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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 21, 2019 6:00am-8:30am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker in salford and naga munchetty in westminster. our headlines today... boris johnson's brexit agreement is back in parliament today — as the government tries again to get mps to vote on it. ministers say they'll push ahead with plans to leave by october 31st — despite the prime minister being forced to ask the eu for an extension at the weekend. the pound slips in early trading after the delay on the brexit vote. i'm here in the heart of london's financial district to get reaction and to find out what it means for your wallet. and in other news, the duke & duchess of sussex speak about struggling in the spotlight — prince harry says he and his brother
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have "good days and bad days" amid reports of a rift. this role and part of this job, and this family being under the pressure that it's under, inevitably, you know, stuff happens. but, look, we're brothers, we will always be brothers. we are certainly on different paths at the moment, good morning. the tears flow for andy murray as he wins his first singles title since career—saving hip surgery. music: jump on it. and mike gets to keep dancing — we'll catch up with him after a hip—thrusting samba saw them survive the strictly dance—off. it's a chilly start to the day, there is even some thruster across parts of scotland. we will see sunny spells, areas of cloud and patchy rain across the south—eastern quarter. i will have more in 15 minutes.
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good morning, thanks forjoining us on breakfast. it's monday october the 21st. our top story... the government will push again today for mps to vote on borisjohnson‘s brexit deal. it comes after a bruising weekend for the prime minister, in which he was forced to ask the eu for an extension to his planned leaving date of october the 31st. let's take a quick look at what's in store. ministers will try for another meaningful vote this afternoon — that's where mps can indicate whether or not they support the prime minister's deal in principle. whether that vote goes ahead is a decision for the speaker, john bercow. most westminster watchers think he'll probably refuse. the government will also bring forward legislation to implement its eu withdrawal agreement bill. that would start the legal process of the uk leaving the eu. meanwhile, the court of session in edinburgh — that's scotland's supreme civil court — will sit today to consider whether mrjohnson acted unlawfully by failing to sign his letter to the eu, which asked for an extension to the brexit deadline.
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let's talk now to our political correspondent, jessica parker. what a weekend! what a start to the we! shall we start with the vote and whether or not it is likely to go ahead? this is what we were expecting on a so—called super saturday. what happened on saturday was because of the letwin amendment, the government decided that they thought what had supposed to been a meaningful vote was rendered meaningless. it looks like they will have another go today. but as you are saying to speak atjohn bercow has to give permission for this to go ahead. the feeling seems to be maybe he won't. perhaps he will judge, as he did with theresa may, it is too similar to what the government already tried to do on saturday. we will have to see whether the speaker grilles in favour of the government or against. that will probably happen around 3:30pm. there is an argument the vote didn't happen so how can it be similar? it did happen. this is the confusion. the amendment went
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through. the government were terribly annoyed. they didn't then move the vote to division so it got the nod through but it didn't count asa the nod through but it didn't count as a meaningful vote. the government is trying to get a bit of impetus as they try and then bring forward the legislation and get that legislation through quickly. this is the next stage. we have ten days until october 31. boris stage. we have ten days until october31. borisjohnson stage. we have ten days until october 31. boris johnson has stage. we have ten days until october 31. borisjohnson has been adamant the uk will leave the eu by that day but there is so much to discuss with the withdrawal bill ahead of that. i think mps will want to look at the legislation very closely. first reading today, that isa closely. first reading today, that is a fairly standard procedure at. second reading tomorrow with a vote. the concern for the government is on the amendments that mps will try to chuck at this bill, whether that is for another referendum, a customs union, whether that is to try to ensure there is no no deal scenario at the end of the transition period. this has a lot of hurdles to get
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over. we would expect the government to bring forward a programme of motion where they try to control the timing of the passage of the bill. it is possible mps could vote that down. we have a lot to pick three. thank you, jessica. that is the theme this morning. we will be trying to explain to you exactly what is happening today and throughout the coming week. let's go back to dan in the studio. lots more news. we will be sifting through all the detail as much as we can. let's bring you up—to—date with some of the other big stories this morning. the duke of sussex has admitted he and his brother are "on different paths" amid reports of a rift. in an interview with itv, he said they have "good days and bad days". the duchess of sussex said that adjusting to royal life had been hard and that she wasn't prepared for the scrutiny of the tabloid press. jon donnison reports. filmed during their recent trip to africa, this documentary reveals that, despite appearances, the royal couple are at times struggling.
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harry says he sees his mother diana in every camera and flash bulb. every single time i see a camera, every single time i hear a click, every time time i see a flash, it takes me straight back. so, in that respect, it's the worst reminder of her life, as opposed to the best. meghan says she's been shocked by the level of press intrusion, even though herfriends had warned her before she got married. my british friends said to me, "i'm sure he's great, but you shouldn't do it, because the british tabloids will destroy your life." and i very naively, "we're american, we don't have that there." what are you talking about?" prince harry talks about the relationship with his brother inevitably, you know, stuff happens, but, look, we're brothers, we will always be brothers.
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we're certainly on different paths at the moment but i will always be there for him, as i know he will always be there for me. prince harry acknowledges he sometimes needs support, saying he still struggles with mental health issues. i thought i was out of the woods and then, suddenly, it all came back, and i suddenly realise that this is something that i have to manage. look, part of this job and part of anyjob, like everybody, means putting on a brave face. the turnaround from a sunny wedding day a year and a half ago is very sharp. john donnison, bbc news. lets us know what you think of that story this morning. spikes in air pollution trigger hundreds of heart attacks, strokes and acute asthma attacks in cities across england compared to days when the air is cleaner. that's according to new research from kings college london which found there are significant short—term health risks caused by polluted air which also contributes to up to
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36,000 deaths each year. abortion and same—sex marriage will become legal in northern ireland at midnight tonight. the change will happen because of legislation passed at westminster with no devolved government at stormont. the assembly there will meet for the first time in two and a half years to debate the change in law today. here's our ireland correspondent chris page. it's a sensitive, emotive and personal issue, but abortion law in northern ireland, which is much more restrictive than the rest of the uk, has generated huge demonstrations. westminster has passed legislation which means terminations will be decriminalised if devolution isn't fully restored today. protesters who oppose the changes have pressured politicians to bring back stormont, so the democratic unionist party has led a move to recall the devolved assembly. campaigners believe it will send a valuable message. let's bring this back to the floor of the assembly, let our elected local
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representatives discussed this, because they are our voice, and let us speak because westminster shouldn't be speaking for us. butjust holding a sitting of the assembly doesn't mean the change in abortion law will be stopped. that will only happen if the parties agreed to settle all their differences, appoint ministers and go back into government together. there's no prospect of such a big breakthrough, so politicians who pushed for change say having a debate in the assembly at this stage is a sham. i think that it is really disingenuous and an absolute stunt to have a motion on that debate when we know it can deliver nothing in the chamber on the same day. as well as abortion, there is set to be another big social shift. the new legislation will legalise same—sex marriage in northern ireland, five years after the rest of the uk. chris page, bbc news, belfast. the illegal use of drones will be tackled by a specialist police unit under new government plans. police will be given more powers and resources to avoid a repeat of the chaos caused by drones at airports last december.
