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tv   BBC News Special  BBC News  October 19, 2019 4:30pm-6:31pm BST

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it means that, under the law, the prime minister borisjohnson will have to write to the eu asking for brexit to be delayed. he's been forced to shelve a vote on his new withdrawal agreement, and that highly anticipated vote will not now take place today. instead there could be what's called a ‘meaningful vote‘ on monday, when the government brings forward to the commons the withdrawal bill, which would enact the agreement in uk law. let's just hear the moment that vote on the letwin amendment came in. the ayes to the right, 322. the noes to the left, 306. cheering thank you. the ayes to the right,
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322. the noes to the left, 306. the ayes have it, the ayes have it. following that defeat, the prime minister said he remained confident that his brexit deal will get through parliament by the end of october, and will do this by bringing forward legislation back to the commons next week. i continue in the very strong belief that the best thing for the uk and for the whole of europe is for us to leave with this new deal on october the 31st. and, to anticipate the questions that are coming from the benches opposite, i will not negotiate a delay with the eu. and neither does the law compelled me to do so. i can tell our friends and collea g u es do so. i can tell our friends and colleagues in the eu exactly what i've told everyone in the last 88 days i've served as prime minister,
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that further delay would be bad for this country. bad for our european union and bad for democracy. so next week, the government will introduce the legislation needed for us to leave the eu with our new deal on october the 31st and i hope that our european union colleagues and friends will not be attracted as benches opposite are, or rather i should say the front bench is by delay. i do not think they will be attracted by delay and i hope that then honourable members, faced with then honourable members, faced with the choice of our new deal, our new dealfor the uk the choice of our new deal, our new deal for the uk and the choice of our new deal, our new dealfor the uk and the eu, will change their minds, because it was pretty close today. i hope they will change their minds, and support this deal in overwhelming numbers. since i became prime minister, i have said we should get on and get brexit done
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on october the 31st say that this country can move on. mr speaker, that policy remains unchanged. no delays, and i will continue to do all i can to get brexit done on october the 31st, and i continue to commend this excellent deal, mr speaker, to the house. that was the prime minister is response to the vote. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, said parliament had spoken and borisjohnson would be wise to listen. i welcome today's vote. parliament has clearly spoken. order, order! apologies. the prime minister was heard. yes, he was. don't argue the toss with the chair, i'm telling you what the situation is and everyone can detect the prime minister was heard and the leader of the opposition will be heard. it is as
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simple and unarguable as that. jeremy corbyn. thank you, mr speaker. i welcome today's vote, it's an emphatic decision by this house that it has declined to back the prime minister is deal today and clearly voted to stop a no deal crashed out from the european union. the prime minister must now comply with the law. he can no longer use the threat of a no deal crashed out to blackmail members to support his sell—out deal. labour is not prepared to sell out the communities we represent. we are not prepared to sell out their future. and, we believe that ultimately, the people must have the final say on brexit which, actually, only the labour party is offering. today is an historic day for parliament because it said it will not be blackmailed bya it said it will not be blackmailed by a prime minister who is apparently prepared once again to
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defy a law passed by this parliament. i invite him to think very carefully about the remarks he just made about refusing, apparently, to apply for the extension which the eu number two act requires of him. our europe editor katya adler is in brussels. more delays, what will they make of it? the european commission has already said that it now waits to hear formally from the prime minister what he intends to do next. as far as the eu is concerned, they are now looking to the uk to sort this out. they've just agreed their second brexit deal with a second uk prime minister and have gone through three years of the brexit process and boris johnson is three years of the brexit process and borisjohnson is right when he says the eu at this stage wants to get on with it, even if and when they receive a request for a new brexit extension. do not expect the eu to rush to answer it, their
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formal deadline, there brexit deadline under eu law, runs out on the 31st of october, they could hold a summit of eu leaders to discuss an extension request as late as the 3ist extension request as late as the 31st of october, all eu leaders, as a reminder, would need to say yes foran a reminder, would need to say yes for an extension to be granted. they do not want to grant it or drag out this process any more than it has already been. however, if an extension is needed, to hold a second referendum on this brexit deal or hold a general election, i cannot imagine eu leaders would say no because, when it comes to the 3ist no because, when it comes to the 31st of october, that would lead to ano 31st of october, that would lead to a no deal they are trying and hoping to avoid since we held our referendum in june 2016.|j to avoid since we held our referendum in june 2016. i should factor in the european parliament because they have to ratify this
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agreement. i was speaking to philip and they were saying they had a session in brussels planned next week they could go before the october deadline but if they miss the window they would have to shove it into november. maybe they cannot get it through the council and the european parliament before the end of november? i would discount that, the european parliament could hold a vote next week. if it was seen that the eu should do so, for the moment they will look to the uk and see if there is going to be the so—called meaningful vote on this deal on monday, what would be the developments at the beginning of the week? the european parliament has a veto on this new deal, just like our parliament that the european parliament that the european parliament isn't expected to make problems for the deal because the european commission, in the building behind me there, they've been careful during negotiations to keep the european parliament in the loop the european parliament in the loop the whole time and now that the 27 eu leaders at the summit last week
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gave the nod to the new brexit deal, the european parliament is extremely unlikely to cause difficulties or obstructions there. from the perspective they are looking to the united kingdom to either pass the deal and everyone can move on. if the deal is passed, they will move into the transition phase where everything, not legally but in practical terms, stays the same between the eu and uk for 1h months to start with and trade negotiations on our actualfuture to start with and trade negotiations on our actual future relationship with the eu would be able to begin. don't forget that the leaving park was supposed to be the easy part. pa rt was supposed to be the easy part. part two, the debate and negotiations on future relations with trade and security and everything elsewhere predicted to be a lot more complicated. a very good clarification, thank you for that. with me is brigid fowler, senior researcher at
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the hansa rd society. let's go through the timetable meticulously, the benn act comes into play. the prime minister has indicated that he did not want to send a letter. or certainly not negotiate, there is a difference, does the letter have to come from the executive, or could it be sent by parliament? the benn act says that the letter must be sent by the prime minister. there is the minimal legal requirement of the prime minister, as of the end of today, that he has to send the letter with the wording that was set out in the act. so, ithink the wording that was set out in the act. so, i think that is pretty clear legally. one immediate question is whether the prime minister does anything else or sends another letter, or does anything else. that's the immediate question. lets anticipate he does that by 11 o'clock tonight. we will bring you news on that as and when we get it.
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on monday, the leader of the house jacob rees—mogg says they are going to put forward the legislation for the second reading, the withdrawal agreement bill that is needed in order to ratify the agreement. could they vote on that on monday?” order to ratify the agreement. could they vote on that on monday? i think that would be pretty difficult. normally, a bill is introduced on one day and you would not have the first big vote on it with the second reading vote, you wouldn't normally have that on the same day. it would be pretty difficult. two things are in play. one is the bill which will be the law needed to implement the withdrawal agreement and the other thing is still, at the moment, the government needs to pass a motion. the so—called meaningful vote which did not go through today. would you attach them together? they would need to be two separate things but the leader of the suggested they would be bringing both of them,
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possibly more starting work on them on monday, but there was a great deal of confusion in the chamber at the end of the debate. it appears even the speaker did not understand what was being proposed on monday and that has upset a lot of mps because they do not know what they are planning for and they have to approach to see if they know clearer what is coming on monday. they have three votes in the bank effectively. three more than theresa may got. the whips will know in which pools to be fishing. there is reason to think they may still get the second reading through. let's say that. then you have to programme the bill. that is where we could get into further delays. programming the bill, when the government basically tries to say how long it wants to ta ke to tries to say how long it wants to take to try and get the bill through. obviously, if the government hopes to ratify the withdrawal agreement by the end of october, he is having to ram the
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bill through quickly and it is possible he may not be able to do that. don't forget it isn'tjust when you get to legislation or a bill, it is notjust the house of commons but the house of lords as well. there may be further difficulties for the government there. and mps who have already argued today with the letwin amendment that they want more time to scrutinise, you will see them presumably putting forward amendments and the house of lords as well? the issue about mps putting forward amendments to the bill, that was going to come up whatever the timetable was. any bill is amendable. mps can always put down and try that anyway. if it was going to be passed. but they were under extreme time pressure if the government was trying to get it passed by the end of october. there is the small matter of the queen's speech alongside all of this, that was due to be debated on monday and
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tuesday. at some point there will have to be a vote on it? that's right, there has to be at least one vote in response to the queen's speech. there are normally votes on amendments proposed to that text as well. but that is in the control. the timing of it is in control with the government. the government said previously that would take place on monday tuesday and the debate would conclude on tuesday but there is nothing to stop the government from breaking off in the middle and doing brexit related work and then coming back to the queen's speech. may be this is a political question, i don't know, but what is their priority? would they want to bring the queen's speech back and risk a vote of no confidence or get the second reading through and get the bill on its way? those are the kinds of extremely intimate calculation is going on in number 10 at the moment
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in sequencing this depending on the numbers. very fine counting in what they think they've got the numbers four and the likelihood of losing the queen speech vote or passing a second reading. that kind of choreography on monday and tuesday could be tricky. stay with us, there will be many more questions through the course of the afternoon. thank you very much for the moment. let's get a sense of the feeble atmosphere here in westminster. jacob rees—mogg with his son being accosted by protestors. there's a large remain vote happening today. a number of prominent conservative's have required police escorts to get into the building today. the leader of the house being escorted by police as he walked through the millbank area on his way home today.
