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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  October 16, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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hello. you're watching bbc news, live from westminster on yet another important day for brexit. government sources say the chances of agreeing a deal with brussels this week are shrinking. he the sticking point continues to be the northern irish border, and irish taoiseach leo varadkar says that, while the two sides are making progress, there are "many issues" yet to be resolved. we'll bring you all the latest from westminster throughout the morning. here's the day's other headlines away from westminster: harry dunn's parents go to the white house but refuse to meet the woman involved in the fatal crash which killed their son, saying they felt ambushed.
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isaid, if i said, if it was your 19—year—old son or your son, no matter what age, you would do the same as me, and he was holding my hand and he said, yes, i would. four bulgarian football fans suspected of subjecting black england players to racist abuse have been detained following police raids. a severely brain—damaged girl who the nhs believed should have her life support withdrawn has arrived in italy to continue her treatment there instead. welcome to westminster. we are live from westminster on another really important day in the brexit process. the chances of a brexit deal between the eu and the uk
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being agreed this week this are now shrinking, according to government sources. we are alsojust we are also just hearing that michel barnier is being quoted as saying that he has told eu commissioners he is hopeful of getting a deal today. that's the irish broadcaster rte saying that michel barnier has told eu commissioners he is hopeful of getting a deal today, so some variation in opinion. talks between the sides restarted briefly this morning after a late finish last night. if a deal was to be agreed, it would need to be published, along with a legal text, if the eu27 are to consider ratifying the withdrawal agreement at the crucial summit, which starts tomorrow. a short time ago, irish prime minister leo varadkar said there is pathway to a possible deal, but there are many issues still to be resolved. the irish news organisation rte
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says that michel barnier is optimistic of a deal being done today. with me now is our assistant political editor, norman smith. talk to me about the very different mood music, because government sources are saying mood music, because government sources are saying hopes of a deal are shrinking, michel barnier, according to these sources, saying something different. according to these sources, saying something differentlj according to these sources, saying something different. i think eve ryo ne something different. i think everyone is very cautious. certainly there was a momentum building up when people saw that cabinet is taking place this afternoon, then borisjohnson is talking to tory mps in the early evening. there was a sense the choreography was being put in place for a deal. now the word from number ten is, in place for a deal. now the word from numberten is, hang in place for a deal. now the word from number ten is, hang on, in place for a deal. now the word from numberten is, hang on, we in place for a deal. now the word from number ten is, hang on, we are not there, there are a lot of hurdles to get over, and all this talk of being on the verge of a deal, well, actually, not quite. i wonder if part of the great, if you like, is getting the sign up of the dup, because boris johnson
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like, is getting the sign up of the dup, because borisjohnson met arlene foster and nigel dodds last night, and you get the sense there is still quite a wide gap between what boris johnson is still quite a wide gap between what borisjohnson needs to sign off on and what the dup are prepared to accept, and i'm struck really, in an interview which arlene foster gave before going into the talks, that it was pretty ha rd before going into the talks, that it was pretty hard line, saying, we are not going to accept any customs border in the irish sea, that's not something we are prepared to accept, and warning boris johnson something we are prepared to accept, and warning borisjohnson that, without her party's backing, there isn't going to be an agreement. and she's right, the arithmetic isn't therefore boris johnson she's right, the arithmetic isn't therefore borisjohnson unless he can get her ten mps on board and, to make it worse for him, a number of the erg have said, look, if you are not going to get the dup on board, we are not coming on board either. so for we are not coming on board either. so foer we are not coming on board either. so for mrjohnson, if he is going to get this over the line here, he absolutely has to get the dup on board, and i'm not sure he has.
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sources have said the dup is looking for a tighter stormont lock, tighter control from the northern ireland assembly, which hasn't been sitting for a couple of years, over what would happen to this process if a deal was done, what would happen three orfour deal was done, what would happen three or four years down the line. the issue of consent is fundamental for the dup. equally, for the eu, they are implacably opposed to the idea of giving another country, another single party, say, the dup, another single party, say, the dup, a veto over their rules and regulations, saying when they should oi’ regulations, saying when they should or shouldn't apply it, because their view that circumvents the integrity of the single market, so there is a straightforward clash there. the question is whether you can find some way round it which can be sold to both sides. there was some chitchat over whether you could maybe say you could have a referendum to sanction northern ireland pulling out of any sort of customs or regulatory arrangement. i
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think most people would shiver at the thought of another referendum, to kelly in northern ireland, even oui’ to kelly in northern ireland, even our experience of how divisive referendums have been here and in scotland, and arlene foster last night rejected that. so i don't think they've quite found a mechanism yet to get round this issue of ensuring there will be consent if northern ireland has to stay in the customs union. on cue and the eu is pretty set onjoint consent from both the unionist and nationalist communities. that is absolutely so. that isn't the only problem. you can find ways of finessing the customs issue. one suggestion is you could say northern ireland would legally stay in the uk's customs union but administratively in the eu's customs union. that's a fancy way of trying to blend it, but the difficulty is,
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from the dup point of view, how do they get out of it and how do they have any control over subsequent regulations coming down the line? they lose control. it's those kind of sticking points which boris johnson has to finesse, notjust for the eu but, as i say, with the dup, andi the eu but, as i say, with the dup, and i think that might be why the idea we are going to get a breakthrough today seems to be fading back now. what does all of this mean for the proposed saturday sitting of the commons?” this mean for the proposed saturday sitting of the commons? i would imagine, if there is no deal to put to the commons on saturday, it would seem bizarre that mrjohnson would wa nt seem bizarre that mrjohnson would want mps to gather, because they'd certainly cause trouble. it would be an opportunity for his opponents to try and impose more restrictions on him, to buttress the benn act, all sorts of things, so i think he would be pretty wary about calling a special session, because i'm not sure that is to his advantage. that
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said, we should know by late tonight, because they will have to put down a motion for tomorrow's order paper to prepare parliament for saturday. speaking of the benn act, that is the law that was passed which means that boris johnson the law that was passed which means that borisjohnson has to request a further extension to the brexit process if no deal has been agreed by the 19th of october, 88 is fast approaching. a little while ago, stephen barclay, the brexit secretary, told the brexit select committee that the prime minister will write that letter asking for a delay if there is no deal saturday. let me quote that. he says the mp will comply with the law and comply with undertakings given to the court. with me now is mark francois, conservative mp and member of the eurosceptic european research group. good morning. steve baker did yourself you will make
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recommendations to your group of mps based on your knowledge of the negotiations. what is the latest detail you have? are you party to any information we haven't heard? not really... shouting off camera. growth if we live, it will be delightful... if this idiot would shut up. he is exercising his democratic right. he is. shouting continues. we had a meeting at number ten yesterday. we have another one this afternoon. we haven't yet been given the full terms of a deal because, by the full terms of a deal because, by the sound of it, it hasn't been finalised in brussels, but the erg met last night, we normally meet on a tuesday evening, that is usual, and we agreed at that meeting that, if there is a deal, and we are going to have a meaningful vote on it on saturday, the erg will meet that
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morning, the offices will make a recommendation to the erg on whether oi’ recommendation to the erg on whether or not to support the deal once we have read the details, we will debate it and then it will be up to every individual member of the erg to look into their heart and decide what is best for their country... shouting continues. if the dup isn't happy, are you saying you won't vote for the deal, oi’ saying you won't vote for the deal, or is there some difference of opinion within the group on that? the erg and the dup have always been strong allies throughout this whole process , strong allies throughout this whole process, so strong allies throughout this whole rocess so it's strong allies throughout this whole process, so it's not axiomatic that we will follow what the dup do, but we will follow what the dup do, but we will follow what the dup do, but we will take very firmly into account their view, securely on those aspects which specifically affect northern ireland, and in a sense it's closest to them. what steve baker, our chairman, said last week still holds, which is that it is not ourjob in the dup to be more
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unionist than the dup, if you follow. but, if the dup feels that northern ireland will be treated to flee to the rest of the uk, is that where your line is as well? —— treated differently. its hypothetical, because we don't know the details, and what i have let down the years from dealing with the eu is you always have to read the small print. it's not hypothetical, in that we've known all along that theissue in that we've known all along that the issue of the border, what happens with those arrangements, the border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland is absolutely definitive to sorting this out, so if you are as closely allied to the dup as you say, i am not going to say you're going to need their say so, but surely will be guided by them on whether or not you would vote for a deal, if there is want to vote on. we don't know the precise details, and i am sorry to sound stuck, but the details do
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matter. it's an international treaty, international law and it could be binding forever. we will ta ke could be binding forever. we will take what the dup very carefully into account. i realise i am asking you to talk about something somewhere between speculation and gut feeling but, in terms of the mood music, what is your gut saying about whether there is going to be a deal to discuss on saturday or not? what i can tell you is this. shouting stop brexit continues. we would like to be in a position to recommend sorting the deal. —— supporting the deal. we can only do that when we've seen it and we know what the details are. if it's acceptable, we would want to recommend it to our members. the acid test is, does it genuinely take us acid test is, does it genuinely take us out of the european union at halloween? if the answer is yes, steve baker and i will be the first
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two guys in the aisle. if there is a deal, do you feel this will be the only chance to vote on a deal which would see the uk leave the eu? if it doesn't happen this time, do you think the mood might swing more strongly behind another referendum, for example? or we have wanted all along is to live in a free country that elects its own government, makes its own laws. if that deal gives this, we will vote for it. thank you. just to reiterate what the brexit secretary, stephen barclay, has been telling the brexit committee this morning, it's that the prime minister will write that letter to the eu asking for another extension to brexit if there is no deal by saturday, so at the moment no decision yet on whether that saturday setting, that very rare saturday setting, that very rare saturday sitting of the commons, will go ahead or not. let's talk about the process of what may or may not happen over the next few days
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with maddy thimont jack from not happen over the next few days with maddy thimontjack from the institute for government. good morning. we are hearing very different things from the eu side and government sources about whether and government sources about whether a deal can be done or not today. but we heard a couple of days ago already from the finnish prime minister that, legally and practically, the uk can't leave by the 31st of october. is it the case, as you see it? it depends on what happens in the next couple of days at the european council, whether or not there was a legal text agreed. if they really can come to an agreement and have a published legal text, in theory, there can be a vote on saturday about whether or not mps here are willing to accept it and if they approve the deal, the next step is passing the implement in legislation which is necessary before the uk can leave in an orderly fashion by the 31st of october. within that, there are some
