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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  October 15, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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you're watching bbc newsroom live — it's11am and these are the main stories this morning: nazi salutes and racist chants at england's euro—qualifer against bulgaria — as the match had to be stopped twice. whatever we do might be perceived as not being enough, but i think we've made a major statement. i think we've made a major statement with the way we played through such a difficult circumstance. i don't think a game has ever been stopped, of this magnitude, twice. england players take to social media to share their disgust — marcus rashford says racism in football "needs stamping out". the uk proposes new customs plans as efforts to reach a brexit deal before an eu summit this week go to the wire.
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michel barnier says a deal can still be done. reaching an agreement is still possible. obviously any agreement must work for everyone. climate change campaigners have been banned from london, after a week of extinction rebellion protests. the duke and duchess of cambridge arrive in pakistan at the start of their five—day tour. good morning, welcome to bbc newsroom live. i'm joanna gosling. the government and the football association — as well as past and present players — have demanded that uefa take tough and immediate action after england's black players were racially abused during an international in bulgaria. the game — which england won 6—0 — had to be halted twice because home fans were making monkey noises
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and nazi salutes. bulgaria's prime minister has called for the head of the country's football union to resign. the referee was following uefa's three step racism protocol. the first incident occurred on the 28th minute when england was leading 2—0. a stadium announcement was made condemning the abuse and warned fans if further incidents occurred the match might be abandoned. the game was stopped again just before half time, and was restarted after discussions between the officials and the england manager, gareth southgate. a number of bulgarian fans who were making racist chants and gestures then left the stadium. if a third incident had occurred, the game would have been abandoned. the fa chairman, greg clarke, described it as one of the most appalling nights he'd seen in football. our correspondentjoe wilson sent this report from the bulgarian capital, sofia. you could say this game began with marcus rashford's blistering finish to score the first england goal. in fact, it began before that. it began when england's players first heard the monkey
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chants, the racial abuse. whistling. i mean, i heard it before i even got to the other side of the pitch in the warm up, so we spoke about it coming off the pitch after the warm up and then, obviously, it was happening in the game but, like i said, it's difficult to categorize the whole country. i think it's perhaps a minority and the second half was a lot better, so perhaps a victory all round. uefa, who i've spoken to throughout the game — at half—time and at the end of the game — will be carrying out a thorough investigation, not just what the ref saw and what the officials around him saw, but also live footage, witness statements to make sure that this appalling scene of terrible racism is treated appropriately. there were intense discussions between england players, management and officials through the first half and an announcement was made
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to the crowd that the referee might suspend the game if abuse continued. it was greeted by boos. there were nazi salutes in the ground. when england's players left this pitch at half time, they then actually discussed whether they should even carry on with the match. they decided to play on and england's captain told me he believes that was the right decision. everyone wanted us to carry on and do the talking on the pitch, which i'm extremely proud of. it's not easy to play in circumstances like that, but the 6—0 finish and the way we played, the manner in which we played, i'm extremely proud of, for sure. england's manager felt they had handled the situation in the best way. i'm incredibly proud of all of the players and all of the staff. i don't think... of course, we could be criticised for not going far enough, but i think we've made a huge statement and, frankly, we were in an impossible situation to get it right to the satisfaction of everybody.
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but bulgaria's manager gave a different perspective. translation: i was totally concentrated on the game. i didn't actually hear anything, but i've just talked to the english press offices and i told them that if this is proven to be true, then we will have to be ashamed and apologize for it. but once again, firstly, it has to be proven to be true. one answer to the abuse was the scoreline. commentator: up towards kane. manager gareth southgate has openly acknowledged that english football has its own issues to deal with, but racism was displayed in its starkest, most blatant form in bulgaria. england's players exposed it, but the reaction can't stop here. it is worth remembering that the bulgarian football authorities were angry when england even brought up the issue of racism in the build up to this game. we heard bulgaria's manager tell us there was not an issue in this country with racism. clearly, racism stretches way beyond bulgaria,
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but nothing was ever changed in a spirit of denial. joe wilson, bbc news, in sofia. a number of england players tweeted after the game. striker marcus rashford tweeted it was "not an easy situation to play in and not one which should be happening in 2019. proud we rose above it to take three points but this needs stamping out." team—mate raheem sterling who has been subject to racist abuse throughout the qualfying campaign said he felt sorry for bulgaria to be represented by such idiots in their stadium. and captain harry kane tweeted that he was "proud of the togetherness we showed in some disgraceful circumstances. racism has no place in society or football. it needs stamping out for good". my colleague annita mcveigh has been speaking to the former chelsea player paul conville, who was subject to racist abuse from some of his club's own fans in the 1980s — and has campaigned to end racism in the sport. she asked him what he made
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of last night's match. disgusting scenes. ugly scenes we witnessed last night clearly. a all for the uefa to get off their backsides and take swift action. we can always remember what they did after the stadium disaster. they banned all clubs for six years. any european football this is a step. they need to send the message. most definitely support and take part at least some. paul, it suggests that if you didn't know about it well does
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anybody know about it? ijust find out i had to make a phone call to my colleague and so this has been going on for how long. and not did not see me. what are they going to do? they need protecting? you mean that uefa's methods are not working and what do they need to do? they are not working, especially the eastern european side. uefa has taken so lightly by:. this time the prime minister has exactly fit the union, whoever is in charge of bulgaria's football union. —— has sacked the football union. —— has sacked the football union. everyone is lessening out to see what punishment is going to be given. let's see what you wish you ever do. this happen in
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ten —— in tennis, golf, athletics and other sports. why does it happen in football? the england players handled themselves so well last night and they did let the football do the talking, didn't they? obviously, there is a debate about whether the black players should walk off in circumstances like that. is that then handing the racists at the when you? what you think should happen? it is a tough position for the footballers to be put in? they should not be having to have the decisions. it should not have been left u p decisions. it should not have been left up to the players. i agree with what abraham said, that the... i would have walked off the pitch. then, as you said, it was a case of, like the situation yesterday, the game led to a win 6—0 and if any chance they did work, they would
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have lasted. but if the referee then stopped the game, it would have been a winfor stopped the game, it would have been a win for england. it had to take, the authorities had to take note and ta ke the authorities had to take note and take the responsibility of looking after their players. as simple as that. it should not be left out of the players to make that decision whether to work for a stay on the pitch. as i said, repeatedly, eve ryo ne pitch. as i said, repeatedly, everyone has said that this has gone on far too long. this is an eye—opener. the whole world can see. this is not going to stop her other clu bs this is not going to stop her other clubs and other countries need to understand, need to know now. we need to stand aside, immediately. more coverage of that letter. —— of that later. the eu's chief negotiator, michael barnier, has told ministers from the 27 member states that it's possible there could be a brexit deal ready for the summit this week but there would have to be agreement
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with the uk by tonight. mr barnier, will update eu ministers at a meeting in luxembourg later, has previously said "big gaps" remained between the uk and eu. speaking this morning, he said talks were difficult. this work has been intense all the weekend and yesterday, because even if the agreement will be difficult — more and more difficult, to be frank — it is still possible this week. reaching an agreement is still possible. obviously any agreement must work for everyone, the whole of the united kingdom and the whole of the european union. also, it is high time to turn good intentions into legal text.