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the people's vote campaign has been holding a march not far away from here. ian blackford, the parliamentary leader of the snp is on stage. let's have a listen. we've got a job to do over the next few weeks. we are involved in all sorts of shenanigans. this is a prime minister prepared to stop at nothing, that we know is going to bring a bill next week to drive this through. so, we need that unity and need to get you to speak to every mp in the land. remind them what brexit is going to do. it is going to put in scotland 100,000 people on the doll, and will be a no—deal brexit because that is what borisjohnson wa nts to because that is what borisjohnson wants to do. we are faced with food shortages and problems with medicine supply. the chief medical officer in
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england, they are telling us lives are at stake. lives are under threat from what borisjohnson wants to do. we need to step back from this cliff edge. let's make sure that the people are given a vote. let's make sure that we find that safe landing place. we are, we will remain european citizens. thank you. a number of politicians have been on the stage through the course of the afternoon. we will keep an ion that one. joe twyman is with me. a lot of people will be asking how this plays out politically, at some point there may be an election. what are we seeing in the polls? my sense
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is that the worst borisjohnson can do is that he will stay where he is with party ratings but if he gets the deal through, he gets a boost as a result of that. no doubt that the bill itself does have support. most of that support you can imagine, comes from the voters. there were those who want it to go through. the key question is if he can sustain that support and for how long? would it get him into a general election at the end of november, beginning of december or next year? what people think of this deal compared to theresa may's? it is early stages but it polls better than theresa may's deal but a lot of it is to do with the fact that it is boris johnson putting it forward and he is far more popular, particularly among lead voters, than theresa may ever was. that is important because most people at home and out there are not
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downloading the deal and making notes and coming to a decision about whether they support it or not but they are looking for queues from people like borisjohnson and leaders they trust to make the right decision and they think he's the best person to deliver this and think it is the deal for them. it's a delicate decision for the labour party and they have called for an election. they say they want an election. they say they want an election but their figures are not climbing. at some point they have to make a decision as to whether they go foran make a decision as to whether they go for an election or a second referendum. that's right, the context is hugely important. if it is fought on brexit as the central issue, what we do about britain exiting the european union, it bases labour ina exiting the european union, it bases labour in a better decision than if brexit is done and dusted. but we do not know whether it will necessarily go well for him. if, longer term, there are problems that mean boris
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johnson's support reduces and the conservative party support. it may be good for labour but we do not know and it is an extraordinary gamble for labour and for the conservatives as well. and a deeply divided, hung parliament. people say would it be a hung parliament if we have the selection again? these points could make all the difference? yes but at the end of the day it is not the share of the vote but 650 seats. across the country there will be calculations based on party affiliations and loyalties but also brexit. that could hurt the conservatives in scotland, london, metropolitan cities, university towns, in the south—west. they could struggle to win over remain voters. boris johnson will be hoping the questions he posts is whether you are willing to hold your nose were reluctantly
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or opt for a government with jeremy corbyn as prime minister. he will be hoping enough people choose the former rather than the latter. and the brexit party are the big concern for borisjohnson. the brexit party are the big concern for boris johnson. does the brexit party are the big concern for borisjohnson. does their support great if he is. in two this delay? it depends on the circumstances. the data suggests, one in six people who voted leave would blame boris johnson one in six people who voted leave would blame borisjohnson if an extension is granted but instead they blame the european union, houses of parliament, anyone but borisjohnson. he houses of parliament, anyone but boris johnson. he could houses of parliament, anyone but borisjohnson. he could ride it out in the short—term but longer term, the tightrope he has to walk is if he goes to far in one direction on brexit, he alienates the brexit party but in the other direction he alienates lib dems and moderates who he needs for those key constituencies. let me take you to
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parliament square now, hilary benn is on the stage addressing the people's vote leaf. the prime minister failed people's vote leaf. the prime ministerfailed to get people's vote leaf. the prime minister failed to get his deal approved, we know it is a worse deal than we have today and worse even than we have today and worse even than theresa may's deal but the fundamental question facing the country is how we resolve this, how do we bring it to an end? not by forcing through his deal in that place but by going back to the people and asking them. in a democracy, there is a fundamental question... do we have the right to change our mind? cheering now, the brexiteers think we don't. i don't know whether the british people have changed their minds or not but i know that a confirmatory
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referendum will put the question back to them and we will get a decision and when that referendum comes, when, iwill decision and when that referendum comes, when, i will be campaigning with all of you to remain. not because the european union is perfect but we have a choice about what kind of country we are going to be. inward —looking or outward facing? embracing our friends be. inward —looking or outward facing? embracing ourfriends and neighbours or somehow wishing to go back to a past that is not going to return. the strongest argument that we can make is that the european project, for all its faults, has brought peace to our continent. cheering every single one of us here today who lost loved ones in the first and second world war is, who have been to visit the gravestones of the fallen, the most poignant
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inscriptions of the soldiers of the great war, known onto god, because no one to this day knows whose son, father, brother lies under those beautifully tended graves. politics, leadership, they brought an end to conflict in europe and we must continue to work with our neighbours if we are to deal with the great challenges that face our world. cheering so, do not... do not give up. keep going. be of good heart. be of good cheer. and, we will succeed. thank you very much. cheering dominic grieve is there, talking to people who want a second referendum. with me is the conservative mp tobias ellwood, the former defence
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minister who voted against the letwi n minister who voted against the letwin amendment this afternoon. you will be disappointed that the deal was not voted on. the nation will be watching this, what have we achieved today? we have not this town until monday or tuesday and we do it all over again. it's a wasted opportunity to show the eu that finally there is a form of consensus after three years of indecision, of paralysis. i hope colleagues, we are down to a handful of votes now, compared to what theresa may went through with those meaningful votes that took place. we are heading in the right direction but boy, are we making it hard for ourselves! why was the decision taken not to put the motion to the vote this evening rather than monday? what do you achieve there? because of the letwin amendment coming through, it changes para meters amendment coming through, it changes parameters a bit and i know he meant well, oliver letwin wants to support a deal itself but unfortunately with
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so many stakeholders supporting their own forms of brexit, we have time taking us beyond the 31st of october and it is scaring people. my concern is no deal has reared its ugly head again. some are saying my goodness, this could be us falling out of the eu without a deal but that cannot be what the dup one. i played on them to think about, when it comes back them supporting the government. but hasn't oliver letwin taken the risk of no deal, wasn't that his intention? yes, but it requires an extension to be granted but not only that, it gives more time, as! but not only that, it gives more time, as i say, for others. with perhaps different agendas to get to work. today we had the opportunity to confirm this parliament, after all of these years, to say we finally have a deal. a workable deal. a compromise. and we fluffed
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it. 306, presumably, are in the bag for the agreement itself. the reason we have lost today on the letwin amendment is because of the dup and i think amendment is because of the dup and ithinki amendment is because of the dup and i think i saw you at one point today cross the floor to try and talk them round. i spoke to sammy wilson, i know him well, a key figure in the dup, explaining concerns of the unintended consequences of supporting the letwin amendment. the numbers were, the same group of people supported a deal. i would be cautiously optimistic that there are greater numbers because there are labour mps who do not want a no deal. that supported oliver letwin and did not get the chance to actually support the substantive motion because it would never work. the two day gap is designed for what? a war of attrition, is it a
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thumbs is out? it is, i'm conscious we are speaking here, surrounded by people with these flags demanding a second referendum and this has been difficult for people like myself who voted to remain. how can you unite the country? if we were to have the second referendum, people'spositions have not moved, they have become deeper. let's say the referendum was won, 52—48 the other way? would it unite the country? it would flare—up, the brexit party and ukip as well. and about the programming, you can get a second reading on the bill on the vote on tuesday, there will be an enormous row and how long that takes. there are a lot of mps, those who backed oliver letwin today who want proper scrutiny of the legislation and they don't want it donein legislation and they don't want it done in two weeks? and there we are all aware of the details itself, whether political will or not, the
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substance is clear to see. we had a working agreement come through, and a written agreement. and the political declaration, the second pa rt political declaration, the second part of it, it is all there. not too different to what we discussed with theresa may's attempts as well. the substance is not worth picking over but it is whether we have a desire to conclude this and allow the compromise, the recognition that nobody is going to get the perfect brexit and i want unimportant, powerful, close relationship with the eu forcing reasons alone because of the wider threats we share. it occurred to me as you said that, you don't have the majority. if the opposition alliance wanted to take a no deal off the table, when they pass them another special motion and ta ke pass them another special motion and take the agenda of you again? you illustrate the problem with parliament today, everyone can agree on what they don't want, a no deal,
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but we cannot agree on what we want. this is a minority government and we require support from the other side of the islet cell. we tried to have a general election which was denied to us —— the other side of the aisle. parliament is in paralysis and we have to move on. tobias ellwood, thank you for sharing your thoughts with us. super saturday has turned into something we did not really expect. when we looked at it yesterday, oliver letwin's amendment has gone through which means the deal itself, the motion for the deal, will be re—presented on monday. and over the next two days, the government will be fishing around for extra votes, putting pressure on the dup to abstain. it doesn't look likely they will want to do that. are there enough labour votes, independent votes on the conservative benches that they can
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turn to get behind this agreement? that will be the focus over the course of the next 24—48 hours. this isa course of the next 24—48 hours. this is a bbc news special, do stay with us. you are watching a bbc news special from westminster where parliament has. borisjohnson to ask for a delay to brexit. the ayes to the right, 322. the noes to the left, 306. the ayes have it. mps passed an amendment withholding approval of borisjohnson amendment withholding approval of boris johnson steel until amendment withholding approval of borisjohnson steel until it becomes law, that means no vote on the prime minister is vote today but he will press on with his strategy. minister is vote today but he will press on with his strategylj minister is vote today but he will press on with his strategy. i will not negotiate a delay with the eu. neither does the law compel me to do so. neither does the law compel me to do so. it is an emphatic decision by this house that he has declined to
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back the prime minister's deal today and clearly voted to stop a no deal crashed out. outside parliament, anti—brexit demonstrators cheered the delay. the second referendum campaign have held a huge rally in central london today. the prime minister must ask for a delay until the end of january, by law. they are waiting to hear from the uk government but it isn't clear what boris johnson the uk government but it isn't clear what borisjohnson will do. welcome to our continuing special coverage of today's event in the house of commons where boris johnson of today's event in the house of commons where borisjohnson has vowed to press on undaunted with his brexit strategy after being defeated in the house of commons this afternoon. let's show you the vote and the numbers that went with it. mps and the numbers that went with it. m ps voted and the numbers that went with it. mps voted for it by 322 to 306 to back an amendment put forward by the former conservative mp sir oliver
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let m ea nt former conservative mp sir oliver let meant to ensure approval for the new brexit deal is withheld. until all of the necessary legislation has passed through the commons. what does that all mean? it means that under the law the prime minister borisjohnson will have to write to the eu by 11pm this evening asking for brexit to be delayed. he has been forced to shelve his vote on his new withdrawal agreement, that highly anticipated vote will now not ta ke highly anticipated vote will now not take place, probably until monday. instead, there could be what is called a meaningful vote in the house of commons on monday when the government brings forward to the commons the withdrawal bill for its second reading, which would enact the agreement in uk law. let's just hear that moment the vote on the left when amendment came in. the ayes to the right, 322. the noes to the left, 306. cheering
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thank you. the ayes to the right, 322. the noes to the left, 306. the ayes have it, the ayes have it. following that defeat, the prime minister said he remained confident his brexit deal will get through parliament by the end of october and will do this by bringing forward legislation to the commons next week. i continue in the very strong belief that the best thing for the uk and for the whole of europe is for us to leave with this new deal on october the 31st. and, to anticipate the questions that are coming from the benches opposite, i will not negotiate a delay with the eu. and neither does the law compelled me to do so. —— and neither does the law
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compell me to do so. i can tell our friends and colleagues in the eu exactly what i've told everyone in the last 88 days i've served as prime minister, that further delay would be bad for this country. bad for our european union and bad for democracy. so next week, the government will introduce the legislation needed for us to leave the eu with our new deal on october the 31st and i hope that our european union colleagues and friends will not be attracted as benches opposite are, or rather i should say the front bench is by delay. i do not think they will be attracted by delay and i hope that then honourable members, faced with the choice of our new deal, our new deal for the uk and the eu, will change their minds, because it was pretty close today. i hope they will change their minds, and support this deal in overwhelming numbers.
