk/london, or tune into bbc radio london.
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hello this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. we'll be looking back at an unrivalled weekend of historic marathon achievements. and celebrating 50 years to the day since the world's first seven—sided coin — the 50 pence piece — went into production. and his quickstep brought outstanding scores from the judges on saturday — and tears ofjoy from his dance partner katya. can he beat that this week? we'll be asking "magic mike" in just a few minutes. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. a lot of tears but hopefully numbness morning. the first queen's speech of boris johnson's premiership will be unveiled today — with promises to introduce tougher sentences for foreign offenders and tackle violent crime. it's the first queen's speech in over two years, but events in brussels could still overshadow the prime minister's plans —
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as he said there was still "significant work" still to do in brexit negotiations. labour has called the speech an "uncosted wish list" which the government has no intention of delivering. the parents of 19—year old harry dunn — who was killed in a road accident involving an american diplomat‘s wife — have arrived in the united states to continue their campaign for justice. charlotte charles and tim dunn flew to new york, where they will give a series of interviews for the us national media. they've said they won't meet anne sacoolas unless she commits to returning to the uk for questioning. kurds in northern syria say the country's government has agreed to send soldiers to stop the turkish invasion of their territory. state media is also claiming the syrian army has been deployed along the border to help the kurdish—led syrian democratic forces. it follows the us decision to pull all its remaining troops from the area — to avoid them being caught between opposing armies.
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a hearing into whether parents should be allowed to protest against the teaching of lgbt relationships outside a primary school will begin later. earlier this year birmingham city council issued a temporary injunction banning campaigners from demonstrating outside the school. the legality of that injunction will be decided at the city's high court. a large—scale security operation is in place in pakistan today, for the arrival of the duke and duchess of cambridge. it will be their first official visit to the country. kensington palace say it's also their most complex tour, due to political tensions and security concerns in the region. william and kate will visit organisations working with young people, and see how local communities are responding to the effects of climate change. sally is here to talk with us about an amazing weekend. amazing human performances, people doing at one stage what you thought was come possible. this lady here.
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that is a time in the marathon. incredible to think we've got to this point. let's start with a world record. brigid kosgei of kenya shattered paula radcliffe's16—year—old mark, running a minute and 21 seconds faster. radcliffe was expecting her record to go — and she was at the finish line in chicago to congratulate kosgei. iam i am feeling good and i was happy because i was not expecting to run like this but today, i wanted to run my best time which i could not ever run and it was something again. it was a disappointing day for mo farah — he was the defending champion but he could only finish eighth, way behind the winner lawrence cherono.
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it was farah's slowest marathon by more than a minute. wales can still make the euro 2020 finals without going through a play—off but were held to a i all draw at home to cardiff last night in their european championships qualifying match. they behind after just nine minutes thanks to nikola vlasic who found the bottom corne. but it was talisman gareth bale to the rescue for ryan gigg's side, he pulled wales level deep into first half injury time. and that's how it finished meaning that qualification directly into the european championships is out of welsh hands. they have to win both of their remaining games and hope that slovakia don't win both of theirs. scotland ended a run of four defeats with a straightforward win over san marino at a sodden hampden. and the rain was hammering down in glasgow — the ball frequently getting stuck in the water on the pitch but it'd take more than just a bit of rain to stop scotland. they scored 6 goals, including a wonderful freekick from stuart armstrong.
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and england face bulgaria tonight in a partially closed stadium in sofia, following bulgarian fans' racist behaviour at games in june. one section of the ground will be closed off, and last week chelsea striker tammy abraham said england players will walk off the pitch if they're racially abused, after deciding as a team if it's the right decision. bulgaria's football union have called this decision "offensive"... —— offensive. if you missed it, scotland have been knocked out of the rugby world cup by hosts japan . at the first asian side to get about point. they want a fantastic game against scotland. they will face south africa next. that was incredible to watch. wales however booked a place in the quarterfinals after a 35—13 win over uruguay which put them top of their group, meaning they'll avoid england in the quarterfinals. they take on france next sunday in oita. lots of records to tell you about this morning and we are running out of records. for simone biles to break! two more gold medals on sunday means that she is now the most decorated gymnast in world championships history.
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she took her 2ath world championships medal on the balance beam before producing another stunning display on the floor to win number 25. i like being able to say this. britain won a surprise gold medal. joe fraser in the parallel bars. it's his first ever world title and great britains first on that piece of apparatus. that brought to an end a successful world championships for great britain with 2 golds, one silver and one bronze medal. it's a dream come true, honestly. all i've ever wanted is to come on the world stage. today i really feel like i've done that and i won the champion, you can't ask for better than that. dan evans has replaced kyle edmund as britain's number one male tennis player. the 29—year—old was unranked when he returned from a doping ban
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eighteen months ago. evans is currently number a3 in the world, two places below his career best ranking, but has told bbc sport he "thinks he can get a lot higher." coco gauff has become the youngest player to win a wta title in 15 years. the fifteen year old beat jelena ostapenko at the linz open and is now set to move inside the world's top 75.she only qualified for the main draw as a lucky loser after losing in the final round of qualifying. she's also the youngest american woman to win a tour singles title in 28 years. she has officially arrived. that grey court is very strange. we don't like that at all. we just like the green of wimbledon. she has a big future. she is fit dean. when we
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spoke to her at wimbledon, she was not fazed. you can imagine a teenager on the stage feeling anxious and nervous and she was taking every day as it comes. good on her. are the days of paper train tickets numbered ? ben's here with more on this one. what's going on here? potentially. more and more of us are opting to use these sorts of things. tickets that you can get on your phone rather than relying on those more traditional ones. i should have beena more traditional ones. i should have been a bit more prepared. there you go. that is the difference. the real challenge for the rail firm is now is to sort of embrace that because where in this halfway house. so let me run you through some of the numbers. more than 60% of all the journeys were ta ken numbers. more than 60% of all the journeys were taken using those old—fashioned paper tickets, with the magnetic stripe stop this year, that number had fallen to less than
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50%, same drop of 13 million so significant differences is more of us significant differences is more of us embrace digital. it means half of all journeys are taken us embrace digital. it means half of alljourneys are taken using this paper tickets and it's because as i said you can get your ticket and all sets of different ways. either you printed and take it on a bit of paper yourself on your mobile phone so paper yourself on your mobile phone so you paper yourself on your mobile phone so you can paper yourself on your mobile phone so you can swipe through the gates much more easily. 18 million more journeys were ta ken much more easily. 18 million more journeys were taken over the last year using digital tickets. train companies that is greater than because there are lots of bits. they are harderto because there are lots of bits. they are harder to lose because the data is stored on the internet so you can get your ticket on whatever device you are using but also allows automatic refunds. it also means you can avoid cues and of course, the agnostic stripe is so unreliable, to get through the barrier and sometimes it doesn't work so they are hoping the digital tickets will get rid of that. but of course, a lot of people will still rely on
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those sorts of things. will they be phased out eventually? the train companies themselves would like that to happen. not any time soon, not overnight. not everybody has a smartphone. some peoplejust don't trust the technology. a lot of people like to the ticket office window and have a conversation with the staff behind the counter to work out the best route or price or the cheapest time to go and a lot of people just don't trust the technology because the battery could run out. what they want to do is move towards a system where the fair system is a lot more simple and allows you to introduce the tickets things like season tickets, like the oyster ca rd things like season tickets, like the oyster card in london. our fair system is so complex with 55 million tickets inside the computer, what it does is it regulates ticket types into bundles which means it's very difficult for ourfair
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into bundles which means it's very difficult for our fair system to talk to otherfair difficult for our fair system to talk to other fair systems like metro systems, for example or bus systems and what we want to do is stripped down, build it backups you can have multimodal journeys, stripped down, build it backups you can have multimodaljourneys, travel from your house on perhaps a boris bike here in london, to get into an uberand bike here in london, to get into an uber and may be a train, all on one ticket. that is the plan. smart tickets, less paper, less waste, less likely to get lost but train companies are saying, we need to do this in moderation. there is a big review of the railway is going on. we will look at all sorts of things. ticket prices, roots and all that sort of thing. and if you believe the reports in the press over the weekend, we may hear much more about the train network in the queen's speech so watch this space.” the train network in the queen's speech so watch this space. i feel bad but i still like my paper tickets. you can't have the next your phone because that thing on the
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practice doesn't work. i've never had a paper ticket. what you mean? the barrier stops you? quite a lot. it's catch up with the weather. carol is at wellington barracks where special preparations are being made ahead of this queen's speech including, she is seeing some stars of the show. good morning. isn't it beautiful? sorry, we will get that back to you in a minute. he isjust magnificent and will be taking part in the procession later on but look at his main or rather lack of main. the reason he doesn't have a main is because it has been shaved off and thatis because it has been shaved off and that is to keep him nice and safe, so that is to keep him nice and safe, so nothing gets caught in it. but
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you can also see here, the horse furniture. this is polished to a mirror shine and it's actually made by the troops custom—made for each horse. here was once ready to go. the saddle is complete. the biggest horse in the treatment he is one of the charges. of course, the king's troop horses and ladies and gents will be taking part in the procession and also the salute as we go through the course of the morning. the salute takes place as soon as morning. the salute takes place as soon as the gun fires, as soon as the queen arrives at the house of lords. it is raining at the moment and it might well be raining when her majesty arrives. this week the forecast remains unsettled one. rain at times, and we are also going to see a little bit of sunshine. three fronts affecting us today. the waiting one in the south—east,
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another one moving up across northern ireland, and another one across the north of scotland. that one will be bringing the rain with it and it will turn more showery through the course of the day. first thing this morning, the rain in the south—east is pushing north and also west. the western extent is a bit uncertain. could get as far west as eastern parts of wales. that will move eastern parts of wales. that will m ove a cross eastern parts of wales. that will move across the midlands and parts of southern england. northern ireland seeing heavy rain. easing across the far north of scotland. sunshine coming through. behind the rain in the south—east, we will see heavy and thundery downpours. temperatures roughly 10—16. this evening and overnight you can see how that rankles across eastern parts of england am south—eastern scotland. showers remain in the west. a bit of mist and fog forming in places where we have a clear spells but not a particularly cold night. then as we head on into tomorrow, the rain in the east pulls away into the north sea and it will bring the odd shower around parts of wales, northern ireland, the midlands, south—west england, but
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they will be the exception, not the rule. the cloud will break. we will see sunny rule. the cloud will break. we will see sunny skies developing, highs of about 16 again. by the end of the day, a well—defined coming into the west. but will start to thicken up to cloud in northern ireland, heralding the arrival of some rain. that rain will move from west to east overnight, accompanied by blustery winds, especially the south—west and the english channel, and during the course of wednesday, the rain advances into the north sea. you can see it is still killing across the north of scotland and into parts of the south—east as well. —— curling. behind it it will dry and brighten up, and after that, dan and lou, the outlook remains u nsettled. thank you. where we have all —— will be have horses through the morning? we will, in varying degrees. they arejust magnificent. we will, in varying degrees. they are just magnificent. they do look... i want to take one home, did you notice?