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thank you very much. arriving in luxembourg this morning, the brexit secretary stephen barclay said we need to give the talks space to take place — but he thought a deal was possible. well, i'm looking forward to the general affairs council this morning an opportunity to discuss this issues with my e.u. counterparts. the talks are ongoing we need to give them space to proceed. but detailed conversations are under way and a deal is still very possible. the dup were in downing street last night — are they on board? we can speak to our political assistant editor norman smith who is in westminsterfor us. what is the reaction to what is coming out of europe because make the bread from number ten is that they are still committed to getting this done and dusted by october the sist. this done and dusted by october the 31st. they were just praying that
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this idea that the significant progress has been made and that is why this morning's cabinet has been delayed until tomorrow. they want to make sure that ministers can be briefed on the latest progress in the talks. i get the sense that this is perhaps going quite a bit more slowly tha n is perhaps going quite a bit more slowly than might be necessary to get a deal in place for the eu summit on thursday and friday. just after we heard from michel barnier, ilan‘s foreign minister did an interview in which he too struck a deliberately cautious —— island's foreign minister did an interview in which he struck it deliberately cautious note. he said that they needed to be big steps forward today. he too was also making the point at agreement on the tax has to be finalised today so that mr bagnaia can presented to eu leaders
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tomorrow, so that they can go into the eu summit —— so that mr barnier can presented to eu leaders tomorrow. so that means today's the day if the deals were to be ready for the eu summit and you sense that could be a tall order because what we seem to be looking at is a bespoke custom steel. nothing an off—the—shelf package, which can be easily dusted down and the legal niceties sorted out, this is a complex agreement which i get the sense may take a bit more time to negotiate. and her suggestion that there may be a special brexit summit before the end of the month if discussions go beyond this week? what is the wider political reaction to all of these latest developments? amongst many of the old hands here at westminster, there is a common view that this is going to take
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longer, certainly, than this weekend. there may well be negotiations next week. the important thing is, if the deal is not done, by this saturday, then the ban act kicks in, which forces boris johnson to ask for extension —— the benn act kicks in. if borisjohnson can geta benn act kicks in. if borisjohnson can get a text worked out today, the eu council to a great and then it goes to parliament on saturday, i think the view of his team is that they can get this through the commons and that the mood has changed, particularly amongst the brexiteers. that would certainly seem brexiteers. that would certainly seem to be the view of jacob rees—mogg this morning saying that he too thought that the deal, mr johnson could get the eu to sign off on it, would go through parliament. if the deal is agreed with your opinion, it will through the house of commons, in my view because everybody is desperate to finish
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this, even lbc's listeners and callers have probably had enough of talking about brexit and they want to talk about the other things that are important to their lives. this has been going on for three years and once parliament has a great something, it can legislate very quickly. if the meaningful vote goes through, the new legislation will merely be the ratification in domestic law of the treaty and that, i think, is a very easy attachment relatively easy bill to pass if there is a deal. but isn't that if there is a deal. but isn't that if the size of texas, a palamo degree something, you can act fairly quickly cosmic that is the big one, isn't it cosmic —— then parliament connect fairly quickly. when you talk to people in downing street, they say that we want to have that special parliamentary setting on saturday, it is our intention to haveit saturday, it is our intention to have it on saturday, we think it is likely to happen on saturday, we
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will deftly have it on saturday, no. it is not ioo%. there is that little bit of wiggle room. but in downing street, they know that this might just be beyond the grasp and if it is beyond grass, i suspect they will not want parliament to sit on saturday because mps can then pile in with all sorts of amendments to make life even more difficult for borisjohnson. it looks, make life even more difficult for boris johnson. it looks, not confirmed, if the country could be delayed a bit longer. thank you very much. the us has announced sanctions on turkey in response to the country's military offensive against kurdish forces in northern syria. president trump, who has been criticised for his decision to withdraw us troops from syria before the turkish offensive began, has phoned turkey's president erdogan to call for an immediate truce. earlier, vice president mike pence spoke at a news conference outside the white house. president trump made it very clear
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that the united states is going to continue to take actions against turkey's actions against turkey's economy until they bring the violence to an end. we want an immediate cease fire. and we want to begin negotiations. between turkey and syrian defense forces. president trump again offered to have the united states of america mediate in those discussions. we can speak now to our middle east correspondent who is on the turkey—syria border. putting aside for one moment that it was america's withdrawal that led to what happened here, what reaction is likely to be to those sanctions now being imposed and a call for negotiations that could be mediated by medical cosmic —— that could be mediated by america? we have seen at
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the reaction. we have seen more turkish bombardment, more shelling. i was here yesterday and it is more intense now than it was yesterday, so intense now than it was yesterday, so turkey's present, president erdogan says that he is not going to back down. he is coming under sustained economic, political pressure from washington. a week ago it was effectively donald trump as my tweet that effectively giving that this operation. washington is now saying that it has had enough and this offensive needs to come to and this offensive needs to come to an end. but i think turkey, it will certainly want to capture two key city and turns on the border, one of which is behind me. kurdish fighters are still putting up resistance there. we might actually see a step up there. we might actually see a step up any military operation in the coming before the vice president,
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vice president p arrives in turkey. it isa vice president p arrives in turkey. it is a feeling that it cannot be put back in the box now? or is there any sense that there may be a mediated way out of this?” any sense that there may be a mediated way out of this? i think there is potential for a mediated way out of this? i think there is potentialfor a ceasefire, but turkey and america need to work that out. the only country turkey is listening to as america, so turkey's president, president erdogan, will wa nt to president, president erdogan, will want to be able to sell this as a victory to the turkish people, so if he takes these two key towns, then perhaps that might be enough, although he said at least any speech although he said at least any speech a while ago saying that it needs to run right along the border. what is interesting, according to reports overnight, he spoke to president trump and he agreed not to enter the syrian town of killarney. that has a potential flash point where you
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could have a flash point. —— not to enter one of the city interns. everyone in the region want to try and resolve. they do not want to see and resolve. they do not want to see a major escalation in syria. thank you very much. the headlines on bbc news... nazi salutes and racist chants at england's euro—qualifer against bulgaria — as the match had to be stopped twice. the uk proposes new customs plans as efforts to reach a brexit deal before a eu summit this week go to the wire. michel barnier says a deal can still be done climate change campaigners have been banned from london, after a week of extinction rebellion protests.
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and in sport... there are calls for bulgaria to be thrown out of the european championship, after england players are subjected to racist chanting from the crowd, in their qualifier last night.the bulgarian prime minister has called on the head of the bulgarian football association to resign. paddy mcnair scores twice as northern ireland beat the czech republic 3—2 to win a friendly match away from home for the first time in 13 years. andy murray says he'll leave the european open — if his wife kim goes into labour earlier than expected. murray is scheduled to play his first round match in belgium today. i'll be back with more on those stories. a "perfect storm" of increased demand and staff shortages means that people with learning disabilities in england are still being locked up in unsuitable secure units. that's according to a report by the care quality commission. the watchdog also warns that more than half of england's accident and emergency departments are not good enough. here's our social affairs correspondent, alison holt. scandals, including allegations in a bbc panorama investigation of patients with learning disabilities and autism being taunted and bullied at the now—closed whorlton hall hospital in county durham,
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underline some of the concerns raised by the care regulator. the care quality commission report looking at the whole of the health and care sector says safety and quality are deteriorating in specialist mental health services, with too many people looked after by workers who lack skills and training. in 2018, inspectors who visited hospitals for people with learning disabilities and autism rated 1% as inadequate. this year, 10% have been given this lowest rating. last year, inspections of inpatient mental health services for children and teenagers found 3% were inadequate. now, 7% are failing to meet standards. what we've seen is a perfect storm brewing — an increase in demand, plus some real concerns over the workforce. and what that means in practical terms is there's been a significant reduction in the number of learning disability nurses, which means that the carers that are looking after people with incredibly complex needs don't have the support and the skills necessary. the report also says increasing demand and staff shortages
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are causing problems across the health and care system, with accident and emergency departments often having to pick up the pieces when people can't get the help they need in the community. the government says it is making record investments in the nhs and that it is transforming mental health services. we'll have more on this at around 11.40pm, when we'll be speaking to the chief executive of the mental health network of the nhs confederation, which represents nhs mental health service providers. there's been a 10% rise in reported hate crimes by police in england and wales. that's according to new home office figures that show there were a record number of offences recorded in the past year. race hate crimes accounted for around three—quarters of recorded offences — that's a rise of 11% on the year before to 78,991. reports of transgender hate crime went up
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37%. sexual orientation hate reports increased by 25%(ani) and disability hate reports went up by 14%. but — do they reflect a real increase in crime? here to talk through the numbers is our head of statistics robert cuffe. over the past six years the number of recorded hate crimes has doubled, so of recorded hate crimes has doubled, so what is the analysis of those figures cosmic it has more than doubled. a year on year we have seen consistent increases and reported crime. but they are mainly public order offences and violence against a person, so order offences and violence against a person, so if you want to think about a picture of hate crime, think about a picture of hate crime, think about similar crimes to that, violence against a person that are not motivated by hate and we sell a similar increases in those as well. all that kind of crime has been increasing. it is important to remember that it is reported and recorded crime, so if you get abused in the street, do you tell the police cosmic to the right time
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cosmic over the last six years, the systems have been getting better and better for doing that. if you add to that, extra information which is not subject to those kinds of issues, if you're going into peoples homes and asked them, have you been a victim of this kind of crime, you see the long—term trend is actually falling more flat. when you add those two bits of things together, if you asked people, it is going down, there is an alternative expansion, thatis there is an alternative expansion, that is where the home office themselves say that a lot of this increase is down to reporting and recording. it is quite confusing to get your head around, isn't it?|j think it is. it is important to remember that crime in general is a difficult one. what has the best measure, to answer a particular question crime does depend on the topic and a hate crime, it is important to look at both pictures together. overall, the simple thing together. overall, the simple thing to ta ke together. overall, the simple thing to take away from it is that the overall trend is flat and the recording, and increase recording of crime, does not a story about the
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violence and hatred and society, but the pattern that is following in place which has been increasing steadily over the last few years. however a place dealing with this cosmic —— how are the police in dealing with this cosmic frequent versus non—hate crime, violence against the non—hit crime is about 8%. non-hit crime is about 8%. it is slightly better for it can, but still, 12% earn 8% charge rate is nothing to write home about. —— at a slightly better for hate crime. recorded crimes are going up, but charge rates are flat or falling. there is a sense that the police are struggling to cope with the additional demand. thank you very much. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. it's not quite as wet as it has been over recent days, but there are a number of showers around today and it will be quite cloudy free time
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yet. that said, the weather was so liberating about sunny spells coming through, the best of these into dumfries and galloway, brightening up dumfries and galloway, brightening up southern england and parts of wales as well. temperatures 1a to 17, but there will be showers around, particularly across wales and southern england. especially across parts of south—east england, where one or two heavy ones will come in from the channel to affect sussex and kent. overnight, we have rain on the way, moving into northern ireland before spreading into scotland and much of england and wales. it has amounted with strengthening southerly winds. temperatures ranging from seven to about 1k celsius. that takes us into tomorrow. it has a wet saturday for many of us. living could well become a slow across to scotland and also south—east england, perhaps a lingering well on into the afternoon. elsewhere, we should see some sunshine coming through, northern ireland wales and southern england. an inquest in england. that's where the best of the sunshine will be, but it will be
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pressure.