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the disruption caused 1,000 flights to be cancelled or diverted. a mobile "counter—drone" unit equipped with technology to track down and interfere with the devices will be set up to respond to incidents across the uk. each year, many of us flock to cities like madrid to see the sights, but this weekend the city's streets were full of shepherds exercising their ancient rights. have a little look at these pictures. thousands of them wandered through the spanish capital as part of an annual agriculture festival — a tradition that dates back to the 13th century, but unlike many visitors, they didn't complain about being "fleeced" by tourist traps. apologies. it is 6:10am. you would expect that to ta ke it is 6:10am. you would expect that to take place in barcelona, wouldn't you? you would. you get the freedom of the city with those sorts of titles. so andy murray may now well
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have the freedom of the country. can we officially say he is back? with a bang,it we officially say he is back? with a bang, it is fair to say. with his replacement hip he might be doing a bit of mike bushell... replacement hip he might be doing a bit of mike bushell. .. don't do that. there are tears from andy murray in antwerp as he wins his first singles title since his hip surgery injanuary — he beats stan wawrinka in the european open final. wales will face south africa in the semi—finals of the rugby world cup after coming from behind with a dramatic late try to beat 1a—man france. var is involved again, as liverpool's perfect start to the premier league season is ended by manchester united — adam lallana with a late equaliser for the leaders. and some big names are left out as the draft is made for the hundred — cricket's new competition that starts next summer. bit of a glitzy affair as those big names were revealed but we know
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about big british get names, where they will go for that tournament. we saw some of the big international stars being picked. it will be exciting when it rolls around. it is just exciting when it rolls around. it isjust me exciting when it rolls around. it is just me and they today. exciting when it rolls around. it isjust me and they today. we are on our lonesome. ben is out somewhere, naga is in westminster. carroll, what do you have? a lot going on in the weather. a lot going on in the weather. a chilly start, a touch of frost in parts of scotland. it is chilly across the board but at this stage, mainly dry. we have a weather front which is coming in across the south—east. it is here already for some of us. it is producing some rain, albeit mostly light and patchy. we have this ridge of high pressure a cross patchy. we have this ridge of high pressure across much of the uk which is keeping things a lot more settled. a quiet start to the day. rain in east anglia, the south—east. ahead of it, a lot of cloud. a
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north—easterly breeze blowing in some showers from the north sea. under clear skies with the lowest temperature, for example in aberdeenshire, you will have some sunshine. some sunshine in northern ireland and despite the cloud across england and wales, we will see some sunny skies develop through the course of the day. temperatures nine to 14 course of the day. temperatures nine to 1a degrees. through the day as the weather front approaches the cloud will thicken up. across the north west of scotland we will see showers ahead of rain and the wind will pick up. gusty winds here at later on. here comes the rain through the overnight period. further south, we still have the odd shower but we could well have some issues with fog through the course of the first thing tomorrow morning. most likely areas are southern parts of wales, southern england, where we have clear skies. it will be a chilly at night except across the north—west of scotland than the nightjust gone. north—west of scotland than the night just gone. temperatures falling to roughly between four and eight in towns and cities. tomorrow
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morning, watch out for the fog. it could well be dense across parts of southern england and south wales. some of itjust southern england and south wales. some of it just lifting southern england and south wales. some of itjust lifting into lower cloud but some will clear all together. what you will find as we go through the course of tomorrow is we will start to see some sunny skies develop. we still do have some gusty winds and weather fronts moving across the north and west of the uk, introducing all that rain. where we have the sunshine, we could get highs up to 15 degrees tomorrow in london and plymouth. 13 in stornoway and aberdeen. then as we had in towards the middle part of the week, you can see we have weather fronts close to the south—east. we also have weather fronts and low pressure coming in across the north west. once again, that means we are looking at some rain across western and northern parts of the uk, accompanied by gusty winds. as we push away from that, brighter skies, but gusty winds. as we push away from that, brighterskies, but don't forget that weather fronts close to the south—east. it is fairly weak
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and will bring in cloud at times and we could see the other shower coming out of it. in summary, for scotland and northern ireland, from mid week, with low pressure in charge, it will be cloudy at times, wet at times and windy at times. for england and wales, with a high pressure in charge, yes, a bit of rain at times as we saw from the weather front, but there will be some sunny skies but there will be some sunny skies but watch out for some fog if you are travelling. damp, back to you. a busy day for you, carol. we will see you later on. john is in the studio to look at the papers. let's look through the front pages. we have a selection. the daily telegraph says there's a "guerrilla war" led by mps who want to delay brexit. it's also picked up on comments from the duchess of sussex who says she's struggling with being in the royal spotlight. a tearful andy murray is on the front of the guardian, after his win yesterday in antwerp. the paper says labour wants to force
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borisjohnson to drop his deal — or accept a softer brexit. that story is also in the mail — it says downing street is accusing labour of trying to cancel brexit by either a fresh referendum or keeping the uk in the customs union. the main image is downton actor michelle dockery on the red carpet at the rome film festival. and something else we're talking about this morning — the sun says there's "bad blood" between the dukes of sussex and cambridge, after harry said on tv last night that he and william were on "different paths". we will be talking about hair loss shortly butjohn is here to look at the inside pages. andy murray dominating the back pages, as well. needless to say, some brilliant headlines. hip, hip, murray. as we know he had that resurfacing operation. like hip, hip, hurray?
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yes. we know about his quality but this is his fourth tournament in six weeks. so soon after he was back on court knocking a ball against the wall at his local club. he doubted it himself. absolutely. think how tea rful it himself. absolutely. think how tearful he was at that press conference at the australian open when you thought this would be it, he wanted to try to limp on, perhaps retire at wimbledon. he surpassed all his expectations. there were all the pre—recorded tapes from roger federer, novak djokovic, saying what a great career he had had. we can erase all of those! we wonder how much further he can go. it is such a brutal sport with the schedule and short rest and the matches i so long. he might have gone through this before. you are playing football, white tennis, you get an injury on your ankle, what do you do? reach for something frozen. you would think so. but a doctor who actually devised the frozen peas approach to ease the pain. he says
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rice. rest, ice, elevation. always peas. you are on the same page here. he has revealed they actually do more harm than good. in 1978, the doctor came up with the rice acronym on how to treat muscle... how to treat muscle soreness and pain. it has seen millions of people use frozen peas for recovery, but the doctor, who is now 84, has written in his blog that cold and total rest actually delay healing. this is the new discovery he has come to. and the chartered society of physiotherapy have edged them to ditch rice and a spokesman said this should be a significant moment but i don't know how many will hear the message. shocker! that is the first thing you go for, always! it still
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helps with the bruising, right? helps the healing process. you need to write a letter to dr gabe mirkin. i will take this up with him. interesting name. also, the guardian, lots of talk about this 19 hour passenger flight, the longest passenger flight. hour passenger flight, the longest passengerflight. 10,000 hour passenger flight, the longest passenger flight. 10,000 miles hour passenger flight, the longest passengerflight. 10,000 miles all the way from new york to sydney. there are lots of questions here about complaints about the amount of fuel used and how many equivalent barrels of oil. but actually it is better for the environment in terms of carbon dioxide production than taking two flights because take—off and landing, you burn far more fuel. in order to keep the body going during that 19 hour flight there was a bit of macarena and boyd stuck up you are encouraged to get up and move around. that is during a normal seven hour, eight hourflight. when you are in the airfor a 19 hours, you are in the airfor a 19 hours, you have to move. or a bit of mike
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bushell. .. will you stop you have to move. or a bit of mike bushell... will you stop doing that! it is just bushell... will you stop doing that! it isjust in my mind. it is not even 6:30am! you can't throw that stuff around. the good news about busheu stuff around. the good news about bushell is he is still in. turn your ea rs off if bushell is he is still in. turn your ears off if you have not seen strictly yet. he was in the dance off and he will come on later with emily to talk about the journey so far. j word. i don't think he has dropped that bomb yet. no more of that, we are done. it is 6:20am. if you have just switched that, we are done. it is 6:20am. if you havejust switched on, naga is at westminster. she has a whole series of mps to talk to. it is a significant day in terms of brexit developments today. i know we have said that a lot but it is significant. elsewhere... hair—loss advertisements promising unrealistic results are targeting young men with some procedures delivering damaging consequences. it's led the british association
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of hair restoration surgery to call for greater regulation of the industry. breakfast‘s tim muffett reports. my name is jerry. i had a hair transplant in 2015. the whole experience, to be honest, was terrible. you want to kind of better yourself and make yourself feel better for it then to only be way worse. all i've got is regret. jerry started losing his hair in his early 20s. newspaper adverts helped convince him to pay £9,000 on a transplant. what were the adverts promising you, and what did the clinic promise you? a full head of hair, that's why i went in. i paid for front to back, so planted from here all the way to the back of my head. i was screaming in pain, saying that i could really feel this. what do you feel about the results that you have now? i think they speak for themselves. they are just shocking, absolutely shocking. straightaway i had a big patch at the front of my head and just a line across where the new hair was planted. and then the patch is
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starting to get bigger. you can see all the scarring. the nerve damage is all round the top here. it's like... it's like a brain freeze all the time, just a constant pain. it's thought a fifth of young men experience hair loss by the age of 28. it can have a huge impact on self—confidence and self—esteem. i find it increasingly common that people are seeking to have these kind of procedures even earlier, at a younger age. perhaps it's also because of the number of celebrities, actors, footballers, who are having it done and making it public. bessam farjo says he is increasingly being asked to correct botched transplants. a hair transplant, whichever technique we use, relies on moving hair roots from the back and the sides of someone's scalp to the top. if you do too much too soon, you end up with visible scars. putting the hair line low,
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you end up with a look that doesn't look natural. at dr farjo's clinic in manchester are clients undergoing transplant surgery. we are at the part of the operation that determines the design of the transplant. we make tiny little cuts in the skin at a particular angle, in a particular direction, and a particular depth. so without that, that's when transplants can go wrong. that's when the appearance of a transplant can go wrong. there are a lot of clinics where it's not the doctor making the incisions in the skin. it's a non—medically—trained person. there need to be steps put in place to change that. it is often seen as cosmetic surgery because it affects appearance, but hair loss from male and female — genetic pattern hair loss is really a medical condition. done properly, the procedure can boost hair growth and self—esteem. but a bad hair transplant can be an expensive, painful mistake.
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tim muffett, bbc news. lets us know what you think of that story or any other story we are dealing with. you can find us on social media or e—mail us. still to come between now and 9:15am will stop we promised you a bit of mike bushell. so i'm going to save mike and katya. music: jump on it. he's made it through to next week's strictly halloween spooktacular — mike was unanimously voted through by the judges after performing his samba in the dance—off. we'll catch up with him just after 8.30. it was david james who sadly went home. someone has to go, but it was not mr bushell. naga is down in
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westminster. we have a whole series of mps to speak to this morning. justine greening is coming up at 7:10am. rishi sunak, chief secretary to the treasury at 7:30am. hilary benn at 8:10am.jim to the treasury at 7:30am. hilary benn at 8:10am. jim fitzpatrick from labour and doctor sarah wallace debt will be with us, as well. that is at about 8:40am. one of the best selling fiction books of the year so far. you might have read it. it is the tatty west of auschwitz. she has written another book. her second book is called silky‘sjenny. heather will be here talking about that and plenty of reflection on the rugby world cup. we will speak to andy swiss injapan after big winds over the weekend for both england and wales. more from westminster coming upa and wales. more from westminster coming up a little bit later on. we mentioned all those mps coming. the big day today where the government will push once again for mps to vote on borisjohnson's will push once again for mps to vote on boris johnson's deal. will push once again for mps to vote on borisjohnson's deal. naga is
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there and we will be there shortly after the news, travel and whether wherever you are watching this morning. hello, i'm asad ahmad. one of the world's leading fund managers from capital group in london has been forced to resign after the bbc discovered he'd broken investment rules. mark denning helped to manage more than £200 billion of investors' money. but the bbc panorama programme has uncovered evidence that suggests he was secretly acquiring shares for his own benefit in some of the same companies as his funds. mr denning denies any wrongdoing. and you can see more on that story on our website, or watch panorama at 8.30 this evening on bbc one. police in london will continue their investigation today into racist abuse at an fa cup tie between haringey borough and yeovil at the weekend. haringey‘s goalkeeper says he was spat at and had a bottle thrown at him on saturday, which led to haringey‘s players being taken—off by the manager. the match being abandoned. no arrests have been made.
