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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 19, 2019 7:00pm-7:46pm BST

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you're watching a bbc news special live from westminster, where members of parliament have forced the british prime minister to ask for a delay to brexit. the ayes to the right, 322. the noes to the left, 306. mps passed an amendment witholding approval of boris johnson's deal until it becomes law. as a result there has been no vote today on the prime minister's deal. i will not negotiate a delay with the eu. this emphatic decision by this house to not back the prime minister's deal today, and clearly
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voted to stop a "no deal" crashed out. —— crash out. the european commissions' chief spokesperson has urged the government "to inform us about the next steps as soon as possible". outside parliament, anti—brexit demonstrators cheered as they heard about the delay. the "people's vote" second referendum campaign have held a huge rally in central london today. a warm welcome from westminster. where the house of commons has been sitting on a saturday — for the first time in nearly a0 years. earlier this afternoon —
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mps voted to delay their decision — on borisjohnson‘s new brexit deal. this was expected to be the day that mps delivered their verdict — on the deal agreed in brussels — but instead borisjohnson must now write to the eu — by 11 o'clock tonight — asking for a brexit extension — beyond october 31st. the prime minister said he was not daunted by today's result — and still planned to take the uk out of the eu by the end of the month. we start with our political editor laura kuenssberg — on the day mps backed another delay to the brexit process. before it was official, the moves in the middle, then the cheers on the right... order! ..showed borisjohnson was thwarted. the ayes to the right, 322. the noes to the left, 306. by a margin of 16, mps said not never to his deal, but not today, not yet. so the ayes have it. the ayes have it. unlock! he is now obliged by law
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to ask the eu for a delay, but he'll kick and scream. i will tell our friends and colleagues in the eu exactly i'm on right now sorry i'm on right now i will tell our friends and colleagues in the eu exactly what i have told everyone in the last 88 days that i have served as prime minister, that further delay would be bad for this country, bad for our european union, and bad for democracy. warnings of big trouble, though, if he wants to frustrate the law. today is an historic day for parliament, because it said it will not be blackmailed by a prime minister who is apparently prepared once again to defy a law passed by this parliament. i invite him to think very carefully about the remarks hejust made about refusing, apparently, to apply for the extension which the eu no.2 act requires him to do. and any failure of a prime minister who thinks he is above the law, well, prime minister, you'll find yourself in court.
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one way or another, this was always going to be a fraught and huge day. not a queue for a saturday match, but for parliament. would mstust rush headlong into more confusion? or is itjust a chance for those sure of their position to give it again? well, i'm going to vote against the deal, it's very bad for the country. i will be supporting the prime minister. the tensions torn by the referendum in plain view, but many of them agonising, genuinely wondering what the best thing to do. even stretching family ties. for the prime minister, though, only one aim — to try to force this to a conclusion any way he could. statement, the prime minister... mr speaker, today this house has a historic opportunity to show the same breadth of vision as our european neighbours, the same ability and resolve to reach beyond past disagreements by getting brexit done.
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decrying attempts by mps to postpone saying yes or no legally to the deal until all the laws that go along with it are also passed. further delay is pointless, expensive and deeply corrosive of public trust. labour, though, resistant notjust to the deal... this government cannot be trusted and these benches will not be duped. but denying, too, borisjohnson any chance to move forward. labour is not prepared to sell out the communities that we represent. and we will not back this sell—out deal. just as the former prime minister found, though, there is a range of opposition parties who will rage against brexit. a deal that will see scotland shafted by this united kingdom government.