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later today we will finally get to hear the queen's speech. it is a day of ceremony and pageantry, but mainly an opportunity for the government to lay out its priorities for the next parliamentary year. unsurprisingly, brexit plans are set to ta ke unsurprisingly, brexit plans are set to take centre stage. the main piece of legislation will be the withdrawal agreement built. the queen will deliver the speech, which has been written by ministers. it will then be debated by mps. after that there is a vote. it is normally seen as that there is a vote. it is normally seen as symbolic because it's extremely rare for the government to actually lose that boat. but of course boris johnson actually lose that boat. but of course borisjohnson has already lost seven times since becoming prime minister. if every opposition mp voted against the government, it would lose by a5, putting mrjohnson under huge political pressure. let's speak now to katie bowles, deputy editor of the spectator, and political commentator faisah shaheen, who will be standing for labour in the next election. thank
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you forjoining us. we don't have much time, but briefly, katie, if you could assess, they have prorogued parliament to get this queen's speech. what do you make of what they are telling us they are going to try to do? it is an ambitious agenda they are putting forward , ambitious agenda they are putting forward, but i think very few people think they will be able to do it in this parliament, simply because they do not have the votes. when the queen's speech is voted on at the beginning of next week it will be a big surprise if it passes, let alone the various bills through the commons. i think this is all about the conservatives trying to say what they would do if they were to wind a majority at the next election, rather than what you can expect in the next month. as faisah, would that be your assessment as well? yes, i agree this is essentially a party political broadcast. if it wasn't bad enough that the queen was misled on the proroguing of parliament, she is now being dragged out to make a conservative party broadcast. on what will be the content of that bill, i agree that it is unlikely to go through, but there are some elements of it but
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are quite hypocritical in the sense that around mental health services, even around crime, there have been huge cuts since 2010, and what we are going to hear today are tougher sentences, potentially more emphasis on looking at things like mental health, but actually, it is the very same people who voted for the cuts in the first place. so there is that hypocritical element. on climate, i think a lot of people, especially people protesting here, would say it is too little, too late. it is unambitious. and i think that a lot of what we hear today will just unambitious. and i think that a lot of what we hear today willjust be trying to set the tone for a general election. katie, let's look forward, because again, we often talk about crucial weeks here on bbc breakfast, but the deadline is fast approaching. how close, i mean, what do you think? is there going to be a deal? difficult to answer, probably, but what is your feeling? there is more optimism than this time last week. once again we are having a wave of dismissal in government, that actually brussels wants even more concessions. i that actually brussels wants even more concessions. i think the problem for borisjohnson is that he isa problem for borisjohnson is that he is a better salesman than theresa
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may, he is better placed to bring brexiteers on board, but he still has a limited landing space. so there is a very narrow path to a deal, but if brussels, as we are hearing, are saying that what is currently proposed is not enough and there needs to be more related to customs and northern ireland, i think it gets very difficult for borisjohnson to pass anything in this parliament. this is a decisive week. i think by the weekend, we will have mps sitting on saturday, so will have mps sitting on saturday, so it is a six—day week for them, and we will really know whether we are heading to an extension, brexit deal, or perhaps a second referendum or no deal. so many unknowns, but faisah, let's go ahead to that saturday. let's say, for example, he does get a deal. what is the labour party going to do about that?” think probably what is likely is that it think probably what is likely is thatitis think probably what is likely is that it is going to be a reheated theresa may deal. i think that is the way it is going, if it is one there. and there is not a lot of time for our parliamentarians to look at what that looks like. but of
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course theresa may's deal was rejected three times but happily, so ido rejected three times but happily, so i do not see how, given the direction talks are going, if there isa direction talks are going, if there is a deal to vote on saturday, but the labour party will be able to vote on that. of course, this would not be the end, october 31, if boris johnson was able to leave on the date, but would not simply be the end. it would be the end of the beginning. the next stage for a future agreement is what labour is worried about as well, because if there is too much for boris johnson, priti patel and others like sajid javid, to put forward something that undermines the rights of workers, that brings us chlorinated chicken, but potentially opens the unadjusted privatisation, they are very concerned about that stage as well. —— opens the nhs to privatisation. ultimately i do not think we'll see anything much different from what theresa may put forward. the labour party will see through it. thank you both very much. well, we have a double dose of mike bushell this morning, did you know that? excellent.
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if you've been watching strictly come dancing, you'll know that breakfast‘s mike bushell has been high—energy and highly entertaining, but not exactly high—scoring. well, that changed this weekend as he quickstepped his way to the top end of the leaderboard. before we speak to him, let's take a look at how he's been getting on. and you are not feeling well, were you? no, it was an horrendous week. i think that is why it was quite emotional at the end. i had a bit of the old man flu, cold, i felt dizzy at times in training. things were still going very badly wrong on thursday. katya was getting frustrated, understandably so. the professionals have got their training for their professionals have got their training fortheirgroup professionals have got their training for their group dance, the next group dance, up on elm street this morning, so the rest of us have to try to keep ourselves fit and active, getting ready for training starting this afternoon. until thursday, in this very hall, i had a
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mental block at times. it was such a surprise to come through and get to that point. i tell you what, it was so that point. i tell you what, it was so touch and go. basically, it was like i said to dan walker, i knew it was coming, i said to him, it was like being 3—0 down to san marino at home, if i was an england player. the dress rehearsal was so bad. i was so the dress rehearsal was so bad. i was so close between success and failure, there was one step. one step, on which everything hinged. and i rememberon step, on which everything hinged. and i remember on saturday night, live on tv, i remember that moment when i came up to dubstep and i will demonstrate exactly where that was, because this went wrong so many times, like in the dress rehearsals. you start like this. apologies, everybody, not an exact frame. one, two, three. one, two, kick! that kicks, for some reason, so many times, ijust could not do. and if you get that kick right, then the re st of you get that kick right, then the rest of the dance would flow. but if you get it wrong, it all went pear—shaped. that is what happened so pear—shaped. that is what happened so many times. sol
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pear—shaped. that is what happened so many times. so i was so nervous about that one step, the 10th step. tha nkfully about that one step, the 10th step. thankfully on saturday night it went 0k. it thankfully on saturday night it went ok. it happened. and that it was just purely for the rest of the dance. i explained that to louise earlier this morning when i came in, i saw you beforehand, when we turned up i saw you beforehand, when we turned up at the studios. you were very unlike yourself. you are nervous. you are talking about how ill you felt. i spoke to your parents beforehand and your sisters. they we re beforehand and your sisters. they were really worried about you. and i saw you just before you did the dance, while they were showing your film for the week, and you didn't look like the normal mike bushell. i thought it —— i felt like shutting, come on, you will be ok! but then you just produced it on the dance floor was not i think it is because the dress rehearsal had been so bad. there was about four or five hours in between. i sat in unusual silence, i think, in between. i sat in unusual silence, ithink, fora in between. i sat in unusual silence, i think, for a while, just thinking about it, probably overthinking it. one of the senior executives at strictly said, look, just enjoy it. it doesn't matter if you get a step wrong. what is the
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worst that can happen? sol you get a step wrong. what is the worst that can happen? so i did that. and one of the professionals gave me a top tip. turn your wedding ring around three times. think about your wife and your family. just focus as if you are back in the village hall. that is what i did. katya said that, just relax, imagine yourself back in the village hall. that seems to work. once i got past that step, and crucial moment, i was actually able to enjoy it.” that step, and crucial moment, i was actually able to enjoy it. i like that little chip. and there was a lot of controversy over the weekend, for those who don't know, switch your ears. one of the favourites, devon, went out, as people were talking about the judges' scores, david james stayed in, it was one of those things, afterwards, give us an idea, mike. diane was really emotional at the end. she was sobbing for ages, for those who were in the studio watching. what was it like among the competitors in the professionals afterwards? definitely a real shock. there is always great sadness when one of you guys because it is such a close—knit family. we're not really competing with each other, we are competing ourselves, trying to better our own
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performances. but dev is a brilliant dancer and they did some fantastic performances, especially last week with aladdin, so to lose dev and diane was a real shock. chris ramsey said to me, no disrespect at the top of the stairs, as it was happening, no disrespect, there is us two dad dancers up here, and one of the best dancers, dev, is going home. it was of high scores. one of the lowest was 23. dev and diane got 27. everybody was in potentialjeopardy. somebody said to me with the scoring, the public voting, the judges people's votes count for half and then it is about the public vote, if you are the very bottom of the leaderboard, i think with alex and neil, sometimes that can almost galvanise the public photo and maybe get some people voting to try to save you. get some people voting to try to save you. but if you are in the middle or slightly higher up, and this is not mentioning anybody in particular, this isjust how it works sometimes, maybe the voters, they wrestled our laws —— there laurels a bit, maybe they will be
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safe and we can help those at the bottom. so suddenly those just above you in the mid— table can be in jeopardy. and maybe that is the sort of thing that happened. a real shock, to lose dev and dianne, as it would have been to lose ami and ali us. well, we will speak to you again later on. mike has some guests today, no katya because she is doing professional rehearsals. we look forward to mike and his guests in the village hall. if you don't vote for your favourite, all kinds of things can happen! time to get the news, travel and whether from where you are. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. bbc london has learnt that the department for transport is giving serious consideration to shortening the proposed high speed 2 line and scrapping plans to tunnel to euston. instead, it would end at old oak common in north—west london. hs2 is meant to create faster journey times and free up space on the existing rail network. the department for transport says it won't comment, but the mayor says reducing the scheme would be bad for the capital.