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over 50 years after seven drinking pals from essex decided to travel the world in a double—decker — they've reunited in the same bus. they left leigh—on—sea to travel to 30 countries, including iran, india and greece. they bought the routemaster bus from a scrap dealer for £145 — before setting off for their adventure, which took them through war zones and floods. i just wanted adventure. something inside mejust wanted to go out there and see a bit more of the world. i was 19, just adventure hungry, if you like. and you can see more that story, on inside out east on bbc one at 7.30 tonight, or on the bbc iplayer. let's take a look at the travel situation now. thejubilee the jubilee line still thejubilee line still has problems. minor delays because of some faulty trains. it's been a bit of a
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nightmare. a look at the roads, and in wandsworth, the a3 west hill is closed between the upper richmond road and tibbets corner for gas works. over in west norwood, leigham court road is blocked at glennie road — because of a collision. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's been a rather wet october so far, but then there's a lot of dry weather in the forecast for us this week. having said that, it's a damp and drizzly start to monday morning. always plenty of cloud around today. but it should turn dry ss as we head through the afternoon. now the rain comes courtesy of this weather front out towards eastern areas today, so it's rain in the east, drizzle in central london, and a little bit drier further west. it should turn dry just about everywhere through the afternoon. always lots of cloud, and added wind chill, as well. highs of 13—14 celsius, but cooler, of course, with exposure to that north—easterly wind. overnight tonight, it should turn dry for most of us. plenty of cloud again towards eastern areas.
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we will see some clear spells and in the clear spells, temperatures could drop as low as 3—4c. there will be some mist and fog patches forming into tomorrow morning and they could be quite slow to lift and clear. but tomorrow, dry with light winds and some spells of sunshine. there could be more rain towards eastern areas again on wednesday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. va nessa vanessa feltz is on with the brea kfast vanessa feltz is on with the breakfast show from this hello this is this breakfast with dan walker. we will be over at westminster shortly. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. as the duke and duchess of sussex open up about struggling with the pressures of royal life and media scrutiny we'll be talking to royal historian kate williams about their emotional interview and what the future holds for the couple.
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following a dramatic weekend of action england and wales have made it through to the semi—finals of the rugby world cup but it was a disappointing result for ireland. we'll get all the latest from japan. when heather morris's novel, the tattooist of auschwitz, was published last year it became an international phenomenon, selling over three million copies worldwide. she's here to tell us about the sequel to her story — cilka's journey. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. the government will try to offer mps another chance to approve the prime minister's brexit deal today — but only if the commons speakerjohn bercow allows the vote to take place. ministers also plan to start the parliamentary process for leaving the eu today — insisting they will leave by the deadline of october 31st, despite being forced over the weekend to request an extension from eu leaders. the duke of sussex has admitted
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he and his brother are "on different paths" amid reports of a rift. in a rare interview with itv, he said they have "good days and bad days". the duchess of sussex said that adjusting to royal life had been hard and revealed that friends had voiced concerns about her marrying into the family. when i first met my now husband, my friends were really happy, but happy, because i was so happy, but my british friends said to me, i'm sure he's great, but you shouldn't do it, because the british tabloids will destroy your life. and i very naively, we are american, we don't have that there, what are you talking about? that doesn't make any sense. i've been in tabloids. and i get it. so it's been complicated. spikes in air pollution trigger hundreds of heart attacks, strokes and acute asthma attacks in cities across england compared
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that's according to new research from king's college london which found there are significant short—term health risks caused by polluted air, which also contributes to up to 36,000 deaths each year. abortion and same—sex marriage will become legal in northern ireland at midnight tonight. the change will happen because of legislation passed at westminster with no devolved government at stormont. the assembly there will meet for the first time in two and a half years to debate the change in law today. the illegal use of drones will be tackled by a specialist police unit under new government plans. police will be given more powers and resources to avoid a repeat of the chaos caused by drones at airports last december. the disruption caused 1,000 flights to be cancelled or diverted. a mobile "counter—drone" unit, equipped with technology to track down and interfere with the devices, will be set up to respond to incidents across the uk.
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thirty ancient wooden coffins have been unearthed by archaeologists in the valley of the kings in egypt. the painted sarcophagi, which were found with preserved mummies inside, date back 3,000 years, according to officials. it's one of the biggest discoveries of its kind in more than a century. plenty going on in the world of sport. you have prepared some... the story of the year. this is a chronology? the glory comes at the end, having won his first title since the hip operation he had which, at the time, looked like it could spell the end of his career and we saw the tearful farewell. he thought this would be it, he would have to retire. he tried to go on to wimbledon. but he has beaten stan wawrinka. his first title in two years. he would have
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predicted that? it has been remarkable. his wife is due to give birth any moment to their third child. titles and silverware seemed a long way off when you consider nobody‘s ever come back from this type of surgery to play competitive singles tennis. and you wonder how much farher he can go after his first title. patrick geraey reports. andy murray has now won 46 tour titles in his career, but none quite like this. one of british sport's great fighters is a champion once more. in another chair at the start of this year and the tears were of pain. that's where i would like to stop. murray said his career was ending, but revolutionary hip surgery gave him a second chance. first in doubles and then eventually in the singles, murray fought his way back. his body renewed, his spirit restored. he said he now loved tennis again, but stan wawrinka would test that affection. two years older than murray and recovered from injuries
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of his own, in the first set, it took energy to watch him, let alone stop him. he carried on in fast forward in the second. murray had played four tournaments in little more than four weeks and struggled to block his path, unless accidentally. but murray is tennis's survival expert. with a partly metal hip and a fully iron will, he fought hard, punching his way back into the match. one set all. in the third, wawrinka broke, but murray broke back. wawrinka broke again, murray broke back again. and then, as the pressure increased and the stakes grew, the swiss made the crucial miss. murray had done it and he should get home just in time to see the birth of his third child. when i've been off the tour in the last few years, my family's got bigger, so i need to get on the road so we don't get out of control. but, yeah, look, i'm excited for the third kid, and my wife's been a huge support for getting me back on the court. he has a few weeks to take his paternity leave before the tennis starts again. the way he's playing, next year could be busy.
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patrick geary, bbc news. as he often does, andy murray used the power of emojis to express his feelings. he was still on the soft drinks at the post—match meal with his coaches — a "bunch of twerps in antwerp". mum judy raised a glass of something fizzy. andy's former primary school in dunblane spoke of their pride, saying that he "is an inspiration to us all". and james corden was among the celebrities who tweeted their appreciation — "unbelievable resilience and commitment", he says. what a weekend at the rugby world cup, where we say goodbye to the hosts japan who were knocked out. but england and wales march on as both reach the semifinals. we can cross to japan
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and join our sports correspondent andy swiss who's there. warren gatland said the best team lost. it is not often you hear a coach say that in international sport and warren gatland said it was an sport and warren gatland said it was n ugly sport and warren gatland said it was an ugly performance from wales and he was right, they were far from their best. but france imploded in their best. but france imploded in the second half when their lock forward was sent off for a blatant elbow, straight red card for him. wales left it to the final few minutes before ross moriarty scored the winning try that gave them the victory but they know they will have to be so much better in the semifinal against south africa because the springboks were so impressive in the way they dismantle japan and ended theirfairy impressive in the way they dismantle japan and ended their fairy tale. impressive in the way they dismantle japan and ended theirfairy tale. at least wales found a way to win and that will give them encouragement.
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sign ofa that will give them encouragement. sign of a good team when you win and perhaps not play particularly well. england dispatching australia at the weekend and they will hope for a perfect week's preparation, because they will need to be at their best to ta ke they will need to be at their best to take on new zealand. that is right. new zealand is the toughest test in world rugby. they are world number one and favourites. they have not lost a world cup match in 12 yea rs, not lost a world cup match in 12 years, which is extraordinary. they we re years, which is extraordinary. they were so impressive in the way they ruthlessly dismantled ireland in their quarterfinal. the history books do not make great reading for england, losing the last six meetings against them and the last time they met in a world cup semifinal, in 1995, you might rememberjonah lomu bulldozing over england. but england were impressive against australia but they will have to be at their very best. more to
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come from andy swiss as we build up to the semifinals. many thanks. liverpool's perfect start to the premier league season has been ended by their great rivals manchester united — and there was yet more var controversy. united took the lead at old trafford, through marcus rashford — that was given after a var check decided divock origi wasn't fouled in the build—up. but sadio mane's goal was ruled out by the video ref for handball. before adam lalla na scored a late equaliser — a great time to put away his first goal for two and a half years. it's obviously a clear foul. there is clear contact. divock origi's down. they play on. we could have sorted it, but it was counter attack. with the speed they have, that's what they always wanted. we had this millisecond where we were fouled. oh, and then they were in the gap. we can now say we are not allowed to do that,
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that's probably clear. yes, there's contact — i'm sure they said that, but it's not a clear mistake of you. hearts have opened an investigation after claims that rangers striker alfredo morelos was racially abused during their 1—1 draw earlier. rotaro mishino put hearts ahead afterjust six minutes, before morelos equalised — and he was allegedy targeted as he celebrated in front of the home fans. rangers are second in the table, level on points with celtic. the player draft has been made for cricket's new competition, the hundred, which begins next summer. there are eight new men's and women's teams, representing seven cities from around the uk. two of australia's ashes stars — steve smith and mitchell starc — will both play for welsh fire, but there were some big names who weren't picked including west indies opener chris gayle. great britain triathlete claire danson has revealed that a bike accident from august has left her paralysed. she won the european triathlon championships in may, and just two months later collided with a tractor during a training ride.