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since i became prime minister, i have said we should get on and get brexit done on october the 31st so that this country can move on. mr speaker, that policy remains unchanged. no delays, and i will continue to do all i can to get brexit done on october the 31st, and i continue to commend this excellent deal, mr speaker, to the house. borisjohnson responding boris johnson responding to borisjohnson responding to the vote. labour leaderjeremy corbyn said parliament had spoken and mr johnson would be wise to listen. i welcome today's vote. parliament has clearly spoken. order, order! apologies. the prime minister was heard. yes, he was. don't argue the toss with the chair, i'm telling you what the situation is and everyone can detect the prime minister was heard and the leader
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of the opposition will be heard. it is as simple and unarguable as that. jeremy corbyn. thank you, mr speaker. i welcome today's vote, it's an emphatic decision by this house that it has declined to back the prime minister's deal today and clearly voted to stop a no—deal crashed out from the european union. the prime minister must now comply with the law. he can no longer use the threat of a no—deal crash out to blackmail members to support his sell—out deal. labour is not prepared to sell out the communities we represent. we are not prepared to sell out their future. and, we believe that, ultimately, the people must have the final say on brexit which, actually, only the labour party is offering. today is an historic day for parliament because it said it
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will not be blackmailed by a prime minister who is apparently prepared once again to defy a law passed by this parliament. i invite him to think very carefully about the remarks he just made about refusing, apparently, to apply for the extension which the eu number two act requires of him. jeremy corbyn responding a short time ago. on thursday in brussels borisjohnson time ago. on thursday in brussels boris johnson told time ago. on thursday in brussels borisjohnson told the 27 european leaders that he was fairly optimistic he could get this through the house but i think many of them would have probably known how tight it would have been. let's go to brussels and speak to our europe correspondence. it won't come as an enormous surprise to the eu, but what will they do in response? the short answer to that, in the short term, is nothing. they will wait to see what happens in the early pa rt wait to see what happens in the early part of next week with their
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fingers crossed. the polish prime minister has already said, look, this isn't rejection, this isjust approval postponed. they look at it with a degree of optimism. the ball is very much in london's court in terms of what happens next. they are not discussing yet what will happen ifa not discussing yet what will happen if a request for an extension comes. they don't want one. nobody thinks brexit is a good idea but nobody wa nts brexit is a good idea but nobody wants it to be delayed any longer and suck the political energy out of eu politics. if all requests were received, it would be granted. —— if a request. because the eu doesn't wa nt to a request. because the eu doesn't want to be looking like it is pushing the uk out of the door. i think today's news from london is quite hard for brussels to react to because it feels like a decision postponed. we will have to wait until monday, tuesday to see what the fate of the legislation is in parliament, then we will have a clear idea of what brussels might do next. for the moment, thanks very much.
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our chief political correspondent can speak to us now. looking at the quote he gave when he responded to the vote, he said i won't negotiate an extension with the eu, but that isn't exactly the same as saying, i won't send the letter the benn act requires. downing street have been very tight—lipped about this. they have been talking about what will happen in the next few hours. the act kicks in at 11 o'clock tonight because "no deal" has —— because a deal hasn't been approved. then he is expected to write this letter. the question is whether he can write the letter but say to the eu this isn't what i want, this is what parliament wants, and effectively, give me more time, because next week they can either hold a meaningful vote, another one on monday, and then bring in the legislation may be on tuesday. i think privately there was a little bit of confidence within government circles that they did have the numbers to get a deal through. if
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you look at some of those who voted against the government and for the oliver let win amendment, some of those are former conservative mps. —— oliver letwin. if it was a straightforward deal they would vote for it, so there is some optimism they could get this through. the question then would be can they get some sort of legislation through before the 31st of october. therefore, an extension wouldn't be required. on that letter, there is a specific wording. it must come from the executive. there is specific wording in the benn act as to what it must say. does he send a second letter, is that what they are suggesting? lots of suggestions over the past few weeks as to how he might be able to get around it. that's a possibility, yes, the wording is in the benn act, so it has to be that. but then you can send something else saying, look, this isn't what i want. there was talk of getting
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somebody else to send the letter, may be somebody else in government, so that borisjohnson doesn't go back on those words where he said, i will not delay brexit at all. the point at the moment is he can still argue at the moment brexit hasn't been delayed and it doesn't happen until the letter has been sent and the eu has approved the delay, and how long it might be. and if it ended up being a delay in order to just get to the legislation through parliament, then i think it wouldn't be too harmful to borisjohnson. the other thing to bear in mind is once the delay is in place, opposition parties said that they would be willing to bring down the prime minister and go for a general election. we will have to see come next week whether they think that is the moment to act against boris johnson. so far they have been slightly reluctant to do so, partly because they can't agree amongst themselves what should happen after that if he were to be deposed. in terms of what will happen over the next 2a to 48 hours, there is
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some business in the house on monday, which will be cleared up by monday, which will be cleared up by monday morning, but presumably tomorrow it is all hands to the pump tomorrow it is all hands to the pump to try and get 1a votes. yes, but as i say, some of those are already in the bag, if you like. i interviewed david gorka early and he voted for the letwin amendment, but he said he would vote for either a second reading of the bill or he would vote in a meaningful vote for the deal. there are several like that. the other point, as well, is that. the other point, as well, is that some of those labour mps, there we re that some of those labour mps, there were a certain number who did not vote with labour today, there could be more if it was actually a vote on the deal. i think some of them would not necessarily want to put their heads above the parapet if it was not for a substantive motion on the deal itself, rather than the letwin amendment. they could get more numbers there. nobody knew for sure, asi numbers there. nobody knew for sure, as i said, but some ministers i have spoken to have looked at the numbers
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and felt the government could have got this through today. isaid got this through today. i said 1a. they had 306, and a majority is 320, you would not have to turn 1a... do you know how many they would need to turn? sorry to put you on the spot. 16 was the majority. it only has to be eight, doesn't it, andi it only has to be eight, doesn't it, and i think they feel like they could do that. but it is difficult without the dup on side. and there are still some conservatives who would much rather have the dup onside than not for lots of reasons. but i think that's a worry to lots of conservative mps, the fact the dup, standing up in parliament saying this deal undermines the union. that isn't a comfortable position for the conservative party to be in. sorry to put you on the spot, your maths is impeccable, better than mine! chuckles thanks very much. didn't she do well! let's go to scotland and sarah smith who has been watching events
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in glasgow. vicky young was raising the prospect that they would want to vote on the queen's speech at some point, sarah. we know the snp is very keen for an election. will they be pushing for a vote of no confidence perhaps sooner than the withdrawal agreement comes back? they've already prepared a vote of no—confidence. it has to be the official opposition who introduce a vote of no confidence. although the snp are very keen to see one and they want a general election as soon as possible it within their control to try and make that happen. they will be delighted, of course, with the result in parliament today. they still hope, somehow, that they might be able to prevent brexit from happening. whether that is via a second referendum which they also support after a general election. because this is a country where there is less pressure to say we have to deliver the results of the referendum. because the referendum here was 62% of the country saying they wanted to remain in the eu.