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we need to have a station at euston, but also old oak common. if the government tries to shortchange londoners, it will be ultimately the country, businesses and family, that are shortchanged. i will ask the government in the review to make sure they recognise the benefits to the country by london getting the investment it needs. and you can see the full story on inside out london. that's at 7:30 tonight here on bbc1. two black men who claim they were framed by a detective in a notorious case of alleged police corruption have had their cases referred to the court of appeal. winston trew and sterling christie were among a group known as the oval four, arrested at the underground station in 1972. they spent eight months in jail for assaulting a police officer and attempted theft. now the criminal cases review commission says evidence about the "integrity" of the officer will form the basis of an appeal. a new exhibition's opened at the museum of london about the krios people. they're part descended from african slaves, and fought for britain
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in the american war of independence, in exchange for freedom. many of them came to london to seek a new life, but were then sent to sierra leone. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there is disruption for south—western railway passengers. some roots are running a reduced service this morning with fewer trains. parliament square and the roads around stjames' park are shut ahead of the state opening of parliament. time for the weather with sara thornton. good morning to you. after a wet weekend we have more rain in the forecast for a good deal of today and many times this week as well. we start with early rain this morning. it will clear up a little bit later on. we will see some heavy showers and they could be quite heavy. we have a met office
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weather warning through this afternoon and into the evening. here is the initial belt of rain, particularly up towards the west and north—west. later the sunny spell start to come through, but with that risk of some heavy showers. a top temperature of 17, not too chilly for this time of year. showers continuing through the first part of the night. starting to clear up into tomorrow morning. it will be quite a bit misty and murky, with low cloud around, to start us off tomorrow. generally it will be an awful lot drier and not too chilly either. as we get through the day tomorrow, little band of showers to work their way across us. there will be a lot more in the way of dry weather. some sunny spells, perhaps a smidge cooler than today. here is forecast looks for the week. you can see plenty of rain, and it will be windy at times. good morning — welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: pomp and politics
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for the queens speech at westminster, but events in brussels could overshadow the prime minister's parliamentary plans. harry dunn's parents head to the us, but they say they won't meet the american woman involved in the crash that killed their son unless she agrees to return to the uk. 50 years of the 50p. as the seven—sided coin that divided a nation celebrates half a century in circulation — i'll be looking back at its launch and finding out if coins really have a future. in sport, a weekend of records. just a day after eliud kipchoge breaks the two hour marathon barrier, brigid kosgei shatters paula radcliffe's 16—year—old world record, good morning from wellington barracks, we have joined good morning from wellington barracks, we havejoined the king's troop this morning joined by some first world war field guns. they will be fired when her majesty the
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queen arrives the state opening of parliament. the weather, you might see rain across many parts of the uk today. the driest parts of the country will be the north and east of scotland. i will have more in 15 minutes. it's monday the iath of october. our top story. the first queen's speech of boris johnson's premiership will be unveiled today — with promises to introduce tougher sentences for foreign offenders, tackle violent crime, and invest more in the nhs. but events in brussels could still overshadow the prime minister's plans — as he said there was still "significant work" still to do in brexit negotiations. labour has called today's speech an "uncosted wish list", which the government has no intention of delivering. our political correspondent nick eardley reports. today, there will be pomp... fanfare. ..and there will be pageantry. but this week is mostly about politics. first up, the queen's speech,
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where the government will set out its priorities — delivering brexit, tackling violent crime, investing in the nhs. labor says it is nothing more than a pre—election party political broadcast. this isn't an ordinary queen's speech, though. borisjohnson doesn't have a majority and can't promise he will be able to get these pledges through parliament. add into the mix the fact that he wants a general election and a lot of it feels more like a pitch to the country. and much of what is said today could well be overshadowed by what happens here. talks to try to find a brexit compromise continue in brussels, but there's been no breakthrough and time is running out at a key summit on thursday and friday. yesterday, borisjohnson told his cabinet there was a significant way to go, but he did still believe a deal was possible. others are far less confident. can borisjohnson get a new deal? can he persuade mps to back it and, if not, can they force him
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to delay our departure again? this week, answers to those questions should become clearer. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. in a minute we'll speak to our reporter in luxembourg, but first let's speak to our political correspondent jonathan blake in westminster. jonathan the government has big plans, but how realistic are they? i wonder how realistic it all is given the b word will dominate. will see the splendour and the spectacle of the state opening of parliament that we are used to dating back centuries. the queen speech where the government will set up the agenda for the parliamentary session in our big plans on lawn order and tougher sentences for most serious criminals, nhs investment, environment and rail plans but boris johnson's chances of getting any of that done a frankly slim because he leads a minority government and doesn't have the numbers in the house of commons. that is one reason
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why he wants an election. his chances of winning that election are highly dependent on how the brexit negotiations shape up and whether or not he can get a deal and get a deal through parliament back here. as far as the uk is concerned, they are staying very tightlipped about the state of talks in brussels but it seems some form of hybrid customs plan is on the table which could be a tough sell to brexit supporting mps in westminster. a different viewpoint from adam fleming in luxembourg. let's talk about exactly that. what are the chances and i will ask you all week, of getting a deal? there is one area where the eu is soft and that's on the timetable. remember, if there was going to be revised brexit deal for the leaders on thursday, that revised treaty would have to be ready a week in advance. now they are saying they
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are prepared to keep on talking until wednesday, the eve of the summit. that's definitely a change. in terms of what's being discussed, still shrouded in a bit of mystery. we are being told by officials that the uk has dropped its plan for the stormont assembly to have a veto on any of the arrangements for northern ireland coming into force before the end of the transition period. that was quite controversial. we are told thatis was quite controversial. we are told that is gone. no comment officially from the uk government. the people of northern ireland get to give their consent. but still described asa their consent. but still described as a very gig —— gap between the eu and the uk. a big political move over the next few days if there is going to be a deal by thursday. over the next few days if there is going to be a deal by thursdaym the next half—an—hour, will be speaking to a government list about
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those plans in today's queen's speech. the family of the teenager killed in a crash involving an american woman say they won't meet her unless she commits to returning to the uk. anne sacoolas has said she'd like to talk to harry dunn's parents, who have flown to the us to continue their fight for justice. our correspondent duncan kennedy sent this report from new york. harry's parents arrived in new york last night exhausted but convinced they had to come. they believe harry, who was killed in august, must getjustice, even in death. you they've travelled to the us to meet anne sacoolas. on the wrong side of the road before colliding with harry's motorbike in northamptonshire. we travelled with tim and charlotte as they flew to new york, believing only a meeting
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with mrs sacoolas could begin to make sense of what's happened to them. we felt like we've really got a breakthrough, we finally had confirmed that the immunity that we didn't think she had has been confirmed, that she doesn't have it. certainly since she absconded back to the usa. the statement from her lawyer is promising, that we we may be able a transatlantic battle forjustice, is huge here. they say what they want to achieve from their visit is simply that harry is not forgotten. last week, donald trump made the death of harry dunn a presidential matter, promising to talk to mrs sacoolas. harry's parents want mrs sacoolas to return to the uk to answer questions from british police.
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they're hoping their trip to america will make that more likely. duncan kennedy, bbc news, new york. kurds in northern syria say the country's government has agreed to send soldiers to stop the turkish invasion of their territory. state media is also claiming the syrian army has been deployed along the border to help the kurdish—led syrian democratic forces. it follows the us decision to pull all its remaining troops from the area — to avoid them being caught between opposing armies. a hearing into whether parents should be allowed to protest against the teaching of lgbt relationships outside a primary school will begin later. earlier this year birmingham city council issued a temporary injunction banning campaigners from demonstrating outside the school. the legality of that injunction will be decided at the city's high court. a large—scale security operation is in place in pakistan today, for the arrival of the duke and duchess of cambridge. a lar n place in pakistan today,
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it will be their first official visit to the country. kensington palace say it's also their most complex tour, due to political tensions and security concerns in the region. william and kate will visit organisations working with young people, and see how local communities are responding to the effects of climate change. scotland can no longer afford to be part of the uk — that will be the message from the scottish national party at its conference this week. they'll claim that brexit risks creating years of economic uncertainty for the country, and say they'll ask for a second independence vote by the end of the year. let's get more on this from scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon. can ask you about the potential brexit deal. would you back it? from what i know now, the snp wouldn't
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back it. i'll explain briefly why. firstly it would take scotland out of the eu, out of the single market and the customs union completely against our will. scotland did not vote for that and it would do significant economic damage to our country but secondly, it very, very clear that the future relationship that boris johnson clear that the future relationship that borisjohnson envisages between the uk and the eu is a much more distant and looser one than even that proposed by theresa may. you don't hear boris johnson that proposed by theresa may. you don't hear borisjohnson talk about protecting workers and environmental and consumer rights so the real risk is that we will find ourselves in a race to the bottom where the priorities to try to do trade deals with the likes of donald trump ‘s thatis with the likes of donald trump ‘s that is not something that is in scotland's interest and if that emerges, it's a big if, the snp would not vote for that in the house of commons. thank you for explaining why. obviously you are first minister for scotland but if i was to say to you that this is something that majority of the uk and scotland
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are still part of the uk voted for why have you not considered potentially backing the deal considering the majority of the uk, a few years ago, yes, voted for this. look, firstly, i am the first minister of scotland and i think it is not unreasonable that i put the interests of scotland centre stage in this and scotland didn't vote believe and a deal of this nature would do significant damage. any form of brexit would do damage. that said if you cast your mind three yea rs said if you cast your mind three years back to about december 2016, i put forward compromise proposals, i tried to persuade theresa may to accept them whereby yes, the uk would leave the eu, it's not what scotla nd would leave the eu, it's not what scotland voted for but it is what the majority of the uk voted for but we should stay in the single market and customs union. that seemed a reasonable compromise, that as far as it is possible to do, would ring together different standpoints and
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views, recognise believe vote across the uk and two of the four nations had voted to remain. that compromise offer was rejected out of hand and every effort we made to compromise has had a similarfate. i make no apology for talking about the interests of scotland because yes, right now we are part of the uk but if that means we are just outvoted and taught and disregarded, i have to say the argument for us being independent and in charge of our own future becomes all the more strong. someone —— some people might have seen you someone —— some people might have seen you yesterday, talking about a linkup with the labour party, and you said jeremy corbyn not to bother picking up the phone unless he backs in independence vote. why is that, and the accusation could be thrown at you that you are playing politics with regard to that. i'm a politician. i've tried very hard not
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to play politics over brexit. we've been working as hard as we can with other parties. putting the snp's interests aside to find common ground. what i said yesterday was looking at the policies —— possibility as some polls suggest a hung parliament and the point i was making was a point about simple democracy. jeremy —— jeremy corbyn imposes scotland being independent and a second scottish independence referendum. i disagree with him but it's perfectly legitimate. what i don't think is legitimate for him or borisjohnson or don't think is legitimate for him or boris johnson or any other westminster politician is that decision should not be entirely for the scottish people. it should be up to the people of scotland and the scottish parliament whether or not there is a second independence referendum on whether scotland boats to be independent in that and if any politician is looking for the support of the snp in a future hung parliament context, the point i'm making is don't expect that support if you don't accept that basic issue