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she suffered multiple injuries, which she says will heal, but she also severed her spinal cord and is now paralysed from the belly button down. her sister alex danson — who was part of the gb hockey squad that won olympic gold in rio — posted an emotional message urging people to follow claire on social media to support her. she will share details of the accident what happened and her recovery and she said it will not hold her back and she wants to return to competition. it isa return to competition. it is a lot to go through as a family. thank you. john will be with us family. thank you. john will be with us throughout the morning. the main focus is on monday morning is what is happening at westminster. let's return to naga in westminster. good morning, everyone. what shall we tell you about now? speakerjohn bercow is set for another clash with mps
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today when he decides whether the prime minister boris johnson can hold his meaningful vote. but how does it all work? let's speak to alice lilly from the institute for government. good morning to you. what do we know about what will happen today? we know the government wants to have another go at a meaningful vote, getting mps to agree to their deal and crucially what the government wa nts and crucially what the government wants is for them to have a straight vote, yes or no on the deal, which is not what the government was able to have 48 hours ago. the problem is whether the speaker will let them do that. how could he not? there is a rule generally in parliament that mps cannot be asked to decide a question if they've already decided it in the same parliamentary session. although mps passed an amended version, they still essentially came up with an answer to that question 48 hours ago, so the speaker may turn round and say
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it falls foul of that rule. and that is because of the oliver letwin amendment attached to it. what about other amendments that could be attached? the question for mps is whether they will want to try to amend the government motion today, ifjohn bercow allows it but where a lot of the action will shift is the withdrawal agreement build, the legislation putting the government deal into law. we expect the government to present the bill today which would mean we see it for the first time but there would be no debate. tomorrow, debate would begin and once it has got through that stage tomorrow is when we can start expecting mps to lay a lot of amendments on all sorts of things. if that happens there is the issue of timing. boris johnson if that happens there is the issue of timing. borisjohnson is adamant the uk will leave by the 31st. how likely is that to happen if we have extra additions? it is possible but it will take up lots of time. there
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will also be a lot of vote so if we go back to the lisbon treaty say, there were between 80 and a votes on those bills. the government can try and control the timetable in the commons. they will table something tomorrow probably called a programme motion to allow them to say this is how much time we want to spend in the commons, but there is no guarantee mps will agree, and if they do not, getting everything done by the 31st of october looks difficult. what about a second referendum amendment, how would that play into this? it looks as though there will absolutely be an amendment calling for a second label —— second referendum tables. even if it got through, that would not be the end of the matter because in order to hold a referendum you would
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need legislation to set out what the question would be, who could vote on it, and there would be practical steps. it is estimated it would take 22 weeks in order to happen and so it is still a long process to get to a second referendum. now, hearing from ministers, mps from both sides, it appears if there was a straight meaningful vote, the government has the numbers. it does, it looks like it will be tight but the government might have the numbers. if the government is able to hold the vote today and mps agree to it, the government will hope it builds momentum so they can get this legislation done quite quickly. thank you for explaining that. 6:45am. time for carroll and the weather. it is raining in westminster. it has been raining all morning. iam not westminster. it has been raining all morning. i am not sure it will stay that way. gloomy skies. how is it
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looking elsewhere? good morning. iam i am worried about myjob, that was a good description. we have rain in the south—east of the uk and it is a colder start, which describes the first part of this week quite nicely. rain at times, cloud around, some sunny spells in colder nights. this is the rain coming in from the near continent. we have showers coming in from the north sea and the cloud is thick enough elsewhere for the odd shower but high pressure in charge for most today. it is a fairly quiet start. some starting on a cold note with a touch of frost across north—east scotland, where you will hang onto sunshine. for scotla nd you will hang onto sunshine. for scotland itself, in the west, cloud
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building showers and the wind will pick up as a new weather front comes our way, fringing the north—west of northern ireland, but the rest of northern ireland, but the rest of northern ireland, but the rest of northern ireland, sunny spells and also in england and wales, but the south—east, still seeing more cloud with the odd shower. even into the afternoon. 9—14, possibly 15 the temperatures today. overnight, the weather front gets closer. winters will pick up as well as rain moving across the northern and western isles and far north of mainland scotland. where we see clear sky further south, southern half of england and wales, we could see fog patches forming. tonight will be colder than the one just gone for all except the far north of scotland where it will be milder. the fog
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will lift into low cloud tomorrow. some of it will break up and sunny skies will develop. we could see some in northern ireland and scotla nd some in northern ireland and scotland but again we have rain across the north and west and still gusty winters. wednesday, rain at times across the south—east, albeit light. a new set of fronts coming into the north and west and again, some of that will be heavy. away from that, sunshine. on thursday, a mixture of rain, showers, sunny spells, but gusty winters, particularly in the north and west. that is something we are keeping a close eye on. and we could see snow on the top of the scottish mountains on the top of the scottish mountains on friday. if you like something mild as we head into the weekend, it
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looks like that could be coming our way. dan. did you catch up with mike on strictly at the weekend? he was brilliant. he gave it his all. he always does. he was in the bottom two for the first time. you have that experience, is it nerve—racking dancing again? it absolutely is. i was against kelly, an amazing dancer, so i knew i was going that night. it made me relax and really enjoy it and i did not give a hoot by then what i was doing with my feet but it is terrifying when you have to do it. you think, this could be it. i went to see mike last week. he is loving the experience but he knows he has to put a shift into stay in the competition. bless him. what i love about mike,
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anything he does, he throws himself into it with gusto. and he has a fabulous personality. i think he is 0k fabulous personality. i think he is oka fabulous personality. i think he is ok a while yet. i hope he will get to blackpool so we can have bbc breakfast outing! if you missed it, strictly met the fresh prince. strictly met the fresh prince this weekend, as mike and katya showed off their samba — a tribute to guestjudge alfonso ribeiro who starred in the fresh prince of bel—air. despite a crowd—pleasing dance they ended up in the bottom two — let's take a look. music: jump on it. # mike, jump on it, jump on it! # jump on it, jump on it!
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three. five. seven. mike, you make me need therapy, honestly. i recoiled in horror, darling. #jump on it, jump on it. in the dance—off is... mike and katya. david and nadiya. music: jump on it. music: such a night. the couple i'd like to save sold the number better and that was mike and katya. i'm going to save mike and katya. well done, mike and katya. you are safely through to next week's halloween special. we'll be catching up with mike later on this morning,
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but in the meantime here's a message from team "bushkat". so here we are, we have survived. it's been a dramatic weekend, saturday and sunday, with the results show. into the dance—off. it was surreal, really, because we had quite a long time to wait, to prepare for the dance off, didn't we? yes, get our heads around it. and just do it again. yeah, do it again. i was told to put more energy in. that meant i put a bit more energy in and then made a mistake, but then we recovered and actually the rest of it... was much better, and i think the judges notice that and appreciated it, so thank you for saving us. glad to go through to halloween week. that means a lot, doesn't it? another milestone. we get to do a group dance for halloween and also our own individual dance. find out what that is. no days off this week at all. no days off at all. it's sunday we're rehearsing. yeah. but obviously we feel for david and nadiya. because it could have been either of us going and it's a horrible moment when one of us has to go. they did brilliantly in the dance off, i think, didn't they? it's nerve—racking. i had to go up to alfonso, again, and do my hip thrusting.
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he was a great sport, by the way. he was really good. and his face was magical when i stared and tried to do the stare—out with him. that was really good. he was really supportive, wasn't he, and he came to do the dance with us on the saturday night. and what a moment again, for you. you got to do it twice. that was an amazing moment, wasn't it? whatever happens, we are just going to carry on working hard. carry on, enjoy every day, put all the hours in. every single week, that's all we can do. just do our best and hope for the best. but thanks, everyone, who's supported us so far. we've just got to carry on. we've got to carry on on this journey as long as we can. thank you. we will be with mike at his home with his wife emilyjust after 830m as we've been hearing this morning the pound has slipped after 830m the pound has slipped after after the brexit vote so what does all the uncertainty mean for uk businesses. ben's in the city to tell us more. morning, ben. it isa it is a bit damp down here. good morning from the city of london. many people like the rest of the
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country here trying to work out what this weekend means and not much has changed as far as certainty is concerned or getting any clear direction about what happens next as far as business planning is concerned and i can speak to two macro people, one from the institute of directors, and a currency expert. talk me through what business makes of this because as far as planning is concerned and getting a sense of what they need to do before brexit, we are no clearer. politicians are good at deciding what they don't wa nt good at deciding what they don't want and kicking the can down the road one day further. there is concern about the revised deal with businesses in northern ireland. the most pressing priority is to avoid no deal because we know among members that would not see investment certainty, it would make it worse. a lot of big banks brought in staff over the weekend to protect
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clients' interest, but it was a bit ofa damp clients' interest, but it was a bit of a damp squib. nothing moved. the pound has declined slightly but i heard some of the traders scaled back and were told not to come in because it would not be 2016 all over again. the pound is a reflection of what is going on. there is no clarity which is why it is staying where it is but there is a positive tone to the pound which we expect to stay, even though we do not know what is going on with brexit. movement in the pound is crucial for so many things, brexit. movement in the pound is crucialfor so many things, whether it is imports and exports and for those of us going on holiday, investments. the pound is going further abroad now than two weeks ago with a 5% increase in the pound last week. exporters, the weaker pound should be good news. a stronger pound is a better thing on the whole. trying to get planning in
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place for business, we are creeping closer to the end of october and they need to start making decisions and they do not know what decision to make. we cannot rule out a no deal at any point because the politics are unreliable and we are ploughing ahead with preparation work with members. there are a lot of people wondering if it will happen and if they need to stockpile again because we do not want to repeat, repeat extended delays. we will talk more later. the big question for businesses, what do they need to do next, how do they prepare, what do they need to put into contingency planning as far as making plans for the future? still big questions. this week could be instrumental in giving answers. but quite uncertain times as far as the pound and investment is concern here in the city. we will talk more but now the news where you are watching.