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there might be other developments in scotland, as well. we've been talking about whether the prime minister is going to send the letter he is required to do by the benn act before 11 o'clock tonight. if he doesn't, we will be in court in edinburgh, the highest court in scotland, one which can mandate the prime minister to act. and there are campaigners there. the court could decide to take the decision out of the prime minister's hand, if he is in contempt of court by not sending the letter, they could use a legal device in scotland called a nobile officium, they could get the clerk officium, they could get the clerk of the court to decide it, and they could send it to the eu and it would have the same legal force as if the pm had sent it himself. it could be a very interesting development to look out for in scotland here on monday if the prime minister does not send that letter tonight. the speaker has said this afternoon that he would be prepared to do that if he would be prepared to do that if he was required to do so. just one
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more question. there was a hearing in the court about a week ago, i think, the government said the prime minister would send the letter. so if he didn't he would be in contempt of court, wouldn't he? yes. he said he would comply with the law, that submission was made by the uk government, a bit different from the rhetoric we have heard from him at the dispatch box. they were clear, the dispatch box. they were clear, the government's lawyers, he would comply with the law. and also, this is important, all the talk over the second letter saying he didn't mean it. what has been made clear is that not only does he have to comply by sending the letter, he has to apply with intent. it was very clear that sending a letter and then saying i didn't really mean it won't count. he has to send a letter asking for a delay, and make sure he tries to get that delay, assuming the eu agreed to it. so, if he tries some sort of
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clever trick where he sends a second letter, it's possible the court of session will take action and hold him in contempt for that. let's quickly cross to belfast. we've just heard from the former defence minister who actually crossed the aisle through the course of the debate today to plead with sammy wilson in the dup to at least abstain and come onto the government's side in some way. yes, but the dup say the deal that was agreed by boris johnson but the dup say the deal that was agreed by borisjohnson provides a fundamental threat to unionism in northern ireland. it wasn'tjust the dup who voted to delay brexit today. the independent unionist mp sylvia herman, she also supported the letwi n herman, she also supported the letwin amendment. the dup say that they will allow further time to
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scrutinise the deal, but they are also seeking fundamental changes. those changes sent on the issue of consent under the withdrawal agreement stormont gets a role in order to provide continuing support, a vote, in the stormont assembly to agree those changes, which the dup say effectively put a regulatory board down the irish sea. but under the withdrawal agreement, that vote would require a simple majority instalment. —— regulatory border. stormont has not sat for two and a half years. the dup are seeking a unionist veto under the good friday agreement, contentious issues require a majority of both unionist and nationalist parties so they say they will use this time to gain the concessions they are looking for. it
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seems like boris johnson concessions they are looking for. it seems like borisjohnson is digging his heels in and it is unlikely there will be those changes that the dup are seeking. thanks very much for that. enormous pressure coming on top of the dup today, no doubt over the next 21! to 48 hours. bridget fowlerjoins me. evenif even if he did send a letter which he is required to do under the benn act, they know exactly what he is trying to do. it is within the power of the 27 leaders to decide how long that extension would be. yes. we have seen from the tone france and poland today that they don't see this as an end of ends, they say this as an end of ends, they say this is a delay in a deal. they won't meet again next week. as for
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the letter, i think he will send it. i think he will send it one minute before 11 o'clock tonight, as he is obliged under the law. he may be taken to the court of session, the scottish courts, if they did comply with the law. but if they didn't, i think it would go against those who voted for the letwin amendment today. political momentum has been with him since thursday, why tamper with him since thursday, why tamper with that by breaking the law? people around the country would take a dim view of that, wouldn't they?” think that right. if you take a slightly longer perspective on this the house of commons and the uk government are clearly nearer to getting a withdrawal agreement approved and ratified than we have
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been at any previous point in this process. if you wanted to take that view of it, don't upset that momentum, as you say, now. but there will have to be tricky manoeuvring over the next few days to get it going. don't go anywhere, i have lots of questions, ijust need to go over to steve baker who has had a long day and is probably about to go home but it is important to hear from him before he goes. he is from the eurosceptic european research group, of course. the letwin amendment went through today and that's because people just don't trust that it isn't a back door to a no—deal brexit. trust that it isn't a back door to a no-deal brexit. the reason it through is because remain have shifted the goalposts. presumably they thought boris johnson wouldn't pull off getting a deal that could secure the support of the house, so they put in place this unconstitutional benn act requiring him to seek an extension if he did not get a deal. then they have panicked because he has got a deal.
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they've shifted the goalposts, denied him, and they have once again changed the rules. they accuse us of forcing him into a "no deal", but myself, mark francois, and other collea g u es myself, mark francois, and other colleagues are clear, we vote for the deal, then we vote for legislation all the way through. people know my record as an organiser of my colleagues. we do what we say. in contrast to us, the other side keep shifting the goalposts. at least the prime minister is absolutely clear he isn't going to negotiate an extension. what the other side have been saying all afternoon is that this is a fundamental change in the way our country is run. there isn't enough time to scrutinise a withdrawal agreement bill. and there has been no economic assessment of it, and economic impact assessment. the same people saying there isn't enough time to scrutinise it, ran through the benn act, overturn the rules in order to get it through, by
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ignoring the queens consent for a royal prerogative, and hadn't thought about the cost of extending our membership. it is quite an unconstitutional act of parliament. it's only because of the bill of rights that we are not able to take it to court and have somebody other than the speaker adjudicate on how unconstitutional it is. my side of the argument have used normal politics, normal constitutional arrangements in the law to get a legitimate public vote and seek to carry it through. the remain side of the argument are chucking our constitution out of the window in order to try and overturn a legitimate democratic result. now today out there we have remain protesters disgracefully abusing decent, civilised ministers with a language i would not dream of throwing at people, then people are talking about us as if we are the bad guys. people have got to start getting real about what is really happening in our country. what's really happening in our country as people are throwing the rule of law of the constitution out of the window because they are too afraid
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to keep their promises. remind us of the numbers. did the entirety of the er g, are they now supporting the prime minister's agreement? —— the erg. supporting the prime minister's agreement? -- the erg. this has meant this is a meaningless vote. because of the letwin amendment it isa because of the letwin amendment it is a meaningless vote. but do you know the numbers? of course. i'm clear that no eurosceptic committed today to voting against the deal. at least not as far as i know. but in every meeting i have had, it is clear to me that no eurosceptic conservative committee to vote against. some were reserving their position, might have abstained, but it was low single digits. after all, precisely because we are going against this backdrop, there are flaws in this withdrawal agreement, but people like me are willing to compromise because, actually, the
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future is good. anyone objective ought to be able to rally around that future state. and see it as an independent country which would leave us great friends with our neighbours. it's the kind of relationship i've been telling ambassadors i would like. it's the kind of relationship they offered us. but we've ended up with mps running around like circus clowns, afraid to keep their promises, and asa afraid to keep their promises, and as a result of failing to keep their promises they are wrecking our constitution and our country. have you then forsake the dup? sammy wilson and nigel dodds have been talking to you through the week. they say this but a customs border across the irish sea, it is constitutionally disastrous for them. what you say to the dup? we are fond of the dup. we've worked closely with them. i was one of the people who stood them through the meaningful votes one, two, three. when i was chairing the meeting of collea g u es when i was chairing the meeting of colleagues earlier today, sammy wilsonjoined us, he got a rapturous
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applause when he arrived. we intend to safeguard our union and work with them. as the pm explained in the house of commons today, the arrangements, which are special to northern ireland, which are being put in place of this deal goes through, are ones that could be superseded. northern ireland is in the customs territory of the uk. we participate in free trade agreements. but because it would ta ke agreements. but because it would take some time to put in place the alternative arrangements which i and others worked up outside government, which is a fairly unprecedented piece of work to have been done, and iam piece of work to have been done, and i am grateful to nicky morgan, prosperity uk, and others, for everything they have done. people said it could not be done. when it is sorted, we will be able to have an arrangement for the uk, and a sea mless an arrangement for the uk, and a seamless infrastructure free border on the island of ireland. we are in a situation now where i hope your
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viewers will see that people like me actually do know what we are doing and how to get there. if only we we re and how to get there. if only we were not opposed by those who have refused to accept the referendum result we wouldn't be in this mess. but, as i say, thank goodness boris johnson won't be negotiating an extension. hopefully we will leave on the 31st of october with this deal, despite the flaws in the remaining section of the withdrawal... is this "no deal"? the situation is what it is in law. i've a lwa ys situation is what it is in law. i've always been clear that i would prefer always been clear that i would p refer to always been clear that i would prefer to leave with a deal. that is what boris johnson prefer to leave with a deal. that is what borisjohnson is putting before us. he is willing to swallow the compromise of the implementation period. even though it is worse for membership in terms of negotiating political power. we have negotiated some safeguards with number ten this week. i'm looking forward to seeing the legislation, seeing the safeguards, and hopefully getting this country out so the public can
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move on as they wish to do. in the meantime, i hope you won't mind me saying that i am due on another bbc programme very soon, and i need to get through that crowd who are going to abuse me on the way over. there is always another bbc outlet. grateful for your time. is always another bbc outlet. gratefulfor your time. thanks is always another bbc outlet. grateful for your time. thanks very much indeed. bridgid fowler is with me now. sorry, so many names! he said we are going to vote for this, we more or less have the numbers to vote for it, and it is those who voted the letwin amendment today who are the bad guys. to pick up on what bridgid said earlier, he lost the battle today, he set up this great theatre today, and he was humiliated. but he has come within 16 votes of getting his deal through. hejust 16 votes of getting his deal through. he just needs to work on eight or nine people to get them
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across the line. and then, fine, his legislation will be scrutinised, looked at. but if he gets that meaningful vote through on monday, he will be carried shoulder high out of the house of commons by the brexiteers and the erg. then only has to do is get the bill through and prevent labour or the opposition from attaching a second referendum. because that was the other issue which wasn't dealt with today. many people on the street are a second vote. nobody push that today so we will have to see what the tight malls say on that afterwards. slight raising of your eyebrows when he said hejust slight raising of your eyebrows when he said he just needs to get the bill through. no small task! chuckles no small task. it'll be a big and bill. mps will be able to table amendments or thoughts of amendment to it, including potential amendments for another referendum.