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complications. it will be a long and complex legal text, but the way the parliamentary procedure works is that the government controls the agenda in the house of commons and they can pass legislation very quickly, even if it is highly controversial to do so. click a if there isn't a deal at a commons doesn't sit on saturday, and we just heard stephen barclay say the prime minister will write that letter to the eu requesting a brexit extension, what potentially happens between that point, the 19th, and the end of october? if that letter is sent, it asks for an extension until the 31st of january, but the eu27 need to agree that, so we would imagine they will decide what length of extension they are willing to accept, and if they agree to january sist, accept, and if they agree to january 31st, the prime minister is obliged to a cce pt 31st, the prime minister is obliged to accept that. if they propose an alternative date, the prime minister can come back to the commons and hold a vote to check that mps are happy to leave on the alternative date and, if mps agree... there is a
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bit ofan date and, if mps agree... there is a bit of an argument going on at the moment between eu member states about quite how long they are willing to allow the uk to remain a member state. if the prime minister sent that letter, will he still be looking for ways to get around that? i think, if he has accepted he is sending the letter, that is what will happen, and if he tries to do something else, and there has been a suggestion of a second letter accompanying it, if he does try to do something to frustrate the act, you can imagine there would be challenges in court around that, so i think, at this stage, given the assurances johnson has i think, at this stage, given the assurancesjohnson has given to scottish courts, he will be following the act at this point. more broadly, that leaves business people, so many sectors in limbo, and finding themselves in varying degrees of readiness, some quite ready for whatever happens next, some not ready at all. ever since
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the benn act, the government has continued to say, we are leaving on the 31st of october, come what may, but if the letter is sent and an extension is agreed, that prolongs this huge unscented tea, because no deal can't be —— huge uncertainty. so no deal is still a chance. so businesses will still need to prepare for that. we don't know if an extension will be to try and iron out details of a possible deal, even if they can't agree one this week. they might try and get one agreed in the next few weeks, but will it be a longer extension where you are looking at an election or possibly referendum before we end up leaving the eu? the various opposition parties have been relatively, and i use that word relatively, quiet in the last 2a hours or so. what calculations will they be making about what to do next? it will come down to whether or notjohnson
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brings back a deal. there was question over whether there will be a vote on saturday, and some mps are saying they will be willing to back a deal if it is put to a confirmatory vote afterwards. if we have a longer extension, there will bea have a longer extension, there will be a question over whether or not they should support an election at this stage, and i expect there will be some heated conversations going on internally in those parties as they try and figure out their positions, but i think all eyes are on the next two days with the european council to see if we can get a deal. thank you. we will be backin get a deal. thank you. we will be back in westminster soon and i'll be talking to the head of the national audit office, which has published its latest report, saying significant risks remain the operation of the borders in the uk in the event of a no—deal brexit, so we'll bring that to you very soon. the parents of harry dunn, the teenager killed in a car crash involving the wife of an american diplomat, have met president trump at the white house. charlotte charles and tim dunn
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arrived for the meeting to be told that the woman, anne sacoolas, was in a room next door, but the couple declined to see her, saying they didn't want to be railroaded into a meeting they weren't prepared for. duncan kennedy has more. arriving at the white house, harry's parents, charlotte and tim, had no idea they were about to meet the president of the united states. they spend 15 minutes with donald trump. afterwards, charlotte said, at one point, the president held her hand, but she says they still don't know if the woman who knocked down harry would return to the uk. i asked him again. i said, if it was your 19—year—old son, oryourson, no matter what age, you would be doing the same as me. and he was holding my hand at the time and said, yes, i would. and he said, maybe we'll try and push this from a different angle. harry dunn died six weeks ago after his motorbike collided with a car in northamptonshire.
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the car was being driven on the wrong side of the road by anne sacoolas, who later left the uk, despite being the main suspect. in a stunning surprise, president trump told harry's parents that mrs sacoolas was waiting in the room next door and wanted to meet the couple there and then. but they refused, saying talking about harry's death with anne sacoolas must be done in a proper, controlled setting. he seemed to understand that our grief has been going on for seven weeks now, in a case that should have been very clear—cut. he understands, or he seemed to understand, that that meeting needs to be with therapists and mediators in the room and notjust her and us. it is, you know, i wouldn't imagine that is even advisable for her, let alone us. the fact that this case has even
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made it to the white house has stunned charlotte and tim. just six weeks ago, they were grieving for harry after that car accident in the northamptonshire countryside. now, after all they've been through, they say that all they ever wanted was to seekjustice for their son. the determination of this family from northamptonshire has been remarkable. amid their grief, they have crossed the atlantic, met a president and maintained their dignity to serve their son. duncan kennedy, bbc news, at the white house. raad seiger is the spokesman for the family and was with them at the white house. he spoke to us from new york about what happened at the meeting. as far as as faras i'm as far as i'm concerned, that was a totally unprecedented and quite extraordinary meeting. we were in new york mid—morning yesterday, doing a number of appearances on the
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brea kfast doing a number of appearances on the breakfast show is out here, trying to raise harry's case amongst the population here, and i got a phone call, it must have been about iiam, and it was somebody at the white house, they couldn't tell me who, but a senior government official wa nted but a senior government official wanted to see us, and could we please come down to washington, about three hours away, and we talked and we said, let's go and see, let's see what they have to say, maybe it's something positive. once we got in there, well, there he was, mrtrump. so that once we got in there, well, there he was, mr trump. so that was our first surprise. our second surprise was when he told us that anne sacoolas was in the building. our third surprise was that she was in the next room and wanted to meet us. you know, it was clearly a meeting that was organised by them in haste, and i think the expression that's been
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used, nincompoops on the run, because when we got the call we thought we were going to come down and talk about may finding a solution to this diplomatic immunity issue, and we told them we looked forward to it. we didn't know anything about mrs sacoolas being either in the building or next door to eat. i dare say if i hadn't been there and said, no, we are not doing that, he would havejust there and said, no, we are not doing that, he would have just flung there and said, no, we are not doing that, he would havejust flung open the door and she would have almost jumped out of the box. you cannot imagine anybody thinking that that was a good idea. yeah, nincompoops is what they are, and they are on the run. you don't need to be a psychiatrist understand that you don't have that sort of meeting in an uncontrolled environment with the world's media watching. you do it in a controlled setting with mediators and therapists around. honestly,
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words fail me. that is the lawyer for harry dunn's family. four people have been detained by police in the bulgarian capital, sofia, following racist chanting directed at england's footballers on monday night. the bulgarian interior ministry said the people had been held to investigate those who are responsible for "improper acts" during the match. england's players were subjected to racist chants and nazi salutes during their 6—0 victory. our correspondent, nick thorpe, is in the bulgarian capital, sofia. bring us up—to—date with the latest on those arrests. yes, the arrests we re on those arrests. yes, the arrests were made clear by the statement on the bulgarian interior ministry website, quoting it as you havejust done, saying this is part of a bigger police investigation. since that statement went up on the website, we understand the chief of police in sofia has spoken to bulgarian television, to the state
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media, said that so far they have identified, police have identified 15 people in all who took part in the racist chanting that evening. and what is the latest on the uefa investigation into what happened? there is also the uefa investigation, but we are not quite sure where that has got to. i think it's safe to say that, here in sofia, in bulgaria, people are pretty divided. many are saying this has brought great shame and embarrassment on the nation, they feel stigmatised in the eyes of the world public, if you like, because of what's happened. other people are saying it's more of a storm in a tea cu p saying it's more of a storm in a teacup and, wait a minute, british fa ns teacup and, wait a minute, british fans traditionally haven't behaved very well, there were other incidents on the night, why target just bulgaria over this? there has also been a comment from one of bulgaria's leading footballers from the 1990s,
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bulgaria's leading footballers from the 19905, it bulgaria's leading footballers from the 1990s, it was well known in britain, who said that really bulgaria has to face the music over this, that it is intolerable and any country where this happens ought to be heavily punished, perhaps with bands not just from be heavily punished, perhaps with bands notjust from tournaments but for a period from all international games, so for a period from all international games, so quite mixed views here in bulgaria at the moment, but the latest has been these arrests. a severely brain—damaged girl who the nhs believed should have her life support withdrawn has arrived in italy to continue her treatment. five—year—old tafida raqeeb is in genoa now. it is the first time a family who have fought an nhs trust in court to keep their child alive have won and then successfully moved their child abroad. the duke and duchess of cambridge, william and kate, are continuing their five—day visit to pakistan. today, they are visiting a glacier in the hindu kush mountain range in the north of the country and a village in the foothills of the himalayas. this is the first royal visit to the country in 13 years. william and kate will learn
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about the effects of climate change on glacial landscapes during the trip. let's cross live to islamabad and speak to the bbc‘s secunder kermani. tell us more about what they've been up tell us more about what they've been up to. today, the royal couple have beenin up to. today, the royal couple have been in one of the most beautiful parts of pakistan, the north of the country, in an area that princess diana visited in herfirst country, in an area that princess diana visited in her first trip to pakistan in 1991, but it's also somewhere that's been affected by climate change, and that's one of the reasons the duke and duchess of cambridge went there, to see a melting glacier and to meet communities who have been displaced by flash flooding in the past. they will also be spending time with members of one of pakistan's smallest but oldest religious minorities. climate change is one of the key issues that the royal couple are focusing on during this trip,
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along with education. during a speech at a reception given by the british high commission yesterday, prince william warmed of the dangers posed to the world by climate change. later in the week, the royal couple will be visiting the city of lahore before returning to the uk on friday. thank you. let's bring you up—to—date with what is happening in syria on that area which buttresses right up to turkey. we can show you the latest live pictures. the military operations by turkey, those incursions into that border area, are continuing, and the latest commentsjust are continuing, and the latest comments just through from the turkish president, president erdogan, saying that the only option for kurdish militants in syria is to lay down their arms and retreat. he has said, our proposal is, right now, they all lay down their arms, destroy their tracks and get out of
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the saison we have designated, but that would be —— the safe zone. he says no power can stop the turkish offensive in syria until it reaches its goals. presumably he is referring to the united states, the vice president saying that they are ready to mediate a ceasefire, and also sanctions have been announced, but recep tayyip erdogan saying that the goal is clear, they are not worried about any sanctions. the us vice president and us secretary of state will shortly be arriving in turkey. they are due to meet with president erdogan in ankara tomorrow, but president erdogan saying very clearly that nothing will stop that operation, and the only way for it to stop is for the kurds to leave that area.
