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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 15, 2019 6:00am-8:30am BST

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good morning — welcome to breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: racism at england's euro qualifer against bulgaria — the match had to be stopped twice in the face of nazi salutes and abusive chanting. probably one of the most appalling nights i've seen on football. scandals, including allegations in a bbc panorama investigation of patients with learning the england players made a collective decision to carry on disabilities and autism aand went on to win 6—0, the question now is how being taunted and bullied at the now—closed whorlton hall will the authorities respond. hospital in county durham, a serious drop in the quality underline some of the concerns of care for people raised by the care regulator. with mental illness and learning disabilities — the care quality commission report health inspectors warn that care looking at the whole of the health services in england are facing a perfect storm of problems. and care sector says safety cracking down on car finance. and quality are deteriorating in specialist mental health
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the regulator says customers could be paying millions services, with too many people of pounds too much — looked after by workers who lack today we find out what they're doing skills and training. to tackle it. in 2018, inspectors who visited britian‘s gymnasts are celebtrating their best ever hospitals for people with learning world championships — three of the team's medal winners are with us this morning. disabilities and autism rated 1% as inadequate. this year, 10% have been given this lowest rating. it's a cloudy start of the day for last year, inspections of inpatient many. rain across north—east england mental health services for children but that will clear, the sun will and teenagers found come out but later, more rain will 3% were inadequate. come out but later, more rain will come in from the west. now, 7% are failing to meet standards. what we've seen is a perfect storm brewing — an increase in demand, it's tuesday 15th october. plus some real concerns our top story. england's euro 2020 qualifier against bulgaria had to be stopped over the workforce. twice last night and came close to being abandoned after it was marred by racist abuse. and what that means in practical terms is there's been a significant reduction in the number monkey chants and nazi of learning disability salutes were directed nurses, which means that the carers at england's players that are looking after people in what the football association chairman greg clarke called "one with incredibly complex needs of the most appalling nights" don't have the support he'd seen in football. and the skills necessary. joe wilson sent this report the report also says increasing from the bulgarian capital, demand and staff shortages sofia. are causing problems across the health and care system, with accident and emergency departments often having to pick up
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you could say this game began with marcus rashford's blistering the pieces when people can't get finish to score the the help they need in the community. first england goal. the government says it is making in fact, it began before that. record investments in the nhs, and that it is transforming mental health services. it began when england's players first heard the monkey chants, efforts to reach a brexit deal the racist abuse. i mean, i heard it before before thursday's crucial summit i got onto the pitch, in the warm—up. of european union leaders continue today. the eu so we spoke about it coming off the pitch after the warm—up, is considering a new emergency and then obviously it was summit which would take place towards the end of the month happening in the game. if a deal can't be reached this like i said, it's difficult to kind week. of categorise the whole country. let's speak to our political i think it's perhaps a minority, correspondent jonathan blake who is in westminster. and the second half was a lot better, so perhaps a victory all round. there were intense discussions good morning to you, jonathan. it is a tense few days ahead. set things between england players, up a tense few days ahead. set things management and officials upfor us, through the first half, a tense few days ahead. set things up for us, where are we today? good and an announcement was made morning. well, negotiations ended at to the crowd that the referee might suspend the game if around 10pm last night. they will start again at around 10am this the abuse continued. morning in brussels. and it has to bea it was greeted by boos. morning in brussels. and it has to be a good sign for those who want to deal that both sides are still talking. but as you suggest, time is there were nazi salutes on the ground. incredibly tight. eu leaders will when england's players left gatherfor incredibly tight. eu leaders will gather for a summit in brussels on this pitch at half—time,
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they then discussed thursday, and the question is what whether they should even carry can be agreed before then? they have on with the match. they decided to play on, said they won't negotiate directly and england's captain told me he believed that was the right decision. with borisjohnson. there was a bit everyone wanted to carry on and do the talking on the pitch, ofa with borisjohnson. there was a bit of a reality check last night from which i'm extremely proud of. finland's prime minister, one of it's not easy to play those eu leaders who will be there in circumstances like that. but the 6—0 fits, really, at the summit, chairing it, in fact, saying that there is no time, and the way we played i'm extremely impractical or legal ways, to find an agreement before the eu council proud of, for sure. meeting. we need more time. now, thatis one answer to the abuse meeting. we need more time. now, that is a pretty definitive view was the score line. that is a pretty definitive view that the deal will not be done by manager gareth southgate has openly acknowledged that english football the end of this week. it could has its own issues to deal with, change, of course, but in reality, but racism was displayed in the next 48 hours, they will in its starkest, most blatant form here in bulgaria. either be a big breakthrough in the england's players exposed it, talks, a breakdown of the talks, or more likely, something in between. a but the reaction can't stop here. holding statement agreed that progress has been made but they need joe wilson, bbc news, in sofia. sally's with us now. more time to do a deal. add in the complication that borisjohnson has an extraordinary night in so many to ask for an extension to the different ways. does this represent brexit process if a deal isn't reached by the weekend. a line in the sand? it was brexit process if a deal isn't reached by the weekendli brexit process if a deal isn't reached by the weekend. i am sure we will be talking about this throughout the programme. thank you extraordinary. watching the game, very much. there was a moment in that first the united states has imposed half where i thought, this game is financial sanctions on turkey
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in response to its military not going to last another five minutes. at ground to a halt. does offensive against kurdish forces in northern syria. three turkish ministers have been blacklisted by president trump and had their us assets frozen. it represent a line in the sand? i mr trump has been criticised for his decision to withdraw us troops from syria before think in terms of how we talk about racism in foot well, yes it probably the turkish offensive began. does. in terms of what uefa are a british couple are being held going to do about it, we will have by united states immigration officials after they allegedly to wait and see. the protocol that crossed the border from canada illegally. they say it happened by accident when they swerved we saw the players follow, very well to avoid hitting an animal while driving south of vancouver 12 days ago. up we saw the players follow, very well up to we saw the players follow, very well uptoa we saw the players follow, very well up to a point was put in place. but we still don't know what they are they were arrested and going to do next. the interesting are still being held, along with their three—month—old baby. our north america correspondent thing is the reaction to what happened last night. with an peter bowes is in los angeles. incredible reaction on social media. so what happened in the first place rio ferdinand. and what is happening now? good morning. david and eileen collins we re morning. david and eileen collins were travelling with their three—month—old son in the vancouver area of canada. they were with relatives, another couple with young children, and they were driving near you saw harry kane in the piece from the border. they say they swerved to
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joe wilson. avoid an animal in the road, and that cause them to go down another road that they hadn't meant to be on, and it headed towards the us border. and once they had crossed the border into washington state, they saw the flashing blue lights. the police stopped them, they were taken into the police stopped them, they were ta ken into custody, the police stopped them, they were taken into custody, initially in tyrone mings was making his debut washington state. they were separated, taken to separate la st 00:05:22,925 --> 2147483051:39:26,177 tyrone mings was making his debut 2147483051:39:26,177 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 last night facilities, eventually flown across country to pennsylvania, where they are currently in another detention facility, one of three in the united states designed to house families. the kind of place that we have been hearing a lot about in recent months, with migrants moving into the us, migrant families across the southern border. of course, the big difference with this case is that this british couple say they didn't wa nt to this british couple say they didn't want to come to the united states. it was simply a mistake. they went down the wrong road. they are still being detained. they have complained to the american government, the us customs authority here has confirmed that they are being held, but they
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say, contrary to what the couple say, contrary to what the couple say, they say they are being held in some pretty tough, frigid conditions in the cells, but the authorities say that they are safe and humane conditions. 0k, well, thank you very much. i am sure it is a story we will keep up—to—date on. thank you for your time. two authors have been named the joint winners of the 2019 booker prize for the first time in 50 years, after thejudges broke the rules to declare a tie. judges said they couldn't separate margaret atwood's the testament, a follow up to the handmaid's tale, and berna rdine evaristo's novel girl, woman, other. bernadine is the first black woman to be awarded the prize. the two novellists will now share the £50,000 prize. that is amazing. i love that they just break the rules. why not? they are due to meet the prime minister. the duke and duchess of cambridge
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continue their official visit to pakistan today, where they're due to meet the prime minister, imran khan. they'll also travel to the city of lahore, amid tight security. the last royal visit to the country was made by prince charles and camilla in 2006. they are due to meet the prime minister. england thrashed bulgaria 6—0 in their latest euro 2020 qualifier — but the match was overshadowed by racist chanting at england players. more of what was happening across the pitch. in the next few minutes. the cover of what happened last night. rightly so. it was the horrible thing to watch, a horrible game to watch. despite that, england crushed bulgaria. marcus rushford scored the first goal. tyrone mings and raheem sterling appeared to be the targets of the chants — with the game in sofia stopped twice — as officials threatened to abandon the match. paddy mcnair scored twice as northern ireland beat the czech republic 3—2 to win a friendly match away from home
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for the first time in 13 years. andy murray says he'll leave the european open if his wife kim goes into labour earlier than expected. murray is scheduled to play his first round match in belgium today. and ireland centre bundee aki will miss the rest of the rugby world cup afterfailing to have his red card against samoa overturned at a disciplinary hearing. aki has until tomorrow to appeal. a very interesting paper review coming up. you are going to have a very busy day. and do get in touch with us as well. if you haven't been out and about, let's give you a bit ofa out and about, let's give you a bit of a headline. miserable. out and about, let's give you a bit ofa headline. miserable. carol out and about, let's give you a bit of a headline. miserable. carol has the details. good morning everybody. it will be miserable all day, i can tell you that. what we have this morning is quite a cloudy start but
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also some lightweight effective in parts north—east england and make the parts of eastern scotland but is that moves away, the cloud will break but many of us will see some sunshine until later when we have a new weather front coming in from the west. as you can see, this cloud here, a clutch of weather fronts producing brain. this respite coming in behind and later on, the next batch of cloud and rain is going to come oui’ batch of cloud and rain is going to come our way and that will bring some more rain. as come our way and that will bring some more rain. as we come our way and that will bring some more rain. as we go through the course of the morning, we say goodbye to this front, this one fizzles and we have some sunshine and later, the next front comes in. soa and later, the next front comes in. so a cloudy start for many areas. still ran across north—east england. turning more drizzly. it mayjust pull off into the north sea. behind it, the cloud will start to break up. later again, the cloud thickens across the west of northern ireland, heralding the arrival of the next
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weather front which will introduce rain and gusty winds. temperatures ranging from 11 to the north to 17 in the south. it will feel quite pleasa nt in the south. it will feel quite pleasant for the time of year. through this evening and overnight, clear skies and eastern areas and out towards the west, the weather front advances, bringing rain, not moving particularly quickly and around it, the gusty winds. eastern areas could well is] dry all night. no rain till wednesday morning. single figures in parts of scotland and in sheltered glens, a little bit lower than this. as we head through wednesday, whether fronts continue to move. we have a bit of a respite before showers come in later on. all connected with a large area. first thing in the morning, it does move over towards the east. before it
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clears up into the north sea but it will be slower to clear from the not expect the far north—east of scotla nd expect the far north—east of scotland in the far south—east of england. one of two showers today but still, a fair bit of sunshine around and temperatures, 11—16, maybe a bit higher across the channel islands and as we head on through thursday, low pressure moves ever closer. the winds will be stronger, particularly if we go through the day across the south—western approaches. it is going to bring in some showers. the further east you are, but out towards the west, you could see showers coming in. wendy and the south—west, with highs up to fit in degrees. a bit of everything coming away this week. carole, thank you very much. not as miserable as you thought it was. let's take a look at some
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of today's front pages. the daily mirror leads on the racist abuse aimed at england's black footballers by bulgarian fans at last night's euros qualifier in sofia. the paper describes it as football's night of shame. the guardian also reports on england's 6—0 win being marred by chants and gestures. its lead story is about an increase in the use of what the paper calls welfare robots within the benefits system. the daily express focuses on the prime minister's pledge to get this amazing country moving again by delivering brexit. it came after the first queen's speech of his premiership, which was described by labour as an uncosted wish list. and the telegraph says a brexit deal is getting closer. that headline is beneath a picture of a smiling queen at yesterday's state opening of parliament. sources in brussels and london have told the paper of cautious optimism that a new deal could be struck. den and sally are here to have a look at the papers —— ben.