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hello, i'm asad ahmad. one of the world's leading fund managers from capital group in london has been forced to resign after the bbc discovered he'd broken investment rules. mark denning helped to manage more than £200 billion of investors' money. but the bbc panorama programme has uncovered evidence that suggests he was secretly acquiring shares for his own benefit. mr denning denies any wrongdoing. and you can see more on that story on our website, or watch panorama at 8.30 this evening on bbc one. police in london will continue their investigation today into racist abuse at an fa cup tie between haringey borough and yeovil at the weekend. haringey‘s goalkeeper says he was spat at and had a bottle thrown at him on saturday — which led to haringey‘s players being taken off by the manager, the match was abandoned. no arrests have been made. over 50 years after some
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drinking pals from essex decided to travel the world in a double decker, they've reunited in the same bus. they left leigh—on—sea to travel to 30 countries, including iran, india and mexico. they bought the routemaster from a scrap dealer for £145 before setting off for their journey, which attracted headlines wherever they went. they found themselves in war zones and floods. i just wanted adventure. something inside mejust wanted to go out there and see a bit more of the world. i was 19, just adventure hungry, if you like. and you can see more of that story, on inside out east on bbc one at 7.30 tonight, or on the bbc iplayer. let's take a look at the travel situation now. problems on the overground due to a signal failure at highbury and islington. jubilee line, mechanical issues on trains. a look at the roads, and in wandsworth the a3 west hill is closed between upper
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richmond road and tibbet‘s corner for gas works. over in west norwood, leigham court road is blocked at glennie road because of a collision. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's been a rather wet october so far, but then there's a lot so far, but there's a lot of dry weather in the forecast for us this week. having said that, it's a damp and drizzly start to monday morning. always plenty of cloud around today. but it should turn dry as we head through the afternoon. now the rain comes courtesy of this weather front out towards eastern areas today, so it's rain in the east, drizzle in central london, and a little bit drier further west. it should turn dry just about everywhere through the afternoon. always lots of cloud, and added wind chill, as well. highs of 13—14 celsius, but cooler, of course, with exposure to that north—easterly wind. overnight tonight, it should turn dry for most of us. plenty of cloud again towards eastern areas. we will see some clear spells and, in the clear spells, temperatures could drop as low as 3—4 celsius.
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there will be some mist and fog patches forming into tomorrow morning and they could be quite slow to lift and clear. but tomorrow, dry with light winds and some spells of sunshine. there could be more rain towards eastern areas again on wednesday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker in salford and naga munchetty in westminster. our headlines today. boris johnson's brexit agreement is back in parliament — as the government tries again to get mps to vote on it. good morning. yes, i'm here in westminster. ministers say they'll push ahead with plans to leave by october 31st — despite the prime minister being forced to ask the eu for an extension at the weekend. the pound slips in early trading
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after the delay on the brexit vote. business tries to assess whether an no deal exit is still likely. i'm here in the heart of london's financial district to get reaction and to find out what it means for your wallet. and in other news, the duke and duchess of sussex speak about struggling in the spotlight — prince harry says he and his brother have "good days and bad days" amid reports of a rift. part of this role and part of this job, and this family being under the pressure that it's under, inevitably, you know, stuff happens. but, look, we're brothers, we will always be brothers. we are certainly on different paths at the moment. good morning. the tears flow for andy murray as he winds his first singles title since career—saving hip surgery. he won the european open in antwerp. music: jump on it. and mike gets to keep dancing. we'll catch up with him after a hip—thrusting samba saw him survive the strictly dance—off. good morning. a chilly start to the day today. chilly enough for a touch
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of frost in parts of scotland but for many it will be dry, some sunny spells developing and some rain across the south—eastern quarter of england. more in 15 minutes. it's monday october the 21st. this is the view across the houses of parliament. a rainy morning. the government will push again today for mps to vote on borisjohnson's brexit deal. it comes after a bruising weekend for the prime minister, in which he was forced to ask the eu for an extension to his planned leaving day of october the 31st. let's take a quick look at what's in store. ministers will try for another meaningful vote this afternoon — that's where mps can indicate whether or not they support the prime minister's deal in principle. whether that vote goes ahead is a decision for the speaker, john bercow. most westminster watchers think he'll probably refuse. the government will also bring
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forward legislation to implement its eu withdrawal agreement bill. that would start the legal process of the uk leaving the eu. meanwhile, the court of session in edinburgh — that's scotland's supreme civil court — will sit today to consider whether mrjohnson acted unlawfully by failing to sign his letter to the eu, which asked for an extension to the brexit deadline. let's talk now to our political correspondent, jessica parker. good morning to you. stop brexit! other noises have begun. another week at westminster. today the noises will continue inside the house. ministers will try to have another meaningful vote. if people are thinking, didn't we go through that on saturday? what happened on saturday was the letwin amendment, so what the government wants is to have a straight up and down a binary choice on the deal in principle, as you were just saying. the question is, willjohn bercow allow that to happen? the smart money might
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currently be on no although he delivers a surprise or two and that is because he will perhaps say it is too similar to what mps were already talking about on saturday. he will probably make that decision around mid—afternoon. meanwhile the government will try to introduce its legislation to actually implement the brexit deal, turn it into law. then we have the issue, whether it does or doesn't come through to a meaningful vote, the issue of timing. do we have enough time for the government to get this through in orderfor the the government to get this through in order for the uk the government to get this through in orderfor the uk to the government to get this through in order for the uk to leave the government to get this through in orderfor the uk to leave by october 31? ministers have insisted there is enough time. they are confident they have the support and can get this done by the 31st of october. getting this legislation through could prove complicated for a number of reasons. there are mps who will undoubtedly try to amend the legislation, whether that is by saying they want the uk to remain in a customs union with the eu, another referendum, to stop no deal at the
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end of a transition period. i think the government may try to bring forward a programme motion to control the timing of the passage of the bill so they stand a chance of getting it through parliament in time, but that itself could be rejected. jessica, thank you. lots going on down here in westminster. we are talking to rishi sunak, the chief secretary to the treasury, justine greening, no one independent mp. i will talk to her, as well. lots more going on throughout the programme. it is noisy down here, dan. cozy in the studio, is it? always cosy here. looks pretty horrendous weather. we will get the update from carol in about ten minutes. elsewhere today... the duke of sussex has admitted he and his brother are "on different paths" amid reports of a rift. in an interview with itv he said they have "good days and bad days". the duchess of sussex said that adjusting to royal life had been hard and that she wasn't prepared for the scrutiny of the tabloid press. jon donnison reports. filmed during their recent
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trip to africa, this documentary reveals that, despite appearances, the royal couple are at times struggling. harry says he sees his mother diana in every camera and flash bulb. every single time i see a camera, every single time i hear a click, every time time i see a flash, it takes me straight back. so, in that respect, it's the worst reminder of her life, as opposed to the best. meghan says she's been shocked by the level of press intrusion, even though herfriends had warned her before she got married. my british friends said to me, "i'm sure he's great, but you shouldn't do it, because the british tabloids will destroy your life." and i very naively, — we're american, we don't have that there — "what are you talking about?" prince harry talks about the relationship with his brother and plays down talk of a rift with prince william.