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-- it'll be amendments for another referendum. —— it'll be a big amendments for another referendum. -- it'll be a big bit amendments for another referendum. —— it'll be a big bit of work to do. while we are thinking of the erg, they said today that they will support the agreement through the legislation. but the conservatives don't have the majority. once these amendments are laid down, this could look different to how it does now. yes, i think that'll be the difficulty. if anything goes through... i mean, that's been the problem all the way along. if you get one side, one group of people passing something, then the other people fall away. if anything goes through that means the erg —— if anything goes through, and other groups such as the erg have a problem with it... including the dup. there were passionate contributions from the dup today. they were really quite angry with feeling betrayed by borisjohnson. everybody is weighing up their options at this moment. the
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opposition must be thinking the same. if they loose the election it'll be a harder brexit because they will have control of the legislation. equally, on the other side, if they do it now they might get a softer brexit. and if they do it now, and have an election, labour would lose it. when and whether to push this motion of no—confidence... we know the chief civil servant has said, you cannot come after december 12, it is the middle of winter. some welsh constituencies wants people to get to the polls. —— won't get people. you could be looking at brexit 2020 as well, not 31st of october, if it gets bogged down in the commons and in the lords. not after super saturday. who knows what would happen? thank you very much for the
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moment, you both. what it is likely to look like a cross the road when the bill is presented. let's go to the bill is presented. let's go to the town of bury in greater manchester. what do voters there make of what they've seen in parliament today? our correspondent andy gill has been finding out. what did they make of it? we spent much of the day in bury, which was a leave voting town. we spoke to levers and remain. a couple of her may voters we spoke to said they would like the deal to pass of this is all over and done with —— remain voters. lots of people in london today marching for a second people's vote. once that letwin a member and was voted for which effectively means a delay, we spoke to a couple of people who voted leave and still wa nt of people who voted leave and still want us to leave, to see what they
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think about the fact that mr johnson's deal has not got through today and there will be another delay. here is what they had to say. i think it's gone on too long. i think it's gone on far too long. this is enough. we should go back to how we used to be. when great britain was great britain. not worth a bit ofa britain was great britain. not worth a bit of a delay to make sure they get a decent deal? how long will the delay go on? another month. would you have liked the mps to pass boris johnson's deal? absolutely. no question. he is a character but i believe in him, yeah. the delay is just putting it back. we need to get out and that's it. all this messing about and delay, delay, delay, what does that prove? all the people that voted to leave, the politicians are not believing in the people stop we
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voted to get out of europe. and they're not taking any notice of us. some fairly transient views for a couple of people who voted leave here in bury. the letwin amendment today may change some peoples minds, but whatever people were think and before that vote today, they are probably something afterwards. passions running high around the country. andy gill there in bury, thank you very much. we had people marching through london today as well. the rally is still ongoing. let's just remind you of the numbers if you are just let's just remind you of the numbers if you arejustjoining us let's just remind you of the numbers if you are justjoining us and missed this afternoon. we did not get a deal because of this. the letwi n get a deal because of this. the letwin amendment, and you can see there are 22 mps voted for that amendment, as opposed to 306 —— 322
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mps. after that vote, the government pulled its vote on the agreement itself today and we are hearing that maybe the meaningful vote will be brought back on monday but that's still unclear. the speakers that he would clarify at the start of play on monday what part of entry business will look like. well, one mp who backed the letwin amendment — but had also said he would vote for the withdrawal deal, had such a vote been held, is the former tory minister david gauke. he of course was ejected from the party last month and currently sits as an independent. he spoke to our chief political correspondent vicki young about what could happen in parliament this week. we don't know for sure what this is about the why might the government wa nt to about the why might the government want to bring forward a vote on monday? one of the things we saw today was, if you like, two issues being entangled for someone about whether the government should seek an extension to get a letter, if
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something goes wrong with the legislation for the deal, that we have that in place so we don't crash out without a deal on the 31st of october. and people like me want to make sure that we've got that insurance policy in place. but then there's also the issue of the prime minister's deal and does parliament back it or not? and for someone like me,| back it or not? and for someone like me, iwant back it or not? and for someone like me, i want to make sure the insurance policy is in place but if there is a clean vote on the deal, thenl there is a clean vote on the deal, then i would vote in favour of it, and we did not get that today. we don't have the details. i don't know what the motion would be, but i suspect that what the government wants to do is, in a way, what should happen today, which was a clean vote the deal without disabling the provisions of the benn act. that is the thing, we did not get to that vote, but people like you to my other of your colleagues, plus some other labour mps might
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feel on monday we made vote for the deal now that we know the delay has happened and we are not crashing out without a deal. that's right. with the insurance policy in place, people like me can support the deal. we can get into legislation. we can scrutinise, if there are particular issues, but basically wanting to wish this a fair wind and make progress on this. i think we have a better chance of getting people on board if they are not voting for something in it runs the risk of a crash out on the 31st of october. i hope that, i in fact, the prime ministercan make hope that, i in fact, the prime minister can make progress and i think, from what i've seen today and talking to colleagues from all parties, is deacon wendy vote whether it is on monday or tuesday. do you think it's really the —— realistic the bill that needs to get through, that gets her by the 3ist get through, that gets her by the 31st of october? it is not normal having something like this going
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through the houses of parliament that quickly. it is very tight, and the balance that needs to be struck is proper scrutiny. at the same time, the public don't want this to drag on forever and ever. it is important we get it right but it cannot drag on for ages. i think it's a matter of getting that balance right 31st of october is very tight, but let's see what the government proposes and if there is a workable way of doing that, i would not want to stand in its way. asa would not want to stand in its way. as a formerjustice secretary, you would advise the preminger to adhere to the law tonight and send a letter. the prime minister has to send the letter, but i don't thing one should necessarily make a big thing about the letter. the effect, in terms of providing an insurance policy is right but in the end, the way the government will be viewed is whether it has been able to deliver a good brexit and the letter is not
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at the heart of that question. and let's remember, it is possible to ta ke let's remember, it is possible to take the legislation through by the sist take the legislation through by the 31st of october. although the letter will on in, it will not be operative because the whole process is done. it is still possible for us to leave on the 31st of october. i have always thought that is ambitious but it is so possible. from some conservatives, not the erg group, when people went to court to make sure there was a vote, they have stop that happening. it is very hard to explain to the public, particular given borisjohnson to explain to the public, particular given boris johnson doesn't to explain to the public, particular given borisjohnson doesn't have a majority here, the opposition could have stopped a no—deal brexit.” come back to the point of disentangling the two issues. i don't thing we should take away the protection, the projection remains
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there, but there are people who voted for the letwin amendment, including oliver letwin, who support the deal and want this to progress as quickly as possible. i am in that camp. ithink as quickly as possible. i am in that camp. i think next week, we can return to what is the issue of substance, about what the bill is, what it does, where does that leave us, andl what it does, where does that leave us, and i think we ought to be able to do that and i think the government is fair in truth to win the second reading of that, whether it is on monday or tuesday. and just to go to the actual deal itself. how do you feel it compares to the one theresa may managed to negotiate? you have any concerns, particularly hearing dup mps saying how much they dislike it and think it undermines the union? i will be very honest with you, i think teresa —— theresa — — theresa may's —— theresa may's t was a better deal. we have got to find a way to get through this. the theresa may
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deal did not get through the house of commons, i suspect the boris johnson deal will get through the house of commons at second reading next week, and although it is not perfect and i think there are things that we want to scrutinise, there are aspects of it i think we need to properly understand, i think leaving with a good deal is still the best outcome for the country. david gauke talking to vicki a short while ago. with me again isjoe twyman — director of the polling company, deltapoll. and it... i have seen an intranet or tweet from your political director saying that nigel dodds has said he is going to examine every moment stomach from is he saying the dup would rather reverse brexit
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altogether and see the pm's deal? pretty occurred in area. —— pretty extraordinary. he is saying with that threat, all the immense are under consideration ex week, whether thatis under consideration ex week, whether that is the queen's speech, the withdrawal bill and i could vote for them. that is a pretty big threat to borisjohnson. them. that is a pretty big threat to boris johnson. we don't need term item of the numbers. with 12 dup votes going the other way, they have that power. absolutely. the dup today basically pushed through this letwi n today basically pushed through this letwin amendment. without those ten mps going the other way, boris would be sitting pretty pretty tonight, but he's not. let's talk about how the country feels. we have just seen people in bury pretty unhappy. lester, the deal itself. it is more
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popular than theresa may's deal, but thatis popular than theresa may's deal, but that is because borisjohnson is more popular a permit is an theresa may was. leave voters... there are some remain supporters as well, some people do want to get brexit done, to give the quote, but at the same time most people want to get brexit done but what is more important as they get what they want from brexit, evenif they get what they want from brexit, even if it takes slightly longer. some people have looked at the dup position and say, why are they proposed to this? this is, it could be, economic nirvana. and yet, it comes down to the union. do we know how people in northern ireland thing about it? it is not clear, because there is not as much pulling in northern ireland, but what is clear is there's been a lot of focus on the economics, the fact that
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britain's economy was going to take a hit, the people that people's own personal economic circumstance will be damaged. but for a lot of people out there, it's notjust be damaged. but for a lot of people out there, it's not just about economics, it's about politics, society, culture, and that is the place with the dup. yes, they will be ina place with the dup. yes, they will be in a stronger economic position but that is not the be—all, end—all, with the dup. i am trying to think to the way the weakest going to unfold. we would expect him to send the letter tonight, wouldn't we? otherwise, he would be in contempt of court. absolutely. what we're expecting tonight is boris will that letter. he did not say anything in his commons speech earlier about whether he will come up at the law suggests he has to do that, and he said earlier today he will not engage in negotiations with the eu. that is different than not sending the letter at all. by the benn act, he has to send it if there is not a deal by the end of today. he has to
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go to the eu and asked them for an extension. that then puts us up for the rest of the week, what is going to happen with the eu. will they come back, of course we are going to grantan come back, of course we are going to grant an extension, there is no way we're going to push you out with the deal? that is what people think is going to happen. there were some people in the eu going to push through a more hard—line approach. president macron does not think there is another deal possible.” president macron does not think there is another deal possible. i am just thinking what they are going to go through with scenarios in downing street tonight. if they fear the dup are as good to their word, that they are as good to their word, that they are going to try and push through all these amendments, they‘ re are going to try and push through all these amendments, they're going to need a general election. will they try to get this agreement through first on monday and then hope, and some way, to have a vote of no—confidence in gopher in election? absolutely. number ten's
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strategy will be towards not focusing on the letter. essentially, they know they have to get the specs a lot past. they will introduce that in the commons this week. they will try and skim over and you that night come, and he bums in the road, and road, and try and push brexit on anyway. if they cannot, that is when boris goes, i have tried to get brexit done, you guys have scuppered it. we have this extension, or maybe we don't, boris will go, i have tried my best, these mps are scupper in brexit, it is time to have an election now. and jeremy corbyn, now that an extension has been gathered, will probably vote for. how does it play in the country, this delay in the election? the delay on the extension generally did not play well for theresa may. the extension on the exit he will play better for borisjohnson bun on the exit he will play better for boris johnson bun extension on the exit he will play better for borisjohnson bun extension on on the exit he will play better for boris johnson bun extension on a general election is something jeremy corbyn is something he hopes he can write out, because he is not in the best position. the general election
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isa gamble best position. the general election is a gamble for the conservatives but generally a bigger gamble for labour. we have seen bury tonight. they are frustrated they are not getting a say now. do they equally getting a say now. do they equally get first or did they do not get a vote on changing the shape of this place across the road? three years ago, people voted to leave the european union on at least in part because they were frustrated, dissatisfied to a disapproving of the way politics works in this country, and nothing really has happened in the three years since to change peoples minds about that. there is a see is him among some people three general election but i think be a lot of people, like brenda from bristol, who would not be really jumping with joy brenda from bristol, who would not be reallyjumping with joy at that being announced. and i must ask you about the people at the bear —— barricades today. where is a people's foot in the country. these things tend to go along party lines.