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hello, this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines: nazi salutes and racist chance at‘s euro qualifier against gary. the match had to be stopped twice. whatever we do, might not be perceived as doing enough. but i think we have made a major statement at the way we played, through such a difficult circumstance. i do not think a game has ever been stopped of this magnitude twice. england players take to social media to share their disgust. marcus rushford says racism in football need stamping out. the uk proposes new custom plans as efforts to reach a brexit deal before an eu summit this week go to the wire. michelle barnier says a deal can still be
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done. reaching an agreement is still possible. obviously, any agreement must work for everyone. climate change campaigners have been banned from london after a week of extinction rebellion protest. the joke and duchess of cambridge arrive in pakistan at the start of the five—day tour. —— the duke and duchess. sport now and a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. the bulgarian prime minister has called for the head of the country past like that but as decision to resign after england players were subjected to racist abuse during last night's euro 2020 qualifier. the game halted twice in the first half as cameras picked up fans making racist gestures and chance. a stadium announcement condemned the base before setting the match would be abandoned if it continued. a group of fans left the stadium after the game was halted for a second
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time. before england went on to win the match 6—0, and move a step closer to qualification. manager gareth southgate said he was pardoned by his players conducted himself, that it was a team decision to carry on. they want to be recognised for their football. they we re recognised for their football. they were playing so well that they do not want to leave the pitch at that moment. that would have been part of their thinking. so, i am moment. that would have been part of theirthinking. so, iam incredibly proud of all the players and staff, do not think, of course, we could be criticised for not going far enough. but i think we have made a huge statement and frankly we were in an impossible situation to get it right, to the satisfaction of everybody. the fa have asked uefa to investigate as a manner of urgency under a for bulgaria to be cut made out of the championship. earlier bespoke to answer network network setup to counter discrimination from european football. after all the
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debate that has happened, all the warnings, it was shocking to see the level of racist abuse of the england players had to endure. it isjust unthinkable how the bulgarian fa president and the bulgarian coach said, you know, these things would not happen or they did not hear it. this is absolutely despicable. we think that after what happened uefa has on their books and in their power to keep gary out of euro 2020 qualification, for sure. there have been to many incidents, too many negations family but gary and fa for this to happen. uefa should make a example of uefa ——... this to happen. uefa should make a example of uefa --... last this to happen. uefa should make a example of uefa --. .. last night northern ireland when i finally away from home for the first time in 13 yea rs. from home for the first time in 13 years. players scored twice, as they beat the czech republic 3— km pride. they play the netherlands again in another qualifier next month.
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cristiano rinaldo with the landmark last night, this penalty was his 700th career goal. it did not help his portugal side and a european qualifier, they lost 2—1. andy murray is due on court in the first round of the european open in an tablature, but round of the european open in an tablatu re, but he round of the european open in an tablature, but he may have to lead the tournament earlier. his third child is due this month and belief in london if his wife goes into labour. he has already said it will ta ke labour. he has already said it will take a month off and the baby does arise. he is scheduled to play a local player at around six 30 pm. that is on the spot for now, plenty more to come in the next hour. downing street says the prime minister has seen the footage between last night's much of england and bulgaria anti—things it is vile.
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the payments are's official spokesman says the player and management should dignity after braces chance from some in the stadium. the government is writing to uefa today to demand more action is the problem has not been adequately dealt with. ministers accept as a matter for the footballing authorities, but the penalties need to be tough. there is a need for real deterrent. racism is never be tolerated. that is just through from downing street. extinction rebellion actives are targeting the department for transport. one of figure's co—founders who climbed on top of the entrance of the building in central london said she was taking action for trees threatened by hs to and likely hit the glass with a hammer. it was reported on social media that she said i do this in the spirit of what emily pancras got the noble art of window smashing. the
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climate change but has a's camp was cleared last night after police issued a ban on the protest. but another is still in tact. avenues corresponding as in central london where the protests have been taking place. explain that the situation is now, because police are taking a tougher line. they are saying that these protests should not be happening, they are banned. but obviously they are so happening. yes, to some extent they are. you can see behind me there are still tense, but you can possibly also say that there are people dismantling tents. people having to make a decision today but have either prepared to purchase after the police said last night that protesters should disperse, that a banning order was in place. they had been living through this camp today asking people to pack up their tents because of it is been fairly low— key, because of it is been fairly low—key, but there has been a helicopter monitoring us. with me are three of the people who been in this camp, jeff, mandy and andre. jess, i stanger going? whether it
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was to stay ago is entirely dependent on what was won't be in the queen's speech yesterday. there was nothing in a child to address the crisis that we are in. whether i stay a global depending the consensus of the other protesters here. if there had been anything minimaland here. if there had been anything minimal and torturing some sort of understanding and intelligence regarding the crisis we are in —— they had been anything at all. do think much has been achieved? yes, i think much has been achieved? yes, i think we have raised awareness of the climate crisis perhaps to lots of people who might not have had that information before. for example, the police have been amazing. we have talked is a mini policeman and they often had seemed to have had very similar ideas to us about climate change. sometimes they say we are not, the disruption is not a good thing to do. but what else can we do? there is nothing else can we do? there is nothing else we can do to try to get the government to do something about it.
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andrew, have you done anything like as before? no, this is all very new territory for me. we have come under a lot of criticism for the amount of disruption in london and i get that. this is nothing compared to the amount of destruction with a say in this country and across the rest of the world is climate change continues at the rate it has done recently. another criticism has been about the timescales, extension rebellion assignment is carbon neutral by 2025 people are saying thatis neutral by 2025 people are saying that is unrealistic. 2050 is the really unrealistic timescale, we need action now. government action fiow. need action now. government action now. and that is why we are here. thanks to other av. that has been the message and the past eight or nine days. the police do seem determined to shut this process down, even though it has the modest run. we will have to see by the another place are prepared to purchase more aggressively the process down.
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staff at some branches of collapsed holiday firm thomas cook have returned to work. last month, the company went out of business, putting 9,000 jobs in the uk at risk. but hay‘s travel has taken over its 500—plus travel shops and says it will continue to employ up to 2,500 of the people who work in them. at the start of the hearing, the former ceo, peter fankhauser, reiterated his apology to everyone affected by the collapse. you heard me saying this already probably, but i really am and two repeated in front of the members of the select committee how deeply sorry the select committee how deeply sorry we are the select committee how deeply sorry we are that we could not save this iconic brand and this company who has a long—standing history in this part of the uk industry. i'm deeply sorry about this failure, and i'm deeply sorry for the distress we caused to millions of customers who booked holidays with us
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and who were on holiday with us. i'm deeply sorry for our suppliers who were long—standing partners and who were loyal to us throughout this time. and i'm especially sorry for all my colleagues who worked extremely hard and tirelessly to make thomas cook a better company. during the hearing the former chair of the company frank meysman described how the company had been attempting to restructure and spoke of some successes it had achieved in reviving the business. but the chair of committee, rachel reeves, told him he should show some humility given the company collapsed. there were lots of new ways of travelling that were proposed. casa cook is one example of that, the expedia joint—venture was. we had a joint—venture in china that was growing and happening. so there was a lot of restructuring happening. even in the uk, in 2011,
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only 20% of the people did buy their vacation online. today, orjust before, it's a0%. so there was a lot of restructuring. it took a long time. mr meysman... and i would agree that... mr meysman, you are here today in front of our committee because 9000 people have lost theirjobs, 150,000 people were on holidays and had to be brought home at a cost to the taxpayer, so with all respect, mr meysman, you can point to as many successes as you like but you have brought down a 178 year business with huge repercussions for customers, staff and taxpayers. so, you can point to the successes, but i'll point to the failures, and they hugely outweigh the successes you've spoken about. and at the beginning, mr meysman, you and your colleagues offered some apologies. i think you are deluded, mr meysman, about the business that you ran. you chaired a business that has gone under
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because of the decisions made collectively by your management team. so, when you're pointing to the successes, maybe you might want to have a little bit more humility, mr meysman. in new international study suggest a cheap and widely available drug could save hundreds of thousands of people from dramatic brain injuries. it suggests a chance examine as it can significant in—person patient‘s chances of survival. i'm a 17 million people suffer these kinds of entries year. our global health correspondence reports. in a brief moment, a head injury can change a person's life forever. five years ago, pam foley fell off her bike in oxford. all i remember is one minute on my bike, next minute, on the ground, trying to get up. i knew i was stunned but i didn't realise how... how much i had hurt myself.
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pam had fractured her skull and suffered a bleed on her brain. she did make a good recovery, but lost her sense of smell and taste. it's a constant reminder of the pleasures that can be had from simple smells. i really miss the smell of freshly cut grass, i loved that smell. this is a ct scan of a patient's brain. this is unfortunately a young man who was punched and fell to the ground. there are currently very few treatment options for patients who've suffered these types of injuries, particularly in low and middle income countries. patients can need surgery to ease pressure on the brain, or life—support equipment. researchers, though, say now there's another option, a simple injection of tranexamic acid. when patients are bleeding into their brain, naturally two processes occur simultaneously. the process of clotting and of breaking down the clot. tranexamic acid stops the breakdown of the clot, so allows the clot to form more
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effectively, and hence reduces and stops the bleeding. this is tranexamic acid. it's been around for decades and was originally used for things like heavy periods. it's cheap, it costs just a few dollars per vial, and it's already easily accessible all around the world. the royal london hospital here in the uk was one of 175 hospitals across 29 countries and involving more than 12,000 patients to take part in the trial. it found deaths in patients with mild—to—moderate brain injuries were cut by a fifth if the drug was given within three hours. it's a simple injection, it can be given around the world by doctors and nurses. there is no special training needed to give it. previous international studies have already shown that the drug can be used to treat women with excessive bleeding after childbirth, as well as patients with life—threatening chest or abdomen injuries.