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inevitably, you know, stuff happens, but, look, we're brothers, we will always be brothers. we're certainly on different paths at the moment but i will always be there for him, as i know he will always be there for me. prince harry acknowledges he sometimes needs support, saying he still struggles with mental health issues. i thought i was out of the woods and then, suddenly, it all came back, and i suddenly realise that this is something that i have to manage. look, part of this job and part of anyjob, like everybody, means putting on a brave face. the turnaround from a sunny wedding day a year and a half ago is very sharp. john donnison, bbc news. abortion and same—sex marriage will become legal in northern ireland at midnight tonight. the change will happen because of legislation passed at westminster with no devolved government at stormont. the assembly there will meet for the first time in two and a half years to debate the change
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in law today. spikes in air pollution trigger hundreds of heart attacks, strokes and acute asthma attacks in cities across england compared to days when the air is cleaner. that's according to new research from kings college london, which found there are significant short—term health risks caused by polluted air which also contributes to up to 36,000 deaths each year. the illegal use of drones will be tackled by a specialist police unit under new government plans. it's been set up to avoid a repeat of the disturbances seen at gatwick airport last winter, when around 1,000 flights were delayed or cancelled following sightings of rogue drones. andy moore reports. the technology now exists to bring down a drone electronically in a matter of seconds. the security minister brandon lewis saw for himself how it can be done in a lab. that is quick, isn't it? now the hardware is being exported
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to the real world, with mobile units that can detect and bring down rogue drones. in essence what we are looking to do is make sure that where drones can be used for malicious or inappropriate circumstances, that our agencies, our police forces, have the tools and ability to stop that and prevent that. last december, drone sightings over gatwick airport caused chaos for several days. the flights of hundreds of thousands of people were cancelled. at heathrow, in a separate incident, flights were briefly disrupted early this year. nobody has ever been arrested. drones are also used to deliver drugs and mobile phones to prisons. it will be used on major infrastructure sites. it could be airports. we are working with the ministry ofjustice looking at prisons, talking to the ministry of defence about various sites that we could use it around there. so around critical national infrastructure sites of importance. drones have many positive applications. here, a device equipped with an infrared camera is being used in an exercise by firefighters to detect heat sources. the government wants to make sure this kind of technology is used
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for the general good, not for malicious purposes. andy moore, bbc news. each year, many of us flock to cities like madrid to see the sights, but this weekend the city's streets were full of shepherds exercising their ancient rights. thousands of sheep wandered through the spanish capital as part of an annual agriculture festival — a tradition that dates back to the 13th century — but unlike many visitors, they didn't complain about being fleeced by tourist traps. there you go. it's 7:10am. let's return now to the main story of the day — and most probably the rest of the week — brexit. naga is in westminster. you are avoiding terrible cheap gags. you have the good end of the 939 gags. you have the good end of the gag today —— good end of the programme. sheep gags? we were doing
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a thing about madrid and talking about sheep being fleeced. literally? i'm avoiding them. i apologise to viewers. you should be able to hear exactly what we are doing. we are trying to figure out what happens next. let's talk now to one of the mps who forced the prime minister to ask the eu for a brexit extension over the weekend — his former conservative cabinet colleague, now sitting as an independent backbencher, justine greening. good morning. good morning. what was in your mind when you were driving this thought is to get the extension? because lots of people have said this is an issue of a lack of trust in borisjohnson in how he will let brexit playout. it was the lack of detailfor will let brexit playout. it was the lack of detail for me. we literally didn't have a deal of any shape until last thursday. this is the biggest constitutional change in britain for decades. we will have to live with it for decades. i want to see the details and that's what we we re see the details and that's what we were voting for saturday. lots of people say you voted to remain, so voting for this amendment is in effect just another way of trying to stop brexit. is that what you are
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trying to do? know. even if we get it done we have to get brexit done properly. that is going through what is proposed in meticulous detail. we have not seen the brexit bill. and thatis have not seen the brexit bill. and that is the new law, if you like, that is the new law, if you like, that my community will have to live underfour decades. ijust that my community will have to live under four decades. i just want to see that actual contract before i sign up to it. that is what my community expects me to do, to be on the ball and making sure i am on top of the details. your community in rotherham voted to leave the eu by 68% so in many ways you are going against what you are constituents wanted. i grew up in a leave constituency and i now represent a heavily remain constituency. i've done my best to represent my community in putney in parliament. that is myjob. wherever you live in the uk, what you need parliament to do is to make sure it is on top of the actual detail that will affect day—to—day lives for decades to come. that is why we need to see the
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withdrawal agreement bill, and i am hoping the government will finally get around to publishing it today. what do you think in terms of the additional amendments that might come along, additional questions, what do you think in terms of realistically getting it done by the 3ist realistically getting it done by the 31st of october? i see very little prospect of us being able to do that because at the end of the day this isa because at the end of the day this is a huge bill. it is likely to be 100 pages, and we all know that rushed law is bad law but this isn't just any old law. this is the political rewiring of our country and it has to be done properly. that is all i'm saying. i recognise that people say, well, let'sjust is all i'm saying. i recognise that people say, well, let's just get it done. this is anyhow the beginning ofa done. this is anyhow the beginning of a brexit process. even when we've done this bill, we will have to look at the free trade agreement, so all iam saying, at the free trade agreement, so all i am saying, with others, is we have to go through this process properly otherwise we will end up with a bad result. at my job
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otherwise we will end up with a bad result. at myjob is a good one. otherwise we will end up with a bad result. at my job is a good one. i'm assuming you don't think the speaker will allow a meaningful vote.|j don't know, that is up tojohn bercow. my sense is we had the vote on saturday and although the government didn't immobilise its own mps and push it to a divided vote, that was the moment. if they wanted to vote their deal through, we were all there to do that! and it didn't happen. i don't know whatjohn bercow will agree to. what i do know is that whatever happens is we need to see the details. if there is a proposalfor an to see the details. if there is a proposal for an amendment for a second referendum, a people's vote, would you support it? yes, because i think we are now 3.5 years on from brexit and i think whatever happens, it feels like we are a very long way away from the lofty ideals of that campaign. i also recognise that brexiteers don't seem to agree on what brexit should be. nigel farage is saying he thinks borisjohnson's
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brexit is a brexit in name only. the only people who can really decide what brexit is and whether to go ahead by the british people. we should just give them the choice. many people will question your motivation as someone who is now out of the conservative party, an independent mp, you are standing down at the next election. you have said, "i am leaving parliament to drive change where it actually is happening on the ground". you also said maybe one day our political system will catch up. you are leaving it, you will not be helping it. i think the real issues in our country i things like the lack of equality of opportunity. i think thatis equality of opportunity. i think that is what drove a lot of the anger and concern around britain that perhaps drove the brexit vote. iam going that perhaps drove the brexit vote. i am going to make sure i am working on those. everyone says we have to get brexit done to get onto these other things. i don't want to wait until we get brexit done because, believe me, brexit will take many, many, believe me, brexit will take many, any believe me, brexit will take many, many, many years. i want to make sure i put my time into campaigning
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and changing things on the ground. sounds like you have given up on the political system. i just think politics will all be focused on brexit and i recognise people want to get onto the other stuff and so do i. justine greening, independent mp, thank you for talking to me. it is raining here. it is cold. that's all i can tell you. but that's not myjob to tell you. we have someone far more qualified, and that is carol. good morning, how are you? very well, thank you. the temperature where you are at the moment is actually 11 degrees. you have that chilly breeze. you will notice the flags blowing behind naga munchetty, i'm quite sure. we have blue skies around. look at all the sties in the sky this morning. a chilly start across parts of scotla nd chilly start across parts of scotland and for the start of this week it will be chilly and mainly dry. mainly dry, there is rain in the forecast, as well. we have it coming in across the south—east of the uk. that is where naga munchetty illy macro is. —— that is won't nag
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it is. just pulling them in from the north sea. we also have the ridge of high pressure, so for most it will bea high pressure, so for most it will be a quite day weather wise and fairly subtle. we hang onto this rain on and off throughout the day. the cloud for enough across england and wales for the shower. scotland and wales for the shower. scotland and northern ireland, clearer skies. a frosty site in aberdeenshire, but through the afternoon the cloud will thicken in the west and that will start to mean we have a weather front coming our way. a few showers and gusty winds. for england, wales, some holes developing in the cloud but still some showers in the south—east replacing the earlier rain. the temperature today at nine to 14, possibly 15 in lengthy spells of sunshine. through this evening and overnight, a weatherfront advances across the northern and western isles, the far north of scotland, bringing rain, gusty winds. quite a bit of cloud around
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but where it breaks that is where we will see fab patches forming. —— fog patches. it may be dense and problematic across the south of the country. a chilly at night this coming night compared to the one just gone, except across the north of scotland, where it will be milder. tomorrow, we will see the fog lifted into low cloud for some. for others it will break. a few sunny spells developing a specially across england and wales. for northern ireland and scotland, a bit more cloud at times with the odd shower and still the rain across parts of the north and west of scotla nd parts of the north and west of scotland and here, too, rather that gusty winter. temperatures 11 to 15. on wednesday, a weather front close to the south—east produces some patchy rain, turning my showery through the day. a bit of cloud associated with it but we have a new democrat my dynamic set of affronts
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in the north and west introducing heavier rain and again gusty winds around the band. in between the two come across northern england, parts of wales, the south—west, we will see sunnier skies. temperatures 11 to 15. on thursday, a bit of everything. some showers, some rain, summer sunshine. but it will be particularly windy across the north and west of scotland. especially so with exposure. we could have really strong gusts. highs of ten to 16 in the south. i miss domecq out mishmash of weather. plenty to look forward to. thank you for that. if you have just switched on your tv, nike and is down at westminster with a few mps to speak to —— naga is in westminster. hair—loss advertisements promising unrealistic results are targeting young men with some procedures delivering damaging consequences. it's led the british association of hair restoration surgery to call for greater regulation of the industry. tim muffett reports.