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den and sally are here to have a look at the papers -- ben. the back pages this morning a very powerful. this is the telegraph pullout sports section. they say disgusting. the back page of the mirror, kick them out. on the back of the express, losers, and on the back of the daily mail, a picture of raheem sterling, england six, racism zero. and it is the comment pieces this morning which are really interesting. henry winter saying in the times, england should have sent a message and simply walked off. i know that is something the players have talked about. they all had agreed that if it got to that point they were going to do it. gareth southgate handled this, i think, to do it. gareth southgate handled this, ithink, absolutely brilliantly. he was so calm, com pletely brilliantly. he was so calm, completely in control of what was happening, and for the players to have the confidence to just say we are not putting up with this, that is obviously a symptom of the
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culture he has developed within that whole set up. that is the incident there. you can see him turning around to the fourth official and saying did you hear that? but also, henry winter points out, one of the really interesting moments was the moment that there fa chairman, greg clark, left the posh seats where the officials and the dignitaries were sitting. recently got up and walked away to stand with gareth southgate. did you see, as well, there were pictures last night obviously but the bulgarian captain went and pleaded with the fans at halftime, spent most of half time talking to them, i don't know what he said but you get the idea it was we have just got to stop this. yes, and he was there on his own doing that, which was quite interesting, because did you then hear the bulgarian manager afterwards saying i didn't know he wasn't in the dressing room at halftime. i didn't hear anything. there are issues, aren't there? and there are issues in football wherever it is played. there is stuff here in the uk which again
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needs addressing. but it has really brought it into very sharp focus last night. on the front of the financial times this morning, you may know that facebook has been trying to launch its own digital currency trying to launch its own digital currency to try and bypass the banks altogether. it wants to launch its own, it is called libra, but it has been beset by all sorts of problems, not least regulation, and some of the big backers have pulled out, ebay, mastercard, mercado, all pulled out. real struggles to try and launch an alternative to our international banking system. and a quick word while we're on banks. rbs, you may had been at some point, a big splash on the front of the telegraph, trying to buy the start—up bank monzo. the boss has been there a number of times talking to us and trying to shake up banking. rbs bulked at the cost, it is now valued at £2 billion. so they
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might have a thought about investing a bit earlier. and this story makes lots of the inside pages. if you missed it yesterday, this is the funeralfor pc missed it yesterday, this is the funeral for pc andrew harper, and many people turning out on the streets of oxford yesterday to pay tribute to him. his widow saying of him, the kindest of kind in the sweetest of sweet. new words in the oxford in this dictionary. some people don't approve, do they? cocky, which is a cockroach, jafaican, which is someone who adopts jamaican culture falsely, on the shambles has made it in, i thought it was in there already, a situation that is comprehensively mismanaged —— omnishambles. but the one that has got people agitated is variations of something. so sumfin is in there. sally is not happy with
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that, and summink, and so is whatevs. does this mean that they are now legit scrabble words? one last one, as well. you know i don't like snakes, right? either way, if you don't like snakes, away now. check out the head of this bad boy. that is a king cobra with a massive head. and i will keep a quick look at that while i tell you, this was found in thailand near a shopping centre. it was removed, it was believed to be four metres in length. four metres in length. and the venom is not that potent, but a single bite from a king cobra can kill 20 people. enough venom in
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there. it is safe to look back now, everyone. i would just leg it. there. it is safe to look back now, everyone. i wouldjust leg it. and throughout the programme this morning, sally has been mentioning it and we will be talking about it throughout the programme, what happened during that england game yesterday, last night, and the repercussions of all of that and what it might mean. and do get in contact with us about that, it would be great to hear what you think, what the next step from uefa should be, and how you thought the england players and the england infrastructure dealt with that. and as ever, we will be discussing it on social media as well. torture — that is just one of the words used by people with autism and learning difficulties to describe their time in some secure mental health units. but more and more vulnerable people are being locked away in unsuitable units, far from home, according to a report out today by the care quality commission. one of them is called jack, and he has been telling his story to breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin.
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it was like a prison, really. he told me the only way out of there was to die. breakfast has long reported on the plight of people with learning disabilities and autism locked away in hospitals. it was really horrible, terrifying. autism locked away in hospitals. it was really horrible, terrifyingm was really horrible, terrifyingm was discharge to heaven. that's what he would tell you. that's what he would tell me. but after 3.5 years, jack is out and can tell his own story. at home he shows me around his amazing collection. so this is my museum. he is full of pride, but his time inside was filled with
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trauma. because the alarms were so loud, ringing into your ears, like, it was horrible. basically every day, constantly, all the time. jack describes an atmosphere which is charged. if you went to get angry, or something, they used to charge m, or something, they used to charge in, grab all the stuff, my personal belongings, and just take it out. this is my favourite thing, because it is all set out really nicely... he witnessed prolonged restraints. it was, like, millions of staff coming injust one person. he it was, like, millions of staff coming in just one person. he was subjected to repeated restraint. coming in just one person. he was subjected to repeated restraintm was like they are crashing you down, it was like bone crushing. he lashed out at a nurse and was himself attacked by a patient. two of his teeth, like, the front teeth bit at the top of my head. and i was calling for help, but they were taking ages. and he wanted to come home. you know, it's not fair. but had friends who had been there for yea rs. had friends who had been there for years. some of these people i've seen, they are not good at... sorry.
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they are not in a good place. what do you say to the people who say that this is a hospital, people are here to get better? no, they can't. this is not a hospital, they can't get better. it is an institution. it isa get better. it is an institution. it is a holding place. they are putting them all together, they are triggering each other. it is non— therapeutic. the defences, the alarms, the keys. say hello. hello, marvin. hello. he has got a lot of support here. they are wonderful here, for him. is this where he needs to be? this is where he needs to be. today, the coc, the health watchdog, agreed. and todayjack to be. today, the coc, the health watchdog, agreed. and today jack has his own home, his own front door, close to family and friends, two support workers to keep him safe, and he is doing really well. i hope i'm not upsetting you, talking about this. no, it's fine. it's fine. you
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really did want to talk about it, though, didn't you? yes, i did. it is important to you. yes. weighs it so is important to you. yes. weighs it so important? to make these pieces better. how much better is it, now you are home? much better. i still like going to the actual natural history museum, as well. but i think mine's... in secret, i think mine's better. i'll high-5 that. love it. i am so better. i'll high-5 that. love it. i am so proud of you. i know, mum. love you, mum. thank you to jack and his mum, jayne, forjoining us. and lovely to see that hug, as well, isn't it? time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tarah welsh. trafalgar square has been cleared of climate change activists
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after the police issued a london—wide ban on the group's protests. extinction rebellion had been lawfully camped in the area since last monday. more than 1,400 people have been arrested during eight days of disruption across the capital. police have told protestors to stop their action immediately or face arrest. the queen will attend a service at westminster abbey today to mark its 750th anniversary. the church was originally built by edward the confessor, but in 1269 it was replaced with the grand gothic structure that stands on the site today. he is one of the uk's most famous artists, and now work from antony gormley‘s 45—year career is going on display at the royal academy. the exhibition combines old and new work from the sculptor. the installation is being described as his most ambitious project for a decade.
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i think that creativity, in a world which is becoming incredibly information bound, is maybe the most important human resource that we've got. we are all responsible for making the future. that takes imagination. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there are minor delays on thejubilee line westbound between stratford and north greenwich. that's because of a faulty train. also, gloucester road station is closed because of faulty lifts. onto the roads, the piccadilly underpass remains closed towards knightsbridge. that is because of gas works. in knightsbridge, brompton road is closed southbbound from brompton oratory for roadworks. whitehall is closed northbound from horse guards avenue to trafalgar square for gas works. and in lewishham, thurston road is closed because of water works. now the weather, with sara thornton. good morning to you. a much better
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day in prospect for us across london today. it's generally going to be pretty dry, something i've not said for a while. just a stray shower later on. and actually, although we start with some low cloud, we are going to see some brighter skies developing and some sunshine for the afternoon. they could just be a couple of showers to drift our way from the south as the afternoon wears on, but it is generally mostly dry, with a top temperature of 17 celsius. and largely dry into this evening in the first part of the night as well. but then we'll see a thickening of the cloud from the south—west, and by tomorrow morning, the next belt of wet weather is with us. the next belt of wet weather is with us. temperatures holding up overnight in double figures, but not a pleasant commute tomorrow morning. some heavy bursts of rain for a time. all of that whistle through quite quickly, but it will be breezy as it does though, with gusts of 35 mph. later a real improvement, though, for the afternoon. a little bit of brightness coming through and certainly drier, at 16 degrees. looks like we will have some fine weather again on thursday, but more wet weather for friday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom
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in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it is back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. england beat bulgaria 6—0 last night but did the authorities do enough to tackle racists among the home fans? we'll be talking to ged grebby, of show racism the red card. i'm not gathering intelligence so the government can lie to the british people. katharine gun was the gchq whistleblower who leaked a plan to bug the united nations. she'll be telling us how she feels about her life being turned into a film, starring keira knightley. also this morning, a captured british paratrooper who survived the bombing of dresden is turning 100 years old today.
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victor gregg will be on the sofa to share his remarkable story. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. england's euro 2020 qualifier had to be stopped and came close to being abandoned after it was marred by racist abuse. chance were directed at england players. it was described as one of the most appalling nights on football. england won the match which took place in sofia by six goals to zero. people with learning disabilities in england are still being locked up in unsuitable secure units. that's according to a report by the care quality commission, the watchdog also reporting that half of accident and emergency departments are not good enough. the department
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of health and social care say the government is committed to providing the best care. efforts to reach a brexit deal before thursday will continue. the eu is considering a new emergency summit which will take pace towards the end of the month. but the eu's chief negotiator has said the gaps still remain between the uk and the eu. the united states has imposed financial sanctions on turkey in response to its military offensive in turkey. three turkish ministers have been blacklisted by president trump and had the us assets frozen. mrtrump has trump and had the us assets frozen. mr trump has been criticised for his decision to withdraw us troops from syria. a british couple are being held by united states immigration officials after they cross the border illegally. they say it happen by accident after they swerved to
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avoid an animal south of vancouver. us authorities confirmed the couple are arrested and are still being held in pennsylvania along with their baby. two authors have been named thejoint their baby. two authors have been named the joint winners of the booker prize afterjudges decided they could not separate them. margaret at would's the testaments was recognised and bernardine everisto became the first will black woman to be recognised. only twice before in its 50—year history has the booker prize been split between joint winners. in fact, rules were introduced to stop this happening. but last night, thejudges could not separate margaret atwood and berna rdine evaristo. the testaments, margaret atwood's long—awaited follow—up to the handmaid's tale, was described by the head judge as a savage and beautiful novel. the 79—year—old is the oldest person to win the prize, and it was her second time.
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i am very surprised. i would have thought that i would have been too elderly. and i kind of don't need the attention, so i'm very glad that you're getting some. thank you. bernardine evaristo made the shortlist for the first time with her eighth book. girl, woman, other was praised as something utterly magical. it follows 12 characters, mostly black british women. i — i suppose a lot of people say this. i never thought it would happen to me. and i will say that i am the first black woman to win this prize. applause. the authors will now share the £50,000 award, but winning one of the world's most prestigious literary prizes is about so much more. bernardine evaristo has described it as a game changer. tolu adeoye, bbc news.