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pam doesn't know if she received tranexamic acid or the placebo dummy injection in this trial, but she says she's glad to be part the study. the world health organization says it will evaluate the findings and consider whether to now recommend the drug for brain injuries. tulip mazumdar, bbc news, oxfordshire. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news... nazi salutes and races chance at england's euro qualifier against bulgaria. the match had to be stopped twice. the uk proposes new customs plans as efforts to reach a better deal before ne summit this week goes to the wire. mr barnier says ideal consul be done. climate change protesters have been banned from london.
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thomas cook's former boss has defended a bonus payment of half a million pounds and said he was not the only one to blame for the collapse of the holiday operator. peter fankhauser said he was sorry but told a cross—party committee of mps that he worked "tirelessly" for thomas cook. the 178—year—old travel firm went under last month — with the loss of 9,000 jobs and left 150 , 000 holiday—makers stranded. slamming the brakes on expensive car loans — the city watchdog wants to ban the way that some dealers and brokers make commission when they sell car finance schemes. the financial conduct authority thinks a crackdown will save drivers £165 million. it said that some dealers make commission on the loan‘s interest rate, which they set — so the higher the interest rate, the higher the commission. there was a rise in the number of people unemployed in the uk between june and august, which was unexpected. unemployment went up to 3.9%. but average wages are still going up faster than average prices —
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earnings excluding bonuses grew at an annual pace of 3.8%. if you're taking out a car loan you might use a broker or dealer to help you find the best rate. but it seems that some buyers are being overcharged by up to £1000. that is what the financial watchdog found earlier this year and it is 110w found earlier this year and it is now proposing to ban the setup where brokers and dealers earn commission thatis brokers and dealers earn commission that is linked to the interest rate on the loan which they can set. now, not all of them did that way, but in some cases it gives an incentive to charge the customer more. the finance and leasing association says the crackdown would be good news for the crackdown would be good news for the industry and consumers as it delivers clear rules and i consistent approach to commissions. let us find out more. i think what
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we really have to remember is a huge rise in the way people buy the cow hearts three finance options over recent yea rs. hearts three finance options over recent years. it was not that long ago that people would go with cash to buy the car. as we've seen this model change, if you like, there was no huge amount of options available to consumers and i think that is by the scam. do you think this crackdown will work? will it save customers money? unquestionably it will save consumers money. our own research shows that people are totally confused by what the different options mean to them. i think the slightly murky practice of dealers being able to set their own interest rates, therefore earning greater commission, is really going to stick many people's throat. if we separate flat fee basis, regular single get a single commission of assigning a car, consumers will feel assigning a car, consumers will feel a lot more comfortable. it will save
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a lot more comfortable. it will save a lot more comfortable. it will save a lot of people money and not a lot of anxiety, as well. from your perspective, should car buyers be using these lives in the first place are what they always under pain the odds compared with taking out a bank loa n to odds compared with taking out a bank loan to help towards the cost of the car? it is really, really important that consumers really look at the different types of finance options available to them. how they're going to use the use the car, the type of mileage are going to use, whether they want to keep changing or not i just maybe buy a card as will last ten or 12 years. really look at that before they actually decide to take out a finance option, because different options really can benefit you depending on what kind of ownership model you want. is a guide on our website which explains all of this to people, because you're absolutely right, you can end up paying way over the odds. if you go for a finance option that does not work for you, equally if you pay for a car in cash, you may be do not have the negotiating power knowing
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that dealers have got a bit of an incentive to say a finance deal, as well. so, there are pros and cons for each and it is important that people do some research. just wonder of the danger of a crackdown that this is it has unintended consequences. a lot of people rely on his car finance schemes to be able to afford to get a new car which they could not pay for a plant. do you think there's a danger that actually the availability of car finance schemes may be a lot less when the numerals coming? yes, that could possibly be one of the knock—on effects. but i think essentially what we have to remember is selling a car to simply cannot afford it is not which consumer either. so, really question has to be is it fair to sell simply a car that they cannot afford to pay for? particularly when the fca have identified people are not having the consequences of not keeping up that loa n consequences of not keeping up that loan explain to them properly and what that might, where that might have a knock—on effect elsewhere in the life. many thanks indeed.
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in other business stories we've been following, neil woodford's flagship fund is to be shut down and he's been removed as investment manager, in a major humiliation for the uk's best—known stockpicker. but investors will not get any money back until mid—january at the earliest. withdrawals from the woodford equity income fund have been frozen since earlyjune, after rising numbers at its peak, the fund had more than £10 billion of people's money in it. bank of england governor mark carney says he expects large swings in financial markets as the brexit process reaches a critical stage. he told a committee of mps there could be an impact on "the value of the pound, the value of shares, and the cost of debt for uk banks and companies, in either direction" depending on how things go.
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there's long—haul travel — then there's ultra long—haul travel. qantas will fly direct from new york to sydney this friday — a nonstop flight lasting 20 hours. no airline has ever done that journey without stopping. a few dozen passengers on board — and the pilots — will be monitored by scientists. they'll be assessing their brain activity, food and sleep to see the effects of spending so long at high altitude. that's all the business news. torture is one of the words of people with autism and learning difficulties used to describe their time... according to a report out today by the care quality commission. one of them is because jack and he has been tying his
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story. it was like a prison, really. he told me the only way out of there was to die. breakfast has long reported on the plight of people with learning disabilities and autism locked away in hospitals. it was really horrible, terrifying. it was discharge to heaven. that's what he would tell you. that's what he would tell me. but, after 3.5 years, jack is out and can tell his own story. at home, he shows me around his amazing collection. so this is my museum. he is full of pride, but his time inside was filled with trauma. because the alarms were so loud, ringing into yourears, like, it was horrible. basically every day, constantly, all the time. jack describes an atmosphere
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which is charged. if you went to get angry, or something, they used to charge in, grab all the stuff, my personal belongings, and just take it out. this is my favourite thing, because it's all set out really nicely... he witnessed prolonged restraints. it was, like, millions of staff coming in forjust one person. he was subjected to repeated restraint. it was like they're crushing you down. it was, like, bone crushing. he lashed out at a nurse and was himself attacked by a patient. two of his teeth, like, the front teeth bit at the top of my head. and i was calling for help, but they were taking ages. and he wanted to come home. you know, it's not fair. but had friends who had been there for years. some of these people i've seen, they're not good at... sorry. they are not in a good place. what do you say to the people
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who say that this is a hospital, people are here to get better? no, they can't. this is not a hospital. they can't get better. it's an institution. it's a holding place. they're putting them all together. they're triggering each other. it is non—therapeutic — the defences, the alarms, the keys. say hello. hello, marvin. hello. he has got a lot of support here. they are wonderful here, for him. is this where he needs to be? this is where he needs to be. today the coc, the health watchdog, agreed. and today jack has his own home, his own front door, close to family and friends, two support workers to keep him safe, and he is doing really well. i hope i'm not upsetting you, talking about this. no, it's fine. it's fine. you really did want to talk about it, though, didn't you? yes, idid. it is important to you. yes. why is it so important?
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to make these places better. how much better is it, now you're home? much better. i still like going to the actual natural history museum, as well. but i think mine's... in secret, i think mine's better. i'll high—five that. love it. i am so proud of you. i know, mum. love you, mum. the check of cambridge has talked with the importance of young people learning the importance of mental health. they met pupils and teachers at government run school for disadvantaged children on the first full day of their visit. they sat some of the younger children and a preschool class before meeting all the peoples. the duchess told stu d e nts the peoples. the duchess told students the issue of girl's education as well important to the couple that the chick spoke about
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teaching young people the importance of mental health. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. there will be some brighter weather around today, but not entirely dry. we will see if you showers. the satellite picture shows today that we still have extensive cloud across the country, thanks to a nearby area of low pressure. already looking out towards the atlantic and this bump on the weather front is going to bring us more rain and could potentially cause the weather front tomorrow to slow down. more and that any moment. the writer picture shows the showers at the moment. theatre is affecting a scotland and some undeveloped across wales and southern anger. particularly across the south—east as we go into the afternoon. some of the showers here could be quite heavy. the cloud will tended then and back up and some sunny spells will come through. western scotland not looking too bad and across wales and southern counties of england it should brighten up some sunshine. temperatures between 1a and 17 degrees and the best of the brighter
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moments. overnight tonight, although the weather starts to dry we will see some rain working it in northern ireland and then scotland, england and wales is the rain arriving later in the night. strengthening winds ahead of this phentermine is a mild night with temperature 701a degrees. that takes us into wednesday. this area of low pressure in charge. the pump and shoji moment ago isjust here and could really put the anchors on the front across an issue is of england and scotland. that said, there will be a clearance of the rain in northern ireland, wales and south—west england. this is where we were seated as a today's sunshine. the rain may be slow to clear. a cross—party scotland and the far east of england, there's a chance at the rain could linger for longer as we go through wednesday afternoon. so, that is a possibility. towards the end of the week, our every of the purchase of effort thursday. weather fronts wrapped round and round the centre of low pressure and it was to make into which the country. another
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u nsu btle into which the country. another unsubtle day. though it's out of bright but giant sunny weather across eastern areas, showers and nebraska going quickly and they will spread is which. imagine areas many eyes will see several downpours through the day. towards the end of the week, by day and into the weekend, keeping that unsettled them going with rain or showers continuing to roll in long before cassel stopped temperatures around 13 or 1a degrees at best. it is forecast to stay unsettled for the foreseeable that is your weather.