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let's return to westminster. i want to begin by giving you a little more context to those comments michel barnier was making in brussels earlier. we've mentioned that government sources here were saying that hopes were shrinking of a brexit deal being reached this week, but that michel barnier was quoted by some sources as saying that he hoped a deal could still be done today, but there is a but because, listening to the rest of those comments, he is also saying significant issues are remaining, significant issues are remaining, significant issues are remaining, significant issues remaining, so, when you look at that broader context, perhaps that rather matches up context, perhaps that rather matches up more with the predictions, speculation from sources here. meanwhile the national audit office has warned of significant problems at the borders in kent. the
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government has made progress in its said the deadline was extended but some contingency planning is not like betty, including the capacity to check whether lorries in france —— including lorries heading to france had an next paperwork. let's talk about the significant risks, including the hopes of making sure that there are not huge queues building up on the approach to dover. and the eurotunnel. government has made assumptions about the likely delays. if it does not take preventative action, so what they are planning to put in place are checks well away from the channel ports. to make sure that lorries approaching the ports are properly equipped with the right paperwork. relaxing that there is still a lot to do to make sure that those arrangements are well understood. what other significant
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risks have you found in your report? we appointed to three key areas in the short term and any long term risk. in the short term, there is clearly a lot of this depends on the readiness of hauliers and traders who want to import and export across the border and the evidence is that there is still a long way to go before government can be confident about the level of readiness. we're not talking about adjusting a large vat registered businesses, that's small business as well and there is a long way to go. as of earlier this month, approximately 25,000 of the 150 or 250,000 traders i need to make custom regulations a day when vinod dominic brexit had registered. only 25,000. yesterday, government announced that they have automatically registered another 95,000 businesses and they are the ones that are vat registered and they can see from that that they are trading with the eu. so getting closer to the number cosmic even for
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those there are steps that those businesses need to take. they cannot submit everything started. they need to make further data entries but there's more work to do for those businesses too, but it still leaves tens of thousands that have not been reached. what has the government satisfactory progress on an event of a no—deal brexit? satisfactory progress on an event of a no-deal brexit? with updated things since february when we last worked on this and all of the keyboard or system that had to be in place, because we replacing the eu system because of the declaration, we need animal health certificate and all of that is in place. the systems have been tested. what has not yet been tested is how they all work together in a live environment, so work together in a live environment, so that remains how to to be seen how it works. another couple of points have emerged from your report. to a greater or lesser extent, i did the government control an event of a no the border between northern ireland and republic are bound is that how the irish
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government but respond in terms of checks in the event of no deal. the point of no deal as there is no agreement. as a government has had to make assumptions about how both the irish government and the french, it is our keeper the practice will respond in that situation and we think that they had made reasonable assumptions about that. there will be controlled but on either side of the border and they have had to factor that into assess the delays. briefly, the key thing you're saying is that the sustainability of the approach, the garment has to balance. allowing the flow of traffic and also making sure the criminals are not taking advantage. the couple accepted is a short—term arrangement is only in the canopy is extendable for the long term in a bid to make sure that we're preventing crime. and collecting the customs duties that will be due under a new approach. and it will ta ke under a new approach. and it will take time but to be fully in place. thank you. gareth davies head of the
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national audit office. the dup had just gone into number ten. arlene foster was quoted about trusting the prime minister saying that she trusted no one. but herself. obviously the support of the dup in terms of whatever arrangements are included in any potential deal is absolutely vital to boris johnson included in any potential deal is absolutely vital to borisjohnson if he is going to have any hope of getting a deal through the house of commons we're also told that the cabinet meeting that was expected later this afternoon is now at 2:30pm instead of apm. we don't know what the significance of that as yet, but a couple of updates in the comings of and goings of westminster today. let's look at sport stop bulgarian authorities have detained four fans suspected of aiming racist
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abuse at england players during monday night's euro qualifier in sofia. they also say they're "working to identify others". jordan henderson says the england players wanted to make the home fans "suffer" for the racist abuse by beating them on the pitch. they won 6—0 . there are also reports that some bulgarian players told england that the racism was pre—planned and co—ordinated. so co—ordinated, in fact, that it's claimed that some of the abusers were disguised as stewards in sofia. looks organised. i need to get that many people inside the stadium all dressed up and the no respect sign. if you compare that in their own stadium, that would not be allowed and they were there for the best pa rt and they were there for the best part of the first half on the left of their own accord, whether or whether they were asked to leave, it looked coordinated. and talking about the disguised as a steward, that make sense as well. the authorities there had to match 70 terms before the game with the czech republic game had finished —— 72 hours before the game to know that the eyes of the world had been watching them and they did not take
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the opportunity unfortunately. the president of the bulgarian fa — borislav mihaylov — has resigned from his post after pressure from the bulgarian prime minister. uefa say the "football family and governments" need to "wage war on the racists", whilst fifa president gianni infantino says the sport needs to "think more broadly" about fixing the problem. uefa have sanctioned the italian side lazio because of the racist behaviuour of their fans. their stadium in rome will be partially closed for their europa league game against celtic on november 7th. that follows incidents during their match against the french side rennes earlier this month. they've also been fined just over £17,000. the republic of ireland missed the chance to qualify for next summer's european championship. that's after losing 2—0 to switzerland. the hosts took the lead early on, and then doubled their lead right at the end of the game. ireland also had captain seamus coleman sent off. their qualifying hopes now rest on next month's home game against denmark. meanwhile, there's a worry
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for manchester united after keeper david de gea limped off during spain's qualifying match with sweden. united face premier league leaders liverpool on sunday. the game last night finished 1—1, meaning spain qualify for next year's finals. that's all the sport for now. the firstjudge to claim protection as a ‘whistleblower‘ has won a landmark appeal at the supreme court. the court unanimously ruled judges can be classified as workers and so should be entitled to whistleblowing protection. our legal affairs correspondent clive coleman is at the supreme court. explain that this was about, she wa nted explain that this was about, she wanted to raise concerns but she was not able to do it. thisjudge is
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clear gillingham, when cut to the court system became she started to worry about... litigants in person, people have to go to court because they were not getting legal aid one of these people had a settled intention to kill her. she was warned by the police. she raised her concerns and as a result of raising those concerns, she was bullied by seniorjudges and court staff and her concerns were not taken seriously. that led to health suffering and she suffered a breakdown. she has fought a legal battle all the way to the supreme court to establish the rate that judges are entitled to blow the whistle like other workers and not suffer as a result of that entity a unanimous ruling, big judgment given by lady hill, thatjudges and all
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judicial office holders are entitled to whistle—blowing protection —— after the billing i spoke tojudge gilham. i do not feeli after the billing i spoke tojudge gilham. i do not fee“ i was after the billing i spoke tojudge gilham. i do not feel i i was off sick. after trying to back to work, i had these issues addressed by every possible means internally, i thought that i had to take the matter to court. and if at a very long battle, legal battle, you are a judge are well equipped to do that, but you have taken it all the way to the supreme court and today, unanimously, they have indicated your claim thatjudges should be entitled to blow the whistle on matters of public concern. yes neck. i felt that the supreme court felt that there is a public duty here. he took an oath of office and though the consequences that come with it and you're doing a public service, so and you're doing a public service, so you have a duty of to speak out if things are not going right and you should be protected. she has had a long fight and she is a judge as you pointed out in the
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fa ct a judge as you pointed out in the fact that she has struggled with it shows that it is tough for anyone going through that sort of thing. she's a busy part of a select group a judge. as their wider implications as part of this cosmic the real point of this case is that, traditionally, judges have not commented about matters concerning the administration. of commented about matters concerning the administration. ijustice, political matters, if you like. the position at its it is just not the role ofjudges to get involved in that sort of thing. what this case establishes is that if they have serious concerns about the workings of justice serious concerns about the workings ofjustice in it is in the public interest that those matters arise, then they have the whistle—blowing protection to do that. judges are very seldom likely to do that and if you speak to some judges of the record, they will say that raising those sorts of content that are doing a judicial concern —— that raising those concerns will not do your judicial raising those concerns will not do yourjudicial career any good. if it
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matters on offenders in the public interest, judges along with other workers have the right to blow the whistle, in the knowledge that they have the protection they should not suffer a detriment doing that. some baking is to bring you from our home affairs correspondent. his reporting that a prison that was condemned as unacceptable will be closed in. last month the chief inspector of prisons said that the grange had the words conditions of any open or category d prisoner. that he had ever seen. he described it as that he had ever seen. he described itasa that he had ever seen. he described it as a squalid, demeaning and depressing. it is unclear at the stage where there is a 200 inmates will be transferred to. some of them may have to return to closed conditions because of a shortage of open spaces locally.
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premature birth — that's a birth before 37 weeks — is globally the biggest cause of death among newborns. while incubators can save the lives of some premature babies — they can also leave them with long—term disabilities. now, scientists in the netherlands say they are within ten years of developing an alternative — an artificial womb that could save many more lives and reduce the risk of such disabilities. as part of our 100 women series, sofia bettiza reports. imagine a future where babies are born from machines. in 2017, researchers in the us successfully tested an artificial womb on lambs. and now a group of doctors in the netherlands are working on the first artificial womb for humans. after being born, a premature baby would be placed in this, an artificial womb full of liquid. and we will close the bag.