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my name is jerry. i had a hair transplant in 2015. the whole experience, to be honest, was terrible. you want to kind of better yourself and make yourself feel better for it then to only be way worse. all i've got is regret. jerry started losing his hair in his early 20s. newspaper adverts helped convince him to pay £9,000 on a transplant. what were the adverts promising you, and what did the clinic promise you? a full head of hair, that's why i went in. i paid for front to back, so planted from here all the way to the back of my head. i was screaming in pain, saying that i could really feel this. what do you feel about the results that you have now? i think they speak for themselves. they're just shocking, absolutely shocking. straightaway i had a big patch at the front of my head and just a line across where the new hair was planted. and then the patch is starting to get bigger. you can see all the scarring. the nerve damage is all
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round the top here. it's like... it's like a brain freeze all the time, just a constant pain. it's thought a fifth of young men experience hair loss by the age of 20. it can have a huge impact on self—confidence and self—esteem. i find it increasingly common that people are seeking to have these kind of procedures even earlier, at a younger age. perhaps it's also because of the number of celebrities, actors, footballers, who are having it done and making it public. bessam farjo says he is increasingly being asked to correct botched transplants. a hair transplant, whichever technique we use, relies on moving hair roots from the back and the sides of someone's scalp to the top. if you do too much too soon, you end up with visible scars. putting the hair line low, you end up with a look that doesn't look natural. at dr farjo's clinic
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in manchester are clients undergoing transplant surgery. we are at the part of the operation that determines the design of the transplant. we make tiny little cuts in the skin at a particular angle, in a particular direction, and at a particular depth. so without that, that's when transplants can go wrong. that's when the appearance of a transplant can go wrong. there are a lot of clinics where it's not the doctor making the incisions in the skin. it's a non—medically—trained person. there need to be steps put in place to change that. it is often seen as cosmetic surgery because it affects appearance, but hair loss from male and female genetic pattern hair loss is really a medical condition. done properly, the procedure can boost hair growth and self—esteem. but a bad hair transplant can be an expensive, painful mistake. tim muffett, bbc news. let's talk about this some
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more with psychologist becky spelman who joins me now. good morning, thank you for coming in. you carry out some psychological assessments on men who are thinking about this procedure. what sort of things are they talking to you about? surgeons send people to me to do psychological assessments when people are considering having this procedure. i am looking to see if people have body dysmorphic disorder, which can be quite hard to pick up on. if someone really is determined to have this procedure they mate democrat might rely on tests a nd they mate democrat might rely on tests and the surgeon thinks the person is psychologically fit to have the procedure when actually they are obsessed with their appearance and may go on to focus on other areas after they have this procedure done. in terms of those meant being sent to see you, is there a rise in that, sharp rise, what is happening?” there a rise in that, sharp rise, what is happening? i receive a lot of referrals for all cosmetic procedures. a lot of men do, but i
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think it is important to understand the psychological impact on young men losing their hair. it is not just men who suffer from low self—esteem who are affected by this. actually men who are otherwise quite confident can really experience a lot of shame, embarrassment when they start to lose their hair. we talked about adverts targeting young men in particular. has that, do you think, had an impact when you are having those assessments, is that mentioned? yeah. it is really u nfortu nate. mentioned? yeah. it is really unfortunate. there is a predatory advertising, as i would call it, when you can target men of a certain age on social media when they may wa nt to age on social media when they may want to have the procedure and they are seeing these ads all the time. u nfortu nately, are seeing these ads all the time. unfortunately, marketing is so advanced in this day and age that they will be influenced by this advertising. it is not that people shouldn't get it done but they have to think carefully and do a lot of research. i'd imagine everyone having these sorts of procedures would have a psychological assessment with someone like you, which is why some people are calling
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for it to be a medical treatment rather than a cosmetic one, which would bring it underfar more regulation. what do you think of that? i think it needs to be regulated because particularly young people can be very impulsive when they think about having this and it is socially acceptable, they might know people who have had it done and they mightjust go to the first really afforda ble they mightjust go to the first really affordable clinic, may be going abroad. i don't have anything against people going abroad but you have to do a lot of research, ask a lot of questions, make sure there are accreditations where the doctor is accredited by certain organisations, they are reputable. speak to their previous patients, see pictures and don't make that decision impulsively. ok. thank you very much. thank you. lets us know what you think about that and anything else we are covering this morning. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. naga is in westminster. still to come this morning... as the duke and duchess of sussex open up about struggling
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with the pressures of royal life and media scrutiny, we'll be talking to royal historian kate williams about their emotional interview and what the future holds for the couple. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. we will be back with all the main headlines at 7:30am. see you then. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. two people have been arrested this morning in connection to racism reported at the match between haringey borough and yeovil at the weekend. haringey‘s goalkeeper says he was spat at and had a bottle thrown at him, which led to the manager taking off his players. the men arrested are from somerset and are being held on suspicion of racially aggravated common assault. one of the world's leading fund managers from capital group in london has been forced to resign after the bbc discovered he'd broken investment rules. mark denning helped to manage
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more than £200 billion of investors' money. but the panorama programme has uncovered evidence that suggests he was secretly acquiring shares for his own benefit. mr denning denies any wrongdoing. and you can see more on that story on our website or watch panorama at 8:30 this evening on bbc one. over 50 years after some drinking pals from essex decided to travel the world in a double—decker, they've reunited in the same bus. they left leigh—on—sea to travel to 30 countries, including iran, india and mexico. they bought the routemaster bus from a scrap dealer for £145 before setting off for theirjourney which attracted headlines wherever they went. they found themselves in war zones and floods. i just wanted adventure. something inside mejust wanted to go out there and see a bit more of the world. i was 19, just adventure hungry, if you like.
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it isa it is a brilliant story. and you can see more that story on inside out east on bbc one at 7.30 tonight, or on the bbc iplayer. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube... problems on the overground due to a signal failure at highbury and islington. jubilee line — mechanical issues on trains. a look at the roads, and, in wandsworth, the a3 west hill is closed between upper richmond road and tibbet‘s corner for gas works. over in west norwood, leigham court road is blocked at glennie road because of a collision. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's been a rather wet october so far, but there's a lot of dry weather in the forecast for us this week. having said that, it's a damp and drizzly start to monday morning. always plenty of cloud around today. but it should turn dry as we head through the afternoon. now the rain comes courtesy of this weather front out towards eastern areas today, so it's rain in the east, drizzle in central london, and a little bit drier further west. it should turn dry just about everywhere through the afternoon. always lots of cloud, and added wind chill, as well.
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highs of 13—14 celsius, but cooler, of course, with exposure to that north—easterly wind. overnight tonight, it should turn dry for most of us. plenty of cloud again towards eastern areas. we will see some clear spells and, in the clear spells, temperatures could drop as low as 3—4 celsius. there will be some mist and fog patches forming into tomorrow morning and they could be quite slow to lift and clear. but tomorrow, dry with light winds and some spells of sunshine. there could be more rain towards eastern areas again on wednesday. inafew in a few minutes of the lesser felts will be talking to the chairman of haringey borough football club about the racism at the match on saturday —— vanessa feltz. that is on bbc radio london. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty.
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thanks very much forjoining us. we are talking about today the government will try to offer mps another chance to approve the brexit deal today, only if the commons speakerjohn bercow allows the vote to ta ke speakerjohn bercow allows the vote to take place. ministers expect to start the parliamentary process for leaving the eu today. insisting they will leave by the deadline of october the 31st, despite being requested at the weekend to ask for an extension. i'm joined now by chief secretary to the treasury, rishi sunak. you did not vote for the oliver letwi n you did not vote for the oliver letwin amendment. hopefully we can correct it today, i think what we wa nt to correct it today, i think what we want to see is mps being able to respect the result of the referendum and leave with a good deal, we now have that good deal. we do not want any more delays to frustrate or
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cancel brexit. i don't want parliament's letter to cancel brexit. i don't want pa rliament‘s letter to lead cancel brexit. i don't want parliament's letter to lead to another delay, i want to get out by the end of october with a good deal andi the end of october with a good deal and i hope today mps will get behind the new deal and make sure that happens. how many pages is the withdrawal agreement? it will be published before second reading, introduced and itself the agreement has been published. they got published last week. how many pages? it will be published later. do you know? it will be published, until it has been published... the reason i am asking is it is thought it is 100 pages and you have ten days and you expect mps to go through it forensically, as the public would expect, but you are not giving them enough time. they are considering a withdrawal agreement that has been published in a long time. the deal
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we renegotiated has specific changes and the rest of it we have considered for three years. i do not think there has been any shortage of time around this process. the withdrawal agreement has been published when we last had the deal, it is just the changes that are new and that is what we have been discussing. boris johnson put forward the deal saying it is better than theresa may's three attempts that were voted down. if this change is so significant, they need to be debated and scrutinise. they must be significant if boris johnson debated and scrutinise. they must be significant if borisjohnson is saying it is a better deal. the changes were published as soon as they were negotiated. they are specific changes and we had a debate on saturday around them and debate more generally and parliament will get a chance to sit at the weekend if needs be to get it done. we have had this process going on three yea rs had this process going on three years and people want it done, they do not want delay. this is a good
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deal, parliament has shown its willingness to move quickly. that is what people expect and i think we can do ourjob well properly but first we have to have the straight vote on the deal and make sure we can end uncertainty. you say the details have been published in this weekend the pound slipped because of what has happened. there has been no official economic assessment by sajid javid. why? the bank of england governor said last week that voting for the deal would be a positive step in the good news for the uk economy and end uncertainty. but what we are talking about on economic assessments is the future relationship, which needs to be negotiated and parliament will have its say on that process. as that process unfolds, there will be assessments done but this is about restoring trust in politics. no impact assessment or spreadsheets can impact assessment or spreadsheets ca n co nvey impact assessment or spreadsheets can convey the value of doing that if we can support this deal. you
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quoted mark carney, who also said andi quoted mark carney, who also said and i quote, the deal might not boost the economy to the same extent as the deal put forward by theresa may. he is talking about the future relationship and this is about leaving, the separate future relationship needs to be negotiated and that will happen after we leave and that will happen after we leave and of course is that process unfolds, there will be assessments made at that time and they will be shared with parliament in the normal way but you cannot do that now because those conversations have not happened. the key thing is do we wa nt to happened. the key thing is do we want to leave at the end of october. this deal allows us to do that and thatis this deal allows us to do that and that is the uncertainty we want to end. any business would not publish a plan to change fundamentally its relationships without showing the economic impact. how can you ask people to vote on something they don't know the economic impact. we are confusing to things. one is about leaving the eu and the second