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you're watching bbc newsroom live — it's11am and these are the main stories this morning: -- it —— it has made today. nazi salutes and racist chants at england's euro—qualifer against bulgaria — as the match had to be stopped twice. whatever we do might be perceived as not being enough, but i think we've made a major statement. i think we've made a major statement with the way we played through such a difficult circumstance. i don't think a game has ever been stopped, of this magnitude, twice. england players take to social media to share their disgust — marcus rashford says racism in football "needs stamping out". the uk proposes new customs plans as efforts to reach a brexit deal before an eu summit this week go to the wire. michel barnier says a deal can still be done. reaching an agreement
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is still possible. obviously any agreement must work for everyone. climate change campaigners have been banned from london, after a week of extinction rebellion protests. the duke and duchess of cambridge arrive in pakistan at the start of their five—day tour. we set good morning, welcome to bbc newsroom live. i'm joanna gosling. boris johnson and the football association — as well as past and present players — have demanded that uefa take tough and immediate action after england's black players were racially abused during an international in bulgaria. the game — which england won 6—0 — had to be halted twice because home fans were making monkey noises and nazi salutes.
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bulgaria's prime minister has called for the head of the country's football union to resign. the referee was following uefa's three step racism protocol. the first incident occurred on the 28th minute when england was leading 2—0. a stadium announcement was made condemning the abuse and warned fans if further incidents occurred the match might be abandoned. the game was stopped again just before half time, and was restarted after discussions between the officials and the england manager, gareth southgate. a number of bulgarian fans who were making racist chants and gestures then left the stadium. if a third incident had occurred, the game would have been abandoned. the fa chairman, greg clarke, described it as one of the most appalling nights he'd seen in football. our correspondentjoe wilson sent this report from the bulgarian capital, sofia. you could say this game began with marcus rashford's blistering finish to score the first england goal. in fact, it began before that. it began when england's players first heard the monkey chants, the racial abuse. whistling.
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i mean, i heard it before i even got to the other side of the pitch in the warm up, so we spoke about it coming off the pitch after the warm up and then, obviously, it was happening in the game but, like i said, it's difficult to categorize the whole country. i think it's perhaps a minority and the second half was a lot better, so perhaps a victory all round. uefa, who i've spoken to throughout the game — at half—time and at the end of the game — will be carrying out a thorough investigation, not just what the ref saw and what the officials around him saw, but also live footage, witness statements to make sure that this appalling scene of terrible racism is treated appropriately. there were intense discussions between england players, management and officials through the first half and an announcement was made to the crowd that the referee might suspend the game if abuse continued. it was greeted by boos.
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there were nazi salutes in the ground. when england's players left this pitch at half time, they then actually discussed whether they should even carry on with the match. they decided to play on and england's captain told me he believes that was the right decision. everyone wanted us to carry on and do the talking on the pitch, which i'm extremely proud of. it's not easy to play in circumstances like that, but the 6—0 finish and the way we played, the manner in which we played, i'm extremely proud of, for sure. england's manager felt they had handled the situation in the best way. i'm incredibly proud of all of the players and all of the staff. i don't think... of course, we could be criticised for not going far enough, but i think we've made a huge statement and, frankly, we were in an impossible situation to get it right to the satisfaction of everybody. but bulgaria's manager gave a different perspective. translation: i was totally concentrated on the game. i didn't actually hear anything,
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but i've just talked to the english press offices and i told them that if this is proven to be true, then we will have to be ashamed and apologize for it. but once again, firstly, it has to be proven to be true. one answer to the abuse was the scoreline. commentator: up towards kane. manager gareth southgate has openly acknowledged that english football has its own issues to deal with, but racism was displayed in its starkest, most blatant form in bulgaria. england's players exposed it, but the reaction can't stop here. it is worth remembering that the bulgarian football authorities were angry when england even brought up the issue of racism in the build up to this game. we heard bulgaria's manager tell us there was not an issue in this country with racism. clearly, racism stretches way beyond bulgaria, but nothing was ever changed in a spirit of denial. joe wilson, bbc news, in sofia.
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ged grebby is the founder and chief executive of the anti racism charity show racism the red card. he joins us via webcam from north shields. thank you forjoining us. what did you think last night as you're watching the match and saw there was a chance and those salutes? very shocked, really because the fa have been warned about the problem of racism over there and then to see it u nfold racism over there and then to see it unfold on our television screens, the nazi salutes and then the monkey chant which you could hear was an absolute disgrace. my first reaction was shock. what you think about the way the players and the manager handled it? i don't think gareth southgate and the players could have handled it any better. they were in an impossible situation, he said, andi an impossible situation, he said, and i think they did exactly the
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right thing. the game a stop, as we know, the announcement was made and the racist fans, you could see them on us “— the racist fans, you could see them on us —— leaving on masse. at the moment, it was better in the second half according to the players so i think the protocol was followed and abandon the game would have been for the racist who win and i think gareth southgate and the team, as long as they decided they wanted to play, that is the key thing, it is not for show racism the red card to anyone in england to decide. but if they want to play the second half and others say they were 3— set up that stage, good on them, because they set a really good example of challenging racism, but also been prepared to continue the game and jealousy when the match. as things
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stand, do you think that uefa has a strong enough ability to punish teams whose fans are this? just back to earlier this year when england we re to earlier this year when england were playing montenegro there was a racist abuse against the england players then and the punishment, the u efa players then and the punishment, the uefa punishment for montenegro was to gaze —— two home games played behind closed doors and a fine, i punishment like that enough of a deterrent cosmic i don't think the current punishment or deterrent, but show racism the red card, we look at the longer term solutions. sanctions, of themselves, closing stadiums and closing parts of the ground, points deductions, any kind of deductions and banning plans for life, all of those things might have individual merits, but they're not going to solve the problem of racism and therefore, we think education has to be one of the top priorities. we do not see uefa or fifa doing
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anything in terms of anti—racist education and, certainly, any number of companies, there earn no campaigns at all, so i think this is an example they are of new education campaign against racism and no active campaigning against racism within the game of football in bulgaria. thank you very much. the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, has told ministers from the 27 member states that it's possible there could be a brexit deal ready for the summit this week, but there would have to be agreement with the uk by tonight. borisjohnson would need to get a new deal approved by saturday if he has to avoid asking for a delay. mr barnier in luxembourg later, has previously said "big gaps" remained between the uk and eu. speaking this morning, he said talks were difficult. this work has been intense all the weekend and yesterday, because even if the agreement will be difficult — more and more
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difficult, to be frank — it is still possible this week. reaching an agreement is still possible. obviously any agreement must work for everyone, the whole of the united kingdom and the whole of the european union. also, it is high time to turn good intentions into legal text. thank you very much. arriving in luxembourg this morning, the brexit secretary stephen barclay —— the irish farmers in —— the irish foreign minister described the situation is difficult but not impossible. the negotiation teams have made progress, but it has been
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slow. they will need to make significant progress slow. they will need to make significa nt progress today. slow. they will need to make significant progress today. if there is to bea significant progress today. if there is to be a deal that michel barnier can report on tomorrow to eu capitals in advance of the village of's summit, but that is what he would like to do. arriving in luxembourg this morning, the brexit secretary stephen barclay said we need to give the talks space to take place, but he thought a deal was possible. well, i'm looking forward to the general affairs council this morning an opportunity to discuss these issues with my eu counterparts. the talks are ongoing — we need to give them space to proceed — but detailed conversations are under way and a deal is still very possible. the dup were in downing street last night — are they on board? we can speak to our political assistant editor norman smith who is in westminsterfor us. what reaction is there to the message coming out of brussels? number ten said that they do not recognise this deadline which michel barnier unveiled this morning and there has to be legal text agreed by
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midnight tonight, so it can be put to the other 27 eu countries so that they can get it the thumbs up before we go to the eu summit at the end of the week. that said, you do get the sense that there is as may be slipping away from boris johnson sense that there is as may be slipping away from borisjohnson and another delay in slimming. interestingly, number ten announcing if parliament meets the saturday, we have been reporting very concise that parliament will be rep meeting on saturday, now that seems to be in a little bit of doubt, that will be dependent on whether legal text is agreed. if it does not great, they may not be much point in parliament meeting. the difficulty is, if this does get kicked into next week, as mr coveney said, was reasonable, as others such as they finish per minister also suggested might be necessary , minister also suggested might be necessary, “— minister also suggested might be necessary, —— the finnish prime minister also suggested might be
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necessary , minister also suggested might be necessary, it might mean that the benn act will kick in and boris johnson will need to ask for another delay up untiljanuary the 31st. although it may look like only potentially a journey into next week, it does open up the possibility of a much longer delay. this video is a pretty crucial moment for mrjohnson —— this really isa moment for mrjohnson —— this really is a pretty crucial moment for mr johnson. if it goes to a longer delay, people will say what happened to your do or delay, people will say what happened to yourdo ordie delay, people will say what happened to your do or die pledge? more critical reaction in a moment. stay with us. we have continuing coverage of this and plenty of coverage online if you want to stay up late online if you want to stay up late on there. right now we're going to say goodbye to viewers on bbc two.