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today hundreds of thousands of people will be outside, demanding a final say in a people's vote. how could plaid cymru ever support his billionaires' brexit? this deal takes a wrecking ball to our social and environmental standards... and without his northern irish allies on board, the prime minister simply couldn't be sure of the numbers. rather than a great deal, this will do a great deal of damage to the union. look, though who was coming to help — with a joke? standing here i have a distinct sense of deja vu. laughter i know how you feel. and a rebuke to those who voted against her now planning to do the same to borisjohnson. but remember, once upon a time, that included him. when this house voted overwhelmingly to give the choice of our membership the eu to the british people, did we really mean it? i think there can only be one answer
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to that and that is, yes, we did mean it, because if this parliament did not mean it, then it is guilty of the most egregious con trick on the british people. but there's a sprinkling of labour mps who want this done. we will be forced, even if a deal is approved, to seek an extension to the 31st of january, underlying that the sponsors of benn act had only one motivation, and that was to delay brexit and stop it. but it's not over, not yet. 306... crowds who want another referendum were delighted that the delay gives them a new chance to stop brexit, but frustration and nerves on the other side. but we were always clear it has to be brexit for the whole of the united kingdom — it can't be northern ireland left behind. remain or leave, they've just had enough. they want us to get this done and i'm astonished by the kind of anger that's beginning
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to boil up. for god's sake, get it done. so they're turning their attention on parliament. the prime minister's allies today wanted it at least to be the beginning of the end, a conclusion. but look at this. cabinet ministers protected by the police from anti—brexit protesters on their way out. chanting: shame on you, shame on you! there's nothing final about what has happened today. animosity still all around. our political correspondent jonathan blakejoins me now. we talk about some of the abuse anna soubry, who left the conservatives, has had from leavers up these barricades for months. but the shoe was on the other foot, we saw front bench ministers accosted by the peoples vote people. yes, andrea
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leadsom, the leader of the house of commons jacob rees mogg, michael gove, they all went with a police escort making their way from parliament just escort making their way from parliamentjust along escort making their way from parliament just along the escort making their way from parliamentjust along the road he had to wherever they were going afterwards. it shows you just how high tempers are running at westminster. things didn't turn violent but lots of verbal abuse was held at those ministers. jacob rees mogg was with his son. yes, and andrea leadsom tweeted how she found it terrifying and thanked the police. but another sign of how tempers have been raised at westminster and how high the tension is and the debate and the protest on either side aren't going to go away. let's talk about what's happened today, let's take a step back from it. the amendment so oliver letwin put down was supposed to create enough space for a proper discussion about the withdrawal agreement bill, the legislation which accompanies the legislation which accompanies the bill. he was worried that if you
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tried to rush that in the course of two weeks you might reopen the prospect of "no deal". that's right. the aim of the amendment, put forward by sir oliver letwin, was to ensure that the legislation to enact the brexit deal, put it into law technically, not just the brexit deal, put it into law technically, notjust giving it the rubber—stamp, had a properairing. and was not able to fall any particular hurdle. meaning the deal, there were approved by parliament, would it be put into place and the uk could leave the eu as the deadline stands without a deal. others would say it is a attempt to delay and may be stopped brexit altogether. but that amendment passed. that means parliament has withheld its approval for boris johnson's deal, so now he legally needs to write a letter to the eu asking for an extension. 11 o'clock is the deadline that he has to do that by. but we are also now looking
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ahead to next week when a whole series of other boats could happen which could be a rerun of today's procedure, potentially, or maybe ta ke procedure, potentially, or maybe take things further along the line. —— other votes. take things further along the line. -- other votes. theresa may said that those who supported the amendment who were doing itjust to delay things would be guilty of the most egregious con trick. lots of anger on the conservative benches. they don't have a majority. if government was really fearful of "no deal", it could just take back the order paper again and stop this process. they could have voted for the meaningful vote today without having to approve this amendment, is how some conservatives see it. yes, they make that argument. theresa may and other spoke in the chamber today saying this amendment was, although on the face of it and in the words of those who put it forward, specifically so oliver letwin, a defence mechanism, if you like. an extra safety net to avoid a no—deal