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this is the artificial placenta and it is connected to the baby with the umbilical cord of the placenta and the umbilical cord of the baby. the hope is that this could increase the chances of survival of premature babies. around the world, about 50 million children are born prematurely every year. and half of them don't survive. like james. his mother gave birth to him when he was only 2a weeks old. he died two months later. at that time, artificial womb was like magic. we dreamt about it, if that was a possibility, but it wasn't. when premature babies are put in an incubator they get oxygen pumped into their lungs to survive. but they're not yet developed enough for this. an artificial womb, on the other hand, would have a baby floating in fluids and kept in a sealed environment until it is fully grown. this will change the lives of many people, because those babies are going to survive.
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dr oei says the technology is nearly ready. but is society ready? a group of designers in amsterdam have created this to represent what the technology could look like. the inflatable balloons are like wombs with babies inside and the tubes coming out of them would carry the fluids that babies need to survive. this was one of the first sketches... lisa created the model because she feels the key to society accepting this new technology is the way it will look. you wouldn't really imagine putting your baby in a plastic bag. you wouldn't feel comfortable with that. so we need to think about a design that you feel comfortable. this technology seems to offer parents hope, but could it actually end up presenting them with an extremely difficult choice? as it is now, if the child is 22 weeks, we just simply do not treat and,
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unfortunately, the child dies. but with the artificial womb, it seems to be the case that they have to actively say no, we're not going to say the child, —— no, we're not going to say that the child, which can evoke feelings of being a bad parent. despite some concerns, doctors plan to start testing artificial wombs on humans within the next ten years in the hope this could save the lives of millions of preterm babies around the world. sofia bettiza, bbc news, the netherlands. lisa mandemaker is one of the bbc‘s 100 women of 2019. she is the designer working for the medical centre. for more from the award—winning 100 women season, head to bbc.com/100women where you'll find more stories from this year's list of inspirational women. the duke of sussex became emotional as he paid tribute
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to "inspirational" children at an awards ceremony last night. harry and meghan attended the wellchild awards in london, meeting with winners and their families. the duke was overcome with emotion as he praised them, saying his own journey into fatherhood meant learning about those with serious illnesses pulls at his heartstrings. last year when my wife and i attended, we knew we were expecting our first child. no—one else did at the time but we did, and i remember... he breaks down. applause. sorry. in a moment, we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news... government sources say the chances of agreeing a deal with brussels this week are shrinking with a number issues still unresolved. harry dunn's parents go to the white house but refuse
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to meet the woman involved in the fatal crash which killed their son, saying they felt "ambushed". police in bulgaria arrest four men in connection with racist chanting directed at black england footballers during their euro 2020 qualifier on monday. welcome to the business news. uk consumer inflation remains at slowest pace since 2016. more on that in just a moment. profits at asos have plunged after warehouse problems led to what the online fashion retailer said was a "disappointing" year. over the last year, asos has installed more robots in its european warehouses and expanded its facilities in the us, but the speed of growth hit profits, which dropped almost 70% for the year. the cost of renting rose fastest in nottingham, leeds and bristol last year,
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whilst falling in aberdeen — that's according to property website zoopla. but on average, renting a home in the uk has become more affordable. part of the reason — according to zoopla — is an increase in the number of people buying their first home, relieving some of the pressure on the rental sector. britains' inflation rate has held steady as petrol prices fell at their fastest rate in more than three years. economists had largely expected inflation to rise last month — to 1.8% — but instead — the office for nationals statistics says consumer prices rose at an annual rate of 1.7% in september, matching august's rate and the lowest since december 2016. the ons also said that wage growth continues to outstrip inflation with real wages nearly back to pre—crisis levels. this will have implications for the state pension thanks to the triple—lock system —
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and is set for its biggest increase since 2012 next year, with pensioners expected to receive a 4% boost. sarah hewin is chief economist for standard chartered bank. what you make of the figures? inflation came in broadly as expected but it is yet another month where inflation is below the bank's 296 where inflation is below the bank's 2% target and what is interesting, as you mentioned, although we're seeing the wages are rising at a much faster pace, rendered 3.8% year—on—year, that is not feeding through into higher inflation. it merely gives the bank of england a lot of scope to ease interest rates if they see the need to and it certainly suggests that they will not need to raise interest rates any time soon. let's look at inflation to begin with. and to be so specific, we're talking at both consumer price index or the cpi,. it
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is largely being blamed on the a falling fuel prices and second—hand cars, but that was offset by rising prices and second—hand cars, but that was offset by rising press appendages, housing appliances, hotel overnight stays and what is that say about her spending habits at the moment cosmic people are spending on services, rather than good. there are spending on it expenses and entertainment. that is reflected in the data that we see today. there is a lot of international competition for production of goods and that has held a press is relatively low. for the same time, there is more demand for services and cultural activities, entertainment activities, entertainment activities, and that could tend to push the price higher. the figures suggest that the bank of england forecast in august, when a frail tuner at forecast in august, when a frail tuneratan forecast in august, when a frail tuner at an average of 1.7% look spot—on, but in reality roberts of
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the table cosmic so much depends on what happens with brexit. the table cosmic so much depends on what happens with brexitm the table cosmic so much depends on what happens with brexit. it looks very unlikely that we will have a new gimmick brexit, but if that were to happen at the end of october or at some point later in this era early next year, we would expect to see the painful, dramatically. last time that happened —— see the pound fall quite dramatically. it had a huge impact on inflation the last time we saw that happen. if we get a deal, if we get an extension, then the value of the pay will probably stay slightly higher as it has currency. that should dampen imported places. that should mean downward movement of inflation. thank you. in other business stories we've been following...
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organised criminals could exploit gaps in the uk's border preparations in the event of a no—deal brexit — that's what the national audit office is warning. it says new border control systems could be used to commit fraud or smuggle goods. with two weeks to go until the uk is due to leave the eu, the nao warns that government departments and businesses are not fully prepared for the risks. the uk's best—known stockpicker is to close his remaining investment funds, ending his multi—billion—pound empire. neil woodford was sacked from his flagship fund early on tuesday, and has now announced he will close the last two funds. mr woodford earned a huge reputation over 30 years of successful investing and at its peak his business managed more than £14 billion pounds. uk fashion company boohoo has been told one of its emailed advertisements must not use the phrase "send nudes" — used to promote a range of clothes coloured to resemble skin. the advertising standards authority upheld a complaint about the advert
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because it made light of a "potentially harmful social trend", telling the retailer to be "socially responsible". a quick look at markets and the currencies in particular. the roller—coaster ride for the british pound continues — having enjoyed its best week since 2017 lastweek since 2017 last week after borisjohnson and irish counterpart leo va radkar said they could see "a pathway" for a brexit agreement — it surges as much as 1.5% on tuesday to a nearfive—month high of $1.28 — but today, it's given up a large chunk of those gains as those expectations of a last—minute agreement wane. it's dropped below a dollar 27 before gaining back some of those losses. and it's a similar, albeit slightly less dramatic, story on the markets — with european stocks retreating today after hitting one—year highs on tuesday. both the ftse100 and 250 are slightly down a picture of the moment
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a himalayan marmot is surprised by a tibetan fox has won yongqing bao wildlife photorapher of the year. the native tibetan had to stake out an alpine meadow in china's oilian mountains for several hours in order to capture the dramatic stand off. moments later a fight begun, which resulted in the marmot being killed — but yongqing said "that's nature". he beat more than 118,000 entries from 100 countries to scoop the prize. this picture of an iridescent big fin reef squid won 14—year—old cruz erdmann young wildlife photographer of the year. he took it on a night dive in the lembeh strait off north sulawesi, indonesia. judges said the shot by the teenager — who gained his diving certificate aged just 10 — was a "resounding achievement". among the category winners, thomas easterbook won the 10 years and under section of the competition for this picture of a hummingbird moth he captured
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on holiday in france. the behaviour: birds category was won by this shot of a golden eagle which took three years to achieve. audun rikardsen carefully placed an old tree branch in a position where the eagles would land, triggering a camera flash. stefan christmann's "the huddle" won the portfolio award. in this image, more than 5,000 male emperor penguins gather together in east antarctica. they are incubating eggs at their feet while the females have gone to sea to forage. and this american bison battling through the snow in yellowstone national park won max waugh the prize for best photo in black and white. thomas easterbook, who won the 10 years and under section of the competition, spoke to victoria derbyshire earlier about how he took his prize—winning photograph. the photo i took is of a hummingbird
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hawk moth which is actually a type of moth which hums because its wings beat up to 75 feet per second. and it also, in flight, is almost indistinguishable drinking nectarfrom a bright pink flower against a green background of grass. how old are you? i'm 11 now. how on earth did you manage to take that photo? well, i took a lot of photos and failed in a lot of them. but if you take a lot of photos by by rule of numbers you you're likely to get a good one. yeah, but there's a good there's a good photo and there's an absolutely stunning photo which is what that is isn't it? yeah it's really amazing.
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rain is clearing off 20 cents in china coming to northern ireland. well, the south—west of england. continuing to move outwards in saint admits to with outbreaks of rain in the far north—east of scotland later this afternoon. maybe if bit more cloud in the south—east as well. for most it is dry this afternoon and are certainly brighter. maximum temperatures about 13 to 16 celsius. through tonight, the area of cloud and the rain it will continue to spread away into the north sea. and then for many of us, it is dry and there will be if you share with them to read south—west england, wales and northern ireland. it could turn quite chilly for many of us, temperatures down into fairly low single figures and perhaps a frost in the north—east of scotland. during thursday and it is looking like one of the sunny spells and showers day. most of the show is across western areas of the uk. the weather is too, you will see lightly dry and, there will be some good spells of sunshine.
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up more with the predictions, speculation from sources here. hello, you're watching bbc news live from westminster on yet another critical day for brexit negotiations. government sources say the chances of agreeing a deal with brussels this week are shrinking. the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, says there are "significant issues to resolve". irish taoiseach leo varadkar says issues around customs, consent and vat still need to be agreed. we'll bring you all the latest from westminster. here's the day's other headlines away from westminster. harry dunn's parents go to the white house but refuse to meet the woman involved in the fatal crash which killed their son, saying they felt "ambushed".