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the duke and duchess of cambridge continued their initial visit to pakistan. they also going to travel to the of lahore amid tight security. thank you for coming on giving us a bit of information, secunder kermani. i'd love to know what you are thinking about the significance of this visit, and the people of pakistan. here in pakistan, this trip is being seen as an opportunity to showcase how much safer pakistan has become in the past few years. the authorities here in ordinary people are very keen on attracting more tourists to pakistan. but i think this trip has a special significance for the uk, given the large british—pakistani
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population. around 1.5 million people from pakistan live in the uk. he will be following in the footsteps of his mother he made three trips in the 1990s. wright you mention those trips from princess diana and they were equally memorable. absolutely. she came for the first time in 1991 and i was speaking to a pakistani government minister and she told me huge crowds came out to see princess diana. she then came again in 1996 and 1997 partly because she was in a relationship with the british—pakistani man at the time but she spent time visiting and raising money for a cancer hospital that was set up by the man who is now the prime minister of pakistan, imran khan and she took what is reported to be one of her favourite photos, cradling a sick child and
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the queen and prince charles have also all made trips out to pakistan. but it's princess diana who most fondly is remembered here. secunder kermani, thank you for talking. they are quite busy. visiting a school this morning, travelling to the foothills of the himalayas to set up a leopard camera trap and the meeting imran khan, the president of pakistan, at about 830. don't know how to describe last night but ugly might be one word. it was an ugly night in sofia as england's euro 2020 qualifier in bulgaria was halted twice in the first half after england's footballers were subjected to racist abuse. it was uncomfortable to watch at home. i can't imagine what it was like those players on the pitch, particularly those players are subject to racist abuse. cameras in
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a stadium announcement condemning the abuse. camera's picked up fans making racist gestures and racist chants. a stadium announcement condemned the abuse before stating the match would be abandoned if it continued. a group of fans left the stadium after the game was halted for a second time. england went on to win 6 nil and move a step closer to qualification. the goals came from marcus rashford, two each from ross barkley and raheem sterling with harry kane rounded things off. they want to be recognised for their output all. they were playing so well that they didn't want to leave the pitch at that moment as well. i'm sure that will have been part of our thinking so i'm incredibly proud of all of the players and all of the staff. i don't think, of course we could be criticised for not going far enough but i think we've made a huge statement and frankly, we were
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in an impossible situation to get it right for the satisfaction of everybody. a really impressive reaction from gareth southgate. i think he has helped the players set that tone and feel like they can ta ke that tone and feel like they can take a stand themselves that what i wa nt take a stand themselves that what i want to share with you is the moment when everything changed because it was really important. this was when tyrone mings playing for england in its first match, turned to one of the officials. i don't think i've ever seen the officials. i don't think i've ever seen that quite so clearly, a player stop and say, did you hear that? england players spoke on social media after the game.
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we're going to be talking about this much more the programme. northern ireland also played last night — and they won a friendly away from home for the first time in 13 yea rs. paddy mcnair scored twice, as they beat the czech republic 3—2 in prague. their next euro qualifier is at home to the netherlands on the 16th of november. cristiano ronaldo reached a career landmark last night — this penalty was his 700th career goal — but it didn't help his portugal side in their european qualifier against ukraine — they lost 2—1. pillai got over 1000. he got a way to go. —— pele. dan evans has won his first match since becoming the new british number one — he beat bernard tomic
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in the first round of the stockholm open. today, andy murray is due to play his first—round match at the european open in antwerp — but he's ready to leave the tournament, if his wife kim goes into labour earlier than expected. andy murray features in this story too — roger federer has announced he will compete at next year's olympic games in toyko, as he aims to win the only title that's eluded him so far in his career. federer has won all four grand slam tournaments — and he did win gold in the men's doubles in beijing in 2008 but he's never won the olympic singles title. he reached the final in 2012, but he was beaten by andy murray. every olympic games has been very special for every olympic games has been very specialfor me. i don't know, ifelt like this is for me something i would like to do if unhealthy and that's why i really hope i will be andi that's why i really hope i will be and i can't wait. there's been a setback for ireland's rugby team, ahead of their world cup quarter—final against the defending champions new zealand this weekend. centre bundee aki has been given a three—week ban and will miss the rest of the tournament, afterfailing to have his red card against samoa overturned at a disciplinary hearing. he has until tomorrow to appeal.
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that is a big loss for them. three weeks. he might have put it on hold for a bit. what on earth was roger fetter are doing? i'm going to go and find out right now. did you ever have one of those? i loved them. i used to strap it to my head and try and catch it. it was great. good for head eye co—ordination. we will stick with that. q. efforts to reach a brexit deal before thursday's crucial summit of european union leaders will continue today. negotiators from both sides are trying to bridge what the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, called big gaps. but sources say another emergency summit could be held at the end
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of the month if a deal is not reached this week. let's speak to our europe reporter adam fleming, who is in luxembourg. it is likely sort of take the temperature every morning of the negotiations. so how are they? what is going on? it is quite hard to say, because yesterday the british in the uk teams went into the negotiating room about 10am in the morning. they didn't come out until 10:30pm at night, and no details have managed to leak out from what they were discussing. so we have got no idea, really, what stage we are at. but we will get a bit of an idea very at. but we will get a bit of an idea very soon, at. but we will get a bit of an idea very soon, because at. but we will get a bit of an idea very soon, because michel barnier, the eu chief negotiator, is driving from brussels to luxembourg here, where european affairs ministers from the 27 other eu countries are having a meeting this morning. and he will update them and then we will probably get a bit of information from that meeting about where things stand. but when you talk to diplomats and you talk to officials, they say the chances of there being a revised brexit deal ready to be signed off by leaders at the summit
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on thursday is looking very, very slim, because they say by now, surely, you would have the draft legal text with all the paragraphs and article numbers and footnotes for the experts to have a look at. that draft legal text with paragraphs and footnotes has not emerged yet, so some people think that means it is probably game over for a deal at the summit this week. although a couple of countries are still optimistic, they say there is still optimistic, they say there is still may be just enough time. so if that doesn't happen, they are already looking at their diaries to see if they can have another emergency summit, are they? yes, so i suspect what might end up happening at the summit on thursday and friday is you have quite a general discussion amongst the leaders. no negotiations with boris johnson, mind, because they do not wa nt johnson, mind, because they do not want that to be how this process works. they want everything to be donein works. they want everything to be done ina works. they want everything to be done in a controlled way, with officials in the experts, rather than the leaders themselves going head—to—head over the details. though i suspect what the leaders might do on thursday is signalled that they are ok for the negotiations to carry on for a few
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more days or a few more weeks. and they will probably start talking about how they would handle a request for an extension to the brexit deadline from 31 october if one is coming from the british government. so i think the big summit which we were all thinking was going to be a big, pivotal crunch moment might actually be a bit less crunchy and a bit less pivotal than we all thought. bit less crunchy and a bit less pivotal than we all thoughtlj bit less crunchy and a bit less pivotal than we all thought. i am just thinking also about diaries, because parliament has been scheduled for saturday, as well, hasn't it? that will be another big moment, because mps will be either asked to approve the brexit deal that boris johnson might asked to approve the brexit deal that borisjohnson might have got, but it is looking like he might not, or will they be talking about telling him to send a letter to the european council, asking for another delay of brexit from 31 october to 31 january. will borisjohnson be opposing that, as he said he always will do, or will, by opposing that, as he said he always will do, orwill, by then, hejust bite the bullet and say we need a bite the bullet and say we need a bit more time? will mps be voting to
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put any deal that does emerge to another referendum, or will they be talking about reviving theresa may's old brexit deal, which borisjohnson doesn't like, but some people do. and then they will be voting on that. i have never been faced with more questions than from a reporter, but thank you for at least laying out what they will be. when you get any certainty, and back to us. breaking the rules, you are not allowed to ask the questions, fleming! he did a very good job. if you really want to know about the intricacies, he is an expert, and it is really worth listening, and now you can watch brexitcast for all of those details. if you want details, thatis those details. if you want details, that is the place to go. if you want weather, we have got that as well. good morning. this was sent in from east sussex, and you can see as well
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bit of cloud in the sky, but it is dry. for most of us today it is going to be a dry day, and we will see some sunshine. but we won't necessarily be starting with that. we've seen quite a bit of rain in the last 12 hours or so. you can see thunderstorms as well, that rain pushing in the direction of the north sea. it has now cleared, but across the north—east of england and eastern scotland there is some drizzle and some showers. with a ridge of high pressure building in behind it, you can see that it is also going to be fairly settled until the next system comes our way later on in the day. so we have said goodbye to this rain now. it has cleared off into the north sea. a lot of cloud across much of the uk, with some drizzly bits and pieces around newcastle, for example. a few showers across fife and into the afternoon we have the remnants of that rain across the northern isles.
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but a lot of dry weather in scotland, just a few showers in the west. she does the same for northern ireland. you could catch the odd road shower, but that will be about it. wales, south—west england, possibly the middle and seeing the odd shower. for most of us it will be dry with sunny spells. temperature—wise, 11 to about 17. not much of a breeze today, so if you are in the sunshine, that will actually feel quite pleasant. however, look out towards the west and you will notice the clouds beginning as the next band of rain start to work its way in. and accompanying this will be gusty winds. so here it comes as we go through the course of the night, moving from the west towards the east. it may not quite reached the east. it may not quite reached the east coast itself until later on wednesday morning. it will be chilly in rural parts of scotland, for example, but as we can further south you can see these overnight lows, evenin you can see these overnight lows, even in belfast, 11 and possibly 12. tomorrow morning we see that rain pushed in towards the east. it will quite quickly move away into the north sea for most. however, it kills around across the northern aisles once again, and it will take its time before it clears kent, for example. but away from these two areas, we are back into some decent sunny spells, with just the odd shower. temperatures 11 to about 16. now, for thursday, we start off on a dry note but we've got low pressure
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anchored in the atlantic. it is coming our way, and anchored in the atlantic. it is coming ourway, and it anchored in the atlantic. it is coming our way, and it is going to throw in a lot of showers. some of them will merge to give some longer spells of rain, and we're also going to see some gusty winds, around the south—west and also the english channel. temperatures by then 11— 15 degrees. friday, that low pressure is right across us, sitting across the british isles, so once again it isa the british isles, so once again it is a showery scenario. but in between those showers we will see some dry and brighter conditions, even some sunshine. temperature—wise, we're looking at 11 in lerwick to highs of 14 or 15 in london and st helier. so the outlook is certainly varied and mixed. thank you very much, varied and mixed. words of the morning. car buyers could be overpaying for their finance deals by millions of pounds a year, according to the regulator. today we find out what steps they are considering to change the situation. ben is looking into this one for us. good morning, that's right. this is an issue the financial conduct authority, the fca, has been looking into for
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a couple of years now. that is because the way we buy new cars has changed. the vast majority of finance deals are what is known as personal contract purchase, or pcp. that means, instead of buying a car outright, you pay a deposit and effectively rent the vehicle from a finance company over a three or four—year period. 80% are now bought in that way and it isa 80% are now bought in that way and it is a huge change in the way the market is working. at the end, consumers can either hand the car back, pay the rest of the contract off, or roll over what is left into a new pcp on a new car. in march, the fca found that customers could be paying a lot more than they should be, because dealers are also allowed to set the interest rates of the contract.
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in some intstances, dealers are overcharging in interest so they can boost their commission. basically if they charge more interest, they make more commission. the finance and leasing association, the trade body which represents car finance firms, said the report in march was based on out—of—date information, and car dealers had already made progress on the issue. but we could find out whether the regulator will step in. so what are we expecting today? well, back in march, the regulator said it expected individual companies to review their policies and make sure they are treating customers fairly. there are various things they could do. it could mean they tighten these current rules over what firms are allowed to charge, they could ban certain kinds of commission, essentially meaning those firms cannot charge commission at all. but crucially i think the issue will be
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on the interest rates. that could mean it is much cheaper, as we said, £1000 or so over the life of it, but it could make it much tougher for finance companies to sell us these deals and make money over the top of them. we will get that news at 7am this morning. in six minutes i will be back. on a separate note, what colour would you describe that tie as? is it coral? iwould colour would you describe that tie as? is it coral? i would go with that, i am very on brand. it is new. idid that, i am very on brand. it is new. i did worry that i look like i work for a certain low—cost airline, but... no, it is not orange enough for that. you are so cute, you two. what, a bit of tie chat? i could have worn a similar colour and blended in. because we don't text.
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you could have just blended in. because we don't text. you could havejust said pink, that would have been enough. still to come on breakfast: we will be talking to the police officer who was left in happy tears by a thank you note from a young boy following last week's knife attack in manchester's arndale centre. actually, i have got... i have the perfect purple tie. i might change to purple. see you in a bit. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tarah welsh. trafalgar square has been cleared of climate change activists after the police issued a london—wide ban on the group's protests. extinction rebellion had been lawfully camped in the area since last monday. more than 1,400 people have been arrested during eight days of disruption across the capital.
