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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  October 18, 2019 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm ben brown live at westminster where boris johnson is trying to persuade mps to back his new brexit deal, ahead of an historic vote in parliament tomorrow. the prime minister says he's "very confident" he'll win, the result is expected to be tight. of course we are going to try and persuade and point out the real positives in this deal, on the substance, on the merits, and i am confident that will help bring people behind it and obviously it will be a close vote tomorrow, but i am confident we can get this done now. but opposition parties are set to vote against him — and northern ireland's 10 democratic unionist mps won't support the deal. the deal is toxic as far as northern ireland is concerned. it does not meet the promises which the prime minister made, that the whole of the united kingdom
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would be leaving the eu. the other news this afternoon: there are reports of fighting in syria despite turkey's agreement to suspend its military offensive against the kurds. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — with jane dougall. plenty of rugby to keep us occupied this weekend... yes, and despite injury concerns for fly— half yes, and despite injury concerns for fly—half dan biggar wales have named him ina fly—half dan biggar wales have named him in a full—strength side for the quarter match against france in the robbie world cup, we'll be hearing from head coach. thanks jane and chris has all the weather — how's the weekend looking? the weekend is looking a bit better, lots of showers around on sunday, less on sunday. we will be looking at hailstorms that have hit cornwall recently.
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good afternoon and welcome from westminster, where the prime minister is in a race to try to persuade mps to back his new brexit agreement before tomorrow's vote in parliament. borisjohnson says he's "very confident" he'll win backing for the deal struck yesterday in brussels, but the result is expected to be tight. with opposition parties, and the dup, set to vote against him, mrjohnson is trying to convince labour mps to switch sides, while keeping his own backbenchers onboard. our political correspondent, iain watson, has this report. here is a turnup for the books, a conservative prime minister who actually seemed to enjoy his excursion to brussels. backslapping all round, as borisjohnson secured a brexit deal yesterday.
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but 2a hours these days, is a long time in politics. and he is facing more difficulties back in britain than in brussels, as he struggles to get enough mps on side. so, what kind of deal will they be voting on? much of it is similar to theresa may's, for example, protecting citizens rights, eu residents here, uk citizens over there. the uk will also pay what the eu regards as its financial obligations, a divorce bill of around £33 billion. but the deal is different when it comes to northern ireland. there would be no border checks in ireland but there will be checks on some goods going from great britain to northern ireland, and this has cost the support of the dup. the deal is toxic as far as northern ireland is concerned. it does not meet the promises which the prime minister made, that the whole of the united kingdom would be leaving the eu. so, we will not be voting for the deal and indeed we will be voting against it and encouraging others to do so. borisjohnson has lost the dup,
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but he will be hoping to hold onto some of his sceptical mps who share their views. so, would the government discipline any of their own politicians who step out of line? of course, we're going to try and persuade and point out the real positives in this deal, on the merits, and i'm confident that that will help bring people behind it, and obviously it will be a close vote tomorrow but i am confident we can get this done now. here is a measure of how hard the government's trying to get the deal through. conservative whips, that's those who try to keep party discipline, have been calling around their colleagues, including, presumably by mistake, an mp who had actually defected to the lib dems. ijust got a call saying, there's a rumour on the grapevine you're going to vote for this deal and is there anything i can do to help? and i told him that actually there is nothing i could do to help them or they could do to help me, this is a lousy deal. meanwhile, the labour leadership are trying to keep their mps in leave areas from backing the deal.
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this is what the shadow chancellor said when told that this mp, ronnie campbell, was likely to vote with borisjohnson. i will have a chat with ronnie, because ronnie is a socialist labour mp and the one thing he has stood up for all his life is the protection of workers' rights. this will undermine workers' rights in our country. and how did that chat go? at the moment, i will be voting to support the deal. but i am getting a lot of pressure from the head lads of the labour party, jeremy corbyn and john mcdonnell, to abstain. because of the deregulation of workers' rights. if all these manoeuvrings weren't complicated enough, i am afraid i have to tell you that something else is going to happen here at westminster tomorrow as well. a cross—party group of mps are going to try to change borisjohnson‘s deal, to make sure it only comes into effect if he is willing
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to extend the brexit deadline. they say this is an insurance policy against leaving with no deal at all. if we don't need the extension, having asked for it, it should terminate immediately we leave the eu, and we are all in favour of doing this as abruptly as possible, if it can be done by 31st october, terrific, but we want to make sure that we don't drop out by mistake in between now and then. and saturday is likely to be one of the most dramatic moments at westminster in recent years. the stakes are high and the key votes will be close. iain watson, bbc news, westminster. so, can mrjohnson secure a majority for his brexit agreement? let's look at the numbers in the commons. there are 650 mps in the house of commons — but the seven sinn fein mps don't take their seats and the speaker and three deputies don't vote, which means the number you need to get to the winning post and gain a commons
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majority is in practice 320. the conservatives now have 287 mps — borisjohnson can be confident of the support of most of them, but some may not vote for him especially if he fails to win over the dup before saturday. labour have 2a2 mps and the message from their leader, jeremy corbyn, is clearly to vote against, but how many can be persuaded to vote for the deal despite party's official position? the answer to this will be crucial. then there are 36 independent mps — of those by far the largest group is 23 who were formerly conservatives but lost the whip or left — most of those who were previously tories are likely to back deal. there are 35 snp mps and they will vote against. as will the 19 liberal democrats. and as things stand, the 10 mps for the democratic unionist party
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say they cannot back the plan — which could be fatal for the deal. the independent group of change — who now have 5 mps — will also vote against. as will the 4 plaid cymru mps and the i green mp. that is the number crunching. let's talk about how it is going to work out in practice. i'm nowjoined here by our political reporterjess parker. it is looking like it will be extremely tight for the prime minister. yes, i was speaking to a tory mp who thinks he will be four short orfour clear, we tory mp who thinks he will be four short or four clear, we are looking at those numbers potentially. interestingly the cabinet set to meet any short while at four o'clock, my understanding is they will be looking at those numbers. it will be looking at those numbers. it will not just be will be looking at those numbers. it will notjust be borisjohnson who is boning up conservative mps or ex conservative mps, as it may be, trying to persuade them to get on board. he will be deploying his entire top team because every single
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vote will count. every single personal relationship, they will be using that. i was speaking to another tory mp, somebody who you would see as being very loyal. no doubt they would be supporting this deal tomorrow but even they had two missed calls from the wet office such as the operation is going on. the democratic union assessed that they will not vote for it. the hardline brexiteers, the arg within the tory party —— the erg, the labour mps it could be persuaded to vote for the deal. it will be impossible to know the numbers for sure until the vote happens and we get the numbers. earlier i saw a labourmp get the numbers. earlier i saw a labour mp who was certainly one who thought would vote, wouldn't be drawn on it and said wait and see until tomorrow. i think some will be reading these documents very carefully, they will also be taking phone calls from their party bosses
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as well. the labour leadership have been suggesting they will be leaning on their mps not to support this agreement. i have heard they are instructing people to abstain which could make a interesting difference. in terms of the european research group, we have seen a couple of them, tory mps, eurosceptics, going into downing street over the last couple of hours. the deputy chair of the erg came up to talk to the camera is briefly saying he had not made up his mind yet, he wanted to talk to the prime minister, he had some questions and then he would decide what to do next. we know they are meeting an hour before the commons kick off tomorrow morning, where presumably they may not come toa where presumably they may not come to a collective decision, they are not a clear voting bloc, but they will have discussions as to where they stand. talk us through what is happening tomorrow. this is highly unusual to have a weekend setting of the commons, it hasn't happened since the falklands. it is high and historic dates in the comments set
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ona historic dates in the comments set on a saturday. we think things will start at half past nine, the prime minister will make a statement to the comments which will be some effort to win people over at the last minute. i would not be surprised after he made that commons statement, he may take some questions potentially, he may go to his office and start having conversations along the corridors of westminster. the very last minute. absolutely, very down to the wire as it goes on. in terms of how long it will last, we do not know because it depends whether at amendments are selected. we have seen two tables in advance, one from the snp calling foran advance, one from the snp calling for an extension and an election, one from oliver letwin, one of the tory rebels, all trying to stop a no—deal brexit. he is trying to safeguard the benn act all over again. i could see some paper mm
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inserted scratch —— we can see some paper amendments submitted last month as well. it could all go on quite late. fascinating, knife edge stuff. in brussels, european leaders have been continuing with the eu summit — and our reality check correspondent chris morris is there now. i suppose all eyes on brussels will be on the commons tomorrow. what will their reaction be, what will be the eu's perspective if boris johnson cannot get this deal through the commons tomorrow? it is interesting. about 12 hours after borisjohnson interesting. about 12 hours after boris johnson left this interesting. about 12 hours after borisjohnson left this building other leaders are still talking about brexit, even though i suspect they would rather be talking about something else. emmanuel macron has given a press conference in the last couple of minutes. he says he hopes the deadline of october the 31st holds and went on to say, i can't predict the future but i don't think any other delay should be given.
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what he didn't say was, i would be to another extension which is a very different thing. we have to bear in mind any run—up to the previous deadline march the 29th he was making similar points. we should not extend, in the end he did. it is bubbling around, there is a little bit of pressure being put there from the french president on those who seek to thwart boris johnson's the french president on those who seek to thwart borisjohnson‘s deal but i suspect if push came to shove, there is no question that collectively the eu would like this to work, would like the house of commons to vote in favour, but if that were not to be the case and under the benn act, the prime minister was instructed to ask for an extension even if it was a short technical extension, after some passing and pattern, i think the a nswer passing and pattern, i think the answer from brussels would still be yes. what is the atmosphere, chris? yesterday we saw extraordinary scenes. leaders backslapping boris johnson, it seemed veryjovial and a
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mood of relief that a deal had been done. yes, it is another thing, i am looking at my notes here, that emmanuel macron said in the last couple of minutes saying sometimes borisjohnson gets underestimated. he said he showed strategic thinking in the brexit‘s negotiation so obviously... i think there is... these are all national political leaders, they have their own parliaments and domestic constituencies to deal with. i think when they see another national leader taking a bit of a chance they can appreciate the political gamble that involves. these are people who just a couple of months ago were saying the withdrawal agreement is closed, it will not be reopened, the text is final, now they have reopened it under some pressure from the british government. granted, i think it was mrjohnson who made the biggest concessions. he moved furthest towards the eu position but
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the eu also gave ground and we now have another version of a withdrawal agreement. we know it has been rejected on the previous version, theresa may's version was rejected three times. i think the eu is now hoping, good on you, you've given us another chance, now proof that in london you can get this through. another chance, now proof that in london you can get this throughm was also interesting you heard a couple of the eu leaders, michel barnier and donald tusk saying we are very sad the uk is leaving but maybe at some future point, it might wa nt to maybe at some future point, it might want to rejoin, almost holding out a hope that at some stage in the future, whether it is near or distant, the united kingdom will be backin distant, the united kingdom will be back in the european union. yes, donald tusk has never hidden his belief this is a massive strategic mistake for both sides and every opportunity he said he is very sad about it and thinks it is wrong. in the door should always be open. in a
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speculative world, 10—20 years down the track after the uk has left, any different political world, if a government decided it wanted to come back into the european union, with this lumpy door in ourface? i do not think they would because of the close geographical links because of the obvious advantage for the eu of having the uk inside, but that is not where we are at the moment. we are looking and it is difficult because people have not done this before, trying to make a future trading relationship by moving further apart rather than moving closer together. good to talk to you, thank you very much indeed. chris morris will be joining me later at 3.30 to answer all your questions on the new brexit deal with jill rutter from uk in a changing europe. send us your questions via text on 61124, tweet us using the hashtag bbc ask this, or email us at askthis@bbc.co.uk.
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you are watching afternoon life, here are the latest headlines. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines. borisjohnson has until tomorrow's vote to persuade mps across the house to back his brexit deal. but opposition parties are set to vote against him — as well as the 10 democratic unionist mps who won't support the deal. there's been sporadic fighting in syria — despite turkey's agreement to suspend its military offensive against kurdish forces. in sport, wales have announced a fully fit side for the quarterfinal match against france in the rugby world cup. it follows fears fly—half dan biggar might not have recovered from concussion in times. following the ugly scenes of racist chanting in england's qualifier against bulgaria, the premier league has raised its profile of its anti—racist campaign this weekend. and johanna konta is out for the rest of the season. she says she has
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pain in her knee and has decided to focus on rehabilitation for the remainder of the year. i will be back on the stories after half past. so what do voters think of mrjohnson‘s agreement? in the eu referendum, more than two—thirds of people in barnsley voted to leave the eu. more than two—thirds of people but the town is represented by two labour mps, whose party is opposed to mrjohnson‘s deal. 0ur north of england correspondent, danny savage, has been speaking to voters about tomorrow's vote — and a question of divided loyalties. barnsley, a traditionally labour supporting town which voted out in the referendum. so, how do people here feel about their local mps being ordered to vote against the brexit deal tomorrow? i think that labour ought to go with the deal, it is time it was sorted out. after three years it has dragged on and dragged on. i voted to leave.
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so you would want your mp to vote for this deal? probably, yeah. but he has been told not to? i know! what do you think of that? i don't know, it is theirjob to do it, i am so undecided, i am up in the air with it all. i think they should vote to leave because the country voted to leave. simple as that? simple as that. dave and i voted differently on the brexit thing and it is the only thing that we would argue about so we try not to talk about it too much. which is why you didn't want to talk to me when i stopped you! most people here think there is nothing difficult about the conundrum facing mps tomorrow. people of barnsley voted to leave, 68%, simple. you would be very happy if you see your labour mp defying what he is being told to do by his party? you have got to ask yourself, where do your loyalties lie, do they lie with the party or with the people that voted you in, hence that is why you are getting a big salary as an mp, to represent the electorate?