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they were told she was in the next room. i said, if it was your 19—year—old son or your son, no matter what age, you would do the same as me, and he was holding my hand and he said, yes, iwould. four bulgarian football fans suspected of subjecting black england players to racist abuse have been detained following police raids. the duke and duchess of cambridge are visiting a glacier in northern pakistan, as they continue their five—day trip of the country. good afternoon from westminster. in the last hour, the eu chief negotiator, michael barnier, has told commissioners in brussels that a number of "significa nt issues"
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remain before a deal with the uk can be agreed and signed off ahead of an eu summit tomorrow. negotiations resumed this morning in brussels — and, while both sides say progress has been made, downing street sources say the chances of an agreement being struck this week are shrinking. irish prime minister leo varadkar says there is a "pathway to a possible deal, but there are many issues still to be resolved". so lots of caveats there. john campbell is the bbc‘s northern ireland economics and business editor. what is your take on the state of the negotiations, where we are at and whether there is any possibility of getting past the sticking points? we know there have been two big sticking point in recent days, and
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they are on customs and consent. on they are on customs and consent. on the uk side, they put a red line which says that northern ireland must leave the eu's customs union along with the rest of the uk. on the eu side, they say, whatever happens, there must be no new customs posts, checks or procedures on the island of ireland, so how do you square that circle? my day has been a customs partnership, suggested by theresa may much earlier in this process, and it would effectively mean that companies and the authorities in northern ireland would act as a sort of customs agent or officer on behalf of the eu, so good is coming to northern ireland from great if they were destined to go on into the republic of ireland, or further into the eu, at that point, the correct ta riffs the eu, at that point, the correct tariffs would be paid. it sounds complicated because it is, that sort of arrangement doesn't really exist anywhere else, so trying to make that legally and operationally feasible is proving difficult. the other issue is consent. the dup,
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with the government think they will need to back any deal, they say, if northern ireland is to be subject to any sort of specific arrangements, that must come with the democratic consent of the people of northern ireland. how do you get that? do you try and get it with the northern ireland assembly, which hasn't existed for more than 1000 days? could you have a special referendum for northern ireland? and they consent issue to be rising up the agenda for the dup, because about a week ago they were saying they would effectively have a veto over this process , effectively have a veto over this process, and i don't think they will be want to see to walk that back too much. just to remind our viewers that northern ireland voted to remain. there are other large political parties there, notjust the dup, so as far as the eu is concerned, john, it's very much an issue of getting joint consent if there is to be any sort of stormont lock, any veto by the northern
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ireland political parties. yes, and the situation is complicated in northern ireland because, even if you have an executive, you have a system known as parallel consent, where the most controversial issues have to be approved by a majority of both unionists and nationalists or nothing changes. so how you frame the consent issue is important. if you were to say that at all points northern ireland must choose to opt into eu rules, effectively that is a unionist veto, because if they say we are not going to opt in, we continue to follow uk rules. if they structured it to say that the bass line is that northern ireland will a lwa ys line is that northern ireland will always follow eu rules and there must be a vote to opt out, that effectively as a nationalist veto, because nationalists, who would prefer because nationalists, who would p refer to because nationalists, who would prefer to be closer to the republic of ireland, will always prefer to follow the single market rules. so the way you structure that is important. how can you have a situation with a true cross
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community vote rather than one which will be perceived as a veto for one community or the other? very tricky issue. what is your gut feeling about whether anything will get across the line today in time for tomorrow's summit? i don't think we are going to have a fully signed, sealed, delivered sort of deal in time for the summit, because those issues are just complicated, particularly on the customs side of things, andi particularly on the customs side of things, and i can't see how that would be in a coherent, legal text. i think the best that can be hoped for like an agreement in principle ora for like an agreement in principle or a political deal, and some senior diplomatic sources in brussels are suggesting that that is the way to go. it would be ideal which was to say that there is the broad shape in place. in clayjohn campbell in brussels. with me now is our assistant political editor, norman smith.
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lets begin with the comings and goings in westminster. the dup are in numberten, and goings in westminster. the dup are in number ten, and a cabinet meeting is taking place earlier this afternoon at 2:30pm, rather than for pm. what should we read into all of that? it's the third day in a row that? it's the third day in a row that the dup have gone in, underlining their absolute centrality to a deal. if arlene foster doesn't buy any deal, it isn't happening, it's as brutal as that. they have ten votes and if they vote against it it's effectively 20 votes, game over, and they have to be brought on board, and the signs are at the moment that they are not on board. the language we've had from arlene foster over the last 2a hours has been pretty tough, to say the least, and it's clear they have deep problems with the idea of a customs order in the irish sea. the issue of consent, ensuring they have some sort of say over whether they remain in any
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future customs arrangement, that is pivotal, and it's not clear to me that either of those issues have been addressed fully and, to add to all of that, some members of the erg, suntory brexiteers takes the view that, if it isn't good enough for the desperate suntory brexiteers ta ke for the desperate suntory brexiteers take the view that, if it isn't good enough for the dup, they are not going to back it either. i'm not sure there is much to read into the cabinet meeting. we've only got two and half hours until the cabinet meets, and i imagine borisjohnson would have hoped to be in a position to say, this is what we are proposing, these are the concessions or other wise proposing, these are the concessions or otherwise are looking at. there are only tied half hours left, which suggests to me maybe this is slipping away, it might not be possible to get it over the line today, and the language from number ten, you get the sense it's trying
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to play down expectations. jeremy corbyn has been out and about on an nhs visit. what has he had to say? he is another key player, because the other way borisjohnson can get a majority is if there is a significant chunk of labour mps who think, we want a deal, we are going to back borisjohnson's deal. how many are there? the numbers range from a handful, five or six, right up from a handful, five or six, right up to 20 or so. i suspect it's nearer the bottom end, but there we re nearer the bottom end, but there were suggestionsjeremy corbyn would ta ke were suggestionsjeremy corbyn would take quite a tough line and say that, if you vote for boris johnson's deal, you will have the whip removed, you will not be able to stand as a labour mp. in the last few minutes, he has backtracked on that. i believe in the power of persuasion, rather than threat. that. i believe in the power of persuasion, ratherthan threat. i will ask all labour mps to vote along with the party in opposing any
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deal which damages rights in our society or drives us into the arms donald trump. so you will not remove the whip? it's not up to me because we are a democratic organisation. he says he believes in the power of persuasion, rather than the power of threat. so what, if there isn't a deal, we know what's going to happen if there is a deal, parliament will be here in a rare seating to lick her sitting on saturday, but if isn't, what then? the benn act kicks in on saturday, forcing boris johnson to write a letter asking the eu for a delay untiljanuary the 31st. this morning, secretary steve barclay confirmed he would comply with the law and he would give that undertaking to write the letter, and steve barclay also played down the idea he might write a second letter saying, you know that first letter, ididn't saying, you know that first letter, i didn't really agree with it. but still standing by this insistence
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that boris johnson still standing by this insistence that borisjohnson is going to take us that borisjohnson is going to take us out of the eu on october the 31st, come what may, and frankly the two don't sit together. if he is going to ask for a delay until january to 31st and take us out on october the 31st, something has to give. what is going to happen? i don't know. there is a view it's all a gigantic bluff by borisjohnson and he doesn't have some legal eagle, he's found a chink in the benn act which would enable him to circumvent it. the other option is if the eu, a supportive eu leader could say, we are not going to give you the extension, because it only needs one eu leader to say no for it not to go ahead. the folks i've been talking to say that's not going to happen, because no eu leader would wa nt to happen, because no eu leader would want to put themselves at odds with the rest of the eu, because they are staying in, so they have good reason to wa nt staying in, so they have good reason to want the best of relations with
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fellow eu leaders. it's a mystery, the short answer. maybe boris johnson has a master plan, maybe there is no cunning plan. thank you, norman smith. the irish prime minister leo varadkar has also been couching what he's been saying about this process with a good deal of caution, saying that there are still significant areas that both sides need to work on, although a deal is possible he said. he's been speaking in the irish parliament at their equivalent prime minister's questions. there are many issues that still need to be fully resolved, particularly around the consent issue and also some issues around customs and vat. i spoke to the prime minister on the phone this morning and i've also been in contact with the european commission andi contact with the european commission and i think we are making progress, but there are still issues yet to be resolved, and hopefully that can be done today, allowing us to ratify
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the agreement at the european council tomorrow, allowing the house of commons to give its view on it on saturday but, if it's not, there is still more time. still more time, and norman has been saying in the last few days, but although the summit supposed to stop tomorrow was supposed to be summit at which a deal would be signed... there is the possibility of an emergency summit that could still be squeezed in potentially between now and the 31st of october deadline. but the language coming from all sides today from the eu, from westminster, from the government here is definitely cautious, not holding out too much optimism that a deal can be done today, saying that it's possible but that significant issues remain to be worked on, including that issue of consent in northern ireland over
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what happens in terms of any deal and the arrangements and what impact that would have on the border in northern ireland. now we said goodbye to our viewers on bbc two. here on the bbc news channel, we will be continuing our coverage of developments post here in westminster and looking to what's happening in brussels as well and bring you right up—to—date as those discussions continue, to see whether a deal can be achieved today, a brexit deal, with borisjohnson still saying that the uk will leave the eu on october 31. now back to the eu on october 31. now back to the studio. turkey's president erdogan has rejected an appeal from the us for an immediate ceasefire in northern syria. turkish troops are leading a military operation to create what mr erdogan calls a safe area along his country's border with syria. kurdish forces have struck a deal with the syrian government and their russian and iranian allies
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to help in their battle against the turks. our correspondent barbara plett—usher is at the border between turkey and syria. barbara, america has been saying it wa nts to ta ke barbara, america has been saying it wants to take the lead in mediating an agreement, sanctions have been put in place, the vice president and secretary of state heading to turkey, and turkey is saying nothing is going to stop them doing what they are doing. what is the latest? that very forceful statement from president heard again in parliament today, in which he said, people might try to mediate with us but we are not going to sit down with terrorists, the only way the operations going to stop is if they put down their weapons and retreat along this area along the border we wa nt to along this area along the border we want to create as a safe zone, and until then we will keep pushing, and they are continuing the pushing, and you can probably see the town behind
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me, ras al—ain, smoke rising, artillery fire from the turks into the town, kurdish militants are not putting their weapons down or retreating. they've been taking a stand. the fighting continues, and mr erdogan has sent a strong message to the united states that they are not going to call a ceasefire, they are not afraid of sanctions, this has to do with turkey and our security, we believe the kurdish militants are a threat so don't try and push us to do something we don't wa nt to and push us to do something we don't want to do. it's a dilemma for the americans because president trump has been partly blamed as being responsible, because he withdrew us troops from this area, which had worked with kurdish militants, so he is being accused of giving turkey the green light to do this and now he is trying to backtrack, to sent diplomats, to tell turkey to stop doing this and threaten sanctions, but how much an average he has at this point, given that the us military is pulling out of this area as we speak, not that much. the
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driver behind this, president erdogan has said, is to resettle around 2 million syrian refugees currently in turkey. how realistic is that? as a premise? forget the politics of it, but actuallyjust moving those to that area, were they to achieve it. that is a good and a complicated question. it could be quite fraught with difficulty. turkey has something like 3.6 million refugees, and there is a growing resentment towards them, so mr erdogan came up with this plan to try and deal with that political and domestic opposition. he says he wa nts to domestic opposition. he says he wants to move 2 million people into this area, and he presented a plan to the international community at the un, saying, we are going to build towns and infrastructure, you can pay for it, but this is a place where refugees can go. some of them do want to go back, some refugees in
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turkey from these towns along the border and would want to go back, but many are not from these areas, they are from other areas, and there isa they are from other areas, and there is a fear they would be forced here, and that they might not be safe because of conflict and instability. there is a big question about whether it could work. thank you. the parents of harry dunn, the teenager killed in a car crash involving the wife of an american diplomat, have met president trump at the white house. charlotte charles and tim dunn arrived for the meeting to be told that the woman, anne sacoolas, was in a room next door. but the couple declined to see her, saying they didn't want to be railroaded into a meeting they weren't prepared for. duncan kennedy has more. arriving at the white house, harry's parents, charlotte and tim, had no idea they were about to meet the president of the united states.