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police have told protestors to stop their action immediately or face arrest. the queen will attend a service at westminster abbey today to mark its 750th anniversary. the church was originally built by edward the confessor, but in 1269 it was replaced with the grand gothic structure that stands on the site today. he is one of the uk's most famous artists, and now work from antony gormley‘s 45—year career is going on display at the royal academy. the exhibition combines old and new work from the sculptor. the installation is being described as his most ambitious project for a decade. i think that creativity, in a world which is becoming incredibly information—bound, is maybe the most important human resource that we've got. we're all responsible for making the future. that takes imagination. let's take a look at the travel situation now.
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there are minor delays on thejubilee line westbound between stratford and north greenwich. that's because of a faulty train. also, gloucester road station is closed because of faulty lifts. onto the roads, the piccadilly underpass remains closed towards knightsbridge. that is because of gas works. in knightsbridge, brompton road is closed southbbound from brompton oratory for roadworks. whitehall is closed northbound from horse guards avenue to trafalgar square for gas works. and in lewishham, thurston road is closed because of water works. now the weather, with sara thornton. good morning to you. a much better day in prospect for us across london today. it's generally going to be pretty dry, something i've not said for a while. just a stray shower later on. and actually, although we start with some low cloud, we are going to see some brighter skies developing and some sunshine for the afternoon. there could just be a couple
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of showers to drift our way from the south as the afternoon wears on, but it is generally mostly dry, with a top temperature of 17 celsius. and largely dry into this evening and the first part of the night as well, but then we'll see a thickening of the cloud from the south—west, and by tomorrow morning, the next belt of wet weather is with us. temperatures holding up overnight in double figures, but not a pleasant commute tomorrow morning. some heavy bursts of rain for a time. all of that whistles through quite quickly, but it will be breezy as it does so, with gusts of 35 mph. later, a real improvement, though, for the afternoon. a little bit of brightness coming through, and certainly drier, at 16 degrees. looks like we will have some fine weather again on thursday, but more wet weather for friday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now.
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good morning — welcome to breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: nazi salutes and racist chants at england's euro—qualifer against bulgaria — the match had to be stopped twice. probably one of the most appalling nights i've seen in football. the england players made a collective decision to carry on aand went on to win 6—0, the question now is how will the authorities respond. a serious drop in the quality
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of care for people with mental illness and learning disabilities — health inspectors warn that care services in england are facing a perfect storm of problems. after the but more rain will come in from the west. details soon. it's tuesday 15th october. our top story. england's euro 2020 qualifier against bulgaria had to be stopped twice last night — and came close to being abandoned — after it was marred by racist abuse.
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monkey chants and nazi salutes were directed at england's players in what the football association chairman greg clarke called "one of the most appalling nights" he'd seen in football. joe wilson sent this report from the bulgarian capital, sofia. you could say this game began with marcus rashford's blistering finish to score the first england goal. in fact, it began before that. it began when england's players first heard the monkey chants, the racist abuse. i mean, i heard it before i got onto the pitch, in the warm—up. so we spoke about it coming off the pitch after the warm—up, and then obviously it was happening in the game. like i said, it's difficult to kind of categorise the whole country. i think it's perhaps a minority, and the second half was a lot better, so perhaps a victory all round. there were intense discussions between england players, management and officials through the first half, and an announcement was made
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to the crowd that the referee might suspend the game if the abuse continued. it was greeted by boos. there were nazi salutes on the ground. when england's players left this pitch at half—time, they then discussed whether they should even carry on with the match. they decided to play on, and england's captain told me he believes that was the right decision. everyone wanted to carry on and do their talking on the pitch, which i'm extremely proud of. it's not easy to play in circumstances like that. but the 6—0 fits, really, and the way we played, the manner in which we played, i'm extremely proud of, for sure. one answer to the abuse was the score line. manager gareth southgate has openly acknowledged that english football has its own issues to deal with, but racism was displayed in its starkest, most blatant form here in bulgaria.
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england's players exposed it, but the reaction can't stop here. joe wilson, bbc news, in sofia. sally's with us now. we all know football is about winning and it's important that you wa nt winning and it's important that you want people to win things but i think england fans watching this morning can be really proud of the way the team reacted in total unity but also that leadership from gareth southgate in giving them that framework to deal with that in the way they did. this is clearly something they had discussed, they knew what the scan —— stance was going to be. they also knew what the protocol was four ten. they were obviously waiting for the announcement to be made. that's when things went a little bit of the rails. gareth southgate has sent the tone and he was so calm on the touchline. he went round all of them. there is a real sense of connection. nancy travelled all the
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way there to see it will this change anything? it probably does change things slightly in england sense because the players are confident enough to say, did hear that? will it change anything? we are waiting to hear from uefa. it change anything? we are waiting to hearfrom uefa. it's it change anything? we are waiting to hear from uefa. it's also great to hear from uefa. it's also great to hear from uefa. it's also great to hear what people are saying last night on social media. rio ferdinand was one of the first. also, harry kane who we heard and that package. tyrone —— tyrone — — tyrone tyrone —— tyrone mings said, did you
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hear that? and we here we have gary lineker. a big reaction on social media, big reaction from the fans and players themselves. the important reaction is uefa. the bulgarian captain did go at halftime and try to talk to the fans. he was on his own. the bulgarian manager said, i didn't hear anything. it's sad that the players have had to take the lead on this. and in this country, i'm sure people can quote examples themselves. clubs that are accused of racist chance. huddersfield were fined £50,000. putting a sponsor ‘s
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name as a gimmick. what sort of message does it send. it is still there. i think what the england players did last night. it was an important marker and hopefully does mean something of a turning point. there needs to be aligned the sand and if you do what the bulgarian fa ns and if you do what the bulgarian fans did, throw them out of the tournament. you will quickly learn. that is the powerful statement. throw them out. a "perfect storm" of increased demand and staff shortages means that people with learning disabilities in england are still being locked up in unsuitable secure units. that's according to a report by the care quality commission.the watchdog also warns that more than half of england's accident and emergency departments are not good enough. here's our social affairs correspondent, alison holt. scandals, including allegations
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in a bbc panorama investigation of patients with learning disabilities and autism being taunted and bullied at the now—closed whorlton hall hospital in county durham, underline some of the concerns raised by the care regulator. the care quality commission report looking at the whole of the health and care sector says safety and quality are deteriorating in specialist mental health services, with too many people looked after by workers who lack skills and training. in 2018, inspectors who visited hospitals for people with learning disabilities and autism rated 1% as inadequate. this year, 10% have been given this lowest rating. last year, inspections of inpatient mental health services for children and teenagers found 3% were inadequate. now, 7% are failing to meet standards. what we've seen is a perfect storm brewing — an increase in demand, plus some real concerns over the workforce. and what that means in practical terms is there's been a significant reduction in the number of learning disability nurses,
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which means that the carers that are looking after people with incredibly complex needs don't have the support and the skills necessary. the report also says increasing demand and staff shortages are causing problems across the health and care system, with accident and emergency departments often having to pick up the pieces when people can't get the help they need in the community. the government says it is making record investments in the nhs, efforts to reach a brexit deal before thursday's crucial summit of european union leaders continue today. the eu is considering a new emergency summit which would take place towards the end of the month if a deal can't be reached this week. let's speak to our political correspondent jonathan blake who is in westminster. good morning to you, jonathan.
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it is a tense few days ahead. set things up for us, where are we today? the temperature is pretty cool at the moment. negotiations wrapped up at around 1030 last night. it will start again at ten o'clock this morning. a good sign for those who want to deal that both sides are still talking. but as you suggest, time is incredibly tight. eu leaders will gather for a summit in brussels on thursday, and they have said they won't negotiate directly with borisjohnson. the fiinnish prime minister, saying that there is no time, impractical or legal ways, to find an agreement before the eu council meeting. they need more time. the issue is, what will both sides do that? there will either be a big breakthrough, breakdown the talks or something in between. a holding statement agreed that progress has been made but they need more time to do a deal. they have a course until the end of october. add in the complication that borisjohnson has
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to ask for an extension to the brexit process if a deal isn't reached by the weekend. thank you very much. the united states has imposed financial sanctions on turkey in response to its military offensive against kurdish forces in northern syria. three turkish ministers have been blacklisted by president trump and had their us assets frozen. mr trump has been criticised for his decision to withdraw us troops from syria before the turkish offensive began. was with a few minutes ago explaining some of the concern the industry had about brokers selling these car deals, personal contract plans. commissions the brokers are making on the sales of these deals. it's quite a significant change.
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they launched an investigation officially back in march. now the results this morning. changes banning the commission, they could save collectively. a significant saving there. they are worried that the interests of the brokers are a bit conflicted. by being able to charge more commission on higher interest rates, they are going to regulate how they do that. the other thing they want to keep an eye on its our customers learn about what they are paying. it should be much clearer information. at the moment if you go and buy a car, you can often be bamboozled about the numbers. how much the interest rate on the deal will be. what they are asking for is the brokers are much clearer up front about where they make their money, how much they are making on the deal and how much they will pay at the end. quite a significant change. about 1000 pounds. typicalfor
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significant change. about 1000 pounds. typical for the car finance deals. nonetheless, the regulators are acting now. by banning this type of commission, we will see increased competition in the market which will ultimately save customers money. here on breakfast, we spent a lot of time drawing attention to people who been locked up in mental health units because of a lack of specialist support. that's a picture which is supported today by a report by the care quality commission. we usually tell those stories by speaking to the patients' families — but today we're hearing from people who have experienced those units, first hand. alexis quinn has autism and was held in mental health facilities for three and a half years. shejoins us now.
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i lived in a great environment conducive to autism. i was in international swimmer, a teacher, i performed well academically so everything was fine and set up to me to kind of do well. but then i had a baby which obviously for any parent isa baby which obviously for any parent is a huge change. my brother died suddenly and suddenly i was unable to cope in that environment. which had been so carefully crafted to enable me to do well in society. suddenly crumble away. my experience isa suddenly crumble away. my experience is a pattern which a lot of autistic people in people with learning disabilities encounter. something happened to rock their environment. is that a finance thing? you couldn't receive the assistance you needed? i think it's a number of things. i went to the gp and i had midwife visitor services involved at
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the time anyway. but i think people aren't properly trained in autism and disabilities and what actually needed wasn't available in the community. the only option is literally sink or swim and if you sink, the only option at the moment is hospital. i mean, i know you are there some time and there is no brief story to this. how did that affect you, what sort of things went on? well, i was supposed to go in for 72 hours and i was therefore 3.5 yea rs. for 72 hours and i was therefore 3.5 years. basically as soon as those doors to the ward close, you're not that family member or teacher, whatever it is you're doing, you are suddenly a patient who needs to be fixed and cured but learning disabilities and autism isn't something we can treat or something that needs to be cured and it can't be in any case so i experienced sensory overload after sensory overload and that was met with
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restraints, seclusion and all of those kind of real negative aspects in hospital and i ended up escaping, ididn't in hospital and i ended up escaping, i didn't leave the system amicably. i knew i was very different, and i had seven different diagnoses. and again, iwas had seven different diagnoses. and again, i was diagnosed a year into my hospital stay, and that is because there isn't that training, you know, for autism, mental health staff, they are there to kind of fix illnesses which can be treated. but obviously autism isn't that way. illnesses which can be treated. but obviously autism isn't that waylj would imagine you being there for 3.5 years, and cared for in that way, i know you probably wouldn't say cared for, but that would be far more expensive than what you needed to sort of get you back on track. well, look, there is some excellent
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care. iam well, look, there is some excellent care. i am not professional bashing and they do their best under very difficult budgets. but yes, i needed occupational therapy, i needed someone occupational therapy, i needed someone to sort my routine out when my brother had died. like so many of us do. this isn't a unique story for people with autism. i needed some speech and language therapy to help for me to express myself in a way that people could understand. and that people could understand. and that probably would have cost, let's say, £5,000, a generous budget for that. but actually what ended up happening is that 2.5 million was spent on basically traumatising me. so the care quality commission has found what it calls this perfect storm, or some might say imperfect storm, or some might say imperfect storm, increasing demand, staff shortages and people stuck in hospitals far from shortages and people stuck in hospitals farfrom home. there shortages and people stuck in hospitals far from home. there are no easy answers for this, but what kind of differences would you like to see in place for people like you and in other positions? we need robust community provision, which is
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easily accessible. we need healthcare professionals in the community to be trained. and the other thing, of course, that we need as we need to stop this situation where it is a sink or swim scenario. you know, there needs to be that provision. and i think in terms of even, like, diagnosis, people are waiting 18 months, two years for a diagnosis. that is far too long. people will have gone into crisis by then. and how are you doing now? really well, really well. what sort of help are you getting now? well, i have paid for my help, i escaped to africa and i paid for my own support. and i am seven months pregnant, so hoping for a different outcome this time. congratulations, and best of luck. thank you very much for coming to talk to us.