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let's go back to norman. what are people saying cosmic the view of the brexiteers is that what they hear of the deal that mrjohnson is putting together is something that they could go along with, which is interesting because while we don't know the exact details of the deal, it does sound like the sort of actual customs regime which was an idea mrs nay cut close to in her negotiations with —— mrs may got close to in her negotiations. amber roger this morning accused them of a whiff of sexism of being ready to go along with borisjohnson's brexit land but not theresa may's brexit upon —— amber rudd. theyjust seem any mode of accepting whatever boris johnson comes back with. listen to jacob rees—mogg. if the deal is agreed with the european union, in my view, it will get through the house
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of commons because everybody is desperate to finish this. even lbc's listeners and callers have probably had enough of talking about brexit and they want to talk about all the other things that we need to when we discuss this queen speech and that are important to their lives. this has been going on for three years and once parliament has agreed something, it can legislate very quickly. if the meaningful vote goes through, the new legislation will merely be the ratification in domestic law of the treaty and that, i think, is a relatively easy bill to pass if there is a deal. but isn't that "if" the size of texas? if something is agreed, then parliament can act fairly quickly? -- if —— if parliament agrees something, thenit —— if parliament agrees something, then it can act fairly quickly cosmic it all goes to plan. if it all goes to plan for mrjohnson, it will then go to the eu summit and borisjohnson will go there. they will sign on the dotted line and he
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will sign on the dotted line and he will come to parliament on saturday and had a fair chance of getting it through the house of commons. however, if it unravels today, and that there is no agreement at the summitand that there is no agreement at the summit and there is no parliament on saturday, then you're into a totally new ball game. it is possible that you could have a short delay of a week or so in which they finesse the negotiating details and managed to put together, maybe at an emergency summit before the end of the month, but however, it is equally possible that the gap between the two sides remains a pretty fundamental one. and that means the negotiations would have to go on and on. and we could be talking about a much more significant delay, which could have profound political ramifications. for profound political ramifications. foer profound political ramifications. for mrjohnson. thank you very much. the headlines on bbc news... nazi salutes and racist chants at england's euro—qualifer against bulgaria — as the match had to be stopped twice. the uk proposes new customs plans as efforts to reach a brexit deal
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the eu's chief negotiator tells the eu 27 member states that it is still possible that an agreement could be reached in time for a summit this week. climate change campaigners have been banned from london, after a week of extinction rebellion protests. time for a sports update withjohn. the bill getting per minister has called for the head of the football association have been asked to resign. the game was halted twice in the first—half when kyle magennis picked up and is making racist gestures and chance. instead eminence and content of the abuse before stating the match would be abandoned if it continued. a group of fa ns abandoned if it continued. a group of fans left the stadium after the game was halted for a second time. england went on to win six nil. the manager gareth southgate said that
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he was currently where the players conduct themselves and it was a team decision to carry on. they want to be recognised for their football and they were playing so well that they did not want to leave the pitch at that moment. i am sure that will have been part of their thinking. so, i'm incredibly proud of all of the players and all of the star. i don't think... of course, we could be criticised for not going far enough, but i think we've made a huge statement. i think we've made a huge statement. i think we've made a huge statement. i think we've made a huge statement and frankly we're in an impossible situation to get it right to the satisfaction of everybody. the uefa have asked to investigate as a matter of urgency. and there have been calls for beginner to be thrown out of the european championship. after all the debate that has happened, after all the warnings that had been in place, it was shocking to see the level of racist abuse of the england players
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having to endure. it is unthinkable how the bulgarian fa president and the locating coach said, you know, these things would not happen and they did not heed it. it is absolutely despicable. after what happened, we think that uefa has on their books to keep —— kick bulgaria out of the 2020 qualifications. there have been to many incidents and too much negligence from the bulgarian fa for this to happen. the uefa should make an example from bulgaria and expel them from the competition. andy murray is due in court in the first round of the european open in antwerp later but he may have to leave the talmud early. his third child is due this month —— he may have to leave the tournament early. he is scheduled to play a local favourite and at around 6:30pm this evening. that is overly busy sports on for them. i will have
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another update around half past one. the us has announced sanctions on turkey in response to the country's military offensive against kurdish forces in northern syria. president trump, who has been criticised for his decision to withdraw us troops from syria before the turkish offensive began, has phoned turkey's president erdogan to call for an immediate truce. earlier, vice president mike pence spoke at a news conference outside the white house. president trump made it very clear that the united states is going to continue to take actions against turkey's economy until they bring the violence to an end. we want an immediate cease fire. and we want to begin negotiations between turkey and syrian defense forces. president trump again offered to have the united states of america mediate in those discussions.
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mike pence who is going to be heading to turkey. we can speak now to our middle east correspondent who is on the turkey—syria border. the us triggered this by withdrawing troops, now saying that the us wants to be incremental in trying to stop it. what reaction? president erdogan has come out and said that this offensive will continue. in fact, you can hear it right behind me. turkish positions continuing to sheu turkish positions continuing to shell a key city and town here on the border. president erdogan has said that the principal continue until he has achieved what he calls an ultimate victory, so we have operations here, operations further along the border. that may well change when vice president mike pence arrives in turkey for talks. what is clear is that the turkish president is increasingly coming under pressure to call off this week—long offensive. under pressure to call off this week-long offensive. even if america
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can put pressure on president are doing —— president erdogan, there are other players involved in this. as the lid of the box and can easily be put on? it is very difficult, but what we're saying is that turkey is moving into areas along the border. we're also seeing kurdish fighters backed by syrian government forces moving into different areas. the situation you have got his potential incredibly dangerous. if we take one time for example, and there is all the elements that could potentially lead to a flash point dashing if we ta ke lead to a flash point dashing if we take one time for example. pro—turkish forces on the outside of that town and the syrian government forces inside the town, and let's not forget that syria's backed by russia and iran. that is the danger the conflict in syria, what happens inside syria starts spilling over
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the borders. this is a dangerous moment not only presidio, but for the region as well. thank you very much, martin. -- for the region as well. branches at some clubs branches of thomas cook have returned to work. hays travel has taken over returned to work. hays travel has ta ken over its returned to work. hays travel has taken over its travel shops and will continue to employ some of those employed. thank you forjoining us, betty. what is your situation now?|j betty. what is your situation now?” am unemployed. i'm just looking around for a job now. i do not actually want to rush into anything. i want to be ready and ready to work for another company. i don't just wa nt to ta ke for another company. i don't just want to take anything knee jerk at the moment, so i am exploring other options, actually. i do have some ideas for the future. have you been
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able to get any compensation for losing yourjob as quickly as it happened? well, i have received the statutory redundancy pay, which meant to me that every year i spent working for thomas cook was worth £279. but at the moment, because we did not receive our last salary, as i'm sure you're aware, that has actually been a little bit of money that has arrived just in time, really. how are you feeling? obviously, you're talking very kindly about what your next options are, but it's a company you worked for a pretty long time and itjust went overnight, how has it left you feeling? yeah. still reeling. we're still absolutely devastated. in the first ten days, i was thinking it did not seem real and itjust seemed as though everything in our company was on pulse. and we would begin again and it is very, very difficult
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now to —— everything was in pause. particularly in the airline where we we re very particularly in the airline where we were very successful and profitable and we're still bewildered as to why the airline was forced to fail. along with the other arms of the company. various members of thomas cook's firma management have been questioned by a cross—party committee of mps today, the former boss said that he worked tirelessly for thomas cook and he defended a bonus payment of £500,000 and said he was not the only one to blame for the collapse. i do not know whether you have been able to see much of what he and others were saying, but ijust wonder how what he and others were saying, but i just wonder how you would what he and others were saying, but ijust wonder how you would respond to those comments? it's never pleasant, and any circumstance like this, to see anyone put under the
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microscope and squirm, but in this particular case, the ramifications and the repercussions of the loss of this company to our nation and right across the globe, are so immense and far—reaching that it really is time to shine a spotlight on them. i still sense from him, although i do believe in those final few months that they all did work very hard to try to turn it round, but i do not believe that they deserved the money that they are and are the bonuses because they should have been paid on the results and that is just the way it should have been. i am just hoping that with the answer is that they gave, which were still tinged with arrogance, they realise that this has to be the final time that this has to be the final time that this type of thing happens to a business where ordinary people, and oui’ business where ordinary people, and our case right across the globe, have lost their livelihoods and incomes because of this. that has to be absolutely the last time. and i would like the government to step in as well and also state what their
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role are what they felt their role and that should have been because, personally, i think we were hung out to dry, not only by the directors and managers of a business, but also by any assistance from our government. thankfully, the passengers and oui’ customers ultimately were helped in the civil aviation authority made a good job of that, i'm proud to say, but for rest of us, yeah, it's been an incredible loss. a bill, real heart—wrenching loss. incredible loss. a bill, real heart-wrenching loss. betty, thank you for your time. i'm sure the best for whatever happens next for you. thank you. there has been a 10% rise in reported hate crimes in england and wales that's according to new home office figures that show there were a record number of offences recorded in the past year. race hate crimes accounted for around three—quarters of recorded offences — that's a rise of 11% on the year before to 78,991.
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reports of transgender hate crime went up 37%. hate reports increased by 25% and disability hate reports went up by 14%. extinction rebellion activists are targeting the department for transport calling on it to stop funding "destructive" projects such as the new high speed rail route hs2 and airport expansion. one of the group's co founders, gail bradbrook, who climbed on top of the entrance of the building in central london said she was taking action for trees threatened by hs2 and "lightly" hit the glass with a hammer. the sun's tom but was reported that she said, i do that any spirit of what emmeline pankhurst called the noble art of window smashing. the climate change protesters at trafalgar square was cleared last night after the ban was issued.