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brexit. it was an opportunity for others who want to delay brexit indefinitely, maybe stop it altogether, maybe have another referendum on the deal, leave against remain, a rerun of the first one, effectively. and a chance for those in parliament to use it to their own ends. what is crucial is their own ends. what is crucial is the amount of people who said they voted for the oliver letwin amendment, but also said they would be prepared to vote for boris johnson's dealfurther be prepared to vote for boris johnson's deal further down the line once this extra safeguard was put in place. if you look at those numbers it might be enough to swing things for the prime minister next time around. all to play for next week. thank you for the moment. you can bet downing street will be looking at those numbers thinking which of these can we swing over to our side to get things across the line. earlier i spoke to our europe correspondent, kevin connolly, and i asked him what the reaction has been in brussels. what happened in westminster today is pretty difficult news for brussels to react to, really. from
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the brussels perspective it feels like a bit of an obscure parliamentary manoeuvring, so everybody is expecting a big, clear decisive day today, but they didn't get that, so now they wait until next week. if and when i letter comes from boris johnson next week. if and when i letter comes from borisjohnson requesting an extension as the law requires, don't expect the brussels town crier to be out on the balcony reading out the eu's response. they'll take it very quietly. they'll take their time over it. because the hope very much here in brussels remains that somehow the withdrawal agreement will survive and we'll get through parliament. they don't want to renegotiate it, they don't want the uk to leave without a deal. they would prefer not to have an extension. but if it came to it, they would certainly grant an extension rather than see the uk leave the eu with "no deal". they are going to keep things open and like everybody else wait to see what happens in westminster. we are
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reading that the french president and boris johnson have reading that the french president and borisjohnson have spoken this evening. emmanuel macron said they needed some clarity from the uk as quickly as possible. no decisions taken in quickly as possible. no decisions ta ken in brussels quickly as possible. no decisions taken in brussels get an no letter sent yet. we are looking out for that letter. the prime minister has descended by iipm that letter. the prime minister has descended by ”pm this evening. joining me now is senior lecturer in uk public & eu law, drjoelle grogan. nice to see you. let's talk about this letter. and what it actually asked for. under the terms of the benn act there would be an extension until the 31st of january. the benn act there would be an extension until the 31st ofjanuary. the benn act quite explicitly says a word for word what must be in that letter. it isa word what must be in that letter. it is a request of the european council, that's the heads of all of the heads of government of the member states of the eu, for an extension until the 31st of january
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2020. that's now an obligation in law. boris johnson 2020. that's now an obligation in law. borisjohnson must send this letter or he risks breaking the law. if you put something else in that letter, does he break the law? anything that is not following the intention of the act is to frustrate the act. i am sure all public lawyers from their first year in law school will say that is unlawful. you cannot frustrate the intention ofan you cannot frustrate the intention of an act. if he did that or he sent a second letter, it is important to say that he would be in contempt of court. the government has given an assurance to the court in scotland that he will send the letter. we will see on monday. they are waiting to see what would happen today. we might seea to see what would happen today. we might see a court order on monday coming down from edinburgh saying, you must follow the law. this is important because if you breach an order, breach a mandatory order of court, there can be criminal sanctions. we will wait to see what happens with that. let's talk about monday across the road. today the
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motion itself, the meaningful vote for, there wasn't a vote on it, it was postponed, let's say, the prime minister would say forced to abandon, but let's call it postpone, there wasn't a vote on it. does that mean they can hold a vote on monday? if you think back to theresa may, when you brought the same deal back, the speaker stopped her from when you brought the same deal back, the speaker stopped herfrom doing that, from having a vote on the same deal. exactly. this will be up to the speaker but one of the key questions will be, are you asking the same question of the house of commons over and over again? but strictly speaking they did not vote on it. that's true and it'll be up to the speaker. what's going to be more certain in this is the withdrawal agreement bill, that piece of legislation needed to bring the withdrawal agreement into uk law. this is a mammoth piece of legislation. this will have huge constitutional social political