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you were saying miserable earlier, but carol disagrees. good morning, everybody. it is not going to be miserable today because we got a lot of cloud first thing but then it is going to brighten up. the cloud is still thick enough to be producing some showers first thing this morning across parts of fife, northern ireland, wales, south—west england, for example. but we will see some sunshine, and it will dry out for most of us as well. so we have said goodbye to this weather front. it brought rain across us through the course of the night, and of course yesterday. we have a transient ridge of high pressure settling things down, and then we got the next weather system coming in from the west later on, probably evening time, introducing some rain and also gusty winds. but in between, you can see how it brightens up quite nicely. so the re m na nts of brightens up quite nicely. so the remnants of this morning's rain still affecting parts of the northern isles, turning more showery, but are a lot of dry weather across scotland. one or two showers possible in dumfries and galloway and parts of northern ireland, wales and the south—west, even the midlands. but they will be the exception rather than the rule.
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for most of us it is going to be a dry day, with variable amounts of cloud and some sunny spells. temperatures 11— 17 degrees. if you are in the sunshine, that will feel quite pleasant for this stage in october. so, as we head on through the evening and overnight, clear skies for some to start with. but then our weather front comes in bringing its rain and gusty winds initially across northern ireland, and then through scotland, parts of england and wales. not quite making it over to the east, and mostly clearing northern ireland and wales and parts of south—west england as well. tomorrow morning it will make it over towards the east. in fact, all of us will get a dose of rain from this weather front. still gusty winds, but behind it, note how it brightens up. once again we will see some sunny brightens up. once again we will see some sunny spells and just the odd shower knocking around. but for most it will be dry. temperatures ranging from 11 in the north to 16 in the south. as we move on through the evening —— into thursday, this wind is coming our way towards the west.
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you can tell by looking at the isobars the wind is going to strengthen. particularly so across the southwest and later across the english channel. so we start off on a chilly note. some of us could well see some frost in sheltered glands. there will be some sunshine, and is the low pressure advances, is going to blow in some showers, blustery around those showers, and some of the showers merging to give some longer spells of rain. temperatures very similar in that we are looking at 11 in the north to 15 in the south. on friday, the low pressure sitting across us now means that again quitea sitting across us now means that again quite a few showers around, some of those emerging, but some drier and brighter conditions as well. breezy around the showers, with temperatures 11 to 15. the weather this week is certainly varied. thank you very much, see you ina bit. when a man stabbed five innocent people at a shopping centre in manchester last week, there were plenty of comments on social media which praised the police for running towards danger while the rest of us run away from it. but here is a much more
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old—fashioned way to say thank you. this was the handwritten note left on the windscreen of a police car in manchester city centre. written on the same day as the attack, it is from a young boy called adam who wanted to thank he police for, as he puts it, saving our lives and keeping us safe. inspectorjon middleton from greater manchester police was deeply touched by the note. hejoins us now. love a thank you letter. the envelope just says to manchester police. so this is from adam, sent in by adam. thank you very much for coming in. so when you first found this, are you trying to think how do we find this young man? yes, so it turns out, i have had contact with his mum this morning, it turns out on friday he decided to go for a day trip with his dad and his older brother into manchester. he wrote out five cards and wanted to give them out to officers just to say
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thank you for the work that they had done and the work that they do. he handed out four of them to officers patrolling manchester city centre and the fifth when he left on a police car, and one of my officers found it and brought it to my attention. i want to do sort of share it a little more widely, really, because it is very, very inspiring, i think. really, because it is very, very inspiring, ithink. it is really, because it is very, very inspiring, i think. it is a massive inspiration notjust for inspiring, i think. it is a massive inspiration not just for our team inspiring, i think. it is a massive inspiration notjust for our team in manchester city centre, but for office rs manchester city centre, but for officers all across the country in the general public as well. shall we just turn that on its head? as dan said earlier, you are the people who run said earlier, you are the people who ru n towards said earlier, you are the people who run towards danger when all the rest of us run away. that is what is inspiring. and presumably you have a lot of reaction from members of the public. does that help when you are doing yourjob, to know that many of them are right behind you? absolutely, we always get a surge in reaction following an incident like we reaction following an incident like we had on friday. i am keen to point out that officers put themselves in danger... you know, i out that officers put themselves in danger... you know, lam a manager, i spend most of my time in the
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office. i should point out that it wasn't me that was running in on friday to get to this incident. but office rs friday to get to this incident. but officers put themselves in danger sort of everyday, and it is nice to... we occasionally get these sorts of messages of support, but there is a big upsurge following something like friday's attack. it really, really motivating stop it is a big morale raiser. we don't get paid bonuses, we don't get company ca rs paid bonuses, we don't get company cars or anything like that. i think a lot of young officers now that do the work are actually sort under a lot of pressure. there is a lot of bureaucracy, a lot of frustration with the job. so when we get something like this from young adam, it is really motivating. it kind of reminds us why we join the police. i think he says save lives and keep us safe, and at the end of the day that is what it is all about. nothing else, really. i really like the police, because they are kind, and when i wave at them they always waive back. he has done a wonderful list of things police officers use, including a taser and a camera. i know it makes a big difference. what will you do with this? will you try and get, if his mum and family
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ee, and get, if his mum and family agree, to get him in and showing around ina agree, to get him in and showing around in a police car, or something like that? we have offered him a visit, apparently he wants to join the police, but we will get him in foran the police, but we will get him in for an all the police, but we will get him in foran all singing, all the police, but we will get him in for an all singing, all dancing visit, we call it, so rather than getting a police car and the sirens on... which i would be happy doing. you are welcome to come to one if you want to. can louise have a go as well? maybe even have a go with the taser, we will see how we go. and thatis taser, we will see how we go. and that is one of the messages you want to send as well. if he wants to be a police officer, you need recruits as well, don't you? he would be planning a long time in advance, but i would say to people thinking of jane donna joining the police, it is a great profession, a great career. we sometimes get a little bit cynical when we have a lot of service in, like me, but when you get little things like this, it reminds you it is actually a valuable profession, as our every other emergency service in the nhs
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and all these sorts of things. i would absolutely encourage people to join and apply. in any walk of life, it is nice to be appreciated, isn't it? yes, exactly. thank you for coming and sharing that note for us. thank you for spending the time and doing that. i think he was joking when he said you could use the taser. thank you so much. really good to speak to you, thank you. you are watching breakfast. still to come this morning: joe fraser has just become the first british gymnast to win a world championship gold on the parallel bars. he will be on the sofa, along with fellow medallists becky and ellie downie. there was a threat that you are going to go and try the parallel bars, but it is too wet. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc
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london, i'm tarah welsh. trafalgar square has been cleared of climate change activists after the police issued a london—wide ban on the group's protests. extinction rebellion had been lawfully camped in the area since last monday. more than 1,400 people have been arrested during eight days of disruption across the capital. police have told protestors to stop their action immediately or face arrest. the queen will attend a service at westminster abbey today to mark its 750th anniversary. the church was originally built by edward the confessor, but in 1269 it was replaced with the grand gothic structure that stands on the site today. he is one of the uk's most famous artists, and now work from antony gormley‘s 45—year career is going on display at the royal academy. the exhibition combines old and new work from the sculptor.
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the installation is being described as his most ambitious project for a decade. i think that creativity, in a world which is becoming incredibly information—bound, is maybe the most important human resource that we've got. we're all responsible for making the future. that takes imagination. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on all tube lines this morning but gloucester road station is closed to piccadilly services because of faulty lifts. onto the roads: the piccadilly underpass remains closed towards knightsbridge. that's because of gas works. in knightsbridge, brompton road is closed southbbound from brompton oratory for roadworks. whitehall is also closed, northbound from horse guards avenue to trafalgar square,
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for gas works. and in lewishham, thurston road is closed because of water works. now the weather with sara thornton. good morning to you. a much better day in prospect for us across london today. it's generally going to be pretty dry, something i've not said for a while. just a stray shower later on. and actually, although we start with some low cloud, we are going to see some brighter skies developing and some sunshine for the afternoon. there could just be a couple of showers to drift our way from the south as the afternoon wears on, but it is generally mostly dry, with a top temperature of 17 celsius. and largely dry into this evening and the first part of the night as well, but then we'll see a thickening of the cloud from the south—west, and by tomorrow morning, the next belt of wet weather is with us. temperatures holding up overnight in double figures, but not a pleasant commute tomorrow morning. some heavy bursts of rain for a time. all of that whistles through quite quickly, but it will be breezy as it does so, with gusts of 35 mph. later, a real improvement, though, for the afternoon. a bit of brightness coming through, and certainly drier, at 16 degrees. looks like we will have some fine weather again on thursday, but more wet weather for friday. i'm back with the latest
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from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to dan and louise. funny hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. england's euro 2020 qualifier against bulgaria had to be stopped twice last night and almost had to be of abandoned. monkey chanting and nazi salutes were directed england players and greg clark called it one of the most appalling nights he'd seen of the most appalling nights he'd seen input all. the daily mirror's chief paul writerjohn cross was there and joins us on the phone. give us an idea. the atmosphere in that stadium. at what point did you
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think there was going to be an issue with regards to racism? from valley earlier on, i had to say, i heard it as early as the first five minutes. i thought it was very, very clear whenever tyrone mings got the ball. there was monkey chanting, sterling was booed and jeered and whistled. there were pockets also towards marcus rushford so from very early on, there was clearly an issue, clearly a referee. a really bad night. it was just so obvious that it was going to be everything and more than what we come to fear over the last few weeks. those protocols had been there for many years. i don't know, we've heard from players and management. i wonder what your perspective was. in the way they
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came together. the way other authorities feel they should be taking. it was a powerful message, really. the last time they encountered these problems in montenegro. so much focus has been put on this game in bulgaria that they certainly knew, and obviously it was clearly very fresh in their mind. they talked about it as a group and what they would do if it arose group and what they would do if it a rose really group and what they would do if it arose really in the protocol is very clear, starts with basically the referee reporting, either the observers or the delegates. in the england players reported it also to
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gareth southgate and it was clear just before half time that the england players were being consulted by gareth southgate and he was asking, what we do? do we leave the pitch? do we take a break as is normal. in the england players were adamant they wanted to stay on the pitch, they didn't want to walk. the place was so clear and gareth southgate was in the press conference but also talking to the players afterwards in interviews. they were adamant they wanted to win the game on the pitch, send a message that way and i know that can sound almost glib, something of a cliche but they were really passionate about that, i know lots of people will say it should have been abandoned and stopped, uefa should have stopped it, they should have taken it into their own hands but i think the england players felt that would let the racists win, almost. some of those fans did leave
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the stadium and we saw the bulgarian captain popov speaking to others yet after the game, i don't know whether you were in the bulgarian manager's press co nfe re nce you were in the bulgarian manager's press conference but for some, there was a denial of anything actually going on in the game. is that right? it is. i asked the bulgarian manager straightaway when he arrived, do you still stand by your assertion that english football has about problem with racism if not worse, as he said, now after the game and indeed did you hearany said, now after the game and indeed did you hear any racist, you must have heard it, abuse during the game and he was in denial on both fronts. he said he was just focused on the game. he wasn't to do non— that which is a standard managerial response but i think deeply disrespect for on occasions like these. and also, he was saying that if indeed it is proved then
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basically there should be punishment. when you have people like that still in denial, still refusing to accept what went on, how on earth do you solve the problem? popov and some of the other players we re popov and some of the other players were clearly incredibly moved by what happened. popov made that plea to the fans right in front of us and i thought to courage and a lot of the england players acknowledge that. i think that shows basically the players don't necessarily agree with this at all. it was a pocket of fans. they were the clearly the biggest perpetrators. it was orchestrated, designed to offend. once that had been done. the fact remains that unless the ground is closed entirely, perhaps those bulgarian fans will be in the next
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one. john cross, really good to talk to you. he was at the game last night and was speaking to us from sofia. have a great trip home. hearing from him gives you a sense of the act sphere. it's incredible to hear from someone who is right there. talking about the bulgarian captain coming over. that's perhaps what we didn't get a sense of on the television but the pictures we have from last night, cameras picked up fans making racist gestures and chanting in the stands. what happened is, the stadium announcement condemned the abuse and the match would be abandoned if it carried on. that group of fans simply left. england went on to win 6-0. a simply left. england went on to win 6—0. a step closer to qualification but that is not what we're talking about this morning. great to hear
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from john cross there. but a really pivotal moment last night when england player tyrone mings turned to one of the officials. in case you didn't catch it, "did you hear that?". in case you didn't catch it, "did you hear that? he in case you didn't catch it, "did you hearthat?". he can in case you didn't catch it, "did you hear that?". he can clearly hear something coming from the stands. gareth southgate said he was proud of his players. they want to be recognised for their football. they were playing so well that they didn't want to leave the pitch at that moment as well. i'm sure that will have been part of our thinking so i'm incredibly proud of all of the players and all of the staff. i don't think, of course we could be criticised for not going far enough but i think we've made a huge statement and frankly, we were in an impossible situation to get it right for the satisfaction
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of everybody. really strong words also from the chairman of the football association who said last night he was dismayed by what he saw. what a disappointing night. it's probably one of the most appalling nights i've seen in football. you talk to the players at half—time and they got to gather and said no, we want to play and finish and win the game, we don't want the racists to win. some of the england players expressed their frustration on social media after the game. raheem sterling said: marcus rashford said: he also praised the fans:
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northern ireland's hopes of qualifying for the euros were knocked last week when they lost to the netherlands — but last night they won a friendly away from home for the first time in 13 years. paddy mcnair scored twice, as they beat the czech republic 3—2 in prague. they play the netherlands again in a qualifier next month. cristiano ronaldo reached a landmark last night — this penalty was his 700th career goal — but it didn't help his portugal side in their european qualifier against ukraine — they lost 2—1. dan evans has won his first match since becoming the new british number one — he beat bernard tomic in the first round of the stockholm open. today, andy murray is due to play his first—round match at the european open in antwerp — but he's ready to leave the tournament, if his wife kim goes into labour earlier than expected.