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they spent 15 minutes with donald trump. afterwards, charlotte said, at one point, the president held her hand, but she says they still don't know if the woman who knocked down harry would return to the uk. i asked him again. i said, if it was your 19—year—old son, oryourson, no matter what age, you would be doing the same as me. and he was holding my hand at the time and said, yes, i would. and he said, maybe we'll try and push this from a different angle. harry dunn died six weeks ago after his motorbike collided with a car in northamptonshire. the car was being driven on the wrong side of the road by anne sacoolas, who later left the uk, despite being the main suspect. in a stunning surprise, president trump told harry's parents that mrs sacoolas was waiting in the room next door and wanted to meet the couple there and then. but they refused, saying talking about harry's death
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with anne sacoolas must be done in a proper, controlled setting. he seemed to understand that our grief has been going on for seven weeks now, in a case that should have been very clear—cut. he understands, or he seemed to understand, that that meeting needs to be with therapists and mediators in the room and notjust her and us. it is, you know, i wouldn't imagine that is even advisable for her, let alone us. the fact that this case has even made it to the white house has stunned charlotte and tim. just six weeks ago, they were grieving for harry after that car accident in the northamptonshire countryside. now, after all they've been through, they say that all they ever wanted was to seekjustice for their son. the determination of this family from northamptonshire has been remarkable. amid their grief, they have crossed the atlantic, met a president
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and maintained their dignity to serve their son. duncan kennedy, bbc news, at the white house. sport now, here's olly. bulgarian police have arrested four men suspected of aiming racist abuse at england players during monday night's euro qualifier in sofia. they also say they're working to identify others. jordan henderson says the england players wanted to make the home fans suffer for the racist abuse by beating them on the pitch. they won 6—0. there are also reports that some bulgarian players told england that the racism was pre—planned and co—ordinated, with claims that some of the abusers were disguised as stewards in sofia. uefa have sanctioned the italian side lazio because of the racist
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behaviuour of their fans. their stadium in rome will be partially closed for their europa league game against celtic on november 7th. that follows incidents during their match against the french side rennes earlier this month. they've also been fined just over £17,000. bury football club has been given two more weeks to avoid going out of business. the league one club were expelled from the english football league in august because of their on—going financial problems. today a winding up order at the high court was adjourned for 1h days. andy murray has paid tribute to the role that wife kim played in his rehabilitation from major hip surgery. murray's currently playing the european open, and beat home favourite kimmer coppejans in the opening round in antwerp. murray says he would have given up on the game had it not been for his wife. and a brilliant year could get even better for heptathlete katarina johnson thompson. she won herfirst global outdoor title at the world championships
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in doha earlier this month. she also won the european indoor pentathlon title in march. she's now on the shortlist to be named world athlete of the year. i feel like i've given ifeel like i've given myself i feel like i've given myself times to develop, and its 2018 and there isa to develop, and its 2018 and there is a glimpse of what i could do. this year, world champion, and i am so this year, world champion, and i am so happy with the position am in pre—tokyo, and then i'll do the british competition and the anniversary games and the newcastle one, so it's going to be a slow build—up. i'll have more for you in the next hour. let's return to westminster.
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let's get up—to—date with negotiations in westminster and brussels. those negotiations are happening in tandem. in terms of what's been going on here, the dup, crucial to borisjohnson's chances of getting any deal through the commons, if there is a deal to put through the commons, and that in itself isn't sure at all at the moment, well, the dup have been in downing street this morning, the third meeting in as many days, and with me now is our reality check correspondence, chris morris, to talk through the latest. let's look at the latest tweets in the last few minutes from sammy wilson, the dup brexit spokesman. i think we can get one on the screen right now he is saying the gfa, good friday agreement, requires cross community consent for all controversial issues passing through the assembly. uk and eu negotiators, who have pontificated ad nauseam about the need to respect the agreement, have
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no business interfering in the process for consent is currently set out. if anybody is having some issues with making sense of what all of that means, consent is absolutely key to a deal being done for sub explain what that is. yes, another reminder of the many levels of negotiation here and in brussels because, while his colleagues were in downing street, sammy wilson was questioning the brexit secretary, making his points to him, basically saying, under the terms of the good friday agreement, don't forget you need a double majority, which means a majority in both communities in northern ireland, to push things through the assembly, and he was asking for an assurance, in effect, that any new customs arrangements would be subject to that double majority, that's what we mean by consent, the consent of the institutions in northern ireland, and that is one of the issues we know, along with customs, that has been proving problematic in the last few days, as negotiations have intensified. esther wilson also
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said, look, these new customs checks, if they are as reported, will amount to an impediment on trade between great britain and northern ireland so, whatever may be coming out from other places, there are coming out from other places, there a re clearly coming out from other places, there are clearly a range of views on every side of this issue, because we are every side of this issue, because we a re really now every side of this issue, because we are really now getting down to the nitty—gritty in what may be the last days of negotiations or may not be. the dup have insisted from the get go that northern ireland must not be treated differently to any other pa rt treated differently to any other part of the uk. and apparently it will be. that is perhaps one of the key concessions we've seen from the british side in the last few days, borisjohnson dropping british side in the last few days, boris johnson dropping the british side in the last few days, borisjohnson dropping the idea of having some sort of limited electronic checks on the land border in northern ireland, saying, as well as regulatory checks, there will have to be some sort of customs checks across the irish sea, so being treated differently. you referred to stephen barclay talking
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to the brexit select committee earlier, not much detail, but new text for the political declaration, but any new text at such a late stage in negotiations will always present difficulties, won't it? we are talking about two documents, the withdrawal agreement, which includes all the stuff on island, the legal text for the uk leaving the eu, but also the non—binding political declaration, and the uk has submitted a new text for that today, and the important thing about that is that it sets the tone of where the government wants to end up in the government wants to end up in the future, and one thing that's changed from the theresa may brexit orbit to the borisjohnson one is that mrjohnson wants a more hands—off relationship economically with the eu in the future. wants to go for a free trade agreement with less, if you like, regulatory connection, potentially, to the eu,
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and that's a problem for the european union. we've heard from angela merkel in the last few days, and others are saying the same sort of thing, saying, hang on, if you wa nt of thing, saying, hang on, if you want a looser arrangement in the future, giving you potentially the option of changing regulations and moving away from the regulations we have, we need to make absolutely sure that, whatever arrangement emerges on the irish border, it is legally sound. in other words, the fudge on the irish border is made more difficult by the fact that mr johnson is saying, i want a slightly more removed relationship in the future. you spent many years reporting from brussels on various sets of negotiations. they are pretty unpredictable, aren't they? it is up, it is down, the pound is up, the pound is down, it is optimistic, pessimistic, and it's a lwa ys optimistic, pessimistic, and it's always like that, because the ha rd est always like that, because the hardest issues tend to get solved last because they are the hardest
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ones, and sometimes the darkest hour is just before the dawn, sometimes it's simply getting dark, and i don't think we are going to know... we must emphasise only a very few people on both sides know exactly what is being discussed in those negotiating rooms, but what we do know is the pressure of time, the summit is starting tomorrow in brussels, at which borisjohnson hoped, still hopes that some sort of agreement from the eu would be forthcoming for his brexit plans. evenif forthcoming for his brexit plans. even if it is on a political level rather than a technical level, i still think the chance of getting everything done and dusted, a legal text approved in parliament and turned into law, by the end of this month, that's almost impossible now. we are all watching the developments and what's happening brussels, only half of the equation, and if there isa half of the equation, and if there is a deal then borisjohnson has to try and get that through the commons. we will be back here
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shortly but now i look at the weather forecast. it's been a damp start across most parts of the country, but plenty of sunshine now across the western side, which is filtering its way east. a drying picture. this is how it's looking in norwich an hour or so it's looking in norwich an hour or so ago. we still have flood warnings in force, so bear that in mind, because we haven't had much significant rain today. we could have more rain in south—eastern areas today, the odd heavy shower, but a fairly decent afternoon for most of us. it will be quite chilly this evening and overnight, especially in eastern areas, with a touch of ground frost, a touch of frost in the glens of scotland. further west, the showers are starting to gather, holding the temperatures up higher, but it will be chilly for many of us, and a chilly start with potentially mist orfog tomorrow morning. chilly start with potentially mist or fog tomorrow morning. that takes a while to clear at this time of year, but the winter strengthening,
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pushing in showers and longer outbreaks of rain to western and southern areas particularly, but nowhere exempt, and the showers are with us throughout the week and for the weekend. hello this is bbc newsroom live with joanna gosling. the headlines... government sources say the chances of agreeing a deal with brussels this week are shrinking. the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, says there are "significant issues to resolve". irish taoiseach leo varadkar says issues around customs, consent and vat still need to be agreed. harry dunn's parents go to the white house, but refuse to meet the woman involved in the fatal crash which killed their son, saying they felt "ambushed". they were suddenly told she was in the next room. four bulgarian football fans suspected of subjecting black england players to racist abuse have been detained following police raids.