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so you think your local labour mp should denyeremy corbyn tomorrow? yes, he should, get it over and done with, we want to come out, most of barnsley wants to come out anyway, so why would they not vote to come out? simple, really, out. but outside barnsley college, there was a note of caution. a deal, yes, in my opinion, because then at least we can have something and plan with it. if they keep changing from no deal to this deal, it makes businesses more confused and annoyed than what they need. barnsley feels no less pro—brexit than it did when we reported from here the day after the referendum. it will be watching what labour mps do tomorrow. danny savage, bbc news, barnsley. as borisjohnson seeks approval from mps on his new eu deal — struck yesterday in brussels, he'll need parliament to back the deal in a special sitting tomorrow. but if it's approved, will it offer the certainty needed for british businesses? joining me now is carolyn fairburn,
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director general of the confederation for british industry. thank you for being with us. will it offer you that certainty you have been craving? i cannot say it offers the certainty business needs but it isa the certainty business needs but it is a step forward. it does three really important thing is for business in the short run. it takes a very damaging no deal of the table in the near term, it does give 4 million citizens' rights across europe, guaranteed for the first time, and it really does help northern ireland. the prevalent business has is there is no certainty around the future deal. that is where the heavy lifting is an that is what really matters. there is a lot of talk about rate of divergence, that is where the worry is and where businesses will be looking for more reassurance. from the business point of view, is this deal better or worse than theresa may's deal? well, it does not give
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us may's deal? well, it does not give us the backstop of a customs union, a bare—bones backstop customs union and that was welcomed by business. but that deal isn't on the table, this deal is. business feels we have beenin this deal is. business feels we have been in the brexit waiting room for far too long. this helps to move us on. it is not three cheers by any means. there are serious issues with this deal. but business can work with it. we are saying we are cautiously welcoming of it. we do want, however, a realfocus on close alignment with the european union and crucially, this deal is virtually silent on services and we are an 80% services economy so there is an awful lot of work to do that we need to start straightaway after this deal is agreed. tell us more about that, you are talking about city of london, and shall services? broadcasting, accountancy, these are powerhouses. there are very short
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paragraphs on services so straightaway we would want there to be businesses around the table to negotiate a very strong services arrangement for the uk. there is not enough there right now, that needs changed in that transition is only 14 months long. that is going to go enabling of an eye, less than half the time we have already had. there's a lot business is uncomfortable about but this is also a time for compromise. we have seen politicians compromise. from a business point of view, we think it is time to get out of that brexit waiting room. for those business leaders, company directors, who want to remain in the european union, as your message, don't think about another referendum, just accept this, we have got to move on and accept this boris johnson this, we have got to move on and accept this borisjohnson deal? remain is not on the table at the moment and from a business point of view, we must play the cards in front of us. there has been gridlocked for months now. this is
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affecting investment, jobs, there arejobs affecting investment, jobs, there are jobs leaving the country, we have had declining business investment. this is an opportunity to move on. it is farfrom perfect, i cannot stress that enough. if you are sitting there in aerospace or automotive or services, you are thinking actually this does not give you anything like this certainty you need is that there is an awful lot to do. but the alternatives, the options on the table, this is one that has been given a cautious welcome by many businesses out there today. thank you very much. in the past few minutes, irish prime minister leo varadkar has been explaining why he supports the new brexit deal, as well as whether the eu would allow a brexit extension, should borisjohnson ask for it. essentially what we are saying and we have accepted along the way, that this could be an outcome we would
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accept, is that we would allow the people of northern ireland, their democratic representatives, the members of their assembly, to determine theirfuture. members of their assembly, to determine their future. and essentially what this new arrangement, this new solution, allows is for the northern ireland assembly, after four years to decide whether it wants to continue. there is an outside chance that at some point in the latter part of the next decade the northern ireland assembly might decide to opt out of alignment, the single electricity market, the new customs arrangement, but i am confident that is not going to happen because i think people in northern ireland, northern ireland farmers, northern ireland are going to see and experience the benefits of this arrangement. but there is a risk we are taking, the risk we are taking is one on democracy and saying to the people of northern ireland that you determine your future. the position that we have agreed as the european council is
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that as things stand there is no request from the uk for an extension, if for some reason a request came, then donald tusk, the president of the european council, would consult individually with all of the readers to see if we would agree to such a request but bear in mind, that request would have to be agreed unanimously by all 27 leaders, so i don't think any mp voting tomorrow should make the assumption that there would be a fine extension. 0ur point of view is we would be open to it but it would bea we would be open to it but it would be a mistake to assume that is guaranteed given it requires all 27 member states to agree to it. lots of number crunching going on here at westminster today, ahead of the crucial vote, a lot of arm—twisting no doubt of various mps who could be crucial to that vote.
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that's it from westminster for now. for the rest of the afternoon's news here's martine croxall. there has been sporadic shelling and gunfire in northern syria, a day after turkey accepted a us demand for a temporary halt to its offensive against kurdish targets. yesterday president erdogan agreed to a five—day pause to allow kurdish forces to withdraw from a swath of territory along the turkish border. barbara plett—usher reports. bomb explodes. there is a ceasefire in place but not all is quiet. in the syrian border town of ras al—ain, the sound of artillery shattered the morning, sporadic gunfire continued. kurdish forces have accused turkey of shelling civilians. the turkish president has denied it. the kurdish militias are deeply entrenched in the city. just a day earlier they were still fighting hard to keep it. turkey says they are a terrorist threat and is determined to expel them away from the border. what happens here will likely be an early test of the accord. what the americans brokered
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was a pause in the violence, but it was enough for president trump to declare victory. he needed one — his decision to withdraw us troops has been strongly criticised as abandoning america's kurdish allies and paving the way for turkey's incursion. we've all agreed on a pause, or a ceasefire, in the border region of syria. and it was unconventional what i did. i said, they're going to have to fight a little while. sometimes you have to let them fight a little while. it's like two kids in a lot, you have got to let them fight and then pull them apart. this was definitely not a victory for the kurds. ankara has agreed to suspend the military operation for five days and to eventually make that permanent, but only if the kurdish fighters pull out and give up their heavy weapons. you cannot solve your refugee problem by making new refugees, by displacing people from their homes. so it's a really serious humanitarian problem, which requires more deliberation,
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because these people have nowhere to go, because these people are the local people of the region. in fact, the americans have essentially accepted what the turks were trying to achieve with the military operation, a buffer zone on the syrian side of the border that they will control with their armed forces. already, the human cost has been great, some 300,000 people displaced. kurdish civilians are wondering what will happen to them, even if the fighting stops. scientists say they've developed an effective technique to spot the mass stranding of whales from space. high resolution satellites orbiting the earth can now be used to scan coastlines, zooming in on the animals' positions. being able to detect strandings more quickly will help the conservation of whales, as well as other animals — and could become a powerful tool to assess the state of the marine environment. rebecca morelle reports.
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it was a stranding on a huge scale. last year in australia, there were more than 150 whales washed up. by the time rescuers got there, most were dead. now there is a new faster way to track strandings, from space. using powerful satellites they can scan thousands of kilometres of coast, zooming in on the animals until the body of a beached whale is revealed. satellites can enable us to take pictures and see whale strandings much more rapidly than people have capacity to do on the ground in remote areas, and they will give us that extra opportunity to react quickly. they hope is that technology could reveal how many whales are stranding and where. which could help us to understand what is causing these deadly events. with so many pressures in the ocean scientists are watching whale numbers carefully. using satellites to monitor them will be key. time for a look at the weather.
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here's chris. do you need a hard hat in cornwall? that would have been useful. we had this, a big hail storm, you can see the hail coming down there. shot on a mobile phone earlier today, you can see it landing on the roads there, giving a covering and bouncing off the cars there. the thing is this hail turned out to be quite large. how large? well, it is difficult to know from this picture because this could be a massive hand... but... i am sure it is not. iam sure hand... but... i am sure it is not. i am sure rose's hands are perfectly normal size before we upset anybody. she has lovely hands! we do have another, another picture that gives some kind of sense of scale of these hailstones. let us see if i can get that. there we go. it is the size of a pound which is quite big. . if it hilt your ned you would know it. it. some way off the biggest in the
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world, about a kilogram. for the uk thatis world, about a kilogram. for the uk that is a good effort. it's a pretty good effort. do you know something funny about the hailstone. they are formally frosty. yes, this is quite clear, and that is to do with, in these thunder clouds you have supercooled water droplet, it has a temperature well below freeze, when these hailstones start the form f you have a cold cloud, the supercooled water will freeze insta ntly a nd supercooled water will freeze instantly and attract ice bubbles in the ice, so that gives it a white appearance, this hailstone was likely to have formed in a relatively warm part of the cloud, so as relatively warm part of the cloud, so as the ice was form, it allowed time for the so as the ice was form, it allowed time forthe air so as the ice was form, it allowed time for the air bubbles to escape so time for the air bubbles to escape so it looks like something you would put in yourgin so it looks like something you would put in your gin and tonic. it does. it it won't melt that fast either, that size. no. that would keep it quite cool. so that is cornwall, it is fairly localised, what is coming for the rest of the weekend. we have
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had loads of showers, that is for sure, i will show you some of them at the moment because it has been u nsettled. at the moment because it has been unsettled. there are big thunder clouds across the sky, these are widespread in southern england, wales and across parts of the midlands, so let us look at what has been going on weather—wise. the ray a car picture picks up you the showers have been. plenty of shunder and lighting with the showers extending across wales and southern england. 0ne extending across wales and southern england. one thing i am watching carefully, you can see a line of clouds extending into the north—west and wales, this coupled with low pressure moving across the irish sea, that will probably mean the showers is and thunderstorms here get really intense this afternoon, so we get really intense this afternoon, so we could see surface water issue, we have seen hail storm, we should see them again. north—west wales could see a few issues. inlet colt, in eastern areas we have a met 0ffice yellow warning in force. not just rain this afternoon but
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overnight and into saturday as well, so we could see issues here, otherwise the blustery showers will continue to flow in overnight but with the winds in the south it never gets that cold. temperatures eight or nine for cardiff and london. chillierfurther or nine for cardiff and london. chillier further north where we get lighter winds. the weekend weather prospect, it's a showery one on saturday and some of them are still heavy and thundery, sunday looks like being a brighter day, with fewer showers round. you have a better chance of staying completely dry. so with more detail the forecast looks like, this and bah of rain pushing southwards into northern england. the wind starred starred to come round to a northerly direction. the showers that we have in western areas won't be as heavy as over recent day, the heaviest will tend to be more across into eastern parts of the uk, still a chance of thunderstorms here, temperatures round 13, 15 for england and wales but it is starting to turn colder in scotland and northern ireland. those winds will
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continue to work southwards on sunday. we will probably see showers in the north east of scotland. again, the showers probably won't be too heavy compared with recent days and there will be sunshine. much drier prospects, temperatures lower, highs of nine degrees and then early next week, look at this, we have an airyaf of high next week, look at this, we have an air yaf of high pressure building in for a time. that means a change in weather. we will have night—time frost, mist and fog but it will be dry and we will see sunshine as well. a little unsettled by a slow improvele as we head to sunday. that is this is bbc news — our latest headlines. borisjohnson is trying to persuade mps to back his new brexit deal,
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ahead of an historic vote in parliament tomorrow. of course we are going to try and persuade and point out the real positives in this deal, on the substance, on the merits and i am confident that will help bring people behind it, and obviously it will be a close vote tomorrow but i am confident we can get it down now. but opposition parties are set to vote against him — and northern ireland's ten democratic unionist mps won't support the deal there are reports of fighting in syria despite turkey's agreement to suspend its military offensive against the kurds. the mexican authorities have freed the son of the jailed drug baron el chapo, after coming under heavy fire from cartel members following his arrest. sport now on afternoon live with jane dougall. a huge weekend in the rugby world cup and the welsh have named the team. yes, they have. and it is good new for wales because they have been able to name a fully fit side for
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their match against france. that is on sunday. things seem to be going to plan. it's the same team that beat australia earlier in the tournament. there were worries about fly half dan biggar — he'd suffered two concussions in consecutive matches earlier in this tournament. but warren gatland has named him and said they've gone through the due diligence, making sure they've covered all the bases. he's obviously done all the protocols and been fit for three orfour days. there were worries about fly half dan biggar — he'd suffered two concussions in consecutive matches earlier in this tournament. he sat out the uruguay match and so has had more than ten days to recover before facing france on sunday. it means wales will be at full strength for the quarter final match. gattland has said they know exactly what to expect from their opponants on sunday. we have had a great record against them, i think we have won seven of them, i think we have won seven of the last eight games and the one we lost was the 100 minute game in paris, where they scored in the last
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minute, so, but even in saying that, they have always been close games, and, but we are going in with a lot of belief, a england play australia and ireland play new zealand on saturday. and ireland play new zealand the other game on sunday is japan v south africa — all the build up and coverage on bbc five live. after the shocking scenes in bulgaria the premier league are acting on racism. we've just had an international break for the euro qualifiers. england played bulgaria — beat them 6—0 but during the match, several of england's black players were racially abused. monkey noises and nazi salutes from the bulgarian home fans and the match had to be stopped twice. the premier league returns tomorrow and they're emphasising their "no room for racism campaign" that was first launched in march. the england and manchester city star raheem sterling is fronting the campaign. he features in a video which will be broadcast on big screens in stadiums this weekend.
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there will also be pitchside flags, advertising boards and match day programmes asking fans to report any racist language or behaviour at the ground. there the room for every kind of emotion. but there is never room for racism. there is no room for racism. in the premier league or anywhere else.“ you see it, report it. if you see it, report it. the former newcastle and england forward shola ameobi is part of the eight—man bame panel, advising the premier league on racism issues ahead of this weekend's campaign. he says nothing has changed since he played because not enough has been put in place to combat racism in football. it is about you know, tackling these issues head on, and i think obviously, coming off the back of what was you know, a tumultuous week in terms of the england team and what the experience of bulgaria, these are issues that really need to be looked at, and i think it's
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really important that you know, as this campaign no room for racism, it is not just a this campaign no room for racism, it is notjust a campaign, it is come on, we need to take action on that. it is come on, we need to take action on that. this month's el clasico between barcelona and real madrid has been postponed because of fears of civil unrest. the match was scheduled for 26 october but there have been days of protest in barcelona after nine catalan separatist leaders were jailed on monday. both barcelona and real madrid disagreed with calls to switch the game to madrid. the clubs must agree a new date by monday. more than a billion people watched last summer's women's football world cup. that's the highest ever viewing figures for the tournament. 1.12 billion watched coverage of the tournament. the final where the united states beat the netherlands was seen live by over 260 million viewers. the average live match audience more than doubled from the 2015 edition.
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the british number onejohanna konta has pulled out of next week's wta elite trophy in zuhai, and won't play again this season. konta has had some pain in her knee, and has decided to focus on rehabilitation for the rest of the year. that's all the sport for now. now back to ben brown in westminster. welcome back to westminster where the prime minister is in a race to try to persuade mps to back his new brexit agreement before tomorrow's vote in parliament. borisjohnson says he's "very confident" he'll win backing for the deal struck yesterday in brussels, but the result is expected to be tight. joining me now is conservative writer and commentator and former tory party adviser at conservative central officejo ann nadler and joe twyman from deltapoll.