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andy murray features in this story too — roger federer has announced he will compete at next year's olympic games in toyko, as he aims to win the only title that's eluded him so far in his career. federer has won all four grand slam tournaments — and he did win gold in the men's doubles in beijing in 2008 — but he's never won the olympic singles title. he reached the final in 2012, but he was beaten by andy murray. every olympic games has been very specialfor me. i don't know, ifelt like this is for me something i would like to do if unhealthy and that's why i really hope i will be and i can't wait. super league man of steeljackson hastings has been named in the great britain lions squad for the tour to new zealand and papua new guinea. hastings has had a hugely impressive first full season in the league, for salford. as has his team—matejoshjones, who's never made an international appearance at senior level. his call up rounds off an amazing weekend — he played in the super league grand final on saturday, he got married on sunday, before getting the lions call up yesterday.
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what a week! how do you have a top that? rodney sullivan survived a scare. putting on the final two frames of the match to win 4— three and progress. the world number one judd trump is also true.|j and progress. the world number one judd trump is also true. i got a job at the bbc today got married. i literally got the letter that morning. a letter through the post, in the olden days. what was more important, louise? both have lasted well. i'm still doing both. 21 yea rs. britain's gymnasts are back home from stuttgart, in germany, after their most successful ever world championships. i'll speak to three of them in a minute. first let's take a look at some
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of those medal—winning performances. joe fraser. great britain's ellie downing. look at that beautiful work. well done, that was the routine.
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that was joe that wasjoe fraser that was joe fraser winning that wasjoe fraser winning gold. becky downing getting a metal and her sister ellie as well. show everybody or medal. number six there joe. turn it on its side. it lights up. it lights up around the edge. it's got a usb charger wanted. i see your little charge port. you've obviously been using it. the last few days. joe, i'm going to start with you because you surprised everybody. did you surprise yourself or you know you had the performance in you? i knew! had or you know you had the performance in you? i knew i had the performance in me, i didn't anticipate winning the gold medal. ijust wanted to go out onto a good routine for myself and my coach and to have come away
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world champion, i couldn't have asked for anything more. talk us through what you are doing here. some flips and stuff. at this point, this is what i would call the bicep basher. i would this is what i would call the bicep basher. iwould be this is what i would call the bicep basher. i would be preparing myself for the pain basher. i would be preparing myself forthe pain and basher. i would be preparing myself for the pain and there we go. are you thinking at this point, it's going well, i've got a sniff here, there is a chance? i was more thinking, it's almost time so i was trying to keep it as clean as i could, keep it steady and composed. and when i got to the dismount, and we did the dismount. that's why they don't look too happy when i come off. i'm happy with the routine. i know i can do more. we could see you wearing, it looked like something on your arms. they like protection but
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they haven't really protected me. let's have a look at that. it's just an excuse to get your guns out. and becky, you are so close to gold. sorry. what happened at the last minute? the world champion, i knew she was going to be the one to beat going into this and to me that was the first time putting up that big routine on a stage like that. so for me just to pull that off in that moment, i couldn't really ask for any more. i was really pleased with the first half, the second half definitely. lots of room for improvement. does this routine stay with you now? we are looking to upgrade it a little bit more. the skill that i worked into from me, it
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didn't look pretty. the make it under that environment, that pressure, it's incredible. and you beat simone biles, she is absolutely fantastic. to see what she does, it'sjust insane fantastic. to see what she does, it's just insane and fantastic. to see what she does, it'sjust insane and there are so many skills that we couldn't even comprehend doing like she does and i think it kind of shows how hard simone biles is, on the bars. the whole thing is upside down and it's all based off your arms rather than leg movements. it's pretty cool to be able to say i've done that on the bars. and ellie, were you alongside simone bales at one point? i was in the same final as her. but that routine,
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i hear, is basically a favourite. yes, vault is one of my favourite apparatus and the second vault i completed is a very hard vault are not many people do it in the world. the fact that i could pull that out this time, i was just really happy with it. not many people can do that in the world. that is incredible. how do you even get to the point where you know you can do it? well, this is the first time i have ever competed that second vault. it has taken three years for me to actually get it and do it successfully. so we re get it and do it successfully. so were you nervous on that runway thinking i have never done this in competition before? well, for that vault especially, normally people put all the power they can into vault, whereas i am naturally very powerful, so all i have to think is i have to run really slow. with adrenaline you just get faster anyway, so at the end of the vault, it is just slow, slow, slow.
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anyway, so at the end of the vault, it isjust slow, slow, slow. do you have a rest now, joe? i will have a bit of a rest. i think we have earned it. i have a few days off, but i can't stay out of the gym, i just love it too much. i am sure i will be back in tomorrow and thursday. you need to work on those biceps, joe, you look small! how are your bodies after competing in a high—end competition like that? are you aching, or are you so used to it you aching, or are you so used to it you just carry on now and go straight back into training? no, definitely aching. i have been sore for two days straight. we will have a bit of time off this week to recover and then get back into it. so many congratulations. don't go too far away, because we are going outside to play in a bit. i believe there are some parallel bars. look how happy he looks. who has brought
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their parallel bars? somebody. go and charge your medals up, yours is starting to fade! here is carol with a look at this morning's weather. is it actually outdoor parallel bars? it is outside. we need a bit of weather guidance on this. i don't think i have ever asked you this before, is it parallel bar outdoor weather? definitely, but don't hurt yourself, sally. iam weather? definitely, but don't hurt yourself, sally. i am seeing weather? definitely, but don't hurt yourself, sally. iam seeing her later and i want her in one piece. it is also quite a foggy start for parts of the country. weather watchers us proud again this morning stop you can see in topsham, in devon were you can hardly see anything. but it will improve as we go through the day. for many of us, although it is a cloudy start, for some of us are damper stars, it will dry up and we will see some sunny spells developed, with one or two exceptions. last night's rain pushing off into the north sea, we have a transient ridge of high
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pressure before this evening. we see the next set of fronts coming our introducing some rain and also some gusty winds. so there goes the rain. the cloud still prevalent, especially in eastern areas, where there is some drizzle coming out of it. a few showers and as we go through the day, we will still have some showers across the far north—east of scotland. for much of the rest of scotland, dry with sunny spells. northern england, dry and brightening up for you, with some sunny spells. the same for northern ireland, with just one or two showers. east anglia, the midlands, down towards the east, dry with some sunny spells. the wells in the southwest and possibly the west midlands, we could catch the odd shower. but that will be the exception rather than the rule. temperatures today 11 in the north to 17 in the south in any sunshine. heading on through the evening and overnight, we start off on a dry note, but then the weather front moving on from the west will cross northern ireland, getting across other parts of the uk through the night, accompanied by gusty winds. not quite making it over to the east, so here we have clear skies it will be cool. but under the cloud in
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the rain and the gusty winds, it won't be as cold. we're looking at overnight lows of 11 or 12. tomorrow morning, then, there goes the rain across the rest of uk. eventually heading off into the north sea. but it will remain for a time across the far north—east of scotland and the far north—east of scotland and the far south—east of england. behind it the cloud will break, we will see some sunny the cloud will break, we will see some sunny spells develop, and again, one or two showers here and there. temperatures 11 to about 16. the thursday, well, low pressure is really going to be the dominant feature. it is a large area as well. it is in the west, but it is going to be moving across us thursday and friday. looking at the isobars, it will tell you we are also looking at blustery wind. we will start off on a dry and chilly note. some of us will have some frost first thing on thursday morning. then income the showers. blustery around them, some of those showers will emerge and give some longer spells of rain. temperatures 11—15. give some longer spells of rain. temperatures 11-15. thank you so much. so it will be perfect for parallel bars. that is what i am
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going to take away from that forecast. i am saying that because you are going to be on them. no, i can't, i have a very bad shoulder. very convenient, and also true.|j would love to be there, with my enormous biceps, but yes. just what went wrong at thomas cook that led to its collapse under massive debts, and could it happen again? an inquiry starts today, and ben mis looking at some of the big outstanding questions. good morning to you both. it has been three weeks since the dramatic collapse of thomas cook, leaving thousands of passengers stranded, hotels lying empty, and a very uncertain future for thousands of staff, and many questions about how it happened. well, today the firm's chief executive, peter fankhauser, will face a grilling from mps as part of an inquiry into what happened. it is a big moment for betty knight, who worked as cabin crew for the company for more than a decade. betty is with me this morning. betty, good morning to you. good
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morning. also in westminster is the chair of the committee, labour mp rachel reeves. rachel, good morning to you. betty, let me start with you. we have spoken quite a bit over this last three weeks. how has this last three weeks been? the initial grief is over, the tears are over, but still very bewildered. still feeling very vulnerable about the whole situation, and still a lot of u na nswered situation, and still a lot of unanswered questions. now, those questions, let's talk about them. because rachel, chairing that committee later today, will be able to put some of those questions to the former bosses and some of the top team at thomas cook. what do you wa nt to top team at thomas cook. what do you want to know from them?|j top team at thomas cook. what do you want to know from them? i have four main questions, and i have gathered the information regarding them from my colleagues. the first one, particularly from the airlines, group airlines operated as a separate entity and we were doing very well. we are wondering why we
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we re very well. we are wondering why we we re allowed very well. we are wondering why we were allowed to fail, actually made to fail, when the rest of the company went. because from what we can understand and from what we were told, we were doing very well. we we re told, we were doing very well. we were successful and highly profitable, and we were told just a couple of weeks before this all happened that actually we were about to announce a very happened that actually we were about to announce a very decent profit, and that we had done well. and quite and that we had done well. and quite a turnaround to go from that decision to one where the firm collapsed. rachel, let me bring you in here. it is yourjob later to be able to speak to former bosses at thomas cook and ask exactly that. what do you want to hear from them? well, we will be asking questions on behalf of betty and other people that work for thomas cook, but also on behalf of people who are left stranded on holiday or have found that their holidays that they had looked, they now can't go on. and so that will be our role today. i think there are a number of questions we wa nt to there are a number of questions we want to put the bosses of business, for example, over the last 12 years,