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effects. and we only have nine days to get it through the house of commons and the house of lords to become legislation before the 31st of october without an extension being given. boris johnson says where there is a will there is a way oi’ where there is a will there is a way or words to that effect, but let's ta ke or words to that effect, but let's take a look at the withdrawal agreement and remind people at home what is in it! chuckles because it deals with so many different elements of our lives, how thejudges act with different elements of our lives, how the judges act with the european court ofjustice, citizens‘ rights, it gives power to ministers to send money to brussels as part of this divorce bill, on and on.|j money to brussels as part of this divorce bill, on and on. i am trying to think of something more dramatic than a mammoth bill. but, yes, it gives a huge amount of power to the government. it places a huge amount of power into the continuation of eu laws as it stands, as we have it right now. but more importantly, it places an important status on the withdrawal agreement in british law. it isa withdrawal agreement in british law. it is a huge piece of legislation. if we look back at something, the
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withdrawal talks in 2017, it took 36 days, which we don‘t have between 110w days, which we don‘t have between now and the 31st of october. in effect, we are talking about the sub headings. we don‘t know what is in it because we haven‘t seen it. three yea rs have it because we haven‘t seen it. three years have gone by and we still haven‘t seen the withdrawal agreement bill. exactly. we had two days to see the northern ireland protocol and the modified withdrawal agreement. but we have not yet seen what is going to be the biggest piece of legislation, the biggest change to our legal system with only nine days to go in the sitting time. we should also say, when we are thinking about, do we need this extra time... if the deal was approved, that there will be all sorts of amendments put to it, won‘t there? once you put a bill on the floor the house of commons will want
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to put their amendments forward. the house of lords will want to put their amendments forward. we could be talking months. potentially, as you describe, we could see parliamentary ping—pong where things move quickly between the house of lords. that was probably a key motivation behind the letwin amendment to give due time, due scrutiny, due time to look at the impact of this on the law. in addition to that, there are four stages the withdrawal agreement has to go through. first, and approval from the house of commons, and this big piece of legislation. but on the eu side, we also need to have the european council give a qualified negotiation... four stages have to happen. it is very possible we will see that extension of time for lawmaking. looking at the politics of that, i think there are only around 160 leavers in the house of commons. as they get down to the nitty—gritty on every piece of
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legislation, surely the risk for borisjohnson legislation, surely the risk for boris johnson and legislation, surely the risk for borisjohnson and those who want a harder brexit is that this will be softened and softened and it‘ll look very different to the deal he has just brought from brussels. this is the key point that i think needs to be reiterated. this is only the first step. the withdrawal agreement is almost only a pass. it is withdrawal issues only. the big question as to the uk‘s relationship with the eu coming next, the next treaty, the next stage of negotiations, which under the current modified withdrawal agreement are due to end in december 2020, that is 14 agreement are due to end in december 2020, that is 1a months to negotiate the biggest treaty probably in uk history. at number ten tonight, as they restudy their next strategy, and their strategy is always evolving, they must be thinking there are some things on our agenda next week, one, can we get another vote on the floor for another meaningful vote, will the speaker allow them to do that? there is also
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the small matter of the queen‘s speech which they‘ve not voted on yet. if that went against the government monday or tuesday we might be in a different position, might be in a different position, might we, by the end of the week?|j cannot might we, by the end of the week?” cannot predict anything in brexit. any other year the queen‘s speech would be the mark of confidence in government. but that‘s going to be a big question next week as to whether oi’ big question next week as to whether or not boris johnson big question next week as to whether or not borisjohnson has the confidence of the commons. so many questions coming. will we be at the general election staged by the end of the week? we shall see. thank you very much for your thoughts and expertise this evening. a little clearer we are as to what the withdrawal agreement is. well, while mps were debating in the chamber of the commons, thousands of demonstrators packed the streets of central london, calling for a public vote on any deal that‘s agreed. the protest, organised by the people‘s vote campaign, converged on parliament square,
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as our home editor mark easton reports. it had been billed as a march to give confident voice for those who wa nt give confident voice for those who want a referendum back to them. the letwi n want a referendum back to them. the letwin amendment could have been their only hope. there were mixed emotions. nervous because we don't know what to expect. the argument could be decided before you get to parliament square. yes, we all know that, and it‘s in the back of our minds, but we are going to keep marching and say what we believe in. i'm fearful boris might be successful. all i can hope is that the letwin amendment goes through. the organisers claim 1 million people snaked their way from marble arch, past wellington‘s home at hyde park corner, past nelson on his column in trafalgar square, the architecture of the nation‘s capital