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thank you for being with us, jo ann, this deal, a lot of people are saying it is similar to theresa may's deal, how do you see it.|j think it is significantly different, because what it does, it gives britain more leeway about its negotiating its free trade deals in the future. it is basically moved away from the alignment with the customs arrangement that theresa may felt she had to do satisfy the issue of the northern ireland, of the border in northern ireland. and i think, you know, in doing that she, borisjohnson has crated a slightly different problem because that has raised real political dilemma for the dup, and therefore for people within the conservative party that feel that the department should be supported at this point. overall it
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isa supported at this point. overall it is a much more bet dealer. it gives britain more independence on leaving the eu which was the point of it in the eu which was the point of it in the first place. did you say it's a harder brexit than theresa may's deal. i would say cleaner, that would be the wording i would prefer, but that also brings problems for those, you know, members of the labour party might be thinking of voting for it, because in a sense, although the pressure is on those wavering potential supporters of the deal, to support it from the point of view, they are in brexit supporting constituencies, actually the body of the deal itself makes it more difficult for them to do that, i think. let us talk about, it is very early days but how this deal is going down or may go down with voters, what is your research showing so far. the early indication are there are divisions along brexit lines. it is likely you do not favour this deal or any deal, but
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among levers there is a suggestion that it has quite high levels of support. higher than theresa may got for her deal. this is to do with the fa ct for her deal. this is to do with the fact that boris johnson is for her deal. this is to do with the fact that borisjohnson is more popular. even if he brought back the same deal he would have got higher levels of support. the ekey question is not whether people support it now, but over the days as it is more analysed in the press, what impact that has on public opinion. nigel farage has already come out and said he is sceptical about it, that could have an impact. jeremy corbyn and jo swinson's views could have an impact. so longer term whether boris o' borisjohnson impact. so longer term whether boris o' boris johnson can impact. so longer term whether boris o' borisjohnson can get over the final hurdle after he has got over the hurdle of westminster approval remains to be seen. it is not public opinion what maps in the short—term,
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it is what happens this that building over there. the two things are connected. how do you see the vote going tomorrow, it might be a handful of mps either way.|j vote going tomorrow, it might be a handful of mps either way. i think it is. i wish coiled share the prime minister's enthusiasm, i understand why he has to take that line, am deeply concerned a lot of pressure is going to be puts on those wavering labour mps i was talking about and i think they do have a degree of cover if they decide not to vote with the government and that is because it is from brexiteer‘s point of view a slightly keener version of brexit which wouldn't be to their particular choosing by any stretch of the imagination, so i am concerned. i think that the labour party, although that talked about wanting to avoid no—deal, the reality is they reallyjust want wanting to avoid no—deal, the reality is they really just want to disrupt the progress of any deal, and now is the moment for them, those individuals to really kind of,
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you know, screw their courage to the, you know, to really be, to be brave and do the right thing and vote for the deal. joe, let us talk about labourmp, we vote for the deal. joe, let us talk about labour mp, we have heard from sarah champion, this is interesting for rotherham. quoted from buzzfeed, has told a constituent that the deal borisjohnson has struck is far from perfect but we are faced with a choice between this deal and catastrophic no—deal. in these circumstances will will vole for the deal. john mann said he will vote pore the deal. there will be a few. do you think they are under pressure in those leave constituencies, from their voters to back this deal?|j imagine their voters to back this deal?” imagine there will be some emphasis from leave constituencies but even within those, the influence that labour voted for leave, or a
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majority, is notes in also i true. it is more complicated than that, it is more nuanced. i imagine that labour mps regardless oofs which side they regardless of which side they are on can choose, if they want to say i am in they are on can choose, if they want to saylam ina they are on can choose, if they want to say i am in a leave constituency they can do it, if they want to say i'm a leave constituency but among my supporter, they favour remain and they can do that. they may say among my constituents but among the members that is different. all the options are available. is if boris johnson loses tomorrow he is still ina good johnson loses tomorrow he is still in a good position they say, because he can go to voters and say i couldn't get this deal through parliament, so the voters need to sort that out, and you know, a lot of people within the tory party, are confident he could do well in that scenario. scenario. ithink that is
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a very difficult scenario, because i think that what the conservative party has promised the public is it would deliver brexit and if it still has been unable to deliver it under these circumstances... you think it is damning? it is damage, it opens the floodgates for the brexit party to do very well, and joe would know more than i do about the individual statistics where there might be a three—way split, but i think it would certainly make it difficult for the conservatives to win in those brexit seats if they were having to compete with the brexit party. hoy damage doing you think it would be? i don't think that is the case. when you look at the underlying, one in six leave supporters thinks that boris johnson is responsible for what has happened. i think he maybe able tos you us that emphasise that this was
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people versus the parliament which is going to be a key aspect of his, in the medium term he won't stake a hit. it is if longer term nothing is being sorted out, owl that is so big. we can talk about that, we have run out of time, thank you very much for your time out of time, thank you very much for yourtime and your out of time, thank you very much for your time and your analysis, lots of number crunching and arm twisting here, cabinet meeting we gather at 4.00 here, cabinet meeting we gather at 14.00 by here, cabinet meeting we gather at 4.00 by the way but for now back to martine in the studio. thank you. susanna will have the business news ina susanna will have the business news in a moment. boris johnson has until tomorrow's vote to persuade mps across the house to back his brexit deal.. but opposition parties are set
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to vote against him — as well as the ten democratic unionist mps who won't support the deal there's been sporadic fighting in syria — despite turkey's agreement to suspend its military offensive against kurdish forces. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. the confederation of british industry says businesses have given a cautious welcome to the brexit deal the government has reached with the eu. cbi director general carolyn fairbairn said it's a step forward and although its not a perfect deal we can work with it. british manufacturers for scotch whisky to biscuits and savile row suits are braced for a significant financial hit after us tariffs came into effect in retaliation for subsidies given to aerospace manufacturer airbus. french, spanish, german and uk still wines will also face the new 25% import tariff from today. sainsbury‘s has become the first major supermarket to stop selling fireworks at its 2,300 stores
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across the uk. the company said it made the decision following a regular yearly review of all its products. last year, a petition to ban the public sale of fireworks to protect animals, children and people with a phobia attracted more than 300,000 signatures. susannah, you've been guaging reaction to the brexit deal. yes the food and drink industry say they have reservation, they say it is sabac ward step in preserving frictionless trade with the european union, compared to the deal brokered by theresa may, other business groups have been speaking as well, i spoke to the deputy director general of the confederation of british industry earlier, he said the businesses had been in the brexit waiting room forfar businesses had been in the brexit waiting room for far too long. businesses had been in the brexit waiting room forfar too long. as businesses had been in the brexit waiting room for far too long. as a result investment was suffering, confidence was suffering so this was a step forward he said. but he is concerned that the deal seems to give more prominence to doing trade deals with other countries and not the european union, our biggest trading partner. the institute of directors has been giving their
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view, they said business leaders will feel guarded leaf at the breakthrough as they call it, but they want time to fully examine the detail because there is so much to an league. earlier i spoke to allie renison, head of eu and trade policy at the iod. here's what she had to there have been changing but that is not necessarily binding and that is subject to change, where i think there are reservation about trying to understand the detail in a bit more depth, is particularly around the fact that whereas before, for businesses in northern ireland, you had an alternative, an insurance policy option under the backstop that was never meant to be triggered, suddenly this has been front loaded, so this will the starting point at the point of eu exit at the end of the transition period that will be incorporated into the agreement. there is a lot of questions round detail, vat, between northern ireland, great
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british businesses so we are working through some of the detail with members but it is a relief to there is susannah allie rennison there, who is picking through the detail of the deal and how it will affect businesses — especially in northern ireland. ian right has said this new deal sets us on ian right has said this new deal sets us on course for ian right has said this new deal sets us on course for regulatory divert screns from our largest overseas market, on criticalfood safety, science and quality areas where we are world leading. he says this will increase costs for businesses and consumers alike there is isa businesses and consumers alike there is is a lots ofs are is investigation still round about this deal. and speculation is continuing about the nature of the trade relationship between the uk and the eu, ata relationship between the uk and the eu, at a time when trade between the us is deteriorating. that has been the focus of some of the criticism of the new deal in it will give priority to deals with the us but it come on the day the day the us has slapped tariffs of 25% on a range of
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british goods from savile row suits to scottish whisky, it is notjust uk goods that are affected. it is european goods. this is part of a row that has been going on for 15 yea rs row that has been going on for 15 years because the us claims that actually, there was unfair subsidies given by the eu to airbus, and it actually, it won this wattle because the world health organization ruled in its favour. it is notjust those products i was telling you. —— world trade organisation. let us find out more. let us find out more. samira hussainjoins us now from new york. how did this start? this has been a real sort of trade dispute that has been going on for 15 year, between the uk, between europe and the us, and it has to do with plane, and both sides have said that look,
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there have been unfair subsidies being given to us's boeing and to airbus, and as a result both countries went to the world trade organisation and levied complaint, the wto found that both sides were guilty of giving unfair subsidies, so, basically the wto ruled in favour of the us, just a bit earlier, so the us said we are going to now impose 25% tariffs op a lot of goods coming in from the uk and from year. the eu and the head of trade for the eu has said we are going to do the same thing, when they are allowed to t and the world trade organisation organise will rule on that in terms of how much they can tax and on which goods. well, that will find out in 2020. so there are real concerns i imagine for wine producers in the us as well. they fear that actually the eu
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could impose tariffs on their products and this is a key market for them, isn't it. absolutely, look, if you look at something like suits for example. these are specialised suits made on savile row, for them their market in the us is really very important, and now all of a sudden we are seeing that suits are going to be taxed from 13%, it is going to go up to 25%. so there is a lot of concern among different entity —— entityties. people aren't necessarily wear of the additional taxes and what impact that will have on the business. thank you. that's all the business news. now live pictures from barcelona, where tens of thousands of demonstrators have entered the city today. stopping trains and blocking roads in their process, this is the
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fifth day of protests and a general strike for that matter that brought barcelona to a halt. i following the jailing of catalan separatist leader, it is having ramification over a week ago because barcelona and real madrid teams have been postponed a match they were due to play a week tomorrow, that was meant to happen in barcelona stadium. a well—known tourist attraction has been shut down because protestors the blocked the entrance and it all stems from the supreme court decision on monday to deal nine separatist leading and it set off street violence across the north east of spain in which dozens of people have very been injured. and so that is the scene in barcelona this afternoon. now it's time for a look at the weather. we are going, to continue to see lots of showers through the rest of this afternoon, particularly across wales and southern england but it is
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across the north—west of wales where we have to cloud stream heading where the showers are going to be particularly intense, we could see localised surface issue, maybe big hail homes as well. further north, rain could cause a few issues, a metz office yellow warning is in force. as we look at the weather picture, through the rest of the night there will be a few more showers coming and go, a bit cooler in north east england and into saturday, a band of rain pushes southwards into northern england. the win starts to turn to a northerly direction. the showers won't be as heavy as the downpours over rece nts won't be as heavy as the downpours over recents days and there will be fewer downpour than in southern england. the exception kent and sussex will continue to see big showers and thunderstorms, that is your
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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm ben brown live at westminster where boris johnson is trying to persuade mps to back his new brexit deal, ahead of an historic vote in parliament tomorrow. the prime minister says he's "very confident" he'll win, the result is expected to be tight. of course we are going to try and persuade and point out the real positives in this deal, on the substance, on the merits, and i am confident that will help bring people behind it and obviously it will be a close vote tomorrow, but i am confident we can get this done now. but opposition parties are set to vote against him — and northern ireland's 10 democratic unionist mps won't support the deal. the deal is toxic as far as northern ireland is concerned. it does not meet the promises which the prime minister made,
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that the whole of the united kingdom would be leaving the eu. the other news this afternoon: barcelona is brought to a standstill, as a general strike is called over the jailing of separatist leaders. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — with jane dougall. plenty of rugby to keep us occupied this weekend. despite injury concerns forfly half dan biggar, wales have named him in a full strength side for their quarter final match against france in the rugby world cup. we'll hear from head coach warren gatland. thanks jane, and chris has all the weather — how's the weekend looking? it's a very pretty picture, is it going to last? it is, we have massive thunderclouds across southern and western areas of the uk and there will be more to come into the weekend so it is going to stay pretty unsettled. it gets a little bit better as the weekend ahead goes by.
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good afternoon and welcome from westminster, where the prime minister is in a race to try to persuade mps to back his new brexit agreement before tomorrow's vote in parliament. he's due to meet with his cabinet in an hour's time. borisjohnson says he's ‘very confident‘ he'll win backing for the deal struck yesterday in brussels, but the result is expected to be tight. with opposition parties, and the dup, set to vote against him, mrjohnson is trying to convince labour mps to switch sides, while keeping his own backbenchers onboard. our political correspondent, iain watson, has this report. here is a turn—up for the books, a conservative prime minister who actually seemed to enjoy his excursion to brussels.
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backslapping all round, as borisjohnson secured a brexit deal yesterday. but 24 hours these days, is a long time in politics. and he is facing more difficulties back in britain than in brussels, as he struggles to get enough mps on side. so, what kind of deal will they be voting on? much of it is similar to theresa may's, for example, protecting citizens' rights, eu residents here, uk citizens over there. the uk will also pay what the eu regards as its financial obligations, a divorce bill of around £33 billion. but the deal is different when it comes to northern ireland. there would be no border checks in ireland but there will be checks on some goods going from great britain to northern ireland, and this has cost the support of the dup. the deal is toxic as far as northern ireland is concerned. it does not meet the promises which the prime minister made, that the whole of the united kingdom would be leaving the eu. so, we will not be voting for the deal and indeed we will be voting against it and encouraging
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others to do so. borisjohnson has lost the dup, but he will be hoping to hold onto some of his sceptical mps who share their views. so, would the government discipline any of their own politicians who step out of line? of course, we're going to try and persuade and point out the real positives in this deal, on the merits, and i'm confident that that will help bring people behind it, and obviously it will be a close vote tomorrow but i am confident we can get this done now. here is a measure of how hard the government's trying to get the deal through. conservative whips, that's those who try to keep party discipline, have been calling around their colleagues, including, presumably by mistake, an mp who had actually defected to the lib dems. ijust got a call saying, there's a rumour on the grapevine you're going to vote for this deal and is there anything i can do to help? and i told him that actually there is nothing i could do to help them or they could do to help me, this is a lousy deal. meanwhile, the labour leadership are trying to keep their mps in leave areas
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from backing the deal. this is what the shadow chancellor said when told that this mp, ronnie campbell, was likely to vote with borisjohnson. i will have a chat with ronnie, because ronnie is a socialist labour mp and the one thing he has stood up for all his life is the protection of workers' rights. this will undermine workers' rights in our country. and how did that chat go? at the moment, i will be voting to support the deal. but i am getting a lot of pressure from the head lads of the labour party, jeremy corbyn and john mcdonnell, to abstain. because of the deregulation of workers' rights. if all these manoeuvrings weren't complicated enough, i am afraid i have to tell you that something else is going to happen here at westminster tomorrow as well. a cross—party group of mps are going to try to change borisjohnson's deal, to make sure it only comes into effect if he is willing
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to extend the brexit deadline. they say this is an insurance policy against leaving with no deal at all. if we don't need the extension, having asked for it, it should terminate immediately we leave the eu, and we are all in favour of doing this as rapidly as possible, if it can be done by 31st october, terrific, but we want to make sure that we don't drop out by mistake in between saturday and then. and saturday is likely to be one of the most dramatic moments at westminster in recent years. so can mrjohnson secure a majority for his brexit agreement? it is the first time the commons had sat at the weekend since the falklands conflict, to give you idea of how unusual that is. let's look at the numbers in the commons. there are 650 mps in the house of commons — but the seven sinn fein mps don't
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take their seats and the speaker and three deputies don't vote, which means the number you need to get to the winning post and gain a commons majority is in practice 320. the conservatives now have 287 mps — borisjohnson can be confident of the support of most of them, but some may not vote for him especially if he fails to win over the dup before saturday. it doesn't look like he can. labour have 242 mps and the message from their leader, jeremy corbyn, is clearly to vote against, but how many can be persuaded to vote for the deal despite party's official position? we will have to wait and see, some people are speculating maybe ten or so labour mps people are speculating maybe ten or so labourmps might people are speculating maybe ten or so labour mps might vote for the deal. then there are 36 independent mps — of those by far the largest group is 23 who were formerly conservatives but lost the whip or left — most of those who were previously tories are likely to back deal. there are 35 snp mps and they will vote against.