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the last three chief executives were paid a combined total of £35 million. will they be handing any of that money back, and how is it fair that money back, and how is it fair that people like that and multi million worth of pay and bonuses, and yet people like betty are those who end up picking up the pieces. those are some of the questions we will be wanting to put to the bosses today, as well as whether they did enough to save the company, and why they ended up landing the company with so many millions of pounds, more than £1 billion worth of debt when the company went bust. how is that responsible, and was it ever possible really to turn around a company like thomas cook when it had so much debt, which would have been accrued by the decisions of the people running the company, the people running the company, the people earn so much and let's take betty's first question, specifically. the fact that the airline which was hugely successful, the seats were full, the planes were full, the bookings were good, and
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yet allowed to collapse. it is clearly a fundamental question you wa nt to clearly a fundamental question you want to get to the bottom of. yes, and of course we have now learnt that there is a buyer for the travel agents on our high street, and that is good news. but what other parts of the business can be salvaged is one of the questions that we want to put to the bosses today, but also to the insolvency service, when we see them. and what efforts were made by them. and what efforts were made by the people running the business to salvage as much of it as possible? because, in the end, they seem to be relying on banks and governments to bail them out, rather than trying to turn the company around to salvage parts of it. and betty, let me bring you in at this point. you are worried that there seems to be a perception that thomas cook was asking for a bailout, for a rescue, and in yourview asking for a bailout, for a rescue, and in your view that was absolutely not the case, was it? what we understood in those final couple of daysis understood in those final couple of days is that a very late request for
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another £200 million worth of backing, actually, not bailout, that phrase bailout has been used repeatedly as though the government we re repeatedly as though the government were asked to provide all of the debt to be written off, which wasn't the case. they were just asked to act as a guarantor, and because of that, we feel we have been misled by our management, because we were that, we feel we have been misled by our management, because we were told that the £900 million was there, and this was a done deal. so certainly the airline had previously been up for sale, and had five very good offers made on it. and the caveat that seemed to break the deals there was that the tour operator requested 50% of the seats. and a quick final question for you, rachel. when you hear stories like betty's, and those of many of her colleagues, are you confident you can actually get a nswe rs , confident you can actually get answers, you can get results, and indeed get some of that money back from those executives, that seemingly walked away with a lot of money out of this collapse? well, there have been so many big
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businesses that have been allowed to fail, carilion, vhs, and of course now the collapse of thomas cook. we need to make sure that when managers make reckless decisions, when the people running the company make reckless decisions, that they are held to account for their actions —— bhs. we should look at whether they are allowed to be directors of other businesses, and also how we can ensure that we can claw back some of that pay and bonuses. because people like betty need answers. rachel, chair of the thomas cook enquiry that kicks off later today, thank you for your time. really good to see you again, betty. thank you for the help you have given us, and to the help you have given us, and to the team today for going ahead with the team today for going ahead with the enquiry. we hope we get some a nswe rs the enquiry. we hope we get some a nswers for the enquiry. we hope we get some answers for you. we will speak soon. more from me after eight a.m.. and some great guests coming your way between now and 9:15am. time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tarah welsh. a severely disabled five—year—old girl who was at the centre of a high court battle will leave london for italy today. tafida raqeeb's parents fought hospital bosses to take thier daughter for life support treatmea nt in genoa. earlier this month, a judge ruled in their favour. trafalgar square has been cleared of climate change activists after the police issued a london—wide ban on the group's protests. extinction rebellion had been lawfully camped in the area since last monday. more than 1,400 people have been arrested during eight days of disruption across the capital. police have told protestors to stop their action immediately or face arrest. he is one of the uk's most famous artists, and now work from antony gormley‘s 45—year career is going on display at the royal academy.
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the exhibition combines old and new work from the sculptor. the installation is being described as his most ambitious project for a decade. i think that creativity, in a world which is becoming incredibly information—bound, is maybe the most important human resource that we've got. we're all responsible for making the future. that takes imagination. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there is a good service on all tube lines this morning, but gloucester road station is closed to picadilly line services only. that is because of faulty lifts. onto the roads. the piccadilly underpass remains closed towards knightsbridge. that is because of gas works. in knightsbridge, brompton road is closed southbbound from brompton oratory for roadworks. whitehall is also closed northbound from horse guards avenue to trafalgar square for gas works. and in lewishham, thurston road
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is closed because of water works. , lewisham. now the weather, with sara thornton. good morning to you. a much better day in prospect for us across london today. it's generally going to be pretty dry, something i've not said for a while. just a stray shower later on. and actually, although we start with some low cloud, we are going to see some brighter skies developing and some sunshine for the afternoon. there could just be a couple of showers to drift our way from the south as the afternoon wears on, but it is generally mostly dry, with a top temperature of 17 celsius. and largely dry into this evening and the first part of the night as well, but then we'll see a thickening of the cloud from the south—west, and by tomorrow morning, the next belt of wet weather is with us. temperatures holding up overnight in double figures, but not a pleasant commute tomorrow morning. some heavy bursts of rain for a time. all of that whistles through quite quickly, but it will be breezy as it does so, with gusts of 35 mph. later, a real improvement, though, for the afternoon. a bit of brightness coming through, and certainly drier, at 16 degrees. looks like we will have some fine
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weather again on thursday, but more wet weather for friday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. the headline stance nazi salutes and racist chants at england's euro qualifer against bulgaria — the match had to be stopped twice. probably one of the most appalling nights i've seen in football. the england players made a collective decision to carry on and they won the match 6—0. the question now is how will the authorities respond. a serious drop in the quality of care for people with mental illness and learning disabilities — health inspectors warn that care services in england are facing a perfect storm.
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cracking down on carfinance — a ban on how some dealers and brokers receive commission when we buy a new vehicle on finance. it could save customers £165 million a year. britian's gymnasts are celebrating their best ever world championships — three of the team's medal winners are with us this morning. sun of us are off to a great start with drizzle, showers and even stand fog. that will give way to a dry day with cerny spells until later, when the next band of rain comes our way. —— with sunny spells. it's tuesday 15th october. our top story: england's euro 2020 qualifier against bulgaria had to be stopped twice last night — and came close to being abandoned — after it was marred by racist abuse. monkey chants and nazi salutes were directed at england's players in what the football association chairman greg clarke called one
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of the most appalling nights he'd seen in football. joe wilson sent this report from the bulgarian capital, sofia. you could say this game began with marcus rashford's blistering finish to score the first england goal. in fact, it began before that. it began when england's players first heard the monkey chants, the racist abuse. i mean, i heard it before i got onto the pitch, in the warm—up. so we spoke about it coming off the pitch after the warm—up, and then obviously it was happening in the game. like i said, it's difficult to kind of categorise the whole country. i think it's perhaps a minority, and the second half was a lot better, so perhaps a victory all round. there were intense discussions between england players, management and officials through the first half, and an announcement was made to the crowd that the referee might suspend the game if the abuse continued. it was greeted by boos.
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there were nazi salutes on the ground. when england's players left this pitch at half—time, they then discussed whether they should even carry on with the match. they decided to play on, and england's captain told me he believes that was the right decision. everyone wanted to carry on and do their talking on the pitch, which i'm extremely proud of. it's not easy to play in circumstances like that. but the 6—0 fits, really, and the way we played, the manner in which we played, i'm extremely proud of, for sure. one answer to the abuse was the scoreline. manager gareth southgate has openly acknowledged that english football has its own issues to deal with, but racism was displayed in its starkest, most blatant form here in bulgaria. england's players exposed it, but the reaction can't stop here. joe wilson, bbc news, in sofia. so many different ways of describing
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what happened. some people calling it disgraceful, other descriptions, ugly. does this draw a line in the sand in anyway? it is the first time with england we have seen that moment when an income player says, did you hear that? speaks to an official, the management is involved, there is a stadium announcement, the uefa protocol kicks off. in one case it is a bit ofa kicks off. in one case it is a bit of a line in the sand. whether or not uefa respond and make some kind of big statement, how they react, how they potentially punish their opponents last night is what we have yet to see. certainly there has been a big reaction from people watching the game. let's hearfrom former england player rio ferdinand. he means uefa when he is asking whether there will be a punishment. this is what people need to hear. ——
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need to know. he is talking about tyrone mings. he is the player, on his debut, who turned to the official and said, did you hear that? he makes a really good point, doesn't he? when you go to any football club, it is one of the most diverse organisations you will go to. football is all working together. the fact that the fans aren't as united in a similar sort of way is really, really, desperately sad. a strong reaction from the fa chairman last night. what a disappointing night, probably one of the most appalling nights i have seen in football. he talked to
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the players at half—time and they got together and said, no, we want to play, finish, win the game, we do not want the racists to win. very much the players' decisions to carry on. i was watching that game at home in 30 minutes and i thought, this will not last another five. they had shown the way to the authorities. greg clark, in his interview with itv sport, who covered the game, said there is an issue back home in england as well, we know, talking about it being ugly, i saw a headline about it being really unsavoury, and yet the players' dignified response, in a framework like gareth southgate has created, where they feel able to act that way, is probably the best way to deal with age and the sanctions need to come from the governing bodies. and the way they behave, if anything, hopefully that sets an example to those areas of fans who have a problem with this. just check
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them out. stop again, throw them out. i know you will not be on the parallel bars, but you are going outside. i will not be on any bars. huge disappointment. not today, another day. let's schedule up to date with the rest of the news. —— margaret let's get you. a "perfect storm" of increased demand and staff shortages means that people with learning disabilities in england are still being locked up in unsuitable secure units. that's according to a report by the care quality commission. the watchdog also warns that more than half of england's accident and emergency departments are not good enough. the department of health and social care says the government is committed to providing everyone with the best quality care. the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier has said that a brexit deal is possible this week. his comments follow a meeting between the prme minister borisjohnson and the dup leader arlene foster last night. our europe correspondent adam fleming is in luxembourg.