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of democracy that whatever you think about scotland's future, it's for the scottish people to decide. what is your number one priority? would it be a second independence referendum, or a general election? in the short term i want to see a general election because the current —— current government has no authority and no mandate, and as soon as we can see extension authority and no mandate, and as soon as we can see extension to article 50, which is what i would like to see, the better. the snp has been trying to pull opposition parties together behind a plan that would achieve that. in terms of scottish independence, scottish independence is what i want to see happen so that in future we don't find ourselves in scotland in this position where our future direction is being decided for us against our will. an independent scotland will a lwa ys will. an independent scotland will always be the closest of friends and allies to other parts of the uk. we will always share an island with
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england and wales. the british isles is where our first priorities in terms of relationships will be. but we will do that if we are independent on the basis of equality. not simply being outvoted and ignored, which has been scotland's experience over the past three and a half years since the brexit vote. do you accept that if that were to happen, they would have to be some kind of hard border between scotland and england, which as you know from recent negotiations, seems to cause quite a few issues? no, i don't accept that, and it would be my intention but that does not happen, and before scotla nd ta kes that does not happen, and before scotland takes that decision independence, we would set out how we intend to ensure that trade flows between scotland and the rest of the uk and vice—versa would continue, because it is important that they do. obviously the detail of that, and this is where i am not going to try to pull the wool over people's eyes, the detail of how we achieve
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that depends on the final relationship between the uk and the eu. we don't yet know what that is going to be. so i will, as the independence campaign did in 201a, we will put forward all of these fa cts we will put forward all of these facts and arguments so that people in scotland can make an informed choice about the future. it is a stark contrast to the kind of choice that was made of the brexit, where there was very little in the way of fa cts there was very little in the way of facts and figures and real understanding of what it meant. i wa nt understanding of what it meant. i want there to be a genuinely informed choice for scotland. in terms of making those choices, i am sure you are aware, there has been a big fluctuation in votes for the snp in recent years. half a million, up toi.5 in recent years. half a million, up to1.5 million, than in recent years. half a million, up to 1.5 million, than half a million votes lost between 2015 and 2017, in that general election. what makes you confident that this time around there will be that backing for you from scottish people?” there will be that backing for you from scottish people? i will come onto that point in a minute, but i should just say, so that we are putting this in some contexts, that the snp has won every single one of these elections you have spoken about, comfortably. what i am referring to is the number of people
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who voted for you. absolutely. half a million down, between 2015 and 2017. but will of course be affected by turnouts and elections. i will not labour that point, i am simply making the point that the way you ask that question makes it sound as though we suffered some electoral failures, which we didn't. he won all these elections. what gives me confidence as the poles. —— is the polling. in a party sense, the snp and government, for almost 12 years, we are farahead and government, for almost 12 years, we are far ahead of our opponents in terms of polling evidence, and on the question of independence, we had a poll yesterday showing that independence support is up 50%, i think a record in that particular poll. so we see rising support for independence. we see rising support in scotland for the demand to have a choice about our future. i should say, never as a politician do take any say, never as a politician do take a ny vote say, never as a politician do take any vote for granted. in politics and democracy, you have an obligation to make your case and to win your case, and that is what i
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will always seek to do. we will be keeping a close eye on the conference in the next few days. a final question on the rugby world cup, isaw final question on the rugby world cup, i saw you talking about the rush of victory, saying that scotla nd rush of victory, saying that scotland were brave, magnificent. you have kept a little quiet since the defeat to japan. how disappointed are you with that? well, i should say i have been pretty busy with the party conference... but you were watching, won't you? i didn't watch the match. i watched the national anthems, and then i had to go and do conference business, but i am hugely disappointed. i am very disappointed for gregor townsend and the team. they played their hearts out. it wasn't good enough on the day. congratulations to japan. while i would have loved to see a scotland victory yesterday, i think everything that japan has been through over the next few days, i am sure there is a part of everybody who feels pleased to see them progress into the next stage of the world cup, so i wish them well, i was sure the teams, including england, well in the next stages. i
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wish scotland was there, but my congratulations to the team, because i know how hard they worked and how disappointed they will be. it will be onwards and upwards in the future. surely don't want england to win the world cup, do you?” future. surely don't want england to win the world cup, do you? i didn't say that! no, but! win the world cup, do you? i didn't say that! no, but i am asking you. i know you wish england all the best, but i imagine that i want the best team... looks, you know, friendly sporting rivalry, ithink team... looks, you know, friendly sporting rivalry, i think you'll probably find most people in scotla nd probably find most people in scotland might not be of that view, but made a best team win. i genuinely wish all the teams who are remaining the best of luck. i look forward to the remaining stages of the competition, and we will see who ends up in the final, and then i will make my decision about who i am going to support. nicola sturgeon, thanks for talking to us. let's get the weather now, and carol's at wellington barracks this morning, where very special preparations are being made ahead of today's queen's speech. good morning, everybody. iam
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standing next to these magnificent world war i guns. now, they are going to be pulled along by these horses here. you can see them being groomed at the moment. they will be pulled into green park and fired when her majesty the queen arrives at the house of lords for the state opening of parliament. you can see how they have been groomed. they have had domains shaved, and their whiskers. that is not for vanity. that is simply to keep them safe, so none of the equipment get stuck in their hair. also, there are a lot of ladies here. the king ‘s troop is the only army unit with a 50—50 balance of men and women. now, today all the nations of the uk on parade, from all aspects of the armed forces. so the army, navy, the raf and the marines. the route, the carriage procession that they lined the route, the carriage procession, and they will also be on the staircase of the house of lords. so, what's going on today. very noisy here. very busy. they have been here since four o'clock or five o'clock
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this morning, getting ready for today's events. it is raining outside. this week is looking rather u nsettled. outside. this week is looking rather unsettled. rain at times, or indeed some sunshine. the best set of the sunshine is likely to be tomorrow and wednesday. it is looking wet which could lead to further issues, of course, with localised flooding. tricky travelling conditions too. today all the pressure child, three distinctive sets of fronts. a waving front in the south—west, so it is northern and western extent that one coming into northern ireland, bringing in rain when leaving the north of scotland, weakening and turning the rain more showery through the course of the day. we have got rain first thing in the south—west. but will head up towards the north—west, possibly toward south wales, get it was northern ireland. a wet morning across northern ireland, the rain getting into western scotland. the driest conditions there today, over the east of scotland, with temperatures ranging from 10—16. through this
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evening and overnight you can see how that band of rain tells across eastern parts of england and south—east scotland. to the west, a few showers. over clear skies will seep patchy mist and fog burning. —— forming. not a particularly cool night for most. tomorrow we start off with that rain, again across eastern areas. it clears into the north sea, allowing it to brighten up. some sunny spells will develop. still a few showers in northern ireland, wales, across the midlands, south—west england. there will be the exception... inaudible. sorry to interrupt you, but we cannot hear you very well, so we will have to leave it there. we will be back and sort it out and be back with carol. some issues there, with the cup and the bit of string. we will get carol back for you, in about 20 times that 20 minutes. elsewhere on the programme today, we are talking about this. families of people killed by sepsis are that warning too many patients
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are being misdiagnosed. last year, figures showed deaths in england's hospitals had risen by more than a third in two years. that's despite awareness campaigns and guidelines for doctors to help them spot the signs. there are more than 250,000 cases of sepsis in the uk every year. 25,000 of those patients are children. five people are killed by sepsis every hour in the uk. ava mcfarlane was five when she died as a result of the condition in 2017. our correspondent sian lloyd has been speaking to her family. we just thought, we are in the best place, aren't we? this is yet. she's going to be ok. but itjust didn't happen. she was already going into toxic shock. ava mcfarlane died from sepsis, hours after being sent home from hospital. her parents had been told that the five—year—old, who had down syndrome, should be given calpel for a virus. at her condition
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was much more serious. an inquest into her death found a number of opportunities to diagnose calpel —— sepsis had been missed, and that national guidelines hadn't been followed. i'm never going to see her get married, i'm never going to see her go to college. it is those things, i think people don't realise, it's not just things, i think people don't realise, it's notjust what you've lost now, it's what you've lost for the rest of your life. sepsis is a leading cause of death in the uk. but there were serious concerns about the treatment that ava received here at the queens medical in nottingham. questions are being asked of the university hospital trust. its chief executive will give evidence before a special hearing, to explain what changes have been made in the wake of her death to prevent similar circumstances in the future. it is two years since ava died and her family future. it is two years since ava died and herfamily are future. it is two years since ava died and her family are still devastated. there is anger, to, but
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information about sepsis had not been made available to them. —— angen been made available to them. —— anger, too. if i had left been made available to them. —— anger, too. if! had left with been made available to them. —— anger, too. if i had left with a leaflet i wouldn't have made it back to the car. i would have read the leaflet a nd to the car. i would have read the leaflet and turned around and gone backin leaflet and turned around and gone back in and said, no, i'm not happy. at the time, i thought, you are telling me this, you've trained for xamount of telling me this, you've trained for x amount of years, you are a doctor, you must be right, i'm just a mom. the hospital said patients are now given information to help identify sepsis, and staff have been trained. but ava's family want to know why guidelines already in existence to help doctors spot the condition were not followed. if you're worried that someone may have sepsis, the nhs advice is to go straight to a&e, or call 999. symptoms to look out for in children include: a rash that doesn't fade when you press it, cold skin, fits or convulsions, breathing quickly or skin that looks mottled, blue or pale. you should seek urgent medical help if any adult develops any of these signs: high temperature or a fever, slurred speech, chills and shivering, fast heartbeat
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or quick breathing. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. and we will have carol back in the next 15 minutes. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. bbc london has learnt that the department for transport is giving serious consideration to shortening the proposed high speed 2 line and scrapping plans to tunnel to euston. instead, it would end at old oak common in north—west london. hs2 is meant to create faster journey times and free up space on the existing rail network. the department for transport says it won't comment, but the mayor says reducing the scheme would be bad for the capital. we need to have a station at euston, but also old oak common. if the government tries to shortchange londoners, it will be ultimately the country,
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businesses and family, that are shortchanged. i will ask the government in the review to make sure they recognise the benefits to the country by london getting the investment we need. and you can see the full story on inside out london. that's at 7:30 tonight here on bbc1. two black men who claim they were framed by a detective in a notorious case of alleged police corruption have had their cases referred to the court of appeal. winston trew and sterling christie were among a group known as the oval four, arrested at the underground station in 1972. they spent eight months in jail for assaulting a police officer and attempted theft. now the criminal cases review commission says evidence about the "integrity" of the officer will form the basis of an appeal. a new exhibition's opened at the museum of london about the krios people. they're part descended from african slaves, and fought for britain in the american war of independence, in exchange for freedom. many of them came to london to seek a new life, but were then sent to sierra leone.