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as will the 19 liberal democrats and as things stand, the 10 mps for the democratic unionist party say they cannot back the plan — they have called it toxic today saying there is no way they are going to vote for it. the independent group of change — who now have 5 mps — will also vote against, as will the 4 plaid cymru mps and the 1 green mp. that is the maths, very simple, not! i'm nowjoined here by our political correspondentjess parker. it is knife edge stuff, we could be talking about a majority either way or single figures. absolutely and i think people across westminster are doing an awful lot of number crunching. we are seeing a couple of people emerged to say what they are doing tomorrow. we have had quite a hardline eurosceptic mp who voted against theresa may's deal three times saying she will support the
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deal tomorrow. some of the key figures in the conservative european research group are keeping a little more tight—lipped, steve baker, the chair of the more tight—lipped, steve baker, the chairof the group, more tight—lipped, steve baker, the chair of the group, has tweeted he is not saying get what he will do. the deputy chair has been to downing street to talk one—on—one with the prime minister saying he needs to talk to boris johnson prime minister saying he needs to talk to borisjohnson before he decides what to do. of course, one of the big concerns for a number ten is now they have lost the dup and it does look like they have lost them, well that influence, and to what extent will it influence, those eurosceptic conservatives who have worked quite closely with the dup and repeatedly have said they will be mindful of what they are saying. that is a key consideration. we know borisjohnson, lots that is a key consideration. we know boris johnson, lots of that is a key consideration. we know borisjohnson, lots of his top team are making phone calls, talking to people one on one this afternoon when cabinet meets i think they will be doing number crunching of their own. making phone calls to tory mps but i wonder if he will be making phone calls to labour mps because
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they can be critical. we have had a couple come out and say they will vote for the deal, sarah champion in rotherham, john mann are saying maybe. how many do you think boris johnson would need to get himself over the line? he needs a considerable handful of labour mps. that is not vague at all! i am not that quick on the arithmetic to be able to tell you right off but he needs labour mps for sure, especially now he has lost the democratic unionist party. my understanding is he may not be personally calling labour mps but getting other people to do it for him. one of the things to remember is, say a conservative cabinet minister has a particular good relationship with a labour mp, maybe they will be deploying those people and using those personal relationships built up over many yea rs relationships built up over many years to say consider voting for this deal. on the other side, you have got leaders from the labour party, people like john
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have got leaders from the labour party, people likejohn mcdonnell, the shadow chancellor saying he had a word with the potential labour rebel to discourage them from supporting the deal. they called to influence the way people vote tomorrow —— the cost influence the way people vote tomorrow going on all sides. tomorrow will be the result from the house of commons. what time will be begetting that result? originally we were looking at half past two, however it is less clear at the moment because of the potential amendments coming forward. we have two amendments already down on the order paper, there could be last once submitted tomorrow. whether the speaker decides to accept any of those, those amendments will the extent to which the debate goes on. it could go on well past half us too, that will not be clear until we know what amendments are selected tomorrow. thank you very much indeed. well president of the european council,
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donald tusk, has spoken to us following the european council summit. he descirbed boris johnson as surprisngly effective — but that he would be reserving hisjudgment until after tomorrow's vote in the house of commons. lam sure i am sure chrisjohnson is really determined to finalise the deal, no doubt. —— boris johnson. determined to finalise the deal, no doubt. —— borisjohnson. i have a different opinion about brexit but i should say borisjohnson is surprisingly effective. it is not only determination but some political skills. we are still waiting for a decision. our assessment will be complete only after voting in the house of commons. that was donald tusk talking to the bbc. the french president, emmanuel macron, has also been giving his reaction to the brexit deal. he said france doesn't want to see the date of brexit slip any further
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now that a divorce agreement has been agreed. translation: i believe we should stick to the deadline of 31st of october but i am not trying to... i do not think we shall grant any further delay. i believe it is now time to put an end to these negotiations and work on the future relationship, and what matters is we stick to the commitment made in the deadline we set for ourselves. alistair burt is the mp for north east bedfordshire — he lost the conservative whip for opposing a no—deal brexit and joins me now from his constituency. good afternoon. thank you for being with us. can i ask you how you are going to vote tomorrow?” with us. can i ask you how you are going to vote tomorrow? i am most likely going to vote for the deal, it is consistent with what i said post—2016, accepting the result of the referenda but being very clear
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that the best interests of the uk and the eu is to leave with a deal. how do you see this deal that boris johnson is negotiating compared to theresa may's deal? it is virtually the same but the point of difference are significant in terms of the changes to the arrangement with northern ireland and some of the regulatory issues, but essentially it isa regulatory issues, but essentially it is a similar deal as it was bound to be. you cannot negotiate a com pletely to be. you cannot negotiate a completely new deal from the time borisjohnson completely new deal from the time boris johnson became prime completely new deal from the time borisjohnson became prime minister to now if you were to leave on the 3ist to now if you were to leave on the 31st of october. but i voted for the withdrawal agreement and i feel very strongly if parliament rejects again an agreement that has been made between 28 southern states and people are going to wonder what on earth we could vote for, and i think the ensuing uncertainty and significant disruption would cost the country quite dear. what do you think others like you and the party, ifi think others like you and the party, if i could put it like that, others
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who lost the whip, how they vote tomorrow because the numbers are extremely tight? everybody is trying to find out how tory mps are going to find out how tory mps are going to be voting, some of the rebel labour mps to be voting, some of the rebel labourmps are going to be voting, some of the rebel labour mps are going to be voting, but what are your thoughts on how the numbers are going to work out tomorrow? no one is acting as a whip in relation to that group that lost the whip very recently and colours can speak for themselves. but my understanding, iam can speak for themselves. but my understanding, i am sure you picked up understanding, i am sure you picked up the same, is there is a broad majority in that group of 21 who a lwa ys majority in that group of 21 who always supported a deal, were against no deal but were committed to living with a deal and i think they will follow that through. there are some of that group you are also equally have a principled manner and say they do not agree with leaving the eu at all and what the matter to back to a referendum or want to somehow reverse the process, they are entitled to that view. not all of the group share the same view. you lost the whip, if you think there was a member of the erg, the
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brexit wing of the party, the european research group, if they vote against the prime minister tomorrow against the deal, should they lose the whip as well?m tomorrow against the deal, should they lose the whip as well? it is not a matter for me and i they lose the whip as well? it is not a matterfor me and i am not really bothered. that is not important. the internal party issues are far less important than whether or not we make the right decision for the country. each colleague in this issue, we have been through it hundred times recently, in that we all feel very passionately and deeply. some of us had to come to very difficult decisions, i am in the same position as some of the eu leaders that were spoken to by the bbc yesterday. i recognise there has been a deal and in one sense i am pleased we are going to leave with a deal, but i am very sad we are leaving. i voted to remain in the eu,i leaving. i voted to remain in the eu, i wish we would, but i don't think we can after the referendum and everything we have been through and everything we have been through andi and everything we have been through and i do genuinely and honestly believe it is best for britain and the eu that we leave with a deal.
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but there are many hundreds of thousands of people who are currently contacting mps on both sides of the argument to feel equally passionate, and i think collea g u es equally passionate, and i think colleagues will approach it equally determined as well. the internal wetting raises interest to some members of the media, it is really not the most important things in our minds, truly —— the internal whipping. i'm nowjoined here by the snp's pete wishart. thank you for being with us. we were just talking to alistair burkey wa nts to just talking to alistair burkey wants to stay in the european union but we can't, he says we are to vote for this deal because it is time to move on, you don't take that view? absolutely not, this deal is disastrous for scotland, it takes us out of the european union against a collective vote, single market membership and critically, it ends
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freedom of movement for scotland. most of our population growth is predicated on inward migration, especially from the european union. most of our vital sectors and services are defined the european union. this is a deal worse than theresa may's deal so there is no way after voting against that we would vote for at this time. why is it worse in your view? there is one critical issue for scotland, there isa critical issue for scotland, there is a different arrangement for northern ireland which allows single market membership in some form of customs union with the eu. that puts scotla nd customs union with the eu. that puts scotland at a competitive disadvantage with our neighbours. the best of them, they are getting an arrangement that we would clearly much enjoy and appreciate something we put forward several years ago that was rejected. forget about the level playing fields and regulatory alignment, that critical feature, level playing fields and regulatory alignment, that criticalfeature, we can never support that. you think scotla nd can never support that. you think scotland is going to lose out to northern ireland ? scotland is going to lose out to northern ireland? yeah. in terms of
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tomorrow, a historic day in parliament, the snp are tabling an amendment? our amendment has said there should be an extension granted. we have to move on from where we are just now when it comes to these arrangements and what is happening in westminster. we cannot keep borisjohnson happening in westminster. we cannot keep boris johnson in happening in westminster. we cannot keep borisjohnson in power any longer. a lot of people would say we have to move on by getting a deal and passing a deal and honouring the result of the 2016 referendum.” think we have been through all that and why we can't possibly support that but beyond that, with a deal hopefully feeling, what we therefore have to do and secure as a general election. we had to remove him from power, this is intolerable. as long as he remains prime minister he remains a risk and a threat and i don't think that is a risk worth accepting any longer. risk any threat, yet we saw him in brussels yesterday, there was backslapping, other european leaders were congratulating him, shaking his hand. they don't treat him like a risk and a threat. the european
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union summit has been remarkable to watch. what we have seen is the european union very keen to get a deal because they know the dangers and risks of a no deal departure, as we do. but we have to look after our national interest in scotland. we have got to make sure our remain voting population, because i don't need to tell you, we voted 62% remain, that has to be articulated, reflected and respected. scottish national party members down in westminster, that is the thing that determines and guides us through, anything that we consider in the house of commons and that will underpin anything we do on saturday. you want an election but you will have read the opinion polls and we'll treat them with due scepticism, but they show a lead for borisjohnson. scepticism, but they show a lead for boris johnson. chances are scepticism, but they show a lead for borisjohnson. chances are if you have the election you what, he will win itand have the election you what, he will win it and have the majority. he may have the lead throughout the united kingdom but he does not have that lead in scotland. we have been ahead of the conservatives for 4—5 years and we looking to claw back the
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seats we have lost. i can understand why labour are reticent about an election, they are looking at the opinion polls and are coming to the assumption that cannot win it. if they were ten points ahead there would be no discussion or debate about the possibility of a general election, they have to do theirjob. at some point they will have to have a general election to ensure that borisjohnson is a general election to ensure that boris johnson is replaced. a general election to ensure that borisjohnson is replaced. we are doing that in scotland and i'm certain that there was a general election in the next couple of weeks, the scottish national party would do well, especially against the conservative party with this disastrous deal. is your hunch what about how the vote will go tomorrow because it is looking very, very close ? because it is looking very, very close? i've been here 18 years and i remember some of the big debates on the iraq war onwards. it is quite something to observe. i am not going to be troubled by the conservatives voting but when you're looking around to see the pressure exerted on friends and colleagues from other
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parties, it is quite extraordinary. right now? right now, anywhere you go there as huddles of people and people being asked by various people about how they are going to vote. there is an extraordinary exercise going on, i don't know how successful it is going to be. and there are i'm testing?” successful it is going to be. and there are i'm testing? i am a former chief whip so i know the inducements and stakes going on. i think the critical thing is the labour members and if this deal is passed by the support of recalcitrant labour members, iam support of recalcitrant labour members, i am sorry to say labour will never be forgiven for that. thank you very much for your time. that is the latest westminster. that's it from westminster for now — back to martine croxall in the studio. there has been sporadic shelling and gunfire in northern syria, a day after turkey accepted a us demand for a temporary halt to its offensive against kurdish targets. yesterday president erdogan agreed to a five—day pause to allow kurdish forces to withdraw from a swath of territory along the turkish border.
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barbara plett—usher reports. bomb explodes. there is a ceasefire in place but not all is quiet. in the syrian border town of ras al—ain, the sound of artillery shattered the morning, sporadic gunfire continued. kurdish forces have accused turkey of shelling civilians. the turkish president has denied it. the kurdish militias are deeply entrenched in the city. just a day earlier they were still fighting hard to keep it. turkey says they are a terrorist threat and is determined to expel them away from the border. what happens here will likely be an early test of the accord. what the americans brokered was a pause in the violence, but it was enough for president trump to declare victory. he needed one — his decision to withdraw us troops has been strongly criticised as abandoning america's kurdish allies and paving the way for turkey's incursion. we've all agreed on a pause, or a ceasefire, in the border region of syria.
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and it was unconventional what i did. i said, they're going to have to fight a little while. sometimes you have to let them fight a little while. it's like two kids in a lot, you have got to let them fight and then pull them apart. this was definitely not a victory for the kurds. ankara has agreed to suspend the military operation for five days and to eventually make that permanent, but only if the kurdish fighters pull out and give up their heavy weapons. you cannot solve your refugee problem by making new refugees, by displacing people from their homes. so it's a really serious humanitarian problem, which requires more deliberation, because these people have nowhere to go, because these people are the local people of the region. in fact, the americans have essentially accepted what the turks were trying to achieve with the military operation, a buffer zone on the syrian side of the border that they will control with their armed forces. already, the human cost has been great, some
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300,000 people displaced. kurdish civilians are wondering what will happen to them, even if the fighting stops. a church warden has been sentenced to life in prison — with a minimum term of thirty—six years — after being convicted of murdering a university lecturer. 28—year—old benjamin field was found guilty in august of killing 69—year—old peter farquhar in order to inherit his house and money. the murderfollowed a campaign of physical and mental torture. here, police have cleared extinction rebellion protesters from london's oxford circus, after the group defied a ban on their demonstrations. the climate activists set up large wooden tripods in the middle of the junction. specialist police teams were brought in to remove the protestors, some of whom had chained themselves to the wooden structures or glued themselves to the road. police have arrested more than 700 people during a week—long operation to tackle so—called county lines drugs gangs across the uk.