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reflecting historical tensions with european neighbours. details of every groa n european neighbours. details of every groan from the debate inside the house of commons rippled through the house of commons rippled through the crowds outside as they headed towards parliament. this long planned event provided a noisy soundtrack to bring the brexit argument to an end before the march reached its destination. pictures of inside the palace of westminster we re inside the palace of westminster were relayed to the vast crowd watching outside and then the moment when it was clear there would be no brexit deal today. cheering the news from parliament is greeted with relief rather than rejoice. the long march that they hope leads from one peoples vote to another people‘s boat, well, that can go on. it's not a defeat. we are still in the fight. —— peoples vote. a defeat. we are still in the fight. -- peoples vote. things are going to slow down. the slower it goes the better. it means the agony
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continues. yes, it's boring, but he has put that in that position. what happens next remains frustratingly unclear for everybody on all sides. passion is running equally high on the other side today, as well. richard whitman is a professor of politics at the university of kent hejoins me now from tunbridge wells. thank you very much for being with us. thank you very much for being with us. where do you think this leaves us us. where do you think this leaves us this evening? we were looking at the strategy the government might be looking at. what will be uppermost in their minds, do you think? they‘ve gone from having this great triumph, which is getting the withdrawal agreement with the other eu member states, which was entirely unexpected, and they really had a reality check in terms of the domestic political obstacles that remain for the government. i think it isa remain for the government. i think it is a cold shower, really, after all of the congratulations at the
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middle and the end of this week. i think next week we are clearly in for quite a lot of parliamentary warfare. on the other hand, they will be looking at those who supported the government against the letwi n supported the government against the letwin amendment, 306, they lost by 16. they only need to turn around eight mps. they would be optimistic, wouldn‘t they, that they could get a meaningful vote, that they might get it through? the government may be in a position to get the meaningful vote through, but that‘s the easy bit, really. because then you‘ve got to contend with getting the withdrawal agreement bill through. and that really is where you will see the government under considerable pressure. in that stage of the process, it allows individual members of parliament and the opposition parties to keep coming forward with votes for the house of
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commons and house of lords, which attempt to undermine the government‘s ability to see an agreement through in the way they wanted, just to get it done as soon as possible. we were told tonight borisjohnson has spoken to emmanuel macron. emmanuel macron has told him that the uk‘s position must be clarified quickly. when i look at the agenda over the next week, i don‘t know what assurances the prime minister would be able to give the president. i think it's very difficult for the eu, the other heads of state, to take a position. they‘ve now got to wait and see if the prime minister sends the letter. then after that, the temptation from their site must be to just sit on it and see how british politics plays itself out. the issues for them first of all will be, do we want to give an extension? but then there‘s also the benn act, which requires the prime minister to ask for an
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extension to january. but is that a period of the eu would like? does it wa nt period of the eu would like? does it want shorter, longer? you know? they are now in the position where they are now in the position where they are confronted by the british political aspect, which is very difficult for them to read. so far we have had extensions which have had a date set on the calendar. knowing that the legislation is going through, if it does indeed go through, they could say, well, you could have an extension pending confirmation of the bill, couldn‘t they? couldn‘t they just leave confirmation of the bill, couldn‘t they? couldn‘t theyjust leave it open ended as long as the uk needed that time to get everything through? i don‘t think they can. this will require on the eu‘s part a legislation back. you have that two stage process on the eu side where the eu has to agree as to what they