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the duke and duchess of cambridge are visiting a glacier in northern pakistan as they continue their five—day trip of the country. let's return to westminster... thank you very much. let's continue to look at those discussions going on in brussels and here in westminster. not too many details emerging in either place about the real substance, the nitty—gritty of those discussions, but safe to say that everyone who is talking about them is putting quite a little bit of context on the statements —— putting quite a bit of context on the statement and injecting a lot of caution to the statements and saying, you know a deal as possible, but there are significant issues to get started. let's talk to tony conneuy get started. let's talk to tony connelly who is rt‘s europe editor. hejoins me from brussels. good
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afternoon. what is your take on that nitty—gritty and what it has at this stage? on the last big issues that have still to be resolved cosmic we've been talking about consent as one of those, but what else are you hearing cosmic there are three big hurdles that are remaining. michel barnier, the chief negotiator, addressed the european commission this morning and spelt out what those are three problems are. the first, as you say, is consent. it appears that the dup have been putting more pressure on the british side to tighten up what is called the stormont work, which would be some kind of oversight or even an extreme situation, perhaps a veto for stormont or perhaps a particular party instrument over whether or not these new arrangements for northern ireland come into effect now that the eu has been adamant that if he too is not going to work. they say that they want legal certainty, but there seems to be a last—minute push
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by the ddp to get that particular commitment by boris johnson tightened up. another problem is a vat. now, this is a bit of a late and a last—minute problem that has emerged because it seems that northern ireland would stay in the vat area in order to safeguard north—south trade, but that means that you would have to create a new mechanism for vat on goods going from northern ireland to great britain because the uk will have its own the 80 arrangements. i understand that they think they can find a workaround for that, but that is something that has become a last minute to something not —— will have its own vat arrangements. the third and final problem is level playing field provisions. these are commitments that theresa may's signed up to when the original withdrawal agreement was being negotiated and essentially, the eu does not want the uk to undercut the eu when it comes to producing goods,
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for example, that are not made to the same social or environmental or state aid or labour standard. the eu applies this gets them to this whole question about whether the uk would be able regulation economy. boris johnson has wanted to dilate those commitments because he wants a much more arm's—length free trade agreement between the uk and the eu. —— would be a though regulation economy. they seem to be holding things up. and given those three key issues that you have outlined, you have been following these negotiations minutely, when do you think both sides are going to call the steady? one way or the other, to say, we cannot do this today? michel barnier was supposed to call it in about 20 minutes' time. he was due to meet eu ambassadors from the 27 member states and tell them yes, we have a deal or no, we don't have a deal. all morning it looked like that meeting was going ahead, but
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now i understand it has been postponed until 5pm this afternoon. the feeling in brussels is that while agreement has within your reach, a lot of the political development in the uk and london with the dup and so on, we have had a meeting in downing street between alabaster and boris johnson, anderson, that that is really holding things —— between arlene foster and borisjohnson. holding things —— between arlene foster and boris johnson. and holding things —— between arlene foster and borisjohnson. and that cannot be signed off and others apply to develop its work themselves there. you will have heard that the brexit secretary here has said this morning to the brexit select committee at westminster that boris johnson will sign that letter asking foran johnson will sign that letter asking for an extension this weekend if a deal is not done. looking slightly further ahead, what kind of extension do you think the 27, the eu 27, would be minded to look for?
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were, the extension question is always very delicate, very political because there is a lot of division within the eu as to how that should be approached in contrast to the overall unity about the general conduct of brexit negotiations. the hilary benn act requires that the uk to seek an extension to the end of january, which is one thing if we're close to ideal, but simplyjust cannot get it over the line today. and this week at the summit, then perhaps a short technical extension would be all that is required. and i think that is something that boris johnson would prefer, if it comes to that. but i think it is important to say that the uk scratch make the eu has less to lose if there is an extension, borisjohnson has less to lose if there is an extension, boris johnson is obviously somewhat hostage to his own rhetoric on this. the eu does not mind if there is an extension. they are not going to use too much particle capital of that. thank you much of for your time. tony
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connelly, rt group coordinator there. now with all the business news is alice baxter. welcome to the business news. uk consumer inflation remains at its slowest pace since 2016 while wage growth continues to outstrip inflation — that's according to the office for national statistics. it said real wages are nearly back to pre—crisis levels which will have implications for the state pension — set for its biggest increase since 2012 next year. profits at asos have plunged after warehouse problems led to what the online fashion retailer said was a "disappointing" year. more on that in just a moment. over the last year, asos has installed more robots the cost of renting rose fastest in nottingham, leeds and bristol last year,
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whilst falling in aberdeen — that's according to property website zoopla. but on average, renting a home in the uk has become more affordable. part of the reason — according to zoopla — is an increase in the number of people buying their first home, relieving some of the pressure on the rental sector. but first, asos its enjoyed rapid growth in recent years as it has benefited from the shift towards shopping online. but today it announced a 70% plunge in profits after what it described as a disappointing year. over the last 12 months, asos has installed more robots in its european warehouses and expanded its facilities in the us. but the speed of growth hit its bottom line. eric musgrave is a fashion industry commentator and the former editor of drapers. really good to talk to you. what are behind this plunge in profits at asos? has it to do with his us
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expansion and those robert? we have to look at some of the management decisions. asos is about 20 years old and it was a huge success in the uk, but as sinner that went on the stock market, investors were looking for and it realised it could not go very much in the uk because it had such a big —— as soon as it went into the stock market. it aimed for europe and america and in both cases, as the ceo has admitted, they totally underestimated the size of the problem, which raises questions about the quality of management at asos. of course, there was that first shock last december to investors with what many describe as a shock profit warning. interestingly, today, the premise of the shares still over 20%. do you think expectations have been well managed ahead of today's announcement? the figures were no surprise today. basically people are
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now saying that we have drawn a line under the sand, let's see what your country. the company has said that it has got to grips with the problem, so in america, the problems we re problem, so in america, the problems were that it underestimated demand and it also had the wrong selection for america in in germany, you as you mention, it has been investing in robots, which we know is the future of the world, but is it the future of the world, but is it the future of the world, but is it the future of the world at the things don't work? and maybe they are a little bit too ambitious and what they were doing because they built a reputation in delivering things quickly and quite cheaply. the problem with that, if you do not deliver to tell, you're going to be there now your customers and if you're making the deal so good that you're making the deal so good that you are losing money or making very little money, on the delivery, then you have another problem. so i would say that asos has still got quite a way to go, but people obviously investors, believe in them. they are a big business and they are still one of the market leaders, but one
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has a few problems. they are a market leader but of course those halcyon days when the sales are over. there are no huge amounts of course those halcyon days when the cells are over. there are no judgments competition online. let's not forget that our judgments judgments competition online. let's not forget that ourjudgments of competition in the high street depending on what section of the fashion you're talking about. online sales may be 20 or 2530%. that still means that 8070% is done not online. -- 20 means that 8070% is done not online. _- 20 _- means that 8070% is done not online. -- 20 -- 20 means that 8070% is done not online. —— 20 —— 20 or means that 8070% is done not online. -- 20 -- 20 or 25, 30%. that means that 8070% is done not online. —— 20 —— 20 or 25, 30%. that means that 80 to 70% is done not online. they put themselves as a responsible business and they had, until this week, had a sustainability team in a source at the head office in london, which has now been disbanded. while they are doing all that are supposed to be the right things in the fashion business is, their competitors such as boohoo are tying
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up competitors such as boohoo are tying up with love violent and offering crazy low prices that people wonder how on earth they are managing to —— tying up with love island. i think that some of your viewers may remember that well—respected ex head of women's ware at m&s, kate bostock, went to asos and batted only about six or seven months and then left perhaps because she found it too much of a crazy runaway train. she was much criticised by some quarters, saying, well that is the new world, that is how companies are run, but companies have got to be run in a very disciplined me if they are to make a profit. that is interesting, isn't it? retail continues to prove a tricky landscape. good to talk to your bed plunging at asos. —— talk to you about plunging profits at asus. in other business stories we've been following... organised criminals could exploit gaps in the uk's border preparations in the event of a no—deal brexit — that's what the national
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audit office is warning. it says new border control systems could be used to commit fraud or smuggle goods. with two weeks to go until the uk is due to leave the eu, the nao warns that government departments and businesses are not fully prepared for the risks. the uk's best—known stockpicker is to close his remaining investment funds, ending his multi—billion—pound empire. neil woodford was sacked from his flagship fund early on tuesday, and has now announced he will close the last two funds. mr woodford earned a huge reputation over 30 years of successful investing and at its peak his business managed more than £14 billion. uk fashion company boohoo has been told one of its emailed advertisements must not use the phrase "send nudes" — used to promote a range of clothes coloured to resemble skin. the advertising standards authority upheld a complaint about the advert because it made light of a "potentially harmful social trend", telling the retailer to be "socially responsible".