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richard lester sent this report. play said last night that protesters should disperse, a banning order was in place and they have been moving through the scam today, asking people to pack up their tents. it has been fairly low—key, but there has been fairly low—key, but there has been fairly low—key, but there has been a helicopter monitoring is for most of the morning. three of the people have been in this camp are with me. jeff, are you staying 01’ are with me. jeff, are you staying or going? whether i wasjust stay or go depends on what was in the queen's speech yesterday. there was nothing in it to address the crisis that when i can. whether i stay or go now will depend upon the consensus of the other protesters here. if there had been anything meaningful at all, showing some sort of understanding and intelligence regarding the crisis that when i can, i would go. there hasn't. mandy, do you think that much has been achieved in the time that you have been here? yes man, i think it
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has. we have raised awareness of the climate crisis to a lot of people who might not have had that information before, for example the police have been amazing. we have talked to so many policemen and they often have seem to have had very similar ideas twice about climate change, sometimes they say we are not doing it are going about it, the destruction is not a good thing to do, but what else can we do? there is nothing else that we can do to try and get the government to do something about it. have you done anything like this before? no. it is all very new territory for me. this year anyway. we have come under a lot of criticism for the amount of disruption going on in london and i get that. but this is nothing compared to the amount of destruction that we're going to see in this country and across the last of the world if climate change continues activated has done. another criticism has been about the timescale, a section rebellion is thing that we had to go carbon neutral by 2025 and p person, that is complete
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—— extension rebellion are saying. we need action now. thank at all three vehicles of that has been the message from the past eight or nine days. the police to seem determined to try and shut this protest and, even that has a few more days to run, so even that has a few more days to run, so we even that has a few more days to run, so we will have see whether or not the police are prepared to post is more aggressively and shut this down. let's catch up with the weather. good afternoon. today is a drier day for some others. they first dry day of octoberfor some of for some others. they first dry day of october for some of us, because we had a diligent study. that is now sitting at an unearthly for the most part, tomorrow plus ‘s rain this evening and tomorrow pop up. it is not totally dry in between, if you share is in eastern scotland and parts of southern england. equally we have some spells of sunshine and lots of it across western scotland. 14 lots of it across western scotland. 1a and 15 pretty good this time of
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year. it does not pass. this evening brings rain to northern ireland, wales and western scotland, western and southern parts of england, so say quite a soggy and night. we will not have any frost what is below that cloud and wind around, but it will be quite unpleasant for the journey to work with spray and standing water. the rain does go quite quickly, dragging its heels in northern scotland. despite scotland. for most of us, if
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let us take you straight to the house of commons. an urgent question is being asked about the racism faced by the england players last night. i have also spoken this morning to the chief exec of the football association to express my support to gareth southgate, his team and all the support staff of the fa and by they conducted themselves. we have made progress in this country to combat discrimination in our domestic game and make our stadium more welcome link places to be. the
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government is supporting a number of antiracism initiatives. including the premier league's no room for racism, show racism the red card and the kick it out campaigns. others which have achieved a great deal in this area. in february this year my predecessor in this rule held a summit on discrimination, with a range of bodies acting within football. but, mr speaker, it is clear we cannot be complacent. we must remain a leading voice on this issue internationally. international competition such as theirs shipping cultures countries together. while it was a step in the right direction to see the uefa protocol engaged last night, i understand for the first time, it is clear that much more needs to be done to stamp out racism in the game. i am also
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encouraged by the reaction of the bulgarian prime minister who has spoken out and called for changes at the bulgarian football association. u efa the bulgarian football association. uefa must now get its response rights, leaving no doubt that the consequences of failing to tackle this issue will be severe. so, i am writing today to the uefa president, urging him to conclude their investigation swiftly and to ensure that all that bull authorities and fa ns that all that bull authorities and fans are clear that again the consequences of failing to tackle this issue will be severe. mr speaker, the england team has myself support and i expect tough action from uefa in response. just before i call the shadow minister, as i have a sense that this matter will unite the house, iwould a sense that this matter will unite the house, i would like to thank the minister for what he has said and to save family share what i think will
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be the feeling of colleagues. gareth southgate again has shown what a magnificent ambassador for england andindeed magnificent ambassador for england and indeed the uk he is. and how magnificent also the team behaved in circumstances of intense provocation and vile behaviour by so—called fans. they conducted themselves with extraordinary dignity. one of my own children was watching the match and came in to say how visibly shocked and upset he was and i think they minister's reaction is one i have a sense will be shared right across the house and buy millions of people across the country. colleague's voices will now be heard. thank you so voices will now be heard. thank you so much for granting this urgent question, mr speaker. iwould so much for granting this urgent question, mr speaker. i would like to echo everything that you have just said. last night, we saw the
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most horrific racist abuse aimed at england players in their match against bulgaria. which cause the match to be halted on two occasions. photos and clips follow japan's performing nazi salutes and the racist chanting continued. it is utterly, utterly deplorable. —— following bands performing nazi salutes. the entire country will be proud of the england team last night and gareth southgate has shown true leadership in defence of his players. this bs must be stamped out. no one should have to arrive at work to be subjected to any form of discrimination. why are our players still being subjected to this? in future, players decide to walk off the pitch in protest they must have
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the pitch in protest they must have the full support of this house, our press and football bodies. we ourselves, however, are not exempt from this problem. it would be irresponsible for us to condemn the behaviour of fans around the world without addressing the fact that many players had indeed suffered racist abuse online from the stands and in their day—to—day lives at the hands of a very small section of our own fans. under the government has committed to writing to uefa, which i really welcome. but can the minister outlined what further steps they are taking to address the scourge of racism in sport? uefa has a duty to act here. the world is watching. a fine is not enough, so i am asking our government to ensure that we are backing up the fa to seek the harshest possible punishment. stadium bans are
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amassed, forfeiting matches and expulsion from tournaments be ruled out. enough is enough. the time to act is now. thank you. can i echo everything about the honourable lady has uttered. she is incredibly passionate about football and other sports, as well, as i know. i sense this is a bit of a pivotal moment. we have experienced these issues for pa rt we have experienced these issues for part two long, but i think the collective desire to see action taken. the sai filly support in the way they swiftly launched their complaint. —— the sai filly support. the way the players handled themselves on the pitch. and they lets the football do the talking, frankly, in the second half. but this clearly cannot go on and
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nothing should be, uefa should rule nothing should be, uefa should rule nothing out in terms of sanctions. asi nothing out in terms of sanctions. as i said previously, my predecessor hosted a summit with all the football authorities in england and we wa nt football authorities in england and we want to take and our department is outlining their plans and how they are going to take them forward. this follows a summit on the issue earlier this year, which involve players, coaches, fan groups, the policing unit and campaign groups. there are lots of proposals and lots of plans that they will be working on, including stronger education measures, better reporting systems, better training and support for referees. who, incidentally, iwould like to commend the referee last night, for the way he handled himself in the way he supported the english players. giving them that option of step two of the uefa protocol. still more today. nigel
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items the sports minister responding to what happened in that england, bulgaria match last night with those races chance and salutes, nazi salutes at the match. the match had to be stopped twice. there was praise ever the england manager gareth southgate from everyone who was speaking, including the speaker himself. also, because for tough action uefa against what happened last night. the sport minister saying nothing should be ruled out. in terms of punishment. now, time for a business update. thomas cook's former boss has defended a bonus payment of half a million pounds and said he was not the only one to blame for the collapse of the holiday operator. peter fankhauser said he was sorry but told a cross—party committee of mps that he worked "tirelessly" for thomas cook. the 178—year—old travel firm went under last month — with the loss of 9,000 jobs and left
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150 , 000 holidaymakers stranded. slamming the brakes on expensive car loans — the city watchdog wants to ban the way that some dealers and brokers make commission when they sell car finance schemes. the financial conduct authority thinks a crackdown will save drivers 165 million pounds. it said that some dealers make commission on the loan's interest rate, which they set — so the higher the interest rate, the higher the commission. there was a rise in the number of people unemployed in the uk between june and august, which was unexpected. unemployment went up to 3.9%. but average wages are still going up faster than average prices — earnings excluding bonuses grew at an annual pace of 3.8%. if your only local pub or shop closes down what do you do? especially if you're in a small rural town or village? well, across the uk more shops and pubs than ever are now in community ownership and are
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bucking the national trend of rural closures. by the end of 2018 there were nearly 100 community pubs trading across the uk — with 11 opening in the previous year alone. what is even more noteworthy is that community pubs and shops in more likely to diss survive, despite trading regulations are pretty suffer some commercial ventures. i am delighted to say that the landlord of a community owned pub joins us now. why do think these community ventures tend to do better? good afternoon. ithink community ventures tend to do better? good afternoon. i think the most important thing is that pubs have always been a cultural centre, if you like, the local community. it is that ability to attract local people and to get them involved and interested that really helps to make them profitable. the other thing, of course, is what you have bought the
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pub that we freehold, it is then we do not have any shareholders that we have to be holding too. so, unlike a company or a brewery, all of the profits are then kept within the community, which makes for a very profitable business. what happens to those profits? how do you decide happens to them? because we are a community benefit society, i am the chairman of the board, if you like, the money is then invested back into the money is then invested back into the pub to improve the facilities. we also sponsor local football teams, we have got darts teams and we also help charity events in the pub. so, as i have said, the money is there, but it is reinvested. our shareholders, they are also entitled toa shareholders, they are also entitled to a dividend after three years. but most of the people, well everyone that invested really, they did not do to make money, they did to keep the pub alive. ijust wonder do to make money, they did to keep the pub alive. i just wonder what you found to be the biggest
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challenge, the biggest obstacles you face? because it seems a lovely idea to ta ke face? because it seems a lovely idea to take over and run your local community pub, but i imagine edges not been a completely smooth ride. that is completely correct. i mean, we raise happy miller pounces six months, which is quite a feat. thanks to the help of... i remember thinking that a set, we have done the difficult bits, we have about the difficult bits, we have about the pub. but then, of course, have to run the pub. we have benefited have years and i'm glad to set things are getting better and better. none of the pubs are my understanding that of coming to community ownership have gone to the waltha mstow community ownership have gone to the walthamstow ok. i am a phrase we have to call time on the interview, but thanks very much forjoining us.