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let's take a look at the travel situation now. the metropolitan line has minor delays between rayners lane and uxbridge after a signal failure. a signalfailure a signal failure at baker street means that a severe delays on the circle and also the hammersmith & city line. part of the metropolitan line was shot earlier but it has now opened with severe delays. there is disruption for south—western railway passengers. some roots are running a reduced service this morning with fewer trains. parliament square and the roads around stjames' park are shut ahead of the state opening of parliament. time for the weather with sara thornton. good morning to you. after a wet weekend we have more rain in the forecast for a good deal of today and many times this week as well. we start with early rain this morning. it will clear up a little bit later on. we will see some heavy showers and they could be quite heavy. we have a met office weather warning through this afternoon and into the evening. here is the initial belt of rain, particularly up towards the west and north—west. later the sunny spells start to come through,
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but with that risk of some heavy showers. a top temperature of 17, not too chilly for this time of year. showers continuing through the first part of the night. starting to clear up into tomorrow morning. it will be quite a bit misty and murky, with low cloud around, to start us off tomorrow. generally it will be an awful lot drier and not too chilly either. as we get through the day tomorrow, a little band of showers to work their way across us. there will be a lot more in the way of dry weather. some sunny spells, perhaps a smidge cooler than today. here is how the forecast looks for the week. you can see plenty of rain, and it will be windy at times. that's all for now. there's more from me in around half an hour. jetlag hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. the first queen's speech of boris johnson's premiership will be unveiled today — with promises to introduce tougher
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sentences for foreign offenders and tackle violent crime. it's the first queen's speech in over two years, but events in brussels could still overshadow the prime minister's plans — as he said there was still "significant work" still to do in brexit negotiations. labour has called the speech an "uncosted wish list" which the government has no intention of delivering. the parents of 19—year old harry dunn — who was killed in a road accident involving an american diplomat‘s wife — have arrived in the united states says he will use the budget to launch an infrastructure revolution. he's called it the right and responsible thing to do. the parents of 19—year old harry dunn — who was killed in a road accident involving an american diplomat‘s wife — have arrived in the united states to continue their campaign for justice. charlotte charles and tim dunn flew to new york, where they will give a series of interviews for the us national media.
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they've said they won't meet anne sacoolas unless she commits to returning to the uk for questioning. a hearing into whether parents should be allowed to protest against the teaching of lgbt relationships outside a primary school will begin later. earlier this year birmingham city council issued a temporary injunction banning campaigners from demonstrating outside the school. the legality of that injunction will be decided at the city's high court. a large—scale security operation is in place in pakistan today, for the arrival of the duke and duchess of cambridge. it will be their first official visit to the country. kensington palace say it's also their most complex tour, due to political tensions and security concerns in the region. william and kate will visit organisations working with young people, and see how local communities are responding to the effects of climate change. those are some of the main stories. if we sort out those issues, carol
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will have the weather in about ten minutes. sally is here because she has a bit of a cough. i will do it. what a weekend it's been. what a weekend it's been for marathon records — on saturday, we had eliud kipchoge breaking the two—hour mark for the first time, and we now have a new women's world record holder — brigid kosgei of kenya shattered paula radcliffe's16—year—old mark, running a minute and 21 seconds faster. radcliffe was expecting her record to go — and she was at the finish line in chicago to congratulate kosgei. i am feeling good and i was happy because i was not expecting to run like this but today, i wanted to run my best time which i could not ever run and it was something again. it was a disappointing day for mo farah — he was the defending champion but he could only finish eighth, way behind the winner lawrence cherono. it was farah's slowest marathon
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by more than a minute. wales can still make the euro 2020 finals without going through a play—off but qualification is now out of their hands, after they drew i—all at home to croatia. they went behind early on but gareth bale came to the rescue yet again. they now have to win both of their remaining games and hope that slovakia don't win both of theirs, to go straight through. scotland will need the play—offs to get through, despite ending a run of four defeats with a 6—nil win over san marino at a sodden hampden. the rain was hammering down in glasgow — the ball frequently getting stuck in standing water. that didn't stop stuart armstrong from putting away a great free—kick to round off the scoring.
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and england face bulgaria tonight in a partially closed stadium in sofia, following bulgaria fa ns' racist behaviour at matches injune. one section of the ground will be closed off, and last week chelsea striker tammy abraham said england players will walk off the pitch if they're racially abused, after deciding as a team if it's the right decision. bulgaria's football union have called that "offensive". japan said they were playing for the families who lost people in the typhoon, after they knocked out scotland to make the quarter—finals of the rugby world cup. they're the first asian side to reach the knock—out stage — they won a cracking game against scotland by 28 points to 21 — and they'll face south africa next. wales won their group with a 35—13 win over uruguay, which means they'll avoid england in the quarterfinals. wales play france next sunday.
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and we are running out of records for simone biles to break! two more gold medals on sunday means that she is now the most decorated gymnast in world championships history. she took her tally to 25 medals, with gold on the beam and the floor. and britain won a suprise gold, thanks tojoe fraser, on the parallel bars. it's his first world title and great britain's first on that piece of apparatus. that brought to an end a successful world championships for great britain with 2 golds, one silver and one bronze medal. it's a dream come true, honestly. all i've ever wanted is to come on the world stage. today i really feel like i've done that and i won the champion, you can't ask for better than that. dan evans has replaced kyle edmund as britain's number one male tennis player.
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he was unranked when he returned from a doping ban eighteen months ago — and he's now a3 in the world, two places below his career best ranking, but he says he "thinks he can get a lot higher." do you remember when 15—year—old coco gauff hit the stage at wimbledon? well her star is still rising. she's now the youngest player to win a main tour title for 15 years, after beating jelena ostapenko at the linz open. that takes her inside the world's top 75 — she began the season ranked outside the top 600. she is 15. amazing, good on her. wide we will see a lot more of her, for many years to come. coming up shortly, we will be talking about 50 years of the 50p piece. if you try and pay something
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over £10 with 50p pieces, you can be turned down. i did not know that. i have never tried it. the prime minister has high hopes for today's queen speech, claiming its policies will make the uk the greatest place on earth. a law and order package will see a crack down on foreign offenders, and longerjail terms, but brexit will no doubt be at the heart of today's agenda. labour has already branded it a party political broadcast. joining us now is the women's minister, victoria atkins. thanks very much indeed forjoining us. lots of things. some people have called it ambitious. labour saying it's uncosted. give us your response to that. this is a new prime minister with a new government and he rightly wants to set his store out in terms of his attentions the future. particularly from office perspective, they are ambitious. so
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much is placed on the domestic abuse bill and the other measures, think this is very much a sign of a government who wants to sort out this stage of exit, so that we can start talking about the things that we ca re start talking about the things that we care about including the nhs, law and order and policing. your minister for safeguarding invulnerability. i know you are talking about giving victims and families the strength to come forward. the queen's speech may not get through it all. well, this is one of the very grave responsibilities. stopping the programme “— responsibilities. stopping the programme —— stopping the progress of this cross—party talk. the result of this cross—party talk. the result of the sort of things. we just need
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other parliamentarians to play the part. i suppose the challenge to jeremy corbyn and others is, if you don't like it, why don't you vote for a general election because that way we can then have this debate in the form of an election campaign in the form of an election campaign in the public can decide which vision for our country they prefer. is it frustrating from your point of view, given you are passionate about that bill. if you feel like you're people down? my wonderful team of officials, and as i say, in fairness, there is cross—party support for this. a lot of animosity and division in politics at the moment but on a subject like this, in fairness, the house of commons is at its best and only two weeks ago,
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we saw the incredibly moving debate where we were debating this bill. i genuinely think pieces of work like this, pieces of legislation must get through but also there is a will to get through and of course, this is a decision that each and every member of parliament when our voting on the queen's speech must bear in mind. let's look at other things of course happening concurrently this week, and we know that in brussels, there are talks going on about a brexit deal and how close we may or may not be. what can you tell us? similar to you, iam be. what can you tell us? similar to you, i am watching with great interest. the circle of people involved is rightly very small. we have seen a real change in approach and attitude which is really welcome. the meeting last week with the prime minister and the taoiseach showed great promise as well. i think it's a case of allowing all
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the people who are involved in the negotiations, giving them a bit of space. i very much hope to vote on a deal before the 31st of october so that we can leave with a deal. we know parliament is going to sit on a saturday which is extremely unusual. borisjohnson is saturday which is extremely unusual. boris johnson is going saturday which is extremely unusual. borisjohnson is going to have to unite your party. what are the chances of doing that? certainly those colleagues who are suspended from the party a few weeks ago, they have all voted for a deal in the past we wanted to exceptions so i'm very, very confident that they would support a deal. we had very promising noises from the drg rather hardline brexit ears. within our own party, there is a real well to get the exit sorted with a deal so that we can turn this page on this part
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of the brexit negotiations and start to focus on other things. what are the chances of getting the numbers on that? would the government make an offer to labour on a referendum? that is beyond my circle of knowledge. there will be a team of people working very hard on this. on the referendum point, we are absolutely clear that the referendum of 2016 must be respected, it's what the prime minister has said all along but in terms of conversations with labour, there are number of labour mps who represent leave voting constituencies who are just as keen to ensure that we leave with as keen to ensure that we leave with a deal. so i'm hopeful we will be able to coalesce around an agreement before the 31st of october so that we can leave as we set up the referendum. victoria atkins, thank
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you for your time and we will be speaking to somebody from labour. we had trouble with carol 20 minutes ago. she wasn't being troublesome. carol is never troublesome. a few technical issues. good morning, everybody. i have garrison sergeant major andrew stokes with me and we are in the wellington barracks. you are in the wellington barracks. you are responsible for so many things. most senior soldier in london, and sergeant these ceremonial positions in the uk forces. including today. tell us about the procession. her majesty will leave the palace at 11 o'clock, by which time these wonderful people behind us will be with their horses in green park. the streets of london will be lined with members of the armed forces, soldiers, sailors, and men and women and royal marines. a guard of honour