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that's all the business news. the headlines on bbc news... government sources say the chances of agreeing a deal with brussels this week are shrinking. the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, says there are "significant issues to resolve". harry dunn's parents go to the white house, but refuse to meet the woman involved in the fatal crash which killed their son, saying they felt ‘ambushed' they saying they felt ‘ambushed' were told she was in ti adjacent they were told she was in the adjacent room if they wanted to meet her but they said they felt ambushed. police in bulgaria arrest four men in connection with racist chanting directed at black england footballers during their euro 2020 some breaking news about northern belle. we are just hitting that the government is confirming the processes under way to change the way it has managed —— some breaking
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news about northern rail. they are considering whether to take the management of that line into public hands. northern rail is one of the biggest franchises in the country and has been in trouble for years. industry sources have confirmed to the bbc that the train company has been losing money for some time and that passenger numbers on northern dropped over the introduction of a new timetable in the summer of last year. new timetable in the summer of last yea r. 55% of new timetable in the summer of last year. 55% of their trains actually run on time, so it has been in line having lots of problems. her managers it is now being looked at and going back into public ownership is on the table. the transport secretary has told the transport select committee that he has asked for a list of proposals because at the franchise cannot continue delivering in the current delivery method. it would be a very significant step if it were to have
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public —— if it were to pack into other kind but it would only be the second rail network to go into public hands if that does happen. let's get a bit reaction from brussels. michel barnier has been speaking about the chances of a deal. eu commissioner dimitris avramopoulos was there. let's listen to what he has to say. technical level discussions with the united kingdom continued late into the night last night and are ongoing as we speak now. talks have been constructive, but there still remains a number of significant issues to resolve. questions. michel barnier will update the european parliament brexit steering group on the set of clear of the discussions later on today. the eu commissioner
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dimitris avramopoulos. the parents of harry dunn — the teenager killed in a car crash involving the wife of an american diplomat — have met president trump at the white house. charlotte charles and tim dunn arrived for the meeting to be told that the woman, anne sacoolas, was in a room next door. but the couple declined to see her, saying they didn't want to be railroaded into a meeting they weren't prepared for. they told cbs this morning how the meeting came about. our spokesperson had a phone call from the white house extending an input sketch make invitation to get there with us as soon as possible to meet with a senior official, that is all we knew. we had no idea who it was and we certainly did not think very second that it would be president trouble. did they tell you that the anne sacoolas would be there? so you're shocked to learn that she was there? he said that she
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was in the building, but they remixed was was being highly guarded. you walk in and he says what? he offered condolences and he seemed warm and was welcoming. that was nice, but it did not take long for him to then drop into the conversation that anne sacoolas was in the building. how did you feel when he said that? honestly, we had discussed it on the train going to washington that we thought, through the scenarios that might be happening, we did discuss that it might be the president and that maybe i am and would be there, so we we re maybe i am and would be there, so we were pre—thinking it, but it was still took our breath away when they mentioned that the first in —— that anne sacoolas would be there. where you're bothered by that suggestion? tell us while you were bothered? wrong setting, we have said that all along that we are willing to meet her and we along that we are willing to meet herand we are along that we are willing to meet
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her and we are still willing to meet her, but it needs to be on uk soil. and with a therapist and mediators and that is notjust for us, that is for her as well. she is traumatised, her children are traumatised. to be thrown into a room together with no prior warning, that is not good for her mental health, it's certainly not good for ours. we've been locked in grief for several weeks and none of us know how we were going to react to her that sprung on us. did you feel pressure? he did ask territory times. it to a three times because we said no, it did not feel right. —— he did ask two or three times. he said let's get some healing. it was a bit of pressure, but we stuck to our guns. shallot, you grabbed him by the hand? ——
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charlotte. i did not have his hand when i was talking to him, but i just explain to mike i have done since we arrived in new york —— i explained to him that he would be doing exactly what we were doing if it was his child. he agreed, he absolutely agreed. he was very willing to listen. he said, did not interrupt me at all. ijust explained that, you know, it isjust not right. the parents of harry dunn speaking on cbs. the duke and duchess of cambridge — william and kate — are continuing their five—day visit to pakistan. today they are visiting a glacier in hindu kush mountain range and a village in the foothills of the himalayas. this is the first royal visit to the country in 13 years. william and kate will learn about the effects of climate change on glacial landscapes during the trip.
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the bbc‘s secunder kermani has been following the events from islamabad. today the royal couple have been and one of the most beautiful parts of pakistan in the north of the country and actually some that princess diana visited in herfirst and actually some that princess diana visited in her first trip to pakistan back in 1991. it is also somewhere that is being affected by climate change and that is one of the reasons why the duke and duchess of cambridge went there to see a melting glacier and to meet communities that had been displaced by flash flooding in the past. they will also be spending time with members of one of the smallest but old est members of one of the smallest but oldest religious minorities in pakistan, the clash people. climate change issues are one of the issues that the coupler focusing on —— the kalaish people. prince william warmed of the dangers posed by climate change. later in the week, the couple will be visiting the city
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of lahore before returning to the uk on friday. a picture of the moment a himalayan marmot is surprised by a tibetan fox has won yongqing bao wildlife photorapher of the year. the native tibetan had to stake out an alpine meadow in china's qilian mountains for several hours in order to capture the dramatic stand off. moments later a fight begun, which resulted in the marmot being killed — but yongqing said "that's nature". he beat more than 118,000 entries from 100 countries to scoop the prize. this picture of an iridescent big fin reef squid won 14—year—old cruz erdmann young wildlife photographer of the year. he took it on a night dive in the lembeh strait off north sulawesi, indonesia. judges said the shot by the teenager — who gained his diving certificate aged just 10 — was a "resounding achievement". among the category winners, thomas easterbook won the 10 years and under section of the competition for this picture of a hummingbird moth he captured on holiday in france. the behaviour: birds
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category was won by this shot of a golden eagle which took three years to achieve. audun rikardsen carefully placed an old tree branch in a position where the eagles would land, triggering a camera flash. stefan christmann's "the huddle" won the portfolio award. in this image, more than 5,000 male emperor penguins gather together in east antarctica. they are incubating eggs at their feet while the females have gone to sea to forage. and this american bison battling through the snow in yellowstone national park won max waugh the prize for best photo in black and white. thomas easterbook, who won the ten years and under section of the competition, spoke to victoria derbyshire earlier about how he took his prize—winning photograph. the photo i took as of the hummingbird hawk moth which is actually a type of map which answer because its wings beat at up to 75 beats per second. and it also, is
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almost indistinguishable from a hummingbird. here it is depicted drinking nectar from hummingbird. here it is depicted drinking nectarfrom a bright pink flower against a green background of grass. how old are you? i am 11 now. how on earth did you manage to take that photo? well, i took a lot of photos and failed any lot of them, but if you take a lot of photos, by beloved numbers, you are likely to get a good one. yeah, but there is a good photo and then there is an absolutely stunning photo, but that is what that is, isn't it? it is absolutely amazing. thank you. before we go, we have some pictures of the north korean leader, kim jong—un, as you've probably never seen him before — astride a white charger amid the snowy mountains. these pictures, released by the country's official news agency, show chairman kim climbing the slopes of mount paektu, revered as the country's spiritual home. the agency described the visit as "a great event
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of weighty importance". now it's time for a look at the weather with helen. there is still a handful of flood warnings across england following the deluge that we've had in recent days. we've had more rain for this morning and potentially across the south—east we could have another pulse of rain coming in. in the next few hours, but that close away and then we have a ridge of high pressure. by thursday, friday, saturday, sunday, the same area of the pressure sits across the uk and little pressure range it means that the risk of rain but rain in the form of share was, nevertheless they can bring quite significant rain. it is only toward the end of sunday and beginning of next week that we start to see this brief lived area of high pressure which could give us a day or two of the drier weather. as for the rest of the afternoon, sunshine is coming out in western areas and it has a lovely day, white winds and the rate will be to slow to clear
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across eastern england —— in the sunshine 16 or so degrees well feels pleasant. but this time of year, nights are longer than it day so the temperatures will fall away quite rapidly. she was develop in the west, not as chilly across the western side of england and wales and ireland. we will have a touch of frost in the glens of scotland. as we head toward morning. notjust rossi to start, but potentially some mist and fog under this ridge of high pressure, but just let mist and fog under this ridge of high pressure, butjust let me remind you that it is low pressure creeping closer to tomorrow so the winds will be stretching all the time. early morning mist and fog we re time. early morning mist and fog were cleared just after the rash and then we have the showers, initially heavy and persistent in western areas, southern areas, but through the day we could see when the response of charolais rain pushing its roots. —— could see meant a spells of showery rain. it will feel cooler than today. friday, that the pressure groups and closer and sits
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across the country. the showers will meander their way around it so there will be longer spells of rain at times, bear in mind, all the time through thursday and friday, saturday and sunday there are quite intense showers, perhaps torrential downpours with hail, certainly by thunder and lightning and a subtle change, be sure to pick up more of a northerly breeze as well. because in mind, all the time through thursday and friday, saturday and sunday there are quite intense showers, perhaps torrential downpours with hail, certainly by thunder and lightning and a subtle change, be sure to pick up more of a northerly breeze as well. across the northern half of and showers. more on the website.
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a crunch day for brexit — or is it? as another dealine passes, with talks resuming after going well into the night, warnings that chances of a deal today are shrinking. all eyes are on the talks — but so far no signs of any white smoke... no signs yet that a brexit agreement has been reached. i spoke to the prime minister by phone this morning and i've been in contact as well with the european commission and i do think we are making progress but there are issues yet to be resolved and hopefully that can be done today. as michel barnier prepares to update eu ambassadors on any progress, it's a race against the clock for the prime minister to secure a deal before eu leaders meet and could agree it tomorrow i'll have the latest from westminster, with suggestions here that the prime minister's plane is on standby ready

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