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the committee asked what was to be said to the staff and holiday—makers. .. i'm deeply sorry about this failure, and i'm deeply sorry for the distress we caused to millions of customers who booked holidays with us and who were on holiday with us. i'm deeply sorry for our suppliers who were long—standing partners and who were loyal to us throughout this time. and i'm especially sorry for all my colleagues who worked extremely hard and tirelessly to make thomas cook a better company.
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letters have a quick look at the markets. the ftse100 a touch lower as sterling rose against both the euro and the dollar. reflecting the cautious optimism about the talks between britain and the eu. the stronger the pound tends to the ftse, it has a lot of firms that sell abroad, makes the goods and services more expensive to foreign buyers. the index getting some support from domestic banks such as lloyds, ba rclays, support from domestic banks such as lloyds, barclays, rbs, as well as stocks considered more sensitive to any brexit fallout. they are up, again on the slopes of a possible deal being reached. that is all the business news for now.
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a watchdog warns that over have of angled's accident and emergency services are not good enough. underlying some of the concerns raised by the care regulator. the ca re raised by the care regulator. the care quality commission report looking at the whole of a health and ca re looking at the whole of a health and care sectors looking at the whole of a health and ca re sectors says looking at the whole of a health and care sectors says that safety and quality are deteriorating in specialist mental health services with too many people looked after by workers who lack skills and training. in 2018 inspectors who visited hospitals for people with learning disabilities and autism rated 1% is inadequate. this year, 10% have been given the slowest rating. last year inspections of inpatient mental health services for children and teenagers found 3% were inadequate. now, 7% failing to meet standards. what we have seen is a perfect storm break. an increase in
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demand, plus some real concerns over the workforce and what that means a particle terms is there has been a significant reduction in the number of learning disability nurses. which means that the carers you're looking out to people with incredibly complex needs do not have the support and skills necessary. the report also says increasing demand and staff shortages are causing problems across the health care system. with accident and emergency departments often having to pick up the pieces when people cannot get the pieces when people cannot get the help they need in the community. the government says it is making record investment in the nhs and that it record investment in the nhs and thatitis record investment in the nhs and that it is transforming mental health services. a new international study suggest a cheap and widely available drug could save hundreds and thousands of people from traumatic brain injuries. the research suggests tra ns—exam traumatic brain injuries. the research suggests trans—exam acid, ortxa, can research suggests trans—exam acid, or t xa, can significantly improve the's chances of survival. on the 70 million people serve these came
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magic injuries every year. abba global health support reports. in a brief moment, a head injury can change a person's life forever. five years ago, pam foley fell off her bike in oxford. all i remember is one minute on my bike, next minute, on the ground, trying to get up. i knew i was stunned but i didn't realise how... how much i had hurt myself. pam had fractured her skull and suffered a bleed on her brain. she did make a good recovery, but lost her sense of smell and taste. it's a constant reminder of the pleasures that can be had from simple smells. i really miss the smell of freshly cut grass, i loved that smell. this is a ct scan of a patient's brain. this is unfortunately a young man who was punched and fell to the ground. there are currently very few treatment options for patients who've suffered these types of injuries, particularly in low and middle income countries.
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patients can need surgery to ease pressure on the brain, or life—support equipment. researchers, though, say now there's another option, a simple injection of tranexamic acid. when patients are bleeding into their brain, naturally two processes occur simultaneously. the process of clotting and of breaking down the clot. tranexamic acid stops the breakdown of the clot, so allows the clot to form more effectively, and hence reduces and stops the bleeding. this is tranexamic acid. it's been around for decades and was originally used for things like heavy periods. it's cheap, it costs just a few dollars per vial, and it's already easily accessible all around the world. the royal london hospital here in the uk was one of 175 hospitals across 29 countries and involving more than 12,000 patients to take part in the trial. it found deaths in patients
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with mild—to—moderate brain injuries were cut by a fifth if the drug was given within three hours. it's a simple injection, it can be given around the world by doctors and nurses. there is no special training needed to give it. previous international studies have already shown that the drug can be used to treat women with excessive bleeding after childbirth, as well as patients with life—threatening chest or abdomen injuries. pam doesn't know if she received tranexamic acid or the placebo dummy injection in this trial, but she says she's glad to be part the study. the world health organization says it will evaluate the findings and consider whether to now recommend the drug for brain injuries. tulip mazumdar, bbc news, oxfordshire. a major clean up is under way after the heaviest storm to hitjapan in 60 years. towns have been left submerged,
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and at least 66 people are dead. in some areas, more than a metre of rain fell in just 48 hours. sylvia lennan spence reports. rivers burst... roads and bridges destroyed... and dozens killed. typhoon hagibis has left destruction in its wake. towns and villages were inundated with water. now, the rescue mission becomes a clean—up operation and a search for survivors. nagano in centraljapan is one of the worst hit areas. more than a metre of rain fell in just two days. the cost of the clean—up will be substantial. hundreds are in emergency accommodation. many still do not know when they will be able to return home. more than 110,000 people have been involved with rescue efforts, but hopes of finding those still listed as missing are fading rapidly.
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sylvia lennan—spence, bbc news. prince william and the duchess of cambridge met pupils and teachers at a government run school for disadvantaged children in islamabad on the first full day of their visit. they sat with some of the youngest children in a pre school class before meeting older pupils. the duchess told students the issue of girls‘ education was really important to the couple and the duke spoke about teaching young people about mental health. now, how's this for a story of friendship and companionship. zoo keepers in russia didn't know what to do when a baby raccoon was abandoned by its mother. but another zoo had a plan partner him up with a puppy. tim allman has the story. best of friends, with a bounce in their step. meet moshka the raccoon and broshka the dog.
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moshka had no—one to play with when he was brought to this zoo in the siberian city of irkutsk, so they put him in with broshka. now, they are as thick as thieves. translation: they not only get along well, but they supplement each other, study each other and take certain behaviours from each other. for example, the dog has already learned how to climb on people. the raccoon is a better teacher than the dog, i must say. dogs are less dangerous to raccoons than, say, cats when it comes to viruses and diseases. broshka, a friendly little chap, helped moshka learn how to eat solid foods, although it doesn't always go smoothly between them. translation: the dog is very disappointed because its paws are not that grippy, and when the raccoon climbs somewhere, the dog sits and starts yelling. i have no idea how they see each other. does the dog think he is a raccoon? does the raccoon think he is a dog?
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a profound question for everyone to ponder. the keepers say they have no plans to split them up. as long as moshka and broshka get along, they will stick together. tim allman, bbc news. the fundamentals of any good relationship. now it's time for a look at the weather. it is no disputable but that has been a wet start to october and we do have more rain to come. today is a dry day. for some, the first dry day of october, because they have the range of these from last night and tonight and tomorrow's rain out of the west. it is not a totally dry picture, we have had showers to northern ireland which will continue into parts of wales and southern england and is in scotland. better west of scotland, the north—east of england and the far south, there is good sunshine out and about. temperatures in the light wins, 1a to 17. it does not last. through this evening and overnight in expand
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of rain and stronger when such a wind themselves up, push across the irish even more than iron into scotland, wales, southern and western parts of england. they went strengthening, the cloud and more rain coming in temperatures will be prevented from falling much so that by the six celsius. a mild night, but quite murky started tomorrow. concerns were tomorrow at the main living through, but how quickly it moves from southern areas, because it is by different staggering around in certain areas. but for many, one such geraint goes through, it might struggle to clear the mighty scotland, but for northern ireland, western scotland, northern england, increasing amounts of santander the day. the wind will be quite light and temperature to be very selected today. it will feel quite peasant. jesse? and how much they weigh per pulse by the north into southern counties through the afternoon. even one such weather system moves out of the way, we have been a series of low pressure moving info but remains at the working week. that
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low— pressure at the working week. that low—pressure initially with the tightly packed as a buyer shall give some 20 weather and lots of showers, actually. showers and logger spots of rain, which means it will not be the persistence we have seen, there will be sunshine in between for but there could be some torrential downpours and the winds be particular about new showers. by thursday, alexa set perhaps north—eastern areas may not see that many showers, but they will tend to gather across western and southern areas and they could give quite a lot of rainfall. even that they are showers, it will be wet at times. no more rain at the moment is a good time given the ground is so saturated. the devil is in the detail when it comes to showers, but if you have plans please stay tune to the forecast.
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a brexit deal needs to be agreed by tonight — says the eu's chief negotiator. if it is to be signed off this week. michel barnier says a legal text needs to be finalised today, before it's put before the eu's leaders on thursday. reaching an agreement is still possible. any agreement must work for everyone. we will have the latest. also this lunchtime. climate change protests continue in london despite police telling extinction rebellion to end their action or risk arrest. bulgaria's prime minister calls for the boss of their football
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organisation to

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