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a lot of the campaigners today are not fans of democracy. they're voting for a result. thank you very much for your thoughts this evening. the people's vote campaign has been holding a march not far away from here. danjohnson is in parliament square for us. there have been thousands of people out on the streets of london today, particularly constituted on parliament square, but it is breaking up now. a couple of people in the crowd have come to london from devon. you are originally dutch, crystal. tell me what this is about for you. we need to get out of this mess, and the only way out is to remain, in order to say we want to remain, in order to say we want to remain, in order to say we want to remain, we need another vote. what is wrong with getting it done, getting it finished? the only deal that's on the table is really worth considering, is what we have now. we wa nt considering, is what we have now. we want to remain, but we have to
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re—ask the question. and this is a democracy, right? this is the oldest democracy, right? this is the oldest democracy in the world. i think it's democracy in the world. i think it's democracy that has to ask the people, what do you want? now! you know people argue that is what happened three years ago. people that are currently voted to leave. and based on lies and deceit. that is what you believed? it is fact, isn't it? it is proven fact. boris johnson is a proven liar. he got sacked from the telegraph for lying through his teeth. he has been lying all this time. he's going carry online. he is threatening to break the law again today, having just lost the vote. is that what you say to 17.4 million people, they believed a lie? a lot of them did believed a lie? a lot of them did believe the lie. people find that
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very offensive. a lot of people find a lot of things very offensive. that is the state of the world, being led by this sort of right wing political elite. johnson is the 20th premise are coming from each and full of is quite different in every. and it has been quite a big rally today. two people addressing them on the stage. the former conservative mp and attorney general — dominic grieve — who voted for the letwin amendment. and the lib dem spokesman tom break. theresa may, the first time she has spoken since she became prime minister. if you mean to deliver brexit, you have to vote for a deal. if you don't, then you are guilty of the most egregious. how do you respond to that? i actually did
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respond to that? i actually did respond to that when i spoke. i agreed with her that if you use parliament to flaunt brexit, i think i would see that as a... going back to the public and asking them if they want a deal, i don't see as a stomach that as all, because the point i had the —— i don't see that as all, because the point i disagree with her, if they assess it to be uniquely damaging to the country, and the interests of the constituents they are supposed to represent... button more damaging can be no deal. tobias ellwood, he think you're has open pandora's box. i think pandora's box is open, bluntly. as i explained in the house, i think borisjohnson's deal, if it goes through, raises two big problems. firstlyi deal, if it goes through, raises two big problems. firstly i think the union of the united kingdom will come to an end. that is my
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assessment. i realise that might not happen but i have to factor that in. that is the end of northern ireland and scotland being in the uk, one threat coming directly from this. any second one is we talk about a transition from a tree trade agreement, but actually if you look at the terms of what the government is trying to do, i do not think he will get a free trade agreement. we are only talking a month before they have to apply to an extension of the transition period. far from have to apply to an extension of the transition period. farfrom this ending... there could be, but if you listen to the mood in the house, are members of parliament, including my erg colleagues, don't tolerate two yea rs of erg colleagues, don't tolerate two years of what jacob rees—mogg called vassalage, where you are locked into two more rules... farfrom recovering sovereignty, we are weekend commit damaged, we are losing leverage and
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we are not even likely to get to an and state —— weekend, damaged. no wonder we can't find a solution because every solution looks really bad, which is why i believe we should have a second referendum. but i spoke to 70 business directors this last week or so who are deeply, deeply frustrated and would have voted for this dealfor deeply frustrated and would have voted for this deal for some certainty, and i we are into the waiting game again, and that is creating damage down the country.” don't quite understand what certainty it would have given them. certainty stomach certainly, manufacturers — — certainty stomach certainly, manufacturers —— certainly, many factors route two boris johnson die route two borisjohnson die mike rome there majority —— majority -- there was no majority in the house for a second referendum.”
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think it will be a disaster for the united kingdom. if he is willing to put into a people's vote, as millions have been calling for today, we... how are you going to get that second referendum? there is no majority. the prime minister decided to support it, there would bea decided to support it, there would be a majority in the house. of course we would. breaking this logjam is possible... they don't wa nt logjam is possible... they don't want a second referendum as badly as you want one. part of the problem, it would be quite nice if this prime ministers stepped up to his responsibilities. he behaves in the most different in every fashion. he is now talking bring his deal back on monday for exactly the same boat. i would come every time he was asked anything, he was happy to give an assurance but the assurances were
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sometimes mutually contradictory. this is serious politics. but one reassurance he was not willing to give, when asked very specifically on the question of what you and traduce legislation to rule out a no deal, he was very quick he was not going to do that. prospect of no deal is still there even with force trondsen's deal at the end of the transition. —— pour chanson's you. do you expect a second... it might. boris johnson's do you expect a second... it might. borisjohnson's deal, do you expect a second... it might. boris johnson's deal, it do you expect a second... it might. borisjohnson's deal, it might start this week, at some point it is possible that we might end up voting ona possible that we might end up voting on a referendum. and i would hope we might geta on a referendum. and i would hope we might get a referendum, but then there's the question, will boris johnson accept that? and if you want to come or do we go from there? i share the frustration of the people
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who write to me and just want this nightmare over. i find who write to me and just want this nightmare over. ifind it nightmarish as well. but some leasing i'm going to abdicate responsibility and sign up to off think is really bad for the country is very difficult. dominic grieve, tom brake, thank you very much indeed. good evening. many of us have been playing the weather lottery today. a few isolate showers, just like this weather picture sent in from london. others, it's been great, wet, and pretty dismal. a couple of flood alerts out due to the intensity of the rainfall that's been stubbornly sitting across the scottish border for much of the day. a few scattered showers further west and some of these have filtered in the nuns we've gone to the afternoon. behind that weather front, some strong winds as well. they will continue to drive and some showers overnight but that weather front will start to wea ken that weather front will start to weaken and ease its way off into the
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north sea. clear skies overnight, lecture winds, separate tours likely to fall away and —— temperatures eckley to follow it. maybe some early morning mist and fog run. the re m na nts of early morning mist and fog run. the remnants of the weather for not producing that much anyway of rain but certainly a lot more in the way of cloud around and northerly wind will drive in a few showers close to the coast. but it will be a drier day in comparison to today and certainly in comparison to last couple of days. just a little bit cooler, 9—14d behind. we have been promising this area of high—pressure building in from the atlantic for the beginning of the new working week. it is there. but there is this little level of uncertainty. we will need to keep an eye on that, could bea need to keep an eye on that, could be a fly in the ointment, for the bulk of the country, it will be a dry, settled start for the new
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working week, and temperatures again around 9—14d to for the high. the high—pressure will drift its way slowly southwards and allow this weather fronts to topple across the top of that high, so that means we could see some rain into the far north of scotland and the winds strengthening here. elsewhere on tuesday, it's a dry, settled story after a chilly start and then with a south—westerly, temperatures may well recover to heights of 11 to 15 degrees. monday into tuesday, again, a good deal of dry weather in the forecast. enjoy your weekend.
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side, if they do it now they might get a softer brexit. the headlines: the government has lost a vote. the ayes to the right, 322. the noes to the left, 306. i will not negotiate a delay with the eu.
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thousands of people have marched on parliament in favour of a people's vote. in brussels, they say it will sit and wait until it gets a letter from the prime minister. the prime minister has until 11 o'clock this evening to send a letter requesting an extension. good evening from westminster — where the house of commons has been sitting on a saturday — for the first time in nearly 40 years. earlier this afternoon — mps voted to delay their decision — on borisjohnson's new brexit deal. this was expected to be the day that mps delivered their verdict — on the deal agreed in brussels — but instead borisjohnson must
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now write to the eu — by 11 o'clock tonight —— asking for a brexit extension — beyond october 31st. once beyond october 31st. the amendment had gone thr the once the amendment had gone through the government pulled theirs. we are no closer to seeing whether there is support in the house of commons for boris johnson's new support in the house of commons for borisjohnson's new deal. we don't know what happens next, not now, but we understand the government would like to bring back the motion on its deal on monday, but the speaker says he needs to look at the agenda in more detail and we should get some clarification on monday morning. we start with our political editor laura kuenssberg — on the day mps backed another delay to the brexit process. before it was official, moves in the middle, and cheering on the right. borisjohnson was thwarted. the ayes to the right, 322. the noes to the left, 306.