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is in place at the palace of westminster and the tower of london and a gun salute will be fired when her majesty reaches parliament at 11:15am. the queen will do her speech and then she will proceed back from westminster to buckingham palace, surrounded by her sovereign's escort. it is going to bea sovereign's escort. it is going to be a wonderful scene. if you are a member of the public and the weather is going to hold off, come and watch, you are in for a treat. and this is off the stage opening of parliament today? yes. how long does it take to organise something like this, because so many people are involved? yes, 1300 trips today. it ta kes a involved? yes, 1300 trips today. it takes a long time. friday morning, over 300 hours, last week we closed the streets of london and we practised while london slaps. —— 0300 hours. and we will bring it all today and deliver it, it should be a wonderful spectacle. we could talk to you for ages, but we better let you get to work, it is such a busy day. you can hear all the thumping
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behind us, horses trying to get out. the horses have been beautiful this morning and they will be a huge part of the procession. the weather is not so beautiful. it is raining now. the outlook for this week is rather u nsettled. the outlook for this week is rather unsettled. we have got rain at times, and indeed there is some sunshine as well. on the pressure chart you can see three distinctive weather fronts. the one chart you can see three distinctive weatherfronts. the one in chart you can see three distinctive weather fronts. the one in the south—east is currently producing the rain, a waving front. the northern and western extent of it is still open to question. another one across northern ireland is bringing in some rain, and another one across the north of scotland is going to weaken, and the rain will turn more showery through the course of the day. so the rain in the south—east is moving through the midlands, heading towards east wales and also towards the southern parts of northern england through the course of the day. northern ireland, you will get rather wet today as well. that rain extending into western scotland. the driest conditions will be across the north and east of scotland, and for a time, the north—east of england. heavy, thundery downpours, temperatures to
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about 16 degrees north and south. through this evening and overnight, the rain kills up the east coast, possibly clipping south—east scotland, still a few showers in the west. under the clear skies, scotland, still a few showers in the west. underthe clearskies, mist and fog patches forming, but not a particularly cold night in prospect. tomorrow we start off with that rain in the east but it quite quickly moves off into the north—eastern c. the cloud behind it will break up, some sunny the cloud behind it will break up, some sunny spells developing, still the risk of showers in northern ireland, wales, the and the south—west. they will be the exception rather than the rule. temperatures, up to about 16 degrees. by the end of the day we will have rain and strong winds coming in from the west. strong winds particularly in the south—west and the english channel. but will cross us overnight and on wednesday, most of it will clear into the north sea, except across northern scotland and fora time sea, except across northern scotland and for a time south—east england, where that rain cloud will linger. then it will brighten up behind it as well. and again, temperatures getting into the mid— teens for many of us. after that, well, the outlook
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remains unsettled. thank you, carol. lovely to get you with no technical worries at all. italy presented, as ever. it is 50 years to the day since the world's first seven—sided coin went into production. the 50 pence piece was pretty controversial at the time but is now a collector's favourite and is even being used to commemorate our planned brexit day. ben's with us and you've been looking into the history, haven't you? ben, you have been looking at this, you have brought all sorts in. we have really been spoilt this morning. 50 years since the introduction of the 50p coin. when it was introduced it was pretty controversial. lots of people didn't like it. one person described it as a monstrous piece of metal. just to give you a sense, look, remember, it replaced potentially note —— replaced potentially note —— replaced the ten shillings note. this is the old, chunky 50p piece. it was slimmed down in the 19905.
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the old ones were really happy. it was slimmed down in the 19905. the old ones were really happym is funny how quickly we forget. feeling those all 505, no wonder people didn't like carrying around all but metal in the pocket. they have got lighter, they have changed overtime. we have got lighter, they have changed over time. we have got different designs. some of them are here. we have got the collectible ones, the rare ones two occasions. it is worth, at this point, 50 years on, looking back to that launch in 1969, because it was pretty controversial. have a look. the royal mint, where 50 p piece is strangled through the machinery and preparation for the public debut. we couldn't go to around coin, because it would have been too big. so the choice was left with us, having eithera choice was left with us, having either a square coin, or something like that, which many of us didn't like, ora coin like that, which many of us didn't like, or a coin with flats on it, similarto
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like, or a coin with flats on it, similar to the thru'penny piece we are all familiar with, all this acted on. this new coin is going into circulation in october and of course it will be worth the same as potentially note. gradually, potentially note. gradually, potentially notes will be withdrawn. so if you can afford ten shillings, it might be well worth keeping one asa it might be well worth keeping one as a souvenir. you it might be well worth keeping one as a souvenir. you never it might be well worth keeping one as a souvenir. you never know, in a furious time it might be valuable collector '5 item. furious time it might be valuable collector 's item. i think it is a good idea. you lose paper money, you rip it. i think this will be much better. i don't see why we want to go to this decimal coinage. what's wrong with decimal coinage? what's wrong with decimal coinage? what's wrong with decimal coinage? what's wrong with what we have now? well, it isa wrong with what we have now? well, it is a simple matter of economics, really. this bag full of coins will still be in use, probably in 50 years time. so although they have cost a bit more than a note to make, they will last for 50 years. there isn't much option but to cope easily with the new coin.
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nothing has changed, has it? still in use 50 years later. joining us now is dominic chorney, coin specialist — or numismatist — at baldwin's with some special props of his own. take us back to 1969. the big change. as we heard there, it was pretty controversial at the time. why? it was. potentially note was quite a popular banknote. people liked it. having it replaced by a monstrous piece of metal, as we heard, people didn't like that very much. we said, when it originally launched, it was much heavier. many people have forgotten quite how it has changed. it has slimmed down, why? why have you change that?” think it was because of inflation over the decades. it became very expensive to produce a very large coin. a5 expensive to produce a very large coin. as we see in the original decimal coins, they were much larger than the ones we know today. so the 5p coin was the same size as the
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original shilling and the 10p coin was the same side as the original florence. they slimmed those down as well. —— florin. florence. they slimmed those down as well. -- florin. the idea was to get people used to be changed so it wasn't quite a difference. nonetheless, it was pretty popular, as faras nonetheless, it was pretty popular, as far as coins go? yeah, it features the most commemorative designs of any circulated coin, ever since 1973, when the first commemorative 50p piece was issued. loads and loads, especially for the olympics, they issued 25 different commemorative designs. give us a sense of the value of them. because, you know,... about 50 p. i think everybody watching would have thought that. carry on, ben. some of them are more valuable than others, aren't they, ben! sorry, i do know what you mean. give me a sense of the value of the collectible coins, let me be more specific. some of them are more widely in circulation. many were produced of certain types, but some are pretty rare? generally speaking, they are relatively common. speaking, they are relatively common. there is one that stands out. in 2009 the mint issued a kew
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gardens commemorative coin. it is quite distinctive, it has a pagoda, they only issued 200,000 of those. that sounds a lot, but things like the beatrix potter coin, they issued millions. i got a btec spot on the other day, i thought it was very special. you are telling me it is not! —— special. you are telling me it is not! -- btec special. you are telling me it is not! —— btec spotter coin. unfortunately not. this closest one is thejemima unfortunately not. this closest one is the jemima puddle duck one. the kew gardens coin, if you are lucky enough to find a kew gardens coin, it is with 70 or £80. so those are the ones people need to be looking for? if there are any in particularly high demand, it is that one? that one in particular, yes. i have a slightly dull question for you. i read this morning if you go into a shop and you try to pay for something over £10 with 50p coins, they can legally say no. is that true? that is right. they are only
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legal tender up to £10, purely because of the sheer weight of the coins. so they can actually say no, go find other dosh? yes. well, you know what it feels like. that isn't £10, but that is a —— that is a weighty lot of cash. that was the biggest issue in the early days. that's neatly gets me onto the idea of the end of cash. we talk about it a lot, mobile payment, credit cards, co nta ctless, a lot, mobile payment, credit cards, contactless, talk about it being the death of cash, but hopefully, in your job, death of cash, but hopefully, in yourjob, you hope it is around for a lot longer? i think coins will always be collectible. i think people love them. different designs, we have seen so people love them. different designs, we have seen so many people love them. different designs, we have seen so many for the 50p coin. they are very popular collectors items. i think coins will continue to be collected for years to come. what is most exciting about the 50p coin in the coin world?” think it is the sheer amount of different designs. i think with this many, and we have got things likely beatrix potter series, people love to collect them. the fact you can just pick these different designs, it is fantastic. i've got one, let
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me have a look at the original coins, none of you are old enough to remember this, but i had one of these as well. are they worth any money? unfortunately, they made about as many of those as they were households in great britain at the time. so if you were born before 1969 you probably have one of these at home. i would think so, we see an awful lot, yes. i think this one is probably worth more. you can have this one. that is a big old unit. bubbly worked a bit more. that archive, the 50p film, that is the best thing i have seen on the telly ina while. best thing i have seen on the telly in a while. isn't it amazing! this feels like it is made for me. i might try to catch that cash this. not quite a change. talk about the old ones being heavy, you should try this one. what i really like about the archive is big —— is that we are all the same. we don't like change. before the end of this, ben, can you ta ke before the end of this, ben, can you take that to shop around the corner and to buy something? do you remember that great tv series where he had massive phone? it isjust the same. thank you very much. thank you
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for putting up with us. that is a footballing phrase, if somebody has a bad header, they call it a 50p had. and now you literally have a 50p had. thank you, ben. this has taken a strange turn, hasn't it? yes. thank you both. hold onto your coins. i will give them back to you. you are watching breakfast, in case you didn't realise. now you can catch up with the news wherever you are. go away, ben. you have caused havoc. good morning, i'm sonja jessup. bbc london has learnt that the department for transport is giving "serious consideration" to shortening the proposed high speed 2 line, and scrapping plans to tunnel to euston. instead, it would end at old oak common in north—west london. hs2 is meant to create faster journey times and free up space on the existing rail network. the department for transport says it won't comment, but the mayor says reducing the scheme would be bad for the capital. we need to have a station at euston,
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but also old oak common. if the government tries to shortchange londoners, it will be ultimately the country, businesses and family, that are shortchanged. i will ask the government in the review to make sure they recognise the benefits to the country by london getting the investment we need. and you can see the full story on inside out london. that's at 7.30 tonight here on bbc1 two men who claim they were framed by a detective in a notorious case of alleged police corruption have had their cases referred to the court of appeal. winston trew and sterling christie were among a group known as the oval four, arrested at the underground station in 1972. they spent eight months in jail for assaulting a police officer and attempted theft. now the criminal cases review commission says evidence about the "integrity" of the officer will form the basis of an appeal. a new exhibition's opened at the museum of london about the krios people. they're part descended from african slaves, and fought for britain in the american war of independence in exchange for freedom. many of them came to london to seek a new life but were then sent to sierra leone.