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wa nt to the eu has to agree as to what they want to give in terms of an extension. that would require heads of state to be brought together for a european council meeting. they obviously want to keep the european parliament on side. because the european parliament needs to provide approval that the uk needs, as well. it's approval that the uk needs, as well. it‘s not as straightforward as the eu thinking what would be idealfor us eu thinking what would be idealfor us in terms of a rolling deadline. i think they will be much more interested in a very precise one. as they‘ve done in the past, they have set conditions or expectations, saying, we will give the extension but it is conditional on the uk‘s side doing something with their time. and specifying how they will use that time. in this case, the uk government is clear on what they wa nt to government is clear on what they want to do, which is get to the agreement through, and get it through parliament. the issue for the eu side is the timetabling on that. good to get your thoughts this
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evening. thanks very much for being with us. we are keeping a close eye on with us. we are keeping a close eye o n eve nts with us. we are keeping a close eye on events in downing street and we are hoping for some news on this letter if and when it is sent. we will bring that to you when we get it. we will be back at eight o‘clock, at the top of the hour, to bring you more news from here in westminster. don‘t forget, sportsday is coming up at 7:45pm. we will pause for a second and bring you the weather with louise. sunday will be a drier day across the country. still a few scattered showers to clear overnight towards eastern england. and with a northerly breeze driving in sharper showers to the far north of scotland. elsewhere we will see those skies clear and temperatures fall away with that northerly wind and we could see low single figures in sheltered rural parts of eastern scotla nd in sheltered rural parts of eastern scotland and eastern england, as well. a chilly start to sunday morning but a quieter story for many. the northerly wind could dry inafew many. the northerly wind could dry in a few scattered showers across east coast. head further south and west, you should get sunshine
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through the day, but a drier story right across the country. temperature is likely to peak at nine to 1a degrees. there is a slight problem on monday morning with the potential for some slight problem on monday morning with the potentialfor some rain pushing into the far south—east corner. we need to keep an eye on that. but high pressure will build from the south—west. monday into tuesday will be drier and quieter right across the country. hello, this is bbc news with chris rogers. the headlines:
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the ayes to the right, 322, the nose neck to the left, 306 —— the noes to the left. the ayes have it. mps passed an amendment witholding approval of boris johnson‘s deal until it becomes law. as a result, there has been no vote today on the prime minister‘s deal. i will not negotiate a delay with the eu. it's an emphatic decision by this house that it has declined to back the prime minister's deal today, and clearly voted to stop a no—deal crash out. the european commission‘s chief spokesperson has urged the government "to inform us about the next steps as soon as possible". outside parliament, anti—brexit demonstrators cheered as they heard about the delay. the "people‘s vote" second referendum campaign have held a huge rally in central london today.
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welcome back to bbc news. let‘s go right back now to the vote at lunchtime which put a spoke in boris johnson‘s plan to get his brexit deal approved today. the prime minister has vowed to press on "undaunted" with his brexit strategy. mps voted by 322 votes to 306 votes to back an amendment put by the former conservative mp oliver letwin — to ensure approval for the new brexit deal is withheld until all the necessary legislation has passed through the commons. so what does this mean? it means that, under the law, the prime minister borisjohnson will have to write to the eu asking for brexit to be delayed. he‘s been forced to shelve a vote on his new withdrawal agreement, and that highly anticipated vote will not now take place today. instead, the legislation to enact the withdrawal bill into uk law will be brought to the commons for mps to consider next week.
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what‘s the prime minister‘s reaction? well, he insisted he remained confident that his brexit deal will get through parliament by the end of october. let‘s hear more of what he had to say. i continue in the very strong belief that the best thing for the uk and for the whole of europe is for us to leave with this new deal on october the 31st. and, to anticipate the questions that are coming from the benches opposite, i will not negotiate a delay with the eu. and neither does the law compelled me to do so. i can tell our friends and colleagues in the eu exactly what i‘ve told everyone in the last 88 days i‘ve served as prime minister, that further delay would be bad for this country. bad for our european union
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and bad for democracy. so next week, the government will introduce the legislation needed for us to leave the eu with our new deal on october the 31st and i hope that our european union colleagues and friends will not be attracted as benches opposite are, or rather i should say the front bench is, by delay. i do not think they will be attracted by delay and i hope that then honourable members, faced with the choice of our new deal, our new deal for the uk and the eu, will change their minds, because it was pretty close today. i hope they will change their minds, and support this deal in overwhelming numbers. since i became prime minister, i have said we should get on and get brexit done on october the 31st so that this country can move on. mr speaker, that policy remains unchanged.