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dealers use mobile phones to make sales outside of cities, and exploit children or vulnerable adults to deliver the drugs. in total, contra band with a street value of around 400 thousand pounds was seized. scientists say they've developed an effective technique to spot the mass stranding of whales from space. high resolution satellites orbiting the earth can now be used to scan coastlines, zooming in on the animals' positions. being able to detect strandings more quickly will help the conservation of whales, as well as other animals — and could become a powerful tool to assess the state of the marine environment. rebecca morelle reports. it was standing on a huge scale, last in australia more than 150 wales washed up but by the time rescu e rs wales washed up but by the time rescuers got their most were dead. now there is a faster way to track
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strandings, from space. using powerful satellite scientist can scan thousands of kilometres of coast zooming in the animals into the body of a beached whale is revealed. satellites can allow us to ta ke revealed. satellites can allow us to take pictures and see whale stranding is much more rapidly. it will give us that extra opportunity to react quickly. the hope as the technology could reveal how many whales are stranded and where they are stranded, which could help us to understand what is causing these deadly events. with so many pressures in the oceans, scientists are watching whale numbers carefully. using satellites to monitor them will be key. time for a look at the weather. here's chris fawkes. we are looking at cornwall, it has slightly odd conditions, what has been happening? it had quite a big hailstorm. you can see the hail coming down quite
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quickly. so yeah, there have been some pretty lively thunderstorms across the part of the world and they are going to continue to roll in across southern and coastal counties of england and wales. parts of the midlands is in widespread thunderstorms as well. the here was quite big here. how bay, chris? well, look at that! you're intrigued an hour ago about the idea of getting super cold water which is liquid water below freezing. do you know what temperature you can get liquid supercooled water down to before it freezes ? no. -40 freezes ? no. —40 celsius. it is stuff we take for granted. we know about water, we drink it but we don't know much about it. you seem to know quite a lot. well, i tried. you seem to know quite a lot. well, itried. the you seem to know quite a lot. well, i tried. the only reason it freezes and our experience below zero as the water has impurities in
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it and that allows the molecular structure to reorganise and create theice structure to reorganise and create the ice we are familiar with. you know what temperature ice melts at? just above zero. zero, yes, that was a trick question. i was thinking, god, have i forgot everything i've learned ? this is involved in creating big ha ilstones this is involved in creating big hailstones and this is what has been coming down in cornwall, the size of a£1 coming down in cornwall, the size of a £1 coin. they don't look like spheres, they look slightly flatter. indeed, andi look slightly flatter. indeed, and i think that is to do with the rotation of the hailstones as they get bounced up and down, as they start spinning, some of the axes will accumulate ice more quickly than others which makes these weird shapes and sometimes you get big prongs sticking out of them due to the spin of the hailstones as they form in the cloud. this is pretty clear looking. yes, and that is due to the temperature.
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because the ice slowly forms it allows little air bubbles in the ice to escape which is why we have clear ice in this hailstone as opposed to the more familiar hailstones that freeze very rapidly entrap little air bubbles. it is quite localised? i'm going to see more across the weekend? we have seen loads of these storms and we are going to see more thunderstorms through the rest of the day and into the weekend, we will see showers as well. these are the cloud creating these hailstones and you can see actually, we have seen plenty of those storms working in across wales, southern coastal counties of england, lots of thunder and lightning showing up. one area i am concerned about is the north—west of wales because we have a stream of cloud heading in here. little area of low pressure enhancing this system storms are going to be very frequent, torrential nature, we can see surface water issues building in and probably hailstones mixed in. across north—west of wales, there
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could be some issues for the rest of the afternoon so difficult to dry conditions out and about. into eastern scotland, the met office issued a weather warning, notjust for relations of rain this afternoon but also overnight and into the early hours of saturday. that is another part of the country are keeping a close eye on. for the rest of the night, there will be further showers across and into the early hours of saturday. that is another pa rt hours of saturday. that is another part of the country are keeping a close eye on. for the rest of the night, there will be further showers are crossing or 9 degrees the wind for a bit lighter and it will get cooler, temperatures down into low single figures. further heavy showers are in the forecast for the weekend with spells of sunshine around on saturday but sunday, looking like a quieter day, fewer showers and a drier forecast. we will look at the forecast in a bit more detail. saturday starts off this band of rain in scotland, a picture southwards into northern england. winds come down to a northerly direction so it's going to feel cooler. any showers across western areas will not be as heavy as they have been over recent days. probably not as widespread either
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across probably not as widespread either a cross m ost probably not as widespread either across most of england and wales, that said, we will have a couple sharp once working once —— working into sussex and kent. that coulis trying to do weather continues into sunday with northerly winds extending southwards. there will be a lot of dry weather around on sunday with spells of sunshine but the cloud will bring a couple of showers to northern and eastern scotla nd showers to northern and eastern scotland and down this eastern coast of england as well, probably not too heavy, but it might not be entirely dry. temperatures coming down, highs of just dry. temperatures coming down, highs ofjust eight or 9 degrees for parts ofjust eight or 9 degrees for parts of northern scotland. as we look into the forecast into the early pa rt into the forecast into the early part of next week, quite a change through monday and perhaps tuesday, a low ridge of high pressure built in. that means the weather for most of us will be quiet, we're looking at more in the way of dry weather, more in the way of sunshine, perhaps if you mist an fog patches and some frost in the countryside. we will see at least a day or two where it will be dry.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines. borisjohnson is trying to persuade mps to back his new brexit deal, ahead of an historic vote in parliament tomorrow. of course we are going to try and persuade and point out the real positives in this deal, on the substance, on the merits, and i am confident that will help bring people behind it, and obviously it will be a close vote tomorrow, but i am confident we can get
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it done now. but opposition parties are set to vote against him — and northern ireland's ten democratic unionist mps won't support the deal. barcelona is brought to a standstill by a general strike as catalans protests against the jailing of separatist leaders. sport now on afternoon live with jane dougal. a huge weekend in the rugby world cup and wales have named their team for their quarter final against france. wales have named a fully fit side for their quarter final match against france, which is on sunday. it's the same team that beat australia earlier in the tournament. there were worries about fly half dan biggar — he'd suffered two concussions in consecutive matches earlier in this tournament. but warren gatland says he's fine to play and that he's gone through the due diligence, and all the protocols and that he's biggarfailed a head injury assessment after taking a blow
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in their win over australia and then collided with his team—mate liam williams during the fiji game. he sat out the uruguay match and so he will have had more than ten days to recover before france on sunday. centres jonathan davies and hadleigh parkes have also been passed fit, after suffering from knee and shoulder injuries respectively. the same 15 will line up that started the games against georgia and australia. warren gatland has said they know exactly what to expect from their opponants on sunday. we have had a great record against them, we have won seven of the last eight games and the one we lost was the 100 minute game in paris, where they scored in the last minute, so, but even in saying that, they have a lwa ys but even in saying that, they have always been close, close games, and but we are going in with you know a lot of belief, a lot of self confidence. england play australia and ireland play new zealand
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on saturday. the other game on sunday is japan v south africa — all the build up and coverage on bbc five live. there is more fall out on racism when england and bulgaria met a few days ago. the bulgaria national coach krasimir balakov has resigned. he was in charge of the team in the 6—0 defeat to england in sofia on monday night which was marred by racist chanting and nazi salutes from home supporters. he had claimed after the game that he couldn't hear any of the racist abuse directed at england's black players. balakov and the entire bulgarian football union executive committee are said to have resigned. because of monkey noises and nazi salutes from the bulgarian home fans, the match had to be stopped twice. so the premier league returns tomorrow and they're re—emphasising their "no room for racism campaign". the england and manchester city star raheem sterling is fronting the video which will be broadcast on big screens in stadiums this weekend.
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the objective is to get fans to report any racist language or behaviour at the ground. there's room for every kind of emotion. but there's never room for racism. there's no room for racism. in the premier league, or anywhere else. if you see it, report it. if you see it, report it. the former newcastle and england forward shola ameobi is part of the eight—man bame panel, advising the premier league on racism issues ahead of this weekend's campaign. he says nothing has changed since he played because not enough has been put in place to combat racism in football. it's about, you know, tackling these issues head on, and i think obviously, coming off the back of what was, you know, tumultuous week, in terms of the england team and what the experience in bulgaria, these are issues that really need to be looked at, and i think it's
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really important that you know, as this campaign no room for racism, it is no just this campaign no room for racism, it is nojust a campaign, it is come on, we need to take action on this. this month's el clasico between barcelona and real madrid has been postponed because of fears of civil unrest. the match was scheduled for the 26th october but there have been several days of protest in barcelona after nine catalan separatist leaders were jailed on monday. both barcelona and real madrid disagreed with calls to switch the game to madrid. barcelona have proposed a new date of the 18th of december. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. now it's time for ask this. good afternoon, i'm here in westminster, where borisjohnson is trying hard today to persuade mps
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to back his new brexit deal he's agreed with the european union. earlier we asked you to send in your questions about the deal. i'm nowjoined here byjill rutter from the uk in a changing europe and from brussels, by our reality check correspondent chris morris. welcome to you both, thank you very much for being with us. jill, let us start with you, here is a question from dave from tamworth, who asks. what a lot of people are asking today. what is the difference between this deal, borisjohnson's deal, and theresa may's deal? so most of it is the same but the two big difference, first big difference is on what has been agreed for northern ireland, so rather than have this backstop fall back arrangement, they have created the permanent relationship, for northern ireland, with the eu, which puts northern ireland in a regulatory zone with the rest of ireland. it puts in this odd mix of being both in the uk custom territory and the
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eu customs territory, so it gets the uk's tariff regime so if it does free trade deals with other countries northern ireland can benefit from that but admin tra stratively it its part of the eu customs area, but there is remember there are talks a about an exit mechanism so we have an exit mechanism so we have an exit mechanism which can be triggered by the assembly in stormont, by voting bya simple the assembly in stormont, by voting by a simple majority that doesn't wa nt to by a simple majority that doesn't want to continue these arrangements it goes into this automatically at the end of the transition period, so the end of the transition period, so the end of december next year, for four years but after that it can decide whether it wants to stay in or opt out and back into the sort of all uk arrangement. all right, jill, thank you very much. that will is very clear. now, chris, we have got kat iner low who is asking what happens if this deal with the eu is rejected, tomorrow by the house of commons? well, we are
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fourth time unlucky i suppose, what that would mean immediately, if no—deal had been proved —— approved and there was no vote in favour of no—deal by the end of saturday, under the law known as the benn act, the prime minister would be obliged to ask the eu for an extension to the brexit process. nor he keeps insisting he will obey the law, that we lord levy on 31st october. no—one is sure how those two statements can both make sense. —— that we will leave. there would have to be a request for the government for an extension, would the eu accept that request? emmanuel macron the french president speaking here this afternoon said he doesn't there there should be another delay to brexit but he has made similar comments before and he didn't say that he would veto any requests, so i suspect we can't be certain about
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this, it would mean we would be yet again delaying that brexit deadline, and probably heading for an election, which would decide which way the country wanted to go. jill, this is a question from suzanne who says will those who are eu passport holding still be enter the uk to work and live after 31st october? and if yes, when will they lose their rights? so, if the withdrawal agreement passes, then we are in this implementation period and things go on as now, so eu passport holders will still be able to enter that period ends formally in december 2020, but actually, under the deal, the uk has given eu citizens who are already here, until june 2021, to have completed the settled status process, that is when free movement ends. but after the end of free movement, and boris
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johnsonjust end of free movement, and boris johnson just like theresa may has said he wants to end free movement, then that will depend on what the new uk migration regime looks like. theresa may was very clear, she wa nted theresa may was very clear, she wanted migration regime that was blind between citizens where ever they came from, and borisjohnson i think was the same, he is now looking at what they call an australian seal points system, where the more skills you have, the more points you would get and the easier it would be to come here. chris, we have got ewan in edinburgh who is is asking would the new deal ensure that the uk is a coastal state, with full ownership and control of its waters and fish? not immediately, during the transition period things would stay the same. if the transition period ended at the end of 2020, then after that, yes, in theory but fishing is bound to then become caught up in the negotiations over a feature — —
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become caught up in the negotiations over a feature —— future free trade agreement. yes the uk would be a coastal state but the question is how much access would it allow to european boats to its waters, and the european argument is going to be pretty simple. some parts of the british fishing industry are very heavily dependent on being able to sell their fish to the european market, so the european argument is going to be if you want access to our market, we want access to your water, and we have had statements from for example the scottish fisherman's federation since the details of yesterday's deal emerged saying let us get on a and do this but it is imperative the government doesn't give up too much ground during the trade negotiations but that i think, fishing communities, who want to take control, back control of their waters in full and restrict access to european boats, is going to be a concern. jill, we have anne in enfield who has a question about security. will police forces and other law agencies still be able to receive and share
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information on criminals, with eu countries? if we are in the transition period, yes. though there will be one difference which is that some eu member states won't extra diet their citizens to non—member states, we won't be a member state formally so that european arrest warrant won't work in those country, then what goes on after that, will depend on what we negotiate as part of the new security treaty but it is much more likely that we will lose quite a bit of access to data bases because the eu is restrictive about what it allows countries that aren't in the schengen area or member states to have access to. it is like iwe states to have access to. it is like i we will lose access there. robert is asking, allowing a simple majority vote at stormont, breaks the good friday agreement, which demands both sides must agree. how
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can the good friday agreement be overruled like this ok, so this is an argument in particular in northern ireland, that is going to run and run this is a reference to the way that, that northern ireland could potentially reject new economic arrangements on customs and regulation in the future. the democratic unionist party had been saying, as robert seems to be suggesting he believes the good friday agreement sets up for major changes to these arrangement, a dual majority, within the northern ireland assembly there should be a majority both within the unionist representatives the and nationalist representatives. others argue saying if you think they should happen for approving these economic relations in the future, what about the whole idea of leaving the eu in the first place? why hasn't that been subject toa place? why hasn't that been subject to a double majority vote in the northern ireland able? so there are different views i think on this, what this plan says is as robert suggests is there needs to be in the
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future, we are talking a few years in the future, if this new economic arrangement is approved along with this deal, there would only need to bea this deal, there would only need to be a simple majority in the northern ireland assembly and no one community, no one party like the dup could exercise that veto, that will be controversial as we go forward. thank you. jill, another one this is from chris. not chris in brussels, there is another chris! asking how will goods or people passing between the uk mainland and northern ireland be monitored, as to their origin and their destination? so for people it is going to carry on as now, it is all the uk and there is still this common travel area with ireland as well, so that will not change. the bit that will change is goods going from gb, so england scotland, wales to northern ireland, because there will be entering the eu customs area, remember this dual arrangement. they will have to have
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associated documentation, saying where they have come from, so the right tariff can be charged, and also, they will need to track where they are going because it is going to be an arrangement where by they stay in northern ireland or in a category of goods where they are at what they call low risk of entering the single market, then they will be subject to a uk tariff not the eu tariff, there are a lot of arrangements to be sorted out. lots of details to be filled in on that over the next month o to see how that works. very much watch this space. we have run out of time. there are more questions but that is all we have time for. jill rutter, thank you and chris morris from our reality check team in brussels. thank you for answering the questions. that is all from westminster for now, back to martine in the studio. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines borisjohnson has until tomorrow's
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vote to persuade mps across the house to back his brexit deal. but opposition parties are set to vote against him — as well as the ten democratic unionist mps who won't support the deal. barcelona is brought to a standstill, as a general strike is called over the jailing of separatist leaders. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. the food and drink federation have called the new brexit deal a backward step in terms of securing frictionless trade with the eu, compared to the agreement secure by teresa may. other groups including the cbi have given a cautious welcome to the deal but want more assurances about the future trading relationship with the european union. british manufacturers for scotch whisky to biscuits and savile row suits are braced for a significant financial hit after us tariffs came into effect in retaliation for subsidies given to aerospace manufacturer airbus. french, spanish, german and uk still wines will also face the new 25% import tariff from today. the competition and