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let's take a look at the travel situation now. signalfailures on signal failures on the tube causing huge problems this morning. minor delays on the circle line, also in hammersmith & city line. severe delays on the metropolitan line due toa delays on the metropolitan line due to a severe signal failure at baker street. the northern line at the moment is part suspended, no northern line from golder screen to edgware. in the city, extension rebellion protesters are blocking roads around bankjunction in parliament square. the roads around saintjames parliament square. the roads around saint james park parliament square. the roads around saintjames park are shut out of the state opening of parliament. good morning to you. after a wet weekend we have more rain in the forecast for a good deal of today and many times this week as well. we start with early rain this morning. it will clear up a little bit later on. we will see some heavy showers and they could be quite heavy. we have a met office weather warning through
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this afternoon and into the evening. here is the initial belt of rain, particularly up towards the west and north—west. later the sunny spells start to come through, but with that risk of some heavy showers. a top temperature of 17, not too chilly for this time of year. showers continuing through the first part of the night. starting to clear up into tomorrow morning. it will be quite a bit misty and murky, with low cloud around, to start us off tomorrow. generally it will be an awful lot drier and not too chilly either. as we get through the day tomorrow, a little band of showers to work their way across us.
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good morning welcome to breakfast, with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today... pomp and politics for the queen's speech at westminster — but events in brussels could overshadow the prime minister's parliamentary plans. harry dunn's parents head to the us, but they say they won't meet the american woman involved in the crash that killed their son unless she agrees to return to the uk. incorrect bills and eyewatering roaming charges. vodafone customers travelling abroad are facing major issues with the phone company's data and voice services. the firm say they have deployed a fix — i'll have all the details. in sport...
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a weekend of records... just a day after eliud kipchoge breaks the two hour marathon barrier, brigid kosgei shatters paula radcliffe's 16—year—old world record, 16—year—old world record. quickstepping up the leaderboard — we'll catch up with mike after his highest strictly score. good morning from wellington barracks this morning, i am with the king's troop, who are getting ready to play their role in the state opening of parliament. today's weather is looking unsettled, with the driest conditions likely to be across the north—east of scotland. i will have more coming up. it's monday 1ath october. our top story... the first queen's speech
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of boris johnson's premiership will be unveiled today, with promises to introduce tougher sentences for foreign offenders, tackle violent crime, and invest more in the nhs. but events in brussels could still overshadow the prime minister's plans, as he said there was still "significant work" to do in brexit negotiations. labour has called today's speech an "uncosted wish list", which the government has no intention of delivering. our political correspondent nick eardley reports. today, there will be pomp... fanfare. ..and there will be pageantry. but this week is mostly about politics. first up, the queen's speech, where the government will set out its priorities — delivering brexit, tackling violent crime, investing in the nhs. labour says it is nothing more than a pre—election party political broadcast. this isn't an ordinary queen's speech, though. borisjohnson doesn't have a majority and can't promise he will be able to get these pledges through parliament. add into the mix the fact that he wants a general election
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and a lot of it feels more like a pitch to the country. and much of what is said today could well be overshadowed by what happens here. talks to try to find a brexit compromise continue in brussels, but there's been no breakthrough and time is running out at a key but there's been no breakthrough and time breakthrough and time is running out, with a key summit on thursday and friday. yesterday, borisjohnson told his cabinet there was a significant way to go, but he did still believe a deal was possible. others are far less confident. can borisjohnson get a new deal? can he persuade mps to back it and, if not, can they force him to delay our departure again? this week, answers to those questions should become clearer. nick eardley, bbc news. in a minute, we'll get the eu perspective from our reporter in luxembourg, but first let's speak to our political correspondent jonathan blake in westminster. jonathan, the government has big plans, but how realistic are they?
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well, it will look and sound like the traditional splendour and spectacle of the queen's speech that we are used to here at westminster, which is, of course, when the government sets out its big plans, as you say, for the parliamentary session ahead. looking down the list, there are 22 bills they want to get through the house of commons and house of lords. debate changes to everything from law and order to the nhs, to mental health, to railways, the transport network, broadband infrastructure and much, much more. but as you suggest, louise, the prime minister's chances of getting all those big plans through parliament are slim because he leads a government at the government moment and sibley doesn't have the numbers in the house of commons to get things done. that's one big reason why he wants an election. that could happen within weeks. another big backdrop to this queen's speech is, of course, the brexit negotiations, and how they
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turn out will have a big impact on boris johnson's chances turn out will have a big impact on borisjohnson's chances of turn out will have a big impact on boris johnson's chances of forming another government and winning a general election. he briefed his cabinet yesterday and said that although there was a pathway to a deal, as he put it, there is still a significant amount of work to do. this morning, the home office minister victoria adkins, who you heard from on breakfast a short while ago, sounded optimistic about the chances of getting a deal. within our own party, i think there isa within our own party, i think there is a real will to get brexit sorted and to get it with a deal so that we can turn this page on this part of the brexit negotiations, and start to focus on other things. focusing on other things is what the government wants to do. and this morning, they have announced that there will be a budget on sixth november, a matter of days after the uk is scheduled to leave the eu at the end of october, that is if there isa the end of october, that is if there is a brexit deal. if there isn't, it
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will be put back by several weeks. so, plans in place but big ifs and questions hanging in the air about whether any of it will get done. let's speak to our reporter adam fleming in luxembourg now. adam, lots of discussions over the weekend, give us an idea of where we are with all of this on monday morning? well, there is something unusual in the air in luxembourg, where foreign ministers are meeting, and that is a bit of positivity about the prospects for a brexit deal this week. the luxembourg foreign minister gave us a big thumbs up and even simon coveney, the irish foreign minister, who is usually very sceptical about progress, raised the prospect of a possible deal this week. something else which has changed is the eu's timetable. it was going to have to be approved by the summit on thursday, and it was said that it would have to be ready one week in advance of that. that has now gone. they are prepared to keep talking to the uk until wednesday, right at the
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last minute. the uk also seems to have ditched one of its ideas, which was the stormont assembly in northern ireland should have the right to veto any arrangements for northern ireland before they come into force. that has gone, although the uk says they are still looking ata the uk says they are still looking at a mechanism to beef up the say that the people of northern ireland have over what happens to them in brexit. the big sticking point is customs, the eu saying, let's do one thing, the uk saying, let's do another. they will have to find a way to bridge that gap in the next few days if they are going to have a deal by thursday. we're getting reports this morning of some big issues facing vodafone customers abroad. ben's looking into this one for us. ben? yes, this is if you have been roaming, maybe you are on holiday abroad. a lot of people waking up this morning to eye—wateringly huge bills, some into thousands of pounds, and this is an error. i have
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spoken to vodafone and they say what happened was, there was a fault in the system which meant that the bills were much larger than they should have been, and in some cases it has led to people being cut off entirely because they have gone beyond the perceived limit. i want to bring you a couple of tweets we have had this morning from customers. this one says... i spent nearly two hours trying to get through to support whilst on holiday in italy, totally ruined my sunday night, a £910 bill, she thought she had done something wrong and burst into tears. not a great holiday. this one says... yesterday the bill was £39, and within12 hours it had jumped to £266. he says... i am in europe and all the extra charge for data, despite having a lot of data allowa nce data, despite having a lot of data allowance left on the plan. he says, no success in getting in touch with vodafone. this one says... i have been charged £5,000 for about 200 megabytes of data in malta.
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astronomical charges, and again, they say they have tried to called vodafone and were cut off. so, i have spoken to vodafone and they say they are really sorry that some people could not use their phones yesterday, it is to do with roaming. a technical error, they say, they have now fixed it, customers will still receive crazy bills about they will not be charged. so, there are all sorts of images of... don't panic if you get a five grand bill. yes, do not panic, they say. but of course if you're on holiday, it is not what you want to be doing while you're on your holiday. they say they are going to make sure that they are going to make sure that they contact people to sort it out and people will not be billed, they say. let's have a look at some of the front pages for you this morning. the daily telegraph are saying that the eu are demanding more concessions in order to secure a brexit deal. the paper says that has prompted fury among brexiteers.
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the picture is of prince charles meeting the pope, at a ceremony at the vatican, where english priest cardinal newman was made a st. the guardian says boris johnson cardinal newman was made a st. the guardian says borisjohnson is using the queen's speech to introduce plans for tougher sentences for foreign criminals and child abusers. this picture is from the rugby world cup,japan this picture is from the rugby world cup, japan knocking out scotland yesterday. the daily mail has more on the prime minister's plans to tackle crime. those who "sneak" back into the country after being deported will have theirjail terms increased from weeks to years under the proposals. the picture is the duchess of cambridge, who's visiting pakistan with the duke of cambridge. and the sun has the latest on the very public and coleen rooney. the paper reports that jamie vardy has a ppa re ntly u nfollowed wayne rooney's instagram account. what drama! i didn't realise it is
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nine years this weekend since those two miners were rescued. does it feel all that time ago to you, or does it feel like just a couple of yea rs does it feel like just a couple of years ago? i can't work it out in my head! i can't, either. years ago? i can't work it out in my head! ican't, either. i'm years ago? i can't work it out in my head! i can't, either. i'm sure many of you will remember them being rescued. and this one says, will bring crosby finally have his first uk number one? more than a0 years after his death? this is because his widow and his family are rereleasing a new album and bing jewellers original vocals are said to be newly recorded. i can't believe he has never had a uk number one. we always love a christmas number one. yeah, for some reason, even though it's meaningless, it means a lot, do you know what i mean?!
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we've just witnessed an historic weekend of sporting achievements in both the women's and the men's marathons. after 16 years, paula radcliffe's world record was finally smashed yesterday. just the day before, eliud kipchoge became the first person to ever run 26.2 miles in under two hours. let's just remind ourselves of that incredible moment. gun fires. we have liftoff, apollo kipchoge is up and away. and the challenge, very easy to say, to run 26.2 miles in under two hours. 1.40, the unofficial time. eliud kipchoge storms into the history books in vienna. everything is a challenge for me, but for now, i've been working for this event for the last two years, i tried in monza in 2017 and i missed it by 26 seconds. i managed to make history and broke the two hour barrier.