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no delays, and i will continue to do all i can to get brexit done on october the 31st, and i continue to commend this excellent deal, mr speaker, to the house. but the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, said parliament had spoken and borisjohnson would be wise to listen. i welcome today's vote. parliament has clearly spoken. order, order! apologies. the prime minister was heard. yes, he was. don't argue the toss with the chair, i'm telling you what the situation is, and everyone can detect the prime minister was heard and the leader of the opposition will be heard. it is as simple and unarguable as that. jeremy corbyn. thank you, mr speaker. i welcome today's vote, it's an emphatic decision by this house that it has declined to back
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the prime minister's deal today and clearly voted to stop a no—deal crashout from the european union. the prime minister must now comply with the law. he can no longer use the threat of a no—deal crashout to blackmail members to support his sell—out deal. labour is not prepared to sell out the communities we represent. we are not prepared to sell out their future. and, we believe that ultimately, the people must have the final say on brexit which, actually, only the labour party is offering. today is an historic day for parliament because it said it will not be blackmailed by a prime minister who is apparently prepared once again to defy a law passed by this parliament. i invite him to think very carefully about the remarks he just made about refusing, apparently, to apply for the extension which the eu
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number two act requires of him. it all started with the referendum, and many mps think it should go back to the people. so what do the people make of it all now? our political correspondent alex forsyth has spent the day with voters in birmingham. at moseley rugby club this morning, people were certainly poised for a big result. the country on tenterhooks, many hoping for a decisive outcome. but while the sport was settled, the wrangling in westminster goes on. as does, for some, the frustration. it's not about whether we are going to leave or not. it's, "shall we have a deal that they won't vote for, therefore we'll have no brexit but it's not our fault, therefore we'll have to have an election?", then they'll say, "well, you didn't back us up well then shouldn't vote for them," and it'sjust... it's childish politics, and they're playing with people's economic futures. in birmingham city centre, despite diwali celebrations, there was a weariness at the brexit state of play.
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itjust seems itjust keeps going round and round and we‘re not getting anywhere. the economy is stagnant because of brexit, because of delay. that view is just what boris johnson had hoped might convince mps to back his deal, get it done. now faced with further delay, it seems he‘ll push back against parliament. come on, moseley! back at the rugby club, there is support for that stance from those frustrated at mps‘ actions today. i think it‘s outrageous. they‘re just cocking a hoot at us, basically and saying, "no, we are not interesting and what you think, we‘re going to do what we want to do." it's an absolute joke. they're just holding it up. itjust needs to be sorted. and actually if they want to go to a general election, go to a general election. my view is that parliament's lost it. so... parliament doesn‘t represent the people any more. parliament has its own agenda. public anger might feed boris johnson‘s defiance, but as ever with brexit, there is little consensus. i think it needs a delay to give more time for the bill... for the deal to be scrutinised,
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because it's all a bit last minute and rushed, so i think it's probably a good thing. i think there was probably a better deal with theresa may, and this one‘s worse. i‘m a remainer anyway. boris johnson is starting to get his comeuppance. so with some backing parliament‘s position, the public view remains divided, in what seems to many like a political game, albeit with crucial consequences. alex forsyth, bbc news. and the views really do vary across the country. we are going to find out now how the delay is going down in the uk‘s nations. in a moment, we‘ll hear from hywel griffith in cardiff and julian fowler in belfast. but first, sarah smith gave us this update from glasgow on the snp‘s view on today‘s vote. they still hope, somehow, that they might be able to prevent brexit from happening, whether that‘s via a second referendum which they also support after a general election, because this is the country remember, where there is less pressure to say we have to deliver the results of the referendum because the referendum here was 62%