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you made me a promise and now you can deliver. what has he said? this is the meeting of eu affairs ministers in luxembourg, chief negotiator michel barnier arrived 18 minutes ago and will brief them on the latest of the brexiter negotiations with the uk. he looked pretty tired, i suspect the work he has been doing has been intense and late nights have been involved. he said a revised brexit deal this week as possible, but he went on to say that it will be challenging and difficult to achieve and it is time to turn good intentions into something real, in other words there isa something real, in other words there is a lot of political will on both sides, lots of ideas thrown around and put on the table, but to become and put on the table, but to become a brexit deal they have to be turned into a legal text. i think he was suggesting that that will be difficult to achieve by the time of
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the eu summit on thursday, and the dutch foreign minister just the eu summit on thursday, and the dutch foreign ministerjust said maybe we should use all the time available right up to the 31st of october, which i think means brexit talks will go on until the very last minute this month. thank you, adam. let's get the latest from westminster from our political correspondent, jonathan blake. good morning. even though we are running out of time it seems there is the chance of a sniff of a deal? gulp an upbeat assessment from michel barnier, as you heard from adam in luxembourg. if the chances are good it seems as if there will bea are good it seems as if there will be a deal at least after some form of delay. it is not looking all that likely this week, although possible, as michel barnier has just said. it raises the question if they have to keep talking and negotiating beyond the summit at the end of this week, right up until the deadline at the end of october, what does boris
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johnson do? if there is not a deal by this weekend he is legally obliged to ask for an extension up to the end of january next year. he has said he will comply with the law, but if he does that he says there was still a chance the deal could be by the end of october and the current deal still stands. it is a risk for him politically because he has said he would rather die nadh then ask for an extension, but is it something he and his mps could contemplate if a deal is in sight? in the last hour we've had an update on new car finance deals, and what changes are coming. ben's with us, what has the regulator said? this kid safe people who buy a car through a personal contract plan more than £1000 over the life of that contract. the regulator has tried to step in insofar as interest
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and commission is concerned. there is an interest rate that comes with buying a car, it is not governed by anybody in particular, meaning the brokers can set the fee and they sometimes charge much more to make more commission to the value of about £1000 extra over the life of the contract. so the fca wants to ban that commission, stockbrokers being able to charge it. they want to make it much clearerfor consumers to know what they are paying before they sign up for it, because in some cases it may be cheaper to get finance from elsewhere, but what often happens is you are a bit bamboozled by the numbers, they offer to arrange it for you so you are not sure about what else is available and therefore it is costing people much more, the fca putting a figure of £165 million per year. the finance leasing association, the body representing carl fearns, says it is good news for the industry and consumers, delivering clear rules and a consistent approach. watch this
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space. the duke and duchess of cambridge continue their official visit to pakistan today, where they're due to meet the prime minister, imran khan. (tx the couple visited a school and chatted to pupils in islamabad. they'll also travel to the city of lahore, amid tight security. the last royal visit to the country was made by prince charles and camilla in 2006. the fa chairman greg clarke called it one of the most appalling nights he'd seen in football, as england players were subjected to vile abuse from bulgarian fans during yesterday's euro 2020 qualifier in sofia. a small section of bulgarian fans, it should be said. monkey chants and nazi salutes came from some of the home supporters, forcing the game to be stopped twice. let's speak now to our sports correspondent joe wilson, who's in sofia. just tell us a little bit, we can see from the television pictures, but just describe the see from the television pictures, butjust describe the atmosphere? gulp it was a nasty atmosphere, i think i have to use that word, in
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contrast to what we had experienced in the 48—hour as before that. contrast to what we had experienced in the 48-hour as before that. we have enjoyed being in the city, good weather, friendly people. the crowd was much bigger than bulgaria have been getting for their home matches, i had been wondering right through the build—up whether there would be afar right the build—up whether there would be a far right element to the crowd in sofia last night and i think that was clear. the first we really became aware that was in the 30 minutes of the game when marcus rashford got the ball on the wing near to some bulgarian supporters and there was a loud noise, you could hear it growing in intensity. it was not 100% clear what exactly it was, but when i spoke to an england supporter who had been in that section of the ground, he said that section of the ground, he said that monkey (inaudible) had begun then. when i spoke to tyrone mings after the game, he said there were monkey chants even before there were monkey chants even before the referee blew the whistle to start the match. he told me that was
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actually monkey chants when they we re actually monkey chants when they were warming up, as sooner actually monkey chants when they were warming up, as sooner they went to the far side of the pitch in the warm up there were monkey chants. after about 20 minutes of the first half, something came up that in a way we had anticipated, history making, there was an announcement over loudspeakers to the crowd that if the racism continued the referee suspend the match, that is the first of the new uefa racism protocols. that announcement was greeted almost universally by booing inside the stadium. joe, we will leave it there because we are having a few issues with the quality of the line, but thank you for explaining to us what it felt like to be in the stadium. we heard that from john cross, the chief football right at the daily mirror. we arejoined by rushing wallace, the chief executive of the
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antiracism group kick it out. —— we are joined antiracism group kick it out. —— we arejoined by roisin antiracism group kick it out. —— we are joined by roisin wallace. antiracism group kick it out. —— we arejoined by roisin wallace. some of the stuff we saw and heard was horrible and unsavoury but there was a very dignified response by the england management and the players on the field. we would agree with what everybody had said, the dignity shown by gareth southgate and the england team was amazing in a very difficult situation. we were asking why this is still happening in 2019 and what is being done about it, and how can england players play their game and still be expected to play at in this situation, it is untenable. we should remind people, this does not just untenable. we should remind people, this does notjust happen in bulgaria, there are problems both here in the uk and when england and other countries play abroad. in terms of what sally spoke about, how authorities are dealing with this, what would you like to see happen? should it go as far as throwing a country like bulgaria or others who
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have broken the rules in this way out of the competition, is that what is needed? uefa had to send a very strong message, bulgaria played the stadium a partial closure because of previous issues. they had officials there, if they will not take this seriously, and by all accounts it seems there are questions to be asked under thorough investigation to be undertaken, but if the bulgarian fa will not take this seriously and they are letting these things happen, then the strongest possible sanctions should be thought about and looked at, and if that means expelling people from future competitions, that has to be done. we can't let this continue, it is 2019. this has to stop at some stage. he had seen what happened last night, i was just shocked to see nazi salutes, the monkey chants, players having to play under those conditions, it isjust players having to play under those conditions, it is just not happening. we are asking for very strong sanctions from uefa, they had
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to stand up. if you see some of these fans who had taken the respect campaign by uefa and put it on t—shirts saying no respect, it tells u efa t—shirts saying no respect, it tells uefa they had to be really strong on this. do you get the feeling there is an understanding that people have reached the end of their tether with this, they need to take a stronger stance, or do you feel there is a lack of understanding and care about making a real stand on this? there are issues in england, we are not sane are issues in england, we are not sane for one minute that we have it sorted, but we had a better communication with the fa and a better communication with the clubs and the lea ks, better communication with the clubs and the leaks, we ask the same from uefa, you had to take this seriously. this is going worldwide, the whole world saw that game last night. what we have seen is a brilliant win by england, not a lot of people are talking about that, we are talking about that. uefa have to
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understand that it is time to take control and stand up and say if you're going to play football, when you're going to play football, when you go to work or when i go to work, like any of us, we will not expect discrimination to be shut down our faces and shouted at. we would not accept it anywhere else, why should professional players accept it at the workplace? thank you very much, roisin wood from kick it out. thank you to everyone who has got in touch about that. i said it was miserable earlier but carroll says there is good news on the way. —— but carol kirkwood says. through the day, the cloud will break and sunshine will come through. foremost, it will be dry. there is quite a bit of cloud in the wa ke there is quite a bit of cloud in the wake of the overnight rain. a transient ridge of pressure is settling things down, but the set of fronts will come away later. cloudy, grey and damp for some first thing
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this morning, through the day the cloud will thin and bright, so bright spells, meaning there will still be some high cloud, also dispelled. the shower, shower is in the afternoon will be the exception rather than the rule. some of them getting into scotland, northern ireland, wales, possibly the midlands and the south—west, but the rest of us should stay dry, temperatures up to 17 degrees in any sunshine and light breezes, not feeling too dry. temperatures get progressively lower as we push further north. through the evening we will see the next front come our way, it will introduce thicker cloud initially and then some rain and gusty winds around it as it moves from the west towards the east overnight. not quite arriving in the east by the end of the night, mostly clearing northern ireland and getting out of wales and south—west england by the end of the night. if you are under this band, temperatures holding up. if you are ahead of it, a cool night, particularly so in rural areas.
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tomorrow morning, we watch the band of rain and blustery winds move across all areas, pushing into the north sea, lingering across parts of south—east england for a time, the same across the far north—east of scotland. behind this bandage should brighten up, sunny spells developing, contrary like the odd shower that they will be the exception rather than the rule, temperatures 11 to 16 as we move north to south. for thursday we have a big area of low pressure in the atla ntic a big area of low pressure in the atlantic coming our way. on thursday you can see how the isobars get tighter together, indicating we will see stronger winds and we are also looking at all this rain coming our way. it will be shower irate but sometimes merging to give longer spells. the further east you are, the better your chances. in and brighterfor the longer the better your chances. in and brighter for the longer periods. even in the east, some showers. temperatures, 11 to 15. by friday the low pressure will sit on top
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others, so we have the dizzy cocktail of bright spells, sunshine and showers with some showers merging to give longer spells of rain, temperatures 11 to 14 degrees. the theme for the next few days is u nsettled, the theme for the next few days is unsettled, we had some rain, then it dries up, some sunshine and then some rain. studio: thank you. let's return to one of our main stories. "tortu re. " that's just one of the words used by people with autism and learning difficulties to describe their time in some secure mental health units. but more and more vulnerable people are being locked away in unsuitable units, farfrom home, according to a report out today by the care quality commission. joining us now from london is ian trenholm, the chief executive of the care quality commission. we have spoken to people who have beenin we have spoken to people who have been in those units, it is distressing to hear the stories,
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what has been happening? in other state of care report launched today, we have learned that in the main much help and so is delivered really well, with people working hard, but well, with people working hard, but we have raised concern about impatient learning disability and autism services in particular, where we are concerned that people are ending up in the wrong care at the wrong time and in the wrong place, we do not think it is acceptable. it isa we do not think it is acceptable. it is a model of care that is not acceptable. it sounds like things are getting worse, not better, why? we are seeing increases in demand, a lack of people with the right skills to look after patients with incredibly complex needs and all of these things coming together, we are describing it as perfect storm. some people pointed out that people were expressing concerns yea rs people pointed out that people were expressing concerns years ago before what happened at winterbourne view, you are the independent regulator, can't you do something about what is going on? we have closed down or put
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into special members 14 of these learning disability and autism services so far this year. whenever we see unsafe care and we have evidence to take action, we do so and we had an exactly that this year. the report concluded that safety is at risk, what else is going on, what else are you doing? in orderfor people going on, what else are you doing? in order for people to get the care that they need in the right place, there needs to be a really strong set of community—based services. we find that people are living at home, they need a small amount of community support, which in many cases is not there, and suddenly they are going into crisis and finding themselves in impatient departments, sometimes going via a police station on the way to those services. once they are in an inpatient wards they are not able to get out because the community—based services are not able to support them to come out. for us, this is
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not about individual services but the whole system working together across both health and. that was the .1 of our guests made about this moment when people get to crisis. —— that was the point that one of our guests made. you think i need to be intervention before that point? when we see services delivered well in people having a good experience of care, they will say they were supported well in the community, where they sometimes need that little bit of a cute support in a hospital they get that for a short period and then services are available close to where they live to support them to go back home. this is a really important system based conversation where services integrate well together and people experience good care. the equality and human rights commission have asked you for more information about what happened at wharton hall, are you cooperating? what is going on?
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absolutely, they have asked us for more information and we have given a comprehensive reply, we are waiting to hear back in case they need more information. people will be interested in accident and emergency and what is going on there. coming up and what is going on there. coming up to winter, what are your concerns? i think our concern is we had some fantastic people working in accident and emergency services at the moment, they have had a really tough winter and they normally get the opportunity to pause for breath during the summer ready for another busy winter, that simply did not happen this year. we had a busy winter followed happen this year. we had a busy wi nter followed by happen this year. we had a busy winter followed by a happen this year. we had a busy winterfollowed by a really, really busy summer. that causes real concerns. if we busy summer. that causes real concerns. if we are busy summer. that causes real concerns. if we are talking about accident and emergency, we are missing the point, this is services being integrated so accident and emergency teams are connected to the rest of the hospital and social care and connected to services in the community. if that all comes
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together, accident and emergency services have the opportunity to deliver the great care that the people who work there want to deliver. thank you for your time. it isa deliver. thank you for your time. it is a really busy show this morning. national headlights in a few minutes, but now the news, travel and weather where you are. —— national headlines. for many of us, cloudy, great old start the day, damp weather for the east of england, the rain pulling away to the north sea. showers in the forecast for the rest of the day will see some moving across northern ireland and southern counties and
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after a cloudy start, slowly brightening up with the best of today sunshine across southern parts of wales, southern counties of england, and probably also parts of north—west scotland. temperatures between 14 and 17 degrees. overnight tonight, starts off dry but eventually, we will see an area of cloud and rain spreading from the west, given the cloud and rain, mild night, temperatures nine to 13 degrees. tomorrow, more rain in the forecast, the weather front will be bringing many of us a wet start to the day, brightening up in northern ireland, wales and south—west england, some sunshine through the afternoon. this band of rain has the potential to become very slow moving, perhaps continuing to bring rain to south—east england even into the evening time.
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hello, this is worklife from bbc news, with sally bundock and tim willcox. will brussels turn up the heat on fossil fuels? live from london, that's our top story on tuesday 15 october.
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a key decision is expected today on whether the european union's lending arm should stop financing fossil fuel projects such as oil exploration beyond next year.
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