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markets authority says nationwide building society will pay up to £2 million customers after failing to send — and sending inaccurate — payment protection insurance reminders. more than 7,000 customers could be due refunds. nationwide has already repaid more than £100,000 to customers who did not receive reminders. so the reaction from business has been coming in thick and fast today — is there an overall consensus emerging? knots really, we have had some grouping saying that step forward in the last hour or so, the food and drink federation have said this was a backward step in comparison to theresa may's deal, in relation to securing frictionless trade with the european union, so ian wright is the industry body's chief executive and he says it sets us on course for regulatory divergence from our largest overseas market on areas including food safety, and quality
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issues. areas we are world leading and he said these would increase costs for businesses and consumers and undermine the suck oefs the uk's food and drink industry. what is the institute of directors saying? they have kind of said it is a relief for many businesses, the problem is, the devil could be in the detail. they are still picking through that detail, to try and come up with really red lights or issues they they really should be raised, but of course they are running out of time. we have the vote tomorrow, the mps vote tomorrow, the confederation of british industry, they are similar, they have given it a cautious week but say we need a bit more detail this is what the director of the cbi had to say. well it does not give us the backstop of a customs union, a bear bones backstop customs union, and that was welcomed by business, but you know, that deal isn't on the table. this deal is. what business
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feels is we have been in the brexit waiting room for far too long. this does help to move us on, it is not three cheers by any mean, there are serious issues with this deal, but business can work with it, and so we are saying we are cautiously welcoming of it, we do want, however, a real focus on close alignment with the european union, and crucially, this deal is virtually silent on service, and we are an8 virtually silent on service, and we are anso virtually silent on service, and we are an800% virtually silent on service, and we are an 8 o 0% services economy, there is a lot of work that would need to start as soon as this deal is agreed. so what do small businesses think about this. let us champions to —— chat to craig bow meant. what is your take on this new deal. thank you. small businesses have been split on brexit, the very question of whether to remain or to leave, so that has fed into this deal. we are
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finally seeing a credible pathway to certainty for small businesses in britain, so we are less, we have less of the cautious welcome, we are a bit more fulsome than that, we see a bit more fulsome than that, we see a way of stopping the three years of uncertainty we have had until now, we see a way of securing that transition deal, that transition period which is, it is only 14 months and it would have been 20 under the original deal. that is less. the point is we get that transition and that is number one issue small businesses have said they need. what about the future, once we come to negotiating the trade deals are you concerned there will be more emphasis on getting trade deals with other countries rather than with the european union our biggest trading partner, because thatis our biggest trading partner, because that is what business groups have been saying. we need to maintain a close relationship to our neighbour, but the same time we see the benefit of talking to the us, in you know, to the growing economies round the world, so we see some benefits in an independent trade policy and to do that you need to have the right to
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negotiate on certain areas of goods. we don't believe this prevents that. imean we don't believe this prevents that. i mean all bets are off in terms of political declaration. the agreed floor of thing, but at the same type if we get that vote tomorrow we will have such a relief in the economy, right across it. people will be able to invest, stop the pause to recruit people, so this would be a good moment tomorrow to finally see a bit of closure. are you concerned about the extent of regulatory divergence from the eu? that is often code for you to agree with brexit? so if you aren't allowed to diverge at all there is no point to brexit, so we don't take that blanket all divergence is bad but we wanted to make sure we don't see standards diluted, so all bets are off. it is an exciting moment if we can finally get a deal that puts that transition period in place, so we have this long period of no change, small businesses only change once, if we
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see ambitious trade deal, small businesses want to trade with the us, it is the number one market for small exporters in britain. we need to see that turbo charged, enthusiasm and a focus back on domestic policy. let's get over this and look at late payments be and employment costs. thank you, at this comes as time craig is talking about doing trade deals with the us, we have had import tariffs imposed on a range of goods manufactured here in the uk from scotch whisky to savile row suits. it is a complicated situation. markets? let us look at the market, the ftse100 has been going in and out of negative territory all day, as you can see currently down, that is the state of play for the currencies so the pound against that, the euro, and the pound against the dollar still rising and certainly this seems a lot of
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optimism round currency traders, optimistic perhaps this deal can be passed tomorrow. the ftse100 has been dragged down though by concerns about china's economy, because in the latest quarter, showed another slow down, that is a real concern of the world's second largest economy. the cac 40 is pulled down by renault shares falling by 12% after really disappointing now it's time for a look at the weather. hello there. some dramatic skies to take us through the rest of this afternoon, with towering cumulonimbus clouds like this, interspersed with spells of sunshine. this was the scene in gosport in hampshire earlier in the day. looking at the radar picture, you can see the lion's share of the showers have been across wales, southern england, with some thunderstorm activity here, and if anything, the showers will continue to be really heavy, driven into the north—west of wales. you can see the clouds aligning —
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a cloud street being pushed in by the prevailing winds into north—west wales, and if anything, the showers here through this afternoon will get even heavier, so i think there is a risk of seeing some localised surface water issues building in here, with those torrential thundery downpours. there will also be some particularly heavy rain working into eastern scotland, where the met office have issued a weather warning for accumulations of rain — notjust through this afternoon, but lasting into the night—time and perhaps into the first part of saturday as well. further southwards, showers will come and go as well across england and wales. it will stay quite blustery overnight as well. the onshore winds keeping things quite mild towards the south coast. generally we are looking at temperatures overnight between four and nine degrees in the towns and cities. as far as the weekend goes, it is another day of sunshine and showers coming up on saturday. however, we should see some change in the weather picture by sunday, with far fewer showers, more in the way of drier weather and a bit of sunshine coming through. now we start the day on saturday with an area of rain moving southwards across scotland, into northern england. behind that, the winds start to turn to a northerly direction. now any showers we have down the western side of the uk will not be as heavy as they have been
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over recent days. the heaviest showers are likely across the north east of the uk, really. temperatures 14 and 15 degrees for parts of england and wales, but turning colder for northern ireland and scotland, and that is a sign of things to come. for the second half of the weekend, those northerly winds become a bit more extensive. around some of our north coasts of scotland, down the north sea coasts of scotland and down the north sea coasts of england as well there could well be a few showers left over here, and probably quite a bit of cloud. the best of the sunshine though will be across western areas where it should be a largely dry day. maybe a few isolated showers just running into pembrokeshire and the peninsula. into next week, quite a big change monday and tuesday. this area of high pressure will be building in and that means a change to much drier, more settled weather. that's your forecast.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm ben brown live at westminster where boris johnson is briefing his cabinet, ahead of an historic vote in parliament tomorrow. the prime minister has been trying to persuade mps to back his new brexit, the result is expected to be tight. what i would say to all colleagues, effectively with this new deal we have something that is fundamentally different, a new proposal, a new proposition, that means we are leaving the eu and able to effectively achieve what other members sought in the past when he didn't vote for the withdrawal agreement. but opposition parties are set to vote against him — and northern ireland's 10 democratic unionist mps won't support the deal.
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the deal is toxic as far as northern ireland is concerned. it does not meet the promises which the prime minister made, that the whole of the united kingdom would be leaving the eu. the other news this afternoon: barcelona is brought to a standstill, as a general strike is called over the jailing of separatist leaders. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — with jane dougall. plenty of rugby to keep us occupied this weekend. yes, but also the breaking news in the last hour, the bulgarian football association has confirmed the head coach has resigned. it comes the head coach has resigned. it co m es after the head coach has resigned. it comes after england's black players we re comes after england's black players were racially abused on their match on monday. thanks jane. chris fawkes has all the weather. the weekend is looking a little bit better, lots of showers on saturday,
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a couple on sunday, but we will be looking at hill storms that have hit cornwall recently. good afternoon and welcome from westminster, where the prime minister is about to brief his cabinet in an emergency meeting ahead of tomorrow's historic vote in the commons where his brexit deal will be put to the test. borisjohnson says he‘s ‘very confident‘ he‘ll win backing for the deal struck yesterday in brussels, but the result is expected to be tight. with opposition parties , and the dup , set to vote against him, mrjohnson is trying to convince labour mps to switch sides, while keeping his own backbenchers onboard. our political correspondent, iain watson, has this report.
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here is a turn—up for the books, a conservative prime minister who actually seemed to enjoy his excursion to brussels. backslapping all round, as borisjohnson secured a brexit deal yesterday. but 24 hours these days, is a long time in politics. and he is facing more difficulties back in britain than in brussels, as he struggles to get enough mps on side. so, what kind of deal will they be voting on? much of it is similar to theresa may‘s, for example, protecting citizens‘ rights, eu residents here, uk citizens over there. the uk will also pay what the eu regards as its financial obligations, a divorce bill of around £33 billion. but the deal is different when it comes to northern ireland. there would be no border checks in ireland but there will be checks on some goods going from great britain to northern ireland, and this has cost the support of the dup. the deal is toxic as far as northern ireland is concerned. it does not meet the promises which the prime minister made,
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that the whole of the united kingdom would be leaving the eu. so, we will not be voting for the deal and indeed we will be voting against it and encouraging others to do so. borisjohnson has lost the dup, but he will be hoping to hold onto some of his sceptical mps who share their views. so, would the government discipline any of their own politicians who step out of line? of course, we‘re going to try and persuade and point out the real positives in this deal, on the merits, and i‘m confident that that will help bring people behind it, and obviously it will be a close vote tomorrow but i am confident we can get this done now. here is a measure of how hard the government‘s trying to get the deal through. conservative whips, that‘s those who try to keep party discipline, have been calling around their colleagues, including, presumably by mistake, an mp who had actually defected to the lib dems. ijust got a call saying, there's a rumour on the grapevine you're going to vote for this deal and is there anything i can do to help?
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and i told him that actually there is nothing i could do to help them or they could do to help me, this is a lousy deal. meanwhile, the labour leadership are trying to keep their mps in leave areas from backing the deal. this is what the shadow chancellor said when told that this mp, ronnie campbell, was likely to vote with borisjohnson. i will have a chat with ronnie, because ronnie is a socialist labour mp and the one thing he has stood up for all his life is the protection of workers‘ rights. this will undermine workers‘ rights in our country. and how did that chat go? at the moment, i will be voting to support the deal. but i am getting a lot of pressure from the head lads of the labour party, jeremy corbyn and john mcdonnell, to abstain. because of the deregulation of workers' rights. if all these manoeuvrings weren‘t complicated enough, i am afraid i have to tell you that something else is going to happen here at westminster tomorrow as well. a cross—party group of mps are going to try to change
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borisjohnson‘s deal, to make sure it only comes into effect if he is willing to extend the brexit deadline. they say this is an insurance policy against leaving with no deal at all. if we don‘t need the extension, having asked for it, it should terminate immediately we leave the eu, and we are all in favour of doing this as rapidly as possible, if it can be done by 31st october, terrific, but we want to make sure that we don‘t drop out by mistake in between saturday and then. and saturday is likely to be one of the most dramatic moments at westminster in recent years. the stakes are high the stakes are high and the stakes are high and the the stakes are high and the key the stakes are high and the key votes will be close. the home secretary, priti patel, says the government is working hard to secure the votes to get boris johnson‘s brexit deal through tomorrow.
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we wa nt we want to work hard tonight and tomorrow to get the votes in parliament. i am confident with the prime minister‘s new deal and also the fact the prime minister has achieved what people said he simply could not achieve, in terms of opening up the withdrawal agreement, removing the backstop, getting back control in a way which we were told can never happen. i think on that basis we have a compelling proposition to go to parliament tomorrow and ask all members of parliament to back this new deal and help us leave the eu. that was priti patel, the home secretary. i‘m nowjoined here by our political correspondentjess parker, who‘s at downing street. there is a cabinet meeting under way right now and i suppose the question for the cabinet, for the prime minister, the question everyone is asking is has borisjohnson got the numbers to get his deal through parliament tomorrow? yeah, politics here in westminster is often a matter of mathematics but never more
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so than ahead of the vote tomorrow. my so than ahead of the vote tomorrow. my understanding is amongst the things the cabinet will be talking about, the last time cabinet was met, they met on monday afternoon, i think they will also be quenching those numbers because be in no doubt, it won‘t just those numbers because be in no doubt, it won‘tjust be boris johnson who is trying to influence people, persuade, conservative mps who are eurosceptic conservative rebels, or maybe even labour mps to try and back this deal tomorrow. cabinet has just got under way. we have seen a number of cabinet ministers including the likes of jacob rees—mogg, stephen barclay, the brexit secretary, more in there and they will be having their meetings. i‘m not sure how long it will last under discussion has to be, do they have the numbers for tomorrow? just tell us, how is tomorrow? just tell us, how is tomorrow going to pan out because there is going to be a couple of amendments at least we understand.
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one from oliver letwin which potentially could throw a bit of a spanner in the works as far as boris johnson is concerned. yes, and it wouldn‘t be the first time that oliver letwin has maybe thrown a spanner in the works as far as boris johnson is concerned. a couple of amendments have already been tabled, there is one from the snp calling foran there is one from the snp calling for an extension and an election, and there is one from sir oliver lachlan which is designed to, even if borisjohnson lachlan which is designed to, even if boris johnson gets lachlan which is designed to, even if borisjohnson gets approval from his deal, still mandate him to seek an extension to that 31st of october deadline. weiser oliver letwin is doing that is he is concerned that between tomorrow and the 31st of october, that legislation that needs to be past in order to bring all of this into effect, it could be a stumbling block. maybe some mps could change their mind, maybe the legislation could get held up somewhere in the house of lords and therefore you could be looking at a no deal scenario on the 31st of october. he is insisting that if all
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the legislation is passed by the 3ist the legislation is passed by the 31st of october, there is no need foran 31st of october, there is no need for an extension. he isjust trying to block no deal but no doubt, it is frustrating some people who really wa nt to frustrating some people who really want to get on with this and put as much pressure on mps as possible to support the deal. thank you very much indeed. the president of the european council, donald tusk, has been talking to journalists after the european council summit in brussels. he described boris johnson as surprisngly effective — but that he would be reserving hisjudgment until after tomorrow‘s vote in the house of commons. i am sure borisjohnson is really determined to finalise the deal, no doubt. i have a different opinion about brexit but i should say boris johnson is surprisingly effective. it is not only determination but some political skills. we are still waiting for a decision.
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our assessment will be complete only after voting in the house of commons. that was donald tusk talking to the bbc. a lot of number crunching as you can imagine. we know the dup will not be supporting the deal, sammy wilson told me earlier on today he thinks the deal is toxic. but a number of labour mps say they will vote for the deal. john mann is one of them — despite party leadership like john mcdonnell telling them not to. he spoke to me earlier. john mcdonnell wants to remain in the european union, he and i stood ona the european union, he and i stood on a manifesto that said we would accept the result of the referendum. he and! accept the result of the referendum. he and i both voted to have that
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referendum but if you have a referendum, you accept the result and that is what i will be doing. nationally, that is what the country did, and it is easierfor me because 70% of my constituents voted to leave as well so there is no ambiguity on the mandate that i have. and that is what i will be seeing through and that is what i was re—elected on, as well as other labour mps. and he had any contact from the leadership, harry had any people telling you what you should be doing or asking you to change your mind? that might have you had any people. i have had no works from anywhere on other side contacted me, i have not had borisjohnson, john mcdonnell or anybody else, nobody. you‘re making up your own mind, you have made it up. also, i think there isa have made it up. also, i think there is a nervousness actually. a nervousness amongst the whips of
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overdoing it because they can get a counter reaction to doing that. what i think counter reaction to doing that. what ithink mps counter reaction to doing that. what i think mps will be doing is they will be thinking through what their constituents expect of them. i have had e—mails this morning, lots of them, from my constituents, overwhelmingly, saying thank you, you are backing the deal. from people elsewhere in the country, lots of them say no, that is a disgrace you are backing the deal. i‘m doing what my constituents say iti i‘m doing what my constituents say it i think the more that labour mps listen to their constituents, the more likely it is that this deal will get through. andy deal, even though a lot of people are saying come on your side, on the labour side, are saying it would be damaging for workers‘ rights, damaging for workers‘ rights, damaging for workers‘ rights, damaging for environment of standards and so on. they know that
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isa standards and so on. they know that is a red herring because there will be in withdrawal bill that is amendable and a majority in parliament wanted to keep workers‘ rights, environmental standards, has the absolute power to do it. indeed, a majority in parliament has the power to strengthen them better than the european union. that is democracy. there is an overwhelming majority in parliament to at least maintain our current standards and a majority, i think, maintain our current standards and a majority, ithink, to maintain our current standards and a majority, i think, to improve them soi majority, i think, to improve them so i have no fears whatsoever on those two issues and i don‘t think the general public would have voted in politicians who try to get rid of paid holidays or water down environmental standards. democracy will prevail on that.