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mps did not say not never, just not yet. i will tell our friends and collea g u es yet. i will tell our friends and colleagues in the eu exactly what i've told everyone in the last 88 days that i have served as prime minister, the further delay would be bad for this country, bad for our european union, and bad for democracy. warnings of big trouble, though, if he wants to frustrate the law. today is an historic day for parliament, because it said it will not be blackmailed by a prime minister who is, apparently, prepared, once again, to defy a law passed by this parliament. i invite him to think very carefully about the remarks he just made about
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refusing, apparently, to apply for the extension, which the eu number two act requires him to do. any failure of a prime minister who thinks he is above the law, well, prime minister, you will find yourself in court. one way or another this was always going to be another this was always going to be a fraught and huge day. not a cue for a saturday match, but for parliament. would mps just for a saturday match, but for parliament. would mstust rush headlong into more confusion, or is it just headlong into more confusion, or is itjust a headlong into more confusion, or is it just a chance for those sure headlong into more confusion, or is itjust a chance for those sure of their position to give it again? i'm going to vote against the deal. it's very bad for the country. tensions torn by the referendum in plain view. but many of them agonising. genuinely wondering the best thing to do. even stretching family ties. for the prime minister, though, only one aim, to try to force this to a
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conclusion, anyway he could. statement from the prime minister. mr speaker, today this house has a historic opportunity to show the same breadth of vision as our european neighbours, the same ability to resolve, reach past disagreements, by getting brexit done. decrying attempts by mps to postpone saying yes or no legally to the deal until all of the laws that go along with it are passed, too. further delay is pointless, expensive, and deeply corrosive of public trust. labour, though, resista nt public trust. labour, though, resistant not just of the public trust. labour, though, resistant notjust of the deal... this government cannot be trusted and these benches will not be duped. but denying borisjohnson any chance to move forward, too. labour is not prepared to sell out the communities we represent. and we will not back this sell—out deal.
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we represent. and we will not back this sell-out deal. just as the former prime minister found, this sell-out deal. just as the former prime ministerfound, though, there is a range of opposition parties who will rage against brexit. a deal that would see scotland shafted by this united kingdom government. today, hundreds of thousands of people will be outside demanding a final say in a people's vote. how could plaid cymru ever support his billionaires brexit? this deal takes a wrecking ball to our social and environmental standards. and without his northern irish allies on board the prime minister simply could not be short of the numbers. this will do a great deal of damage to the union. look, though, who is coming to help, with a joke? though, who is coming to help, with ajoke? i though, who is coming to help, with a joke? i have though, who is coming to help, with ajoke? i have a though, who is coming to help, with a joke? i have a distinct sense of deja vu standing here.” a joke? i have a distinct sense of deja vu standing here. i know how you feel! and a rebuke to those who voted against her, now planning to
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do the same against borisjohnson. remember, though, once upon a time, that included him. when this house voted overwhelmingly to give the choice of our membership of the eu to the british people did we really mean it? i think there can only be one answer to that, and that is yes, we did mean it, because if this parliament did not mean it then it is guilty of the most egregious con trick on the british people. but there is a sprinkling of labour mps who want this done. we will be forced to seek an extension to the sist forced to seek an extension to the 31st of january. underlying forced to seek an extension to the 31st ofjanuary. underlying that the sponsors of their knack and only one motivation. that was to delay brexit and stop it. and it's not over, not yet. crowds who want another referendum are delighted. the delay gives them another chance to stop brexit. but frustration and nerves on the other side. we've always been
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clear, it's got to be brexit for the whole of the uk, it cannot be northern ireland left behind. remain, if they had enough, they would want us to get this done, and i'm astonished by the kind of anger thatis i'm astonished by the kind of anger that is beginning to boil up. for god's say, get it done, so they are turning their attention to parliament. they wanted this to be the beginning of the end, at least a conclusion. and look at this, cabinet minister being protected by the police from andy brexit protesters outside. —— anti—brexit. there is nothing final about what has happened today. animosity still all around. shame on you! shame on you! jonathan blake joins me now. we have had a big demonstration here for a people's vote, but it did get quite ugly for some of those
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politicians who were leaving. yes. there was a police escort for andrea leadsom. forjacob rees mogg, who had his son with him. michael gove also getting a significant amount of abuse while leaving the house of commons. that is a sign of heightened tension around westminster. it's extraordinary to have the house of commons sitting on a saturday. with that, you have the people's vote march through central london. and protesters here who we can see and hear outside the houses of parliament. tensions are high. when you have these big days at westminster, these big crunch moments, or not, as it turned out to be again today, then we see an increase in that activity. andrea leadsom responded and said it was frightening. pressures were running high. | frightening. pressures were running high. i will not negotiate an extension with the eu, says the prime minister. that's not exactly the same as saying i will not send a letter. do we have news of when he might send it? in a word, no. downing street have said very little if anything about that process of
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the prime minister sending a letter to brussels. he is required by law now because a deal has not been approved by the house of commons. to send that letter. the text which is set out in the benn act to brussels asking for an extension up to january 31 next year. he wasn't asked anything about that specifically in the house of commons. there was a briefing about it afterwards and the mp said to refer back to the prime minister's words. whether it will be sent, the process of it, whether we will see a copy of it after it has been sent, we simply don't know. let's take a step back for those who might not have gone on today. we had the letwi n have gone on today. we had the letwin amendment which withholds improvement pending the legislation. to ratify you need legislation, known as the withdrawn agreement bill. what happens to that bill now the letwin amendment has gone through? and the withdrawal agreement bill, which is the legislation which enacts the brexit
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deal borisjohnson legislation which enacts the brexit deal boris johnson has legislation which enacts the brexit deal borisjohnson has negotiated with the eu, put it into law, if you like. it'll still be brought forward next week, the government tells us. it will be introduced next week, as a formality, then a second reading on tuesday, when the real scrutiny and the votes on that legislation begin. today's events in parliament, the meaningful vote becoming meaningless in the prime minister's words, hasn't deterred him from trying to get the legislation to pass this deal through the house of commons. in addition to that, we will also see another attempt at another meaningful vote. that's what the government wanted to happen today. effectively mps were rubber—stamping the deal saying we will approve this before the detailed scrutiny on it starts. they will try again to do that on monday. when the leader of the house of commons, jacob rees mogg, announced that, there was a lot of disquiet among mps, particularly on the opposition benches about the process under which he had done that. some felt they had been ambushed, that it had been snuck in at the last
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moment. a lot of concern from the speaker, as well, bad weather that will be in order, because it'll be a similar motion to the one put out today where enough time has passed between the two to allow it. and crucially whether it will be amendable. because if it is we could be back in a situation we had today where a meaningful vote to become something very different because mps try to amend it and change it. something very different because mps try to amend it and change itm seems odd to people sitting at home that you have legislation for a deal that you have legislation for a deal that hasn't been voted on. we don't know whether the house of commons supports this deal. it almost sounds like they are putting the chicken before the egg. it seems odd to our standing out here, frankly. but that is what the government is trying to do to keep the process moving, in effect, and not be held up by the fa ct effect, and not be held up by the fact that mps had voted it a to delay their approval of the deal. you could argue this is an attempt to comply with what mps voted for today. in any case, we have this
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question hanging over the whole procedure of the extension that the prime minister is legally required to ask for and what his response to that will be. they lost by 16 on the letwi n that will be. they lost by 16 on the letwin amendment. if you think that the 306 who voted by the government would have also voted for the deal, that's a lot more than theresa may got. they need to switch eight if they are going to get some support for this deal. one imagines, through the course of the week, and there is going to be almighty pressure put on some of those independent conservatives, on the dup come on those labour mps they think they can shift. yes, there will be intense conversations over the weekend and into next week trying to bring on board from the government's point of view those who voted for the letwin amendment but were in favour of boris johnson's brexit amendment but were in favour of borisjohnson's brexit deal. those who primarily want to avoid a no—deal brexit, but are prepared to vote for the deal. that raises
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questions in terms of what happens next week. because if the meaningful vote happens on monday and the threat of a no—deal brexit is still there, because a deal is then effectively been approved, are they still going to vote for it? —— has then effectively. so we could be in a very similar situation at the beginning of next week to the one we are now. the db is crucial. they voted for the letwin amendment today. they don't like boris johnson's deal. they want to continue the process and hopefully see the brahmins to go back in and renegotiate. a final thought on the dup. they could bring all of this tumbling down for the government. if there isn't a general election. because they will be able to vote on every amendment which comes. some reporting tonight that nigel dodds said we will vote on every amendment, even the amendment for a second referendum. they could take brexit away from the government. they have held a hard line throughout this entire process. we
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saw right down to the last minute the db holding out, going in and out of downing street for meetings, having discussions with the pm about what they could accept. —— with the dup holding out. they then came to the decision that they could not back the deal. if they deploy those techniques to do anything with their power to stop borisjohnson's deal passing through the house of commons, which they don't want to see, then, yes, they have indicated that they could put their support behind various different amendments to steer the brexit process in any other way aside from boris johnson's deal going through. the opposition will be considering that. they will know what nigel dodds has said. that will come into their consideration as they think about whether to bring the government down next week. yes, because a general election remains possible as a way to somehow break the deadlock. but when and if that happens is still completely up in the air. there will be moved by the
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opposition to potentially steer the process one way or another. whether thatis process one way or another. whether that is in favour of a second referendum or revoking article 15, or coming round any kind of deal, trying to put down amendments to the legislation we will see going through next week around a customs union and a closer relationship with the eu. -- union and a closer relationship with the eu. —— revoking article 50. a further referendum, and what have you. there will be more opportunities for mps to do that. the question is, what is the timetable they are working to? does the october deadline stay in place or is there an extension meaning things are more likely than not? very fluid. more uncertainty. thank you very much for that. in a moment we will speak to our correspondent, julian fowler in belfast — but let's get the reaction from brussels, and our europe correspondent, kevin connolly. they would have been watching events in the house of commons this afternoon. what will they make of it, kevin? interesting question, question. what happened in westminster today is pretty