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watch the clock here, brigid kosgei of kenya, heading for something absolutely incredible here, paula radcliffe's record has stood since 2003. brigid kosgei has made history! i am happy because i was not expecting to run like this. let's talk about those fantastic achievements now with someone who's no stranger to sporting success herself. we're joined by the olympic champion jo pavey. good morning, and sally is here with us as well. jo, both of them, extraordinary, in different ways. shall we talk about the sub—2 hour marathon, first of all? yeah, it was absolutely phenomenal, i felt emotional watching those closing scenes of him crossing the line with
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the pacemakers behind him. of course it wasn't an official world record but this was about pushing the limits of human endeavour, could a person actually run the marathon distance in under two hours? and he a nswered distance in under two hours? and he answered that question. of course he had the pacemakers, a1 pacemakers rotating, he had rings given to him from a bike, the course was prepared, there were factors there which made it not an official world record, but it was phenomenal and very inspirational. you ran at a fair old lick, jo, but if anyone wa nts to fair old lick, jo, but if anyone wants to try it, you have to put your treadmill to 13mph, and run that for two hours, obviously. the treadmill doesn't even go up to that! it is a ridiculous pace, isn't it? it is! we saw scenes of people trying that pace at the london marathon exhibition so they could see what it was like and there were scenes of people falling fat on their face, scenes of people falling fat on theirface, it isjust scenes of people falling fat on their face, it is just pure sprinting, really. you're running, 2.5 minutes per kilometre, mile
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splits of a.31, for that whole distance. it's like running 420 to 100 metres distances, and each one of them you run in 17 seconds. when you see these big records broken, like roger bannister, all those years ago, then all of a sudden it happens again and again and again, why is that? like you say, it's inspirational because it is not since roger bannister, the first person to break the four—minute mile, 65 years ago, have we had such a barrier broken. but records are going all over the place. i think eliud kipchoge, his real achievement is that he has inspired a lot of people, he has this phrase, no human is limited, and that has inspired other people to go out there and feel that they can achieve their personal goals and i think that is a beneficial thing, as he's a great speaker. and of course, paula radcliffe's record, it lasted 16 yea rs, radcliffe's record, it lasted 16 years, that was incredible as well?
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yeah, that was incredible, there had been rumours that she was going to go for the record if the weather was 0k, go for the record if the weather was ok, and she went out with full intent, she went through the first five miles in 25 minutes ten, she we nt five miles in 25 minutes ten, she went through the halfway point well under world record pace, and people thought maybe she had gone too much, maybe this is going to go completely wrong, but she kept it going. paula radcliffe herself was there to congratulate brigid at the end of the race. but i never thought i would see a woman run a marathon that quick, it was absolutely amazing. and we've got to ask you about your own training at the moment, where are you up to? i've had some injury problems, i'm still determined that getting old, maybe that's the problem. not old! no, that's the problem. not old! no, that's just a number. that's the problem. not old! no, that'sjust a number. i that's the problem. not old! no, that's just a number. i still feel that's just a number. i still feel thatis that's just a number. i still feel that is a possibility to run some good performances so i am keeping going, iam motivated, ijust hope the body holds up, but ijust love running and! the body holds up, but ijust love running and i think if you find a passion for something, you want to keep going. as a competitor, you
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wa nt to keep going. as a competitor, you want to make sure that you can achieve again, so, what are your goals for next year, are you thinking about another olympics?” am but! thinking about another olympics?” am but i don't want people to think i'm delusional, i know it is a big ask but i am very much focused on attempting that. but if it doesn't happen i will still be enjoying competing in events and enjoying my running and! competing in events and enjoying my running and i just love competing in events and enjoying my running and ijust love running and i think, like loads of people, there's goals and that's exciting, to set yourself a challenge. if you don't make it, you enjoy thejourney on the way. it doesn't matter whether it is your goals or their goals or a 5k, does it? except that you're a bit faster! quite a lot! i am going to find a treadmill which actually goes up to 21km/h. i am going to try 30 seconds, see if i can manage it! thank you very much and good luck with your running! let's get the weather now, and carol is at wellington barracks this morning, where very special preparations are being made ahead of today's queen's speech.
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where are you, carol, good morning?! good morning from the wellington barracks in london. we are here this morning with the king's troop royal horse artillery and you can see some of the horses, which are now ready for the procession later on, for the state opening of parliament. they look magnificent, we've seen them getting their breakfast, we've seen them getting their nails painted and their whiskers shaved, and they are almost ready to go. we have also seen almost ready to go. we have also seen the world war i guns which will be fired today from green park for the state opening of parliament. they've now been taken outside in preparation, things are really starting to heat up here ahead of the procession for the state opening of parliament, and the guns will be fired when her majesty the queen arrives at the house of lords later
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on this morning. now, it is raining outside, it is nice and toasty inside here with the horses, and the forecast for the rest of this week remains unsettled. we're looking at rain at times or indeed some sunshine. today, what we have are three distinctive areas of weather, we have got the weather front coming in from the south—east, which is bringing rain on and off during the day in london. it is moving northwards and westwards. and we have another one across northern ireland bringing in rain. and another week one across the north of scotland, with rain turning showery during the day. this morning we have got the rain around the south—east, pushing up through the midlands, heading towards east wales and into southern parts of northern england. rain transferring from northern ireland into western scotland. in northern scotland, the rain pushing towards the northern isles and weakening. the driest conditions today will be in the north and east
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of scotland, which is where we will see the most sunshine. as we head through the evening and overnight period, that rain will continue to push northwards and eastwards, resting across north—east england, possibly into south—east scotland. there will still be a few showers in the west. some mist and fog patches forming. overnight lows, not particularly low. tomorrow morning, rain pushing off into the north sea leaving a lot of cloud, which will break up and we will start to see some sunny break up and we will start to see some sunny spells. however there will also be a few showers in northern ireland, wales, south—west england, but they will be the exception rather than the rule. by the end of the day, a new weather front coming in across northern ireland will introduce rain and strengthening winds, strong winds overnight across the irish sea and the english channel, and the rain continuing to push over towards the north sea, clearing all but the north of scotland and potentially for a time the south—east of
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england. after that, the forecast is u nsettled. england. after that, the forecast is unsettled. just before i go, have another look at these horses, they are truly magnificent. the amount of attention to detail that is taking place here this morning is beyond my wildest dreams, i didn't realise this. i know, we've been watching them working on them since the early hours this morning, and you're right, carol, they look beautiful and fantastic. the parents of 19—year old harry dunn, who was killed in a road accident involving the wife of an american official, have arrived in the united states to continue their campaign for justice. charlotte charles and tim dunn will give a series of interviews for the us national media. we can talk now to the family's lawyer, radd seiger, who is in new york. thank you very much for coming on the programme to give us a bit more information about what might happen today. over the weekend we saw that anne sacoolas, the woman involved in this, said she would like to meet
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harry's parents. do you think that will happen? good morning. it's obviously a very positive development. we were delighted to have anne sacoolas's lawyer reach out to me and we had a very warm exchange by telephone, and we agreed that she and i would meet at the earliest opportunity to try and see if we can bring the parties together at some point in the future. it's not imminent, there is a lot of work as you can imagine that we need to go into. it would need to be in a controlled environment perhaps with mediators and therapists around. so, best will in the world, that is likely to take some time. but certainly, mrs sacoolas's lawyer and i committed to each other that we we re i committed to each other that we were trying to get together this week. funnily enough i am in new york and she is in london but we will do our best to try and get together and see if we can do something soon. can i ask you
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specifically on that, do you think that meeting will only take place if there is a chance that mrs sacoolas welcome back to the uk, will that be on the table? yeah, dan, it is a very simple issue, right from the outset, when i got involved, harry's mother charlotte made it clear to me that for her, this was all about mrs sacoolas returning to the uk and simply presenting herself to northamptonshire police, so that they could resume or continue their inquiries. that is what it is all about. so, what! inquiries. that is what it is all about. so, what i have said to my colleague representing mrs sacoolas is, we would love to sit down and talk and bring the parties together, but the precondition for doing that is that mrs sacoolas must commit to returning to the uk to face the authorities, and it's a very simple issue. if you or i had been involved in sucha issue. if you or i had been involved in such a matter and skipped the
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country, i think everybody else would expect us to return to cooperate with the inquiry. so, i've made it clear, respectfully, that we can sitand made it clear, respectfully, that we can sit and have tea and coffee and talk, but there is little point in doing that unless mrs sacoolas does what we would all have to do. no—one is above the law. and there is no—one rule for one and one for the other. and so, i always enjoy spending time with esteemed colleagues, but on this occasion there doesn't seem much point, u nless we there doesn't seem much point, unless we have that commitment before we even engage. it seems there might be a bit of external pressure on this as well and i weather weather appearing on us tv, because we know that president trump does tend to comment on things which might be in the us media, there is a lot going on for the president and many people in america at the moment, taking those national headlines, do you think these interviews might change that and
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bring this to more prominence in america? absolutely. that was part of my strategy right from the minute i got involved. from the bottom of our hearts, thank you to all the supporters that we were able to garner back home in the uk, you made it possible for us, you gave us the springboard and the bbc and other collea g u es springboard and the bbc and other colleagues in the media made it possible for us to raise the profile of this awful situation, which i think has touched the heart strings, pulled on the heartstrings, of every single—parent back home. and look at the success that we've had in the uk, we decided at the end of last week that it was now a critical time to come to the us and to do exactly what we did in the uk, but clearly president trump is sitting here in washington and there are hundreds of millions of people who live in this country and if we can do the same here that we did there, then we're
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hopeful that that one united voice will get you to the white horse and will get you to the white horse and will cause president trump to reconsider what we think is a flawed and pretty disastrous decision —— the white house —— in recalling her in the first place and then not returning her once that request was made by the foreign & commonwealth office. radd seiger, really good to talk to you on the programme this morning. that is radd seiger, who is representing the parents of harry dunn. time for the news where you are.
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elsewhere there will be drier and brighter weather and temperature today getting up to about 13 to 18 degrees. you can see through tonight at that rain continues to spread north and north—east words, there will be some showers behind it in southern areas. for many of us it will be a dry night into tuesday morning. overnight temperatures of eight to 12 degrees. for most of us on tuesday it should be dry. some bright skies around as well and just a couple of showers, particularly towards southern areas. goodbye.
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this is worklife from bbc news, with sally bundock and tim willcox. across europe, the age of austerity is over. what does it mean for government debt? live from london, that's our top story on monday 1ath october. spend, spend, spend. the queen will open a new session of the uk parliament setting out the government's agenda,
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