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so, can mrjohnson secure a majority for his brexit agreement? let‘s look at the numbers in the commons. there are 650 mps in the house of commons — but the seven sinn fein mps don‘t take their seats and the speaker and three deputies don‘t vote, which means the number you need to get to the winning post and gain a commons majority is in practice 320. the conservatives now have 287 mps — borisjohnson can be confident of the support of most of them, but some may not vote for him especially if he fails to win over the dup before saturday. it doesn‘t look like he can, they are calling the deal toxic. labour have 242 mps and the message from their leader, jeremy corbyn, is clearly to vote against, but how many can be persuaded to vote for the deal despite party‘s official position? how many would supportjohn man‘s
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position who we were just hearing from, that is going to be really crucial. then there are 36 independent mps — of those by far the largest group is 23 who were formerly conservatives but lost the whip or left — most of those who were previously tories are likely to back the deal. there are 35 snp mps and they will vote against. as will the 19 liberal democrats and as things stand, the 10 mps for the democratic unionist party say they cannot back the plan — the independent group of change — who now have 5 mps — will also vote against as will the 4 plaid cymru mps and the 1 green. well, let‘s talk about those numbers a bit more, i‘m joined now by our senior political analyst peter barnes. that is a quick run through of the numbers coming from your perspective can mrjohnson get that deal through? it is too close to call at the moment. we have been looking at the moment. we have been looking at the various mps who have made public
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state m e nts the various mps who have made public statements or told us which way they are planning to vote on the record. we got it down to 202 we‘re pretty confident i planning to vote for the deal —— 302, confident i planning to vote for the deal -- 302,301 confident i planning to vote for the deal —— 302, 301 who are planning to vote against the deal but that still leaves a large number, 36 undecided mps and it is that group who are going be crucial. tell us in more detail, who that group are. we‘re talking some from the brexit wing of the tory party and some from re—voting labour constituencies? there are effectively three different groups of mps which the prime minister has to win over. there is the erg, the probe exit wing of the conservative party. he has won over a number of those mps, —— brexit wayne. they say they are now happy to support the deal. there are still quite a few who are
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undecided. i think most will end up voting for it but they could be swayed against. there are labour mps, we have seenjohn mann and there are a handful of others who are there are a handful of others who a re pretty there are a handful of others who are pretty confident to vote against the deal but there are probably 15 or so who are undecided. a lot of the labour mps early voting constituencies. their constituents we re constituencies. their constituents were like them to vote with the deal and they are people who have written letters who desperately need a deal at some point. did you want a deal so they are pretty undecided. the third group, there is a group of independent mps, a lot of those are former conservatives who had the whip withdrawn, there are some four labourmps, whip withdrawn, there are some four labour mps, this whip withdrawn, there are some four labourmps, this group whip withdrawn, there are some four labour mps, this group of independence and quite a few of those are undecided so there are some of those that conservative whips will be trying to proceed. what a visit —— what if it is a tie?
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it is conceivable, isn‘t it? what a visit —— what if it is a tie? it is conceivable, isn't it? there are rules, but i am not clear. the speaker has a casting vote and are presidents on what the speaker should do in such circumstances. this is an unusual vote, it is not clear what the president should be. there are two main ones, one in there is a chance of further debate, there is a chance of further debate, the speaker should vote in a way that allows for further debate to carry on. but he should not change the substantive text of a bell. if it isa the substantive text of a bell. if it is a law going to the house of commons and there is a tie on an amendment, the speaker normally vote against that amendment. in this situation, i am against that amendment. in this situation, iam not against that amendment. in this situation, i am not quite sure what the position would be. it might be that he takes the view if it is a tie he should vote with the government‘s motion, but wejust don‘t know. government‘s motion, but wejust don't know. great to talk to you, thank you so much for that detailed analysis, at the end of which we cannot still really predict but good to talk about it.
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let me show you some pictures live from big ben with an extinction rebellion a protester doing what the organisation has called a free solo climb. a spokesman from extinction rebelling saying the climber is actually a tree surgeon. then atkinson, who is 43 years of age. they have said he is planning to drop an extinction rebellion banner. there it is, you can see it. and this is elizabeth tower, currently under maintenance, surrounded by scaffolding and extinction rebellion are saying it is to highlight government inaction on the climate and ecological emergency. those are the latest pictures from westminster, that extinction rebellion demonstrator, and that is
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at the end of their two weeks of protest here in the capital. apparently, he isjust as boris johnson. there he is, tree surgeon who is very high up that tower. that‘s it from westminster for now — back to martine croxall in the studio. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: borisjohnson is briefing his cabinet, ahead of tomorrow‘s vote in the commons for his brexit deal. but opposition parties are set to vote against him — as well as the ten democratic unionist mps who won‘t support the deal barcelona is brought to a standstill, as a general strike is called over the jailing of separatist leaders. in the sport, the bulgarian football association has confirmed the head coach has resigned. it comes after england‘s black players were
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racially abused during their euro qualifier on monday. wales have announced a fully fit side for the quarterfinal match against france in the rugby world cup. it follows fears that fly—half dan biggar might not have recovered for a concussion in time. and british number one johanna konta is out for the rest of the season. she says she has pain in her knee and has decided to focus on rehabilitation for the remainder of the year. i‘ll be back with more after half past. there has been sporadic shelling and gunfire in northern syria, a day after turkey accepted a us demand for a temporary halt to its offensive against kurdish targets. yesterday president erdogan agreed to a five—day pause to allow kurdish forces to withdraw from a swath of territory along the turkish border. barbara plett—usher reports. bomb explodes. there is a ceasefire in place but not all is quiet. in the syrian border town of ras al—ain, the sound of artillery shattered the morning, sporadic gunfire continued. kurdish forces have accused turkey
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of shelling civilians. the turkish president has denied it. the kurdish militias are deeply entrenched in the city. just a day earlier they were still fighting hard to keep it. turkey says they are a terrorist threat and is determined to expel them away from the border. what happens here will likely be an early test of the accord. what the americans brokered was a pause in the violence, but it was enough for president trump to declare victory. he needed one — his decision to withdraw us troops has been strongly criticised as abandoning america‘s kurdish allies and paving the way for turkey‘s incursion. we‘ve all agreed on a pause, or a ceasefire, in the border region of syria. and it was unconventional what i did. i said, they‘re going to have to fight a little while. sometimes you have to let them fight a little while. it‘s like two kids in a lot, you have got to let them fight and then pull them apart. this was definitely not a victory for the kurds. ankara has agreed to suspend
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the military operation for five days and to eventually make that permanent, but only if the kurdish fighters pull out and give up their heavy weapons. you cannot solve your refugee problem by making new refugees, by displacing people from their homes. so it‘s a really serious humanitarian problem, which requires more deliberation, because these people have nowhere to go, because these people are the local people of the region. in fact, the americans have essentially accepted what the turks were trying to achieve with the military operation, a buffer zone on the syrian side of the border that they will control with their armed forces. already, the human cost has been great, some 300,000 people displaced. kurdish civilians are wondering what will happen to them, even if the fighting stops. a fifth day of protests and a general strike have brought
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barcelona to a standstill. tens of thousands of demonstrators have converged on the city from all over the region, two days after the supreme court sentenced nine separatists to up to 13 years in jail over a failed attempt to break away from spain in 2017. these are the life pictures from the city. trains have been stopped, roads have been blocked and the sagrada familia church has been shut down after protesters blocked its entrance. barcelona and real madrid have also postponed a match they were due to play on 26th october. a church warden has been sentenced to life in prison — with a minimum term of 36 years — after being convicted of murdering a university lecturer. 28—year—old benjamin field was found guilty in august of killing 69—year—old peter farquhar in order to inherit his house and money. the murderfollowed a campaign of physical and mental torture.
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police have arrested more than 700 people during a week—long operation to tackle so—called county lines drugs gangs across the uk. dealers use mobile phones to make sales outside of cities, and exploit children or vulnerable adults to deliver the drugs. in total, contra band with a street value of around 400 thousand pounds was seized. there have been fierce gun battles in northern mexico after security forces seized a son of the jailed drugs kingpin, joaquin ‘el chapo‘ guzman. heavily armed members of the cartel exchanged fire with police and troops for several hours after ovidio guzman lopez was picked up in the city of culiacan. police later withdrew without him. our south america correspondent will grant reports. culiacan is a city at war. not a conventional war perhaps, but an intense and violent conflict all the same. heavily armed gunmen
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from the powerful sinaloa cartel exchanged sustained gunfire with the police and the military in the state capital, spreading panic in the city‘s main commercial district. gunfire. their demand was simple, they wanted their leader, ovidio guzman, the son of the most notorious drug lord, joaquin "el chapo" guzman, to be released immediately. once the fighting subsided a little, the government gave its version of events, saying a routine police patrol had been attacked from a home and the officers went in to take control. translation: during this incident one of them was identified as ovidio guzman lopez. as a result, several organised crime groups surrounded the house with a force greater than that of the patrol unit. given the cartel‘s greater force and the potential harm to the civilian population, the authorities later said that the police decided to turn
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the wanted drug lord over to his men. if that is in fact what happened, and in mexico moments like this are generally very murky, it will be a huge embarrassment to the state and federal governments. at the same time there was a prison break in the city involving as many as 20 inmates who escaped in the chaos. el chapo guzman was recently sentenced to life in prison plus 30 years in the united states on drug trafficking charges. his sons have partly inherited the family business. the government of president andres manuel lopez obrador has been accused of failing to create a coherent security strategy on the drug war since coming to power nearly a year ago. this latest violence will only serve as further evidence to his critics that his administration needs to get a grip on the problem still sweeping much of the country. will grant, bbc news, mexico.
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now it‘s time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. hello, it is a dramatic afternoon sunshine and showers. some of those showers will be thundery and most frequent in wales, across parts of the midlands and southern counties of england. a look at the stream of cloud heading into the north—west of wales, that‘s where we are likely to see the downpours, bringing a risk of localised water issues, may be some hailstorms mixed in. it‘sjust got it will have a very wet afternoon, the rain continued to pour down overnight. we have a met office yellow weather warning in force with that extra to come and go. elsewhere, showers continue overnight, it will stay blustery, relatively mild in the south, temperatures it will stay blustery, relatively mild in the south, temperatures eight or 9 degrees in western areas will not be as heavy, a band of rain pushes southwards across scotland into northern england. behind that the wind turns into a northerly direction so it will feel cooler because his
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northern areas. further south, generally fewer showers but still a couple of heavy ones. that is your weather.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines. borisjohnson is briefing his cabinet, ahead of an historic vote on the new brexit deal in parliament tomorrow. i would say to all colleagues effectively with this new deal we have something that is fundamentally different. it‘s a new proposal, it‘s a new proposition that means we are leaving the eu, and are able to effectively achieve what other members of the parliament sought in the past when they didn‘t vote for the withdrawal agreement. but opposition parties are set to vote against him — and northern ireland‘s ten democratic unionist mps won‘t support the deal. extinction rebellion hold more protests in westminster — including one activist who scaled the scaffolding surrounding big ben. barcelona is brought to a standstill by a general strike as catalans
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protests against the jailing of separatist leaders. sport now on afternoon live with jane dougall. there‘s been more fall out from the racism experienced by england‘s footballers in bulgaria at the beginning of the week? the bulgaria national coach krasimir balakov has resigned. he was in charge of the team in the 6—0 defeat to england in sofia on monday night which was marred by racist chanting and nazi salutes from home supporters. the bulgarian football association has confirmed bala kov‘s departure, but they say it was because of the side‘s performance, which had been unsatisfactory in recent months. the match — which was a euro qualifier — had to be stopped twice because of monkey noises and nazi salutes from the bulgarian home fans. balakov had claimed after the game that he couldn‘t hear any of the racist abuse directed at england‘s black players.