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difficult news for brussels to react to, really. from the brussels perspective, it feels like a bit of rather obscure parliamentary manoeuvring. everyone was expecting something decisive today, they didn't get that, so they've got to wait for next week. if a letter comes from boris johnson wait for next week. if a letter comes from borisjohnson requesting an extension as the law requires, don't expect the brussels town crier to be out on the balcony reading at the eu's response. they will take it very quietly. they will take their time over it. the hope in brussels remains that somehow the withdrawal agreement will survive and we'll get through parliament. they don't want to renegotiate it. they don't want the uk to leave without a deal. they would prefer not to have an extension, but if it came to the did they would grant an extension, rather than see the uk leave the eu with "no deal". —— but if it came to
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the bid. like everybody else, wait and see what happens at westminster. how does the european parliament come into this? they must ratify, as well. some talk earlier today that now we have missed a deadline here they won't be able to do it next week. does that matter, or can they call a special meeting if they need to? i don't think it matters enormously. there is an idea that the timetabling issue is important. they meet for a session next week. they meet for a session next week. they are not due to meet again until the middle of november. they could do it then. if push came to shove they could be called back. the eu is very good at making possible anything it needs to make possible. this would not be an exception to that. i think the parliament could be recalled. the european parliament has been intimately involved in this process all the way along, it has been kept in the loop by the eu negotiator michel barnier. it is on
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board with the eu's negotiating position. you can assume they have preagreed the withdrawal agreement and that their approval of it is very, very likely indeed. it is at westminster where you will have the parliamentary problems. thanks very much. let's go to belfast and speak tojulian much. let's go to belfast and speak to julian fowler. much. let's go to belfast and speak tojulian fowler. we'vejust much. let's go to belfast and speak tojulian fowler. we've just been talking about the threats nigel dodds has made, that he is prepared to vote for all of the amendments, including an amendment on a second referendum. they have such power at the moment, if we don't have a general election, and they are adamant they won't get behind this deal. that's right. they are saying they will seek to use the time granted by the delay to try and make changes to the withdrawal agreement. the fundamental thing they have an issue with is regarding the issue of consent under the terms of the
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withdrawal agreement stormont will be given a role, the northern ireland assembly, to give continuing approval to whether northern ireland remains aligned to the eu customs regime. the dup is seeking a unionist veto and under the terms of the good friday agreement contentious issues are supposed to require support from a majority of both nationalists and unionists. that's despite the fact that stormont hasn't even been sitting for the last two and a half years. we had the prime minister say today in the house of commons that he did not believe that the withdrawal agreement did undermine the good friday agreement, and he felt that the brexit issue is one of a simple majority, as was the referendum. so, it's hard to see where any ground will be given in order to bring the dup on board when it comes to the
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vote for the withdrawal agreement. they don't speak for the majority in northern ireland, the dup, but what do people think of this deal? do they like it better than "no deal"? do they think it is worse than theresa may's deal? what's the opinion on it? there is a lot to be said for what the unionist community think about it and what they think it means to the constitutional integrity and northern ireland's place within the uk. sinn fein are anti—brexit. they have described what happened today as doing nothing but to allay the fears of businesses and people who live along the border community. we've also heard from business groups today. they were hoping for an end to the uncertainty. they are saying that this continued period of uncertainty means that businesses just cannot plan for the future. they were expecting a decisive decision today.
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that would have allowed businesses to move on. they expressed their disappointment at the continuing delay. thanks very much. thanks also to kevin connelly who we heard from in brussels. you are watching a bbc news special. as we've heard — the parliamentary vote on the prime minister's brexit deal — which we had been expecting today — might now take place early next week. it's yet another complication for boris johnson and the government to tackle — as they try to introduce all the legislation necessary to make brexit happen. our political correspondent ben wright has been looking at what might happen — in the days and months ahead. ministers never tire of saying, "it's time to get brexit done," but leaving the eu was always going to be a hugely complex and time—consuming process, and it is farfrom being over. this is how the next few days and even years might unfold. borisjohnson and the eu have agreed a new withdrawal deal.
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the terms of divorce. the prime minister wanted mps to approve it today in principle, but they haven't, so after this setback for the government it needs to change tack again. next week, ministers will publish the withdrawal agreement bill, which puts the deal into law. there will be many votes over many days, and the government may even ask mps to back the deal in principle again as soon as monday. the government still wants the bill to be law by october the 31st, and for the uk to leave the eu then. but after today all that could slip, and borisjohnson must now write to the eu asking for another brexit delay. let's look even further ahead. a whole new phase of brexit will begin if and when the uk leaves the eu, a transition period during which little actually changes. this is the time both sides meant to hammer out their future relationship, on trade, security and more. ministers will set out their negotiating aims to parliament, and then the talking with brussels begins again.
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this transition period will last until the end of december 2020, but could be extended for another two years if both sides agree. some tory mps hate that idea, and today borisjohnson said he wouldn't want that either, but complex trade deals can take several years to negotiate. the deal mps are arguing about now sets out how the uk leaves the european union, but explains comparatively little about what comes next. and that will be the focus of wrangling and negotiation for a long time yet. a very good stab at it by ben wright. anyone who thinks he knows what is coming next is a liar. believe me. chuckles nobody really knows what is ahead of this over the next week. why don't you have a quick go at it? what do you have a quick go at it? what do you think the government is thinking tonight, what might their strategy be? i'm not sure if there is a firm
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strategy in place. because of the letwi n strategy in place. because of the letwin amendment which passed by mps today has really cut the wind from boris johnson's sales. today has really cut the wind from borisjohnson's sales. all eyes will be on what happens at 11pm. will borisjohnson send this extension request of the european council? something he said he would rather be deadin something he said he would rather be dead ina something he said he would rather be dead in a ditch than do. but due to the benn act and the letwin amendment pass today he will be legally compelled to. there is a lot of talk in number ten about perhaps sending a second letter to make very clear this isn't the government requesting it, this isn't what they want, and asking the eu to turn it down. whether that would be undermining the statutory duty within the benn act would be debatable. you could see a court case being led by mps against the government very early next week if the government fails to comply with the government fails to comply with the benn act. he is now saying he has no intention of negotiating any
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delay, any extension with the european union. wait and see. look to 11pm. he might have no intention of negotiating a delay, but sending the letter isn't the same thing in of itself. maybe there is a political consideration now that he has got his deal. and the fact he has got his deal. and the fact he has got his deal, and he has had this momentum, if he is to break the law he might start going backwards again. we did see him enter this morning with a lot of momentum having got this deal that a lot of people had said to him it is simply not possible to negotiate in time. he did secure those changes to the backstop that he promised. and i think today he was hoping mps would lend him that support and he'd be able to get through the necessary legislation next week without having to request it. but the law is the law, even the prime minister isn't above that. the benn act does legislate that he must request that extension, even if he has negotiated a withdrawal agreement. if he does and it comes back as january the
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sist, and it comes back as january the 3ist, it and it comes back as january the 31st, it is within the power of the 27 to decide how long the extension is, if it goes to january the 31st then that opens up an array of possibilities. the withdrawal bill will take a long time to get through because of all of the amendments. but there could be space for a general election or indeed a second vote. wait and see. you are right. any legislation the government are going to try and pass next week, expect a lot of amendments to that. there will be ones around confirmatory referendums. there was one today led by peter kyle which did not get heard, that was putting any deal back to the people. expect to see that come back with any other legislation. legislation takes months and months to go through those. i'm not sure it would be completed by 31st of january 2020. a general election, on the other hand could be, and the outcome of that is
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possible, mps today have said that it's possible to get a withdrawal bill, with the right intentions you can do it in two weeks. there are other big pieces of legislation meaning it could take weeks or months. the big fight will be over the timetabling. you could have a second reading, everybody might vote for that, who knows? but then they have to vote on how long this will take. yes, it's important to note that mps will need a lot of time to scrutinise the withdrawal agreement bill the government have to legislate for before exit date. it'll be a mammoth piece of legislation affecting, you know, the future of this country. it's going to change a lot of things fundamentally for the united kingdom. they are going to want a lot of time to scrutinise what will be in that bill. it's not a case of just going through the house of commons, it needs to go through the house of the lord is, and that can bea house of the lord is, and that can be a lengthy process. —— the house of lords. ijust
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be a lengthy process. —— the house of lords. i just want to bring people up to speed as to what has happened today. if you weren't aware, there was no forth meaningful vote. the amendment which went through, which was put forward by sir oliver letwin, which withholds the agreement pending legislation, won by 322 to 306 votes. that means we could be looking at next week before another meaningful vote will before another meaningful vote will be brought. and an awful lot of confusion tonight over the timetable and whether the prime minister is indeed going to send this letter, as he is required to by law, by 11p indeed going to send this letter, as he is required to by law, by up and this evening. just to remind you that the wording of that letter is set down by the benn act. —— megabyte 11pm. it is specific. there isa rumour megabyte 11pm. it is specific. there is a rumour that he might change the wording and say that he does not wa nt to
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wording and say that he does not want to negotiate for an extension. it is unclear as to what he will do. you are watching a bbc news special. we are focusing on the vote in the house of commons which went against the government again today. let's ta ke the government again today. let's take a step back and talk about next week. it really depends on the speaker of the house. what he decides to do. the government seems intent on bringing a forth meaningful vote back on monday. this speculation coming from what was said earlier, the government will seem to bring back... bring back, improve the withdrawal agreements force trondsen negotiate with brussels last week. this would be quite straightforward, they would simply ask mps to lend it it's the board. another hurdle from the
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government came from the speaker john bercow,

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