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of the country saying they wanted to remain in the eu. other than elements in scotland as well. you have been talking about whether the premonitions going to send this letter he is referred to by 11pm tonight. if he does not, he will be in court in edinburgh. the dup say the deal provided by dorisjohnson provides a find a mental threat to unionism in northern ireland. it was notjust the unionism in northern ireland. it was not just the dup who voted to delay brexit today. the independent unionist mp saw —— supported the letwin amendment for some the dup say delay will allow further time to scrutinise the deal, but they are also seeking fund mental changes. within minutes of that vote coming through here, the
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welsh first minister tweeted, pretty plainly, what he thought, that the pm must now obey the lot and request a new extension. he says there should be another amendment, a second vote, that welsh labour would campaign to stay in the u macro. the first minister making pre—plane if one amendment can succeed, he things there should be another one which opens up the vote of another eu referendum. as we‘ve heard, the parliamentary vote on the prime minister‘s brexit deal might now take place early next week. it‘s yet another complication for boris johnson and the government to tackle — as they try to introduce all the legislation necessary to make brexit happen. our political correspondent ben wright has been looking at what might happe in the days and months ahead. ministers never tire of saying, "it‘s time to get brexit done,"
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but leaving the eu was always going to be a hugely complex and time—consuming process, and it is farfrom being over. this is how the next few days and even years might unfold. borisjohnson and the eu have agreed a new withdrawal deal. the terms of divorce. the prime minister wanted mps to approve it today in principle, but they haven‘t, so after this setback for the government it needs to change tack again. next week, ministers will publish the withdrawal agreement bill, which puts the deal into law. there will be many votes over many days, and the government may even ask mps to back the deal in principle again as soon as monday. the government still wants the bill to be law by october the 31st, and for the uk to leave the eu then. but after today all that could slip, and borisjohnson must now write to the eu asking for another brexit delay. let‘s look even further ahead. a whole new phase of brexit will begin if and when the uk leaves the eu, a transition period during which little actually changes.
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this is the time both sides meant to hammer out their future relationship, on trade, security and more. ministers will set out their negotiating aims to parliament, and then the talking with brussels begins again. this transition period will last until the end of december 2020, but could be extended for another two years if both sides agree. some tory mps hate that idea, and today borisjohnson said he wouldn‘t want that either, but complex trade deals can take several years to negotiate. the deal mps are arguing about now sets out how the uk leaves the european union, but explains comparatively little about what comes next. and that will be the focus of wrangling and negotiation for a long time yet. we will find out what the newspaper headlines are tomorrow in regards to all of this at the usual times of 10:a0pm and 11:30pm. i say the
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normal times. we have a special running at the normal time. our guests joining me tonight are the former conservative adviser mo mo hussein and martin lipton, chief sports reporter at the sun. let‘s catch up with sport, especially the rugby, in sportsday now. hello and welcome to sportsday. i‘m lizzie greenwood—hughes. yes, we do have the rugby for you tonight! england book their place in the semi—finals of the rugby world cu p after co mforta bly beating australia. they now face the holders — new zealand — who crushed ireland‘s hopes with a 7—try thrashing. and an fa cup qualifying game is abandoned after alleged racist abuse towards a goalkeeper.
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hello there. so, lots to get through in a shortened saturday sportsday for you. and we‘re starting injapan where earlier, england‘s rugby union side put—in one of their best ever world cup performances to comfortably beat australia 40—16 and reach the semi—finals of the tournament for the first time in 12 years. our sports editor dan roan was watching in oita. their world cup‘s ta ken time to gather pace, but here in oita, a defining moment for england had arrived. one of rugby‘s great rivalries about to resume. england had beaten australia six times in a row, but this was the one that really mattered, and jonny may gave his side the perfect start. they weren‘t finished there. the recalled henry slade with the interception. he may not have had the pace, but he certainly had the vision, finding may for his second try injust three minutes.

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