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in light of those ugly racist scenes the premier league is re—emphasising their "no room for racism campaign" as the premier league returns after the international break. the england and manchester city star raheem sterling is fronting the video which will be broadcast on big screens in stadiums this weekend. the objective is to get fans to report any racist language or behaviour at the ground. there‘s room for every kind of emotion. but there‘s never room for racism. there's no room for racism... in the premier league... ..or anywhere else. if you see it, report it. the former newcastle and england forward shola ameobi is part of the eight—man bame panel, advising the premier league on racism issues ahead of this weekend‘s campaign. he says nothing has changed since he played because not enough has been put in place to combat racism in football. it is about, you know,
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tackling these issues head on, and i think obviously, coming off the back of what was, you know, a tumultuous week in terms of the england team and the experience of bulgaria, these are issues that really need to be looked at, and i think it‘s really important that, you know, as this campaign no room for racism, it is notjust a campaign, it is, come on, we need to take action on that. this month‘s el clasico between barcelona and real madrid has been postponed because of fears of civil unrest. the match was scheduled for the 26th october but there have been several days of protest in barcelona after nine catalan separatist leaders were jailed on monday. both barcelona and real madrid disagreed with calls to switch the game to madrid. barcelona have proposed a new date of the 18th of december. we are waiting for confirmation on that. a huge weekend ahead at the
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rugby world cup and wales have named their team when they face france in their team when they face france in the quarterfinal. wales have named a fully fit side for their quarter final match against france, which is on sunday. it‘s the same team that beat australia earlier in the tournament. there were worries about fly half dan biggar — he‘d suffered two concussions in consecutive matches earlier in this tournament. but warren gatland says he‘s fine to play and that he‘s gone through the due diligence, and all the protocols and that he‘s been fit for three or four days. biggarfailed a head injury assessment after taking a blow in their win over australia and then collided with his team—mate liam williams during the fiji game. he sat out the uruguay match and so he will have had more than ten days to recover before france on sunday. centres jonathan davies and hadleigh parkes have also been passed fit, after suffering from knee and shoulder injuries respectively. the same 15 will line up that started the games against georgia and australia. warren gatland has said they know
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exactly what to expect from their opponants on sunday. we have had a great record against them. i think we have won seven of the last eight games and the one we lost was the 100 minute game in paris, where they scored in the last minute. so — but even in saying that, they have always been close games, but we are going in with a lot of belief, a lot of self confidence. england play australia and ireland play new zealand on saturday. the other game on sunday is japan v south africa — all the build up and coverage on bbc five live. that‘s all the sport for now. now on afternoon live — let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. sss
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peter levy is in hull with a special piece on how eu citizens are feeling now a brexit deal has been agreed between the uk and eu. back with you in a second, peter. susie fowler—watt is in norwich with the opening of a new exhibition in great yarmouth, but not the typical exhibition you might expect. more injust a moment. but first, peter, what seems to be the issue for those from the eu living in lincolnshire at the moment? we have been looking at people who are from the eu working and living here, we have been to boston, in lincolnshire, now this is the police in the uk which had the highest number of people who voted to leave, backin number of people who voted to leave, back in the referendum in 2016. and the figure was 75%. 75% of people in the figure was 75%. 75% of people in the town voted to leave the eu, the highest in the country. now, the clock is ticking for thousands of
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people from poland, latvia, lithuania and other eu countries who moved here for work. the government wa nts moved here for work. the government wants them to apply for what is called settled status, so they can stay after brexit, but so far, only a few have bothered. and we are going to hearfrom one lady a few have bothered. and we are going to hear from one lady called veronica, she is a freelance journalist, she worked in lincolnshire, she has been here for four year, she is enjoying life here and wants to stay. this is her. my name is veronica, and i'm a freelance journalist, here in lincolnshire. i came to the uk four years ago, and i enjoy living here, because of my friends, job and volleyball, but often miss my family and dog in poland. so how do people feel about applying to stay? it is hard to tell. there isa to stay? it is hard to tell. there is a bit of apathy, that is for sure, the eu families having until december 2020 to apply for this
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settled status, now in boston which we are talking about today, only 15% of people have actually started that application process, which as you can see is very low. since the eu referendum there has been an increase in the number of migrants living in lincolnshire since 2016. we were talking earlier to a chef who moved here fire years ago and ru ns who moved here fire years ago and runs a very successful polish restau ra nt. runs a very successful polish restaurant. he believes his restau ra nt restaurant. he believes his restaurant and his business has a good future. he by the way has presettled stay us the. the government martine, is spending almost four million pounds on a marketing campaign to encourage eu migrants to apply. many will be watching the programme this afternoon, they need to apply early for the settlement scheme. they have until december 2020, but an advice centre in boston said many are leaving it too late and some if you can believe this, many don‘t think
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that brexit will happen at all. that is a talking point for another day. no—one has a crystal ball, no—one has predicted it yet. not quite. thank you. now over to susie fowler—watt in norwich with an exhibition set up for tattoos — tell us more! this is an exhibition all about tattoos and i didn‘t know this but a p pa re ntly tattoos and i didn‘t know this but apparently one in five is tattooed and that rises to one in three for young adults, that includes anything from a little floorer on the ankle to the full body with sleeves and everything. this new exhibition should be popular. it is on at the time and tide museum £4. the organisers are keen to say it is not just about sailors tattoos. it is the largest collection of tattoo related arm work. it includes a life—size sculpture of a tooed maori
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but tucks to the 100 hands project. each tattooed with an original design by leading tattoo artists work in the uk today. 36 it's a beautiful art exhibition, with a lot of original tattoo artwork that hasn't been seen before this exhibition was created. and this sort of thing isn't really being collected by other museums, so it's a bit of a one off. i think if you're interested in tattoos and being tattooed, the one hundred hands is an amazing sculptural record of where we are in tattooing now. tattooed maori buttocks, once you see something you can‘t unsee it! as you said tattoos very popular these days but they go back a long way. you said tattoos very popular these days but they go back a long waym wa nts to days but they go back a long waym wants to challenge myths about tattooing which is existed for many centuries, across different culture, in fact king harold had tattoos which i didn‘t know, that were used to identify his body after the
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battle of hastings in 1066 and early christians often had the sign of the cross tattooed on their bodies. it became fashionable in the late 18 hundreds and early 19 hundreds for aristocratics torta tooed. winston churchill mears had a snake on her wrist. now it has developed into an art form, that is what this exhibition is celebrating. in fact the curator stars in the publicity material. she has had a special tattoo to mark the occasion which she proudly showed off this afternoon and it says notjust for sailors. i am not going to ask where either of your two‘s are. we will have to maintain an air of mystery. peter has more on the that story in lincolnshire at 6.30 on look north. thank you both for taking us nationwide.
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if you would like to see more on any of those stories you can find them on bbc iplayer and we go nationwide every afternoon at 4.30 ever here on afternoon live. let‘s return to brexit now, and what voters think of mrjohnson‘s agreement? in the eu referendum, more than two—thirds of people in barnsley voted to leave the eu. but the town is represented by two labour mps, whose party is opposed to mrjohnson‘s deal. our north of england correspondent, danny savage, has been speaking to voters about tomorrow‘s vote , and a question of divided loyalties. barnsley, a traditionally labour supporting town which voted out in the referendum. so, how do people here feel about their local mps being ordered to vote against the brexit deal tomorrow? i think that labour ought to go with the deal, it is time it was sorted out. after three years it has
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dragged on and dragged on. i voted to leave. so you would want your mp to vote for this deal? probably, yeah. but he has been told not to? i know! what do you think of that? i don't know, it is theirjob to do it, i am so undecided, i am up in the air with it all. i think they should vote to leave because the country voted to leave. simple as that? simple as that. dave and i voted differently on the brexit thing and it is the only thing that we would argue about so we try not to talk about it too much. which is why you didn‘t want to talk to me when i stopped you! most people here think there is nothing difficult about the conundrum facing mps tomorrow. people of barnsley voted to leave, 68%, simple. you would be very happy if you see your labour mp defying what he is being told to do by his party? you have got to ask yourself, where do your loyalties lie,
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do they lie with the party or with the people that voted you in, hence that is why you are getting a big salary as an mp, to represent the electorate? so you think your local labour mp should denyeremy corbyn tomorrow? yes, he should, get it over and done with, we want to come out, most of barnsley wants to come out anyway, so why would they not vote to come out? simple, really, out. but outside barnsley college, there was a note of caution. a deal, yes, in my opinion, because then at least we can have something and plan with it. if they keep changing from no deal to this deal, it makes businesses more confused and annoyed than what they need. barnsley feels no less pro—brexit than it did when we reported from here the day after the referendum. it will be watching what labour mps do tomorrow. danny savage, bbc news, barnsley. in a moment, the latest
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business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. borisjohnson is briefing his cabinet, ahead of tomorrow‘s vote in the commons for his brexit deal. but opposition parties are set to vote against him — as well as the ten democratic unionist mps who won‘t support the deal. barcelona is brought to a standstill, as a general strike is called over the jailing of separatist leaders. if you would like the food and drink federation have called the new brexit deal a backward step in terms of securing frictionless trade with the eu, compared to the agreement secure by teresa may. other groups including the cbi have given a cautious welcome to the deal but want more assurances about the future trading relationship with the european union. british manufacturers for scotch whisky to biscuits and savile row suits are braced for a significant financial hit after us tariffs came into effect in retaliation for subsidies given to aerospace manufacturer airbus. french, spanish, german and uk still wines will also face the new 25% import
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tariff from today. the competition and markets authority says nationwide building society will pay up to £2 million customers after failing to send — and sending inaccurate — payment protection insurance reminders. more than 7,000 customers could be due refunds. nationwide has already repaid more than £100,000 to customers who did not receive reminders. what has been happening to the pound? optimism following the news a deal has been reached. there is speculation it will be passed by mps because sterling has continued upwards up one point, pushing through the 1.16 against the euro barrier. it has slipped back but still up on the day, and the optimism remains, so certainly as far as the currency markets are concerned, some are factoring in that there will be a deal passed
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tomorrow. and you have been canvassing opinion from various business groups on this deal?” canvassing opinion from various business groups on this deal? i have and they are wide and varied. so we have had a cautious welcome from the cbi but it says it needs more reassu ra nces cbi but it says it needs more reassurances about the trading relationship. that there might be too much emphasis on doing deals with other countries. from the federation of small businesses, i spoke to the boss who told me that he believes we are finally seeing a credible pathway, to certainty for small businesses, and the fsb also said outlined they see a lot of benefits in having this independent trade policy. however, the food and drink federation have said it‘s a backward step. i mentioned that in the headlines. in terms of securing trickionless trade it doesn‘t believe it as good as the one
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secured by theresa may. so let us have a chat about that with tim rycroft, the chief operating officer of the food and drink federation. tell me why you think it‘s a backward step. yesterday pouring over all 96 pages of the deal and we have compared it. there are two areas we feel it‘s a backward step. the first is the future of our frictionless trade with the eu, our biggest market for food and drink, where this government is looking to secure more of a bare bones free trade agreement, than something that was much more closely aligned with european regulation and the second area is on that issue of harm nighisation of regulation, in order to have a seamless market we need to be closely aligned to the eu, and we are anxious about the absence of detail in the political declaration about our relationship with other
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agencies. one commentator said earlier, this is like the first stage of a marathon, the negotiations are going to be going on and on, even if the deal is passed can you try and thrash out some of what you want after a deal is passed? passed? it is vital to have this discussion now? you are right, of course will is a huge amount of work to do on delivering the political declaration on turning it into detailed tenting. we will be talking to the government ant that, but i think it is important now, that we signal our view of what britain‘s largest manufacturing sector thinks of the direction of travel. isn't it better for your members that there is a deal? well, it is certainly taking no deal off the table on 31st october, it is something that would be massively welcome for our members after the third deadline is approaching, for which they have had to spend time and money preparing, so that is vital. but it is also important that
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people understand what the consequences are of having a more arms—length trading relationship with our biggest food and drink partner. thank you very much for your views. speculation is continuing about how a trade deal will be struck, at a time when trade between the uk and the us is deteriorating. absolutely, some of the groups i have spoken to today said they are concerned is about the fact there will be more emphasis on doing a deal with the likes of the us instead of the european union on the day tariffs have come into force on goods manufactured here in the uk. for example on savile row suit, cheese, this is a row the us said the eu had put illegal subsidies on airbus, made those subsidies available illegally and the world trade
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organisation ruled that was true, so these tariffs have now come into effect on the day we are debating this. let us have a chat to my market‘s guest. simon french. what do you make of the fact that these tariffs have been imposed today. this is a long running dispute? well as you rightly say this stems from accusations from the us, that the european union has provided legal subsidies to airbus, and the european union‘s view is well the us government do the same thing towards boeing, but of course you put nit the right context, this comes at a time when particularly in the uk we are looking at the prospects for third country trade deals of which the us one would be the most significant. this perhaps sends a message that the white house might believe in fairtrade but they are not necessarily interested in
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free trade, that is a challenge in the negotiating position that will come after a deal is approved. also we have a reading today about how the trade war with china has affected china‘s economy because there has been another marked slow down. that is right. growth in china down. that is right. growth in china down to just 6% year on year, that is brilliant growth rate. in the context of where china have grown, thatis context of where china have grown, that is a slow rate of growth and they have been embroiled in a larger trade war with the us, as well as trying to reduce the amount of stimulus they have put into their account, so together, that is a growth rate that has taken the markets a if not by surprise put them on a back foot, particularly when the world economy is so reliant, on a quarter of the global growth coming from china. what do you make of the sterling move, are they are a rethe reflection of a deal would be struck, passed in
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parliament tomorrow? well i think you put the sterling move today, which has been a bit of upward movement but in the context of the movement but in the context of the move where you have seen a 6—7% increase in the value of sterling. traders going into the weekend like the rest of us, not certain which way lit g go. even if the deal doesn‘t get past there is a pathway for more discussions down the path, if you perhaps get a second referendum, that is not a position to be short on sterling given how sure traders have been over the last few years. the markets. the ftse one hundred you can see has ended in negative territory, those concerns about the slow down in with‘s sec largest economy have weighed on indices round the world. investors are concerned about what this signals because it seems as though there is this downturn which is approaching
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as you can see on the boards, the pound still holding up very well against the euro, 115 against the dollar 1.28. it broke through to the 1.16. cat 0.25% rant, renault shares listed two female astronauts are making history with the first ever all—women spacewalk. christina koch and jessica meir have floated out of the international space station in an operation to replace defective equipment. the walk is due to last five and a half hours. more than 200 people have carried out spacewalks since the first one in 1965, but only 14 were women and they‘ve always been accompanied by men. i long to see the day when that is
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not even news any more! i long to see the day when that is not even news any more! now it‘s time for a look at the weather with chris. hello there. some dramatic skies to take us through the rest of this afternoon, with towering cumulonimbus clouds like this, interspersed with spells of sunshine. this was the scene in gosport in hampshire earlier in the day. looking at the radar picture, you can see the lion‘s share of the showers have been across wales, southern england, with some thunderstorm activity here, and if anything, the showers will continue to be really heavy, driven into the north—west of wales. you can see the clouds aligning — a cloud street being pushed in by the prevailing winds into north—west wales, and if anything, the showers here through this afternoon will get even heavier, so i think there is a risk of seeing some localised surface water issues building in here, with those torrential thundery downpours. there will also be some particularly heavy rain working into eastern scotland, where the met office have issued a weather warning for accumulations of rain — notjust through this afternoon, but lasting into the night—time and perhaps into the first part of saturday as well. further southwards, showers will come and go as well across england and wales.
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it will stay quite blustery overnight as well. the onshore winds keeping things quite mild towards the south coast. generally we are looking at temperatures overnight between four and nine degrees in the towns and cities. as far as the weekend goes, it is another day of sunshine and showers coming up on saturday. however, we should see some change in the weather picture by sunday, with far fewer showers, more in the way of drier weather and a bit of sunshine coming through. now we start the day on saturday with an area of rain moving southwards across scotland, into northern england. behind that, the winds start to turn to a northerly direction. now any showers we have down the western side of the uk will not be as heavy as they have been over recent days. the heaviest showers are likely across the north east of the uk, really. temperatures 14 and 15 degrees for parts of england and wales, but turning colder for northern ireland and scotland, and that is a sign of things to come. for the second half of the weekend, those northerly winds become a bit more extensive. around some of our north coasts
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of scotland, down the north sea coasts of scotland and down the north sea coasts of england as well there could well be a few showers left over here, and probably quite a bit of cloud. the best of the sunshine though will be across western areas where it should be a largely dry day. maybe a few isolated showers just running into pembrokeshire and the peninsula. into next week, quite a big change monday and tuesday. this area of high pressure will be building in and that means a change to much drier, more settled weather. that‘s your forecast.
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live at westminster, ahead of an historic vote in parliament tomorrow as mps decide whether they will back borisjohnson‘s brexit deal. the prime minister is briefing his cabinet — he says he‘s confident his deal will pass but the result is expected to be tight. this is an opportunity notjust to deliver it brexit absolutely on october the 31st, but start a new chapter for october the 31st, but start a new chapterfor our october the 31st, but start a new chapter for our country. but will they get the numbers? the dup and labour, and every opposition party saying they‘ll vote against the deal. the deal is toxic as far as northern
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ireland is

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