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is about conversations about our future relationship. the eu themselves that they wanted to separate those conversations and said you have to talk about first, which they insisted on, and they said only after you have left can we talk about the future relationship. they were the eu's rules. first we have to leave which we want to do by the end of october, which is what this treaty allows us to do and after that we could negotiate a deeper comprehensive economic partnership which is what we have committed to and that is what the political declaration states in the documents published but we cannot have that conversation until we have left. we need to leave and this is what the vote this week is about. the former home secretary amber rudd says, our government's assessments are this will hurt the economy by 4-6% are this will hurt the economy by 4—6% per year. are this will hurt the economy by 4-6% per year. is she right? i think she was talking in those numbers about leaving without a deal. what
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this withdrawal does is we are not leaving without a deal. no, she was knocked talking about that. leaving without a deal. no, she was knocked talking about thatlj leaving without a deal. no, she was knocked talking about that. i do not know how she knows exactly what the future relationship will be because it has not been negotiated. we are trying to separate two things. we have to leave and once we have left we can have a conversation about the nature of the future economic partnership. that is the eu rules, they wanted that to be separate. this is stage one, leave first. after we have left we have a transition period to negotiate the future relationship and there is a statement of intent about that and it states we want to close economic partnership. and this depends on the speaker allowing a meaningful vote and the mood music suggests he will not be doing that. the speaker has a lwa ys not be doing that. the speaker has always said he would allow parliament to find a way to express an opinion on something. it is clear parliament wants to express an
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opinion on this important matter. i think the country, european partners, wants the uncertainty to end. they want to vote and i think it will be odd if everyone looking at us today thinks why can we not have that straight up and down vote and europe is looking for us to have and europe is looking for us to have a substantive vote on this issue. thank you very much for talking to me. plenty more coming up. we will speak to lots of people and get opinions about what is happening this week. dan's in the studio with the rest of this morning's news. plenty more guests coming your way from westminster and we will speak to hilary benn at 8:10am who voted for the oliver letwin amendment. and jim fitzpatrick, another labour member who voted against the amendment and also a liberal democrat, former conservative, who voted for that amendment. we will be speaking across the political
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spectrum. but elsewhere, the news today. the duke of sussex has admitted he and his brother are "on different paths" amid reports of a rift. in a rare interview with itv, he said they have "good days and bad days". the duchess of sussex said that adjusting to royal life had been hard and revealed that friends had voiced concerns about her marrying into the family. when i first met my now husband, happy, because i was so happy, but my british friends said to me, "i'm sure he's great, but you shouldn't do it, because the british tabloids will destroy your life." and i very naively — we're american, we don't have that there — "what are you talking about? that doesn't make any sense." i've been in tabloids. and i get it. so it's been complicated. spikes in air pollution trigger hundreds of heart attacks, strokes and acute asthma attacks in cities across england compared to days when the air is cleaner. that's according to new research from king's college london, which found there are significant
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short—term health risks caused by polluted air which also contributes to up to 36,000 deaths each year. abortion and same—sex marriage will become legal in northern ireland at midnight tonight. the change will happen because of legislation passed at westminster with no devolved government at stormont. the assembly there will meet for the first time in two and a half years to debate the change in law today. thirty ancient wooden coffins have been unearthed by archaeologists in the valley of the kings in egypt. the painted sarcophagi, which were found with preserved mummies inside, date back 3,000 years, according to officials. it's one of the biggest discoveries of its kind in more than a century. those are some of the main stories. we will have the weather shortly. ben is in the city of london and john is in the studio. it is good
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because otherwise it would just be me in him. we are celebrating something we thought might not happen. andy murray is back and back wedding. back with a trophy. we saw an emotional andy murray as he won at the european open and he would have predicted that when we saw the tea rs have predicted that when we saw the tears at the australian open, which was like an emotional farewell as he thought it was the end of his career. at the australian open, thinking the tournament could be his last, he underwent a second hip operation injanuary, and only started hitting a ball again six months ago — nobody had ever returned to singles competition after such major surgery. murray played doubles at queen's and wimbledon — but this was only his seventh singles tournamet since his return. and he came from a set down to beat stan wawrinka in the final. his 46th title and possibly the hardest yet. i mean, obviously, it means a lot.
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the last few years have been extremely difficult. both actually me and stan have had a lot of injury problems in the last couple of years. and, yeah, amazing to be back playing against him in a final like that. amazing and really emotional there. what a weekend at the rugby world cup. we've said goodbye to the hosts japan who've been brilliant to watch, as england and wales march on to the semifinals. we can cross to japan and join our sports correspondent andy swiss who's there. wales edging out france yesterday. their head coach warren gatland said the best team lost yesterday. that is right, not often you hear a coach of international sport say something like that. warren gatland said it was an ugly performance from wales and he was right, they were far from
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their best but france imploded in their best but france imploded in the second half once their second row forward had been sent off for a blatant elbow, a straight red card to for him. even then, wales had to wait until the closing minutes before they scored the try that sealed their victory, courtesy of ross moriarty. they know they will have to play so much better in the semifinal against south africa, who looked clinical in the way they despatched the host nationjapan, ending that particular sporting fairy tale. wales at least found a way to win and that should give them encouragement. we talk about england. australia also shot themselves in the foot, gifted possession easily. i suppose england will hope for a perfect week of preparation because they will need
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it to face new zealand. that is right. they are up against the toughest test in world rugby, new zealand the world number ones, the favourites, and have not lost a world cup match for 12 years, which is quite extraordinary. they looked impressive in the way they thrashed ireland in the quarterfinal and the history books do not make for encouraging reading for england fans, losing the last six against new zealand in the last time they met ina new zealand in the last time they met in a world cup semifinal, in 95, you may rememberjonah lomu bulldozed his way through the england defence. england played well against australia, showing mental toughness particularly in the second half, and they will need that mental toughness against new zealand. what a couple of matches to come. many thanks. more to come throughout the week as we build up to the
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semifinals. liverpool's perfect start to the premier league season has been ended by manchester united, after yet more var controversy. the first came as united took the lead at old trafford through marcus rashford — that was given after a var check decided divock origi wasn't fouled in the build—up. and then sadio mane's goal was ruled out by the video ref for handball before adam lallana scored a late equaliser. united will be frustrated with the defending — a great time to put away his first goal for two and a half years. two men have been arrested this morning, following an investigation into reports of racist comments made during the fa cup match between haringey borough fc and yeovil town on saturday, and yeovil town on saturday. you might remember the haringey manager took his players off the pitch. and hearts have opened an investigation after claims that rangers striker alfredo morelos was racially abused during their 1—1 draw. after hearts had gone ahead early on, morelos scored the equaliser —
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and he was allegedy targeted as he celebrated in front of the home fans. rangers are second in the table, level on points with celtic. it was a big weekend of sport and it will be a big week ahead, notjust for andy murray, because his wife is due to give birth any day now. and then we build up. good that he got then we build up. good that he got the win under his belt before he has to fly home. say you injure your knee, what do you do to that me? i would say get the frozen peas out. let's demonstrate the frozen peas. a nice little bend, the advantage of them. that has been done by hundreds, thousands, millions of people based on research in 1978, an american
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doctor who came up with rest, ice, compression, elevation, to deal with this. put on frozen peas and it ta kes this. put on frozen peas and it takes down the swelling. other people are saying it is not the right advice and he at the age of 84 has written to say the use of cold can delay healing and is questioning what has become standard practice for many years. it will take awhile to unravel. we have three young children. everyone, if the kid bumps their head, you get out the peas. even if it doesn't work, you tell them it does. exactly. it is the go to method. i think we have got to the bottom of the big news of the day. thank you. and the assistant to have.
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naga is in westminster. but we have got a picture of you then at westminster. you would not have to get your frozen peas out in one part because the temperature is minus five degrees. and you can see this lovely picture sent in by mark in london. for most, we are looking at cold nights, mainly dry, but rain in the forecast for some and already this morning it has been falling in the east anglia and the south—east of england. on the north—easterly wind, blowing some showers across parts of wales and south—west england. for the rest, with high pressure in charge, things are fairly settled. where we have low temperatures in the highlands, we have clear skies and for much of
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scotla nd have clear skies and for much of scotland and northern ireland you will have quite a lot of sunshine today. later across the north west, cloud and showers and the wind will strengthen. it is the same in the extreme north—west of northern ireland. for much of england and wales, the cloud will break and sunny skies developed but in the south—east, more cloud at times with the rain turning into showers in nature during the afternoon. probably worth taking an umbrella. as we head through the evening and overnight, the weather front continues to approach the north west and the winds strengthen. for much of the uk, drying, feeling cooler than the one just gone except in the far north—west of scotland where it will be mild. under clear skies particularly in southern england and south wales country, we could see fog patches. if that happens,
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through the morning that will lift into low cloud. for some it will not clear but where it does we will see sunny skies. this time it will be northern ireland and scotland who will see more cloud with the weather fronts draped across the north and west producing rain and gusty winds. temperatures on tuesday, 11—15. on wednesday, weather fronts. coming temperatures on tuesday, 11—15. on wednesday, weatherfronts. coming in from the west. producing some rain but further south, drier and brighter with sunny skies. thank you. we will be back with you later. also over the weekend you might‘ve seen strictly met fresh prince as mike and katya showed off a samba and a tribute to thejudge alfonso who starred in that programme. mike and katya ended up in the bottom two.
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music: jump on it. # mike, jump on it, jump on it! # jump on it, jump on it! three. five. seven. mike, you make me need therapy, honestly. i recoiled in horror, darling. #jump on it, jump on it. in the dance—off is... mike and katya. david and nadiya. music: jump on it. music: such a night.
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the couple i'd like to save sold the number better and that was mike and katya. i'm going to save mike and katya. well done, mike and katya. you are safely through to next week's halloween special. we'll be catching up with mike later on this morning, but in the meantime here's a message from team "bushkat" so here we are, we have survived. it's been a dramatic weekend, saturday and sunday, with the results show. into the dance off. into the dance—off. it was surreal, really, because we had quite a long time to wait, to prepare for the dance off, didn't we? yes, get our heads around it. and just do it again. yeah, do it again. i was told to put more energy in. that meant i put a bit more energy in and then made a mistake, but then we recovered and actually the rest of it... was much better, and i think the judges notice that and appreciated it, so thank you for saving us. glad to go through to halloween week. that means a lot, doesn't it?
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another milestone. get to do a group dance for halloween and also our own individual dance. find out what that is. no days off this week at all. no days off at all. it's sunday we're rehearsing. yeah. but obviously we feel for david and nadiya. because it could have been either of us going and it's a horrible moment when one of us has to go. they did brilliantly in the dance off, i think, didn't they? it was nerve—racking. i had to go up to alfonso, again, and do my hip thrusting. he was a great sport, by the way. he was really good. and his face was magical when i stared and tried to do the stare—out with him. that was really good. he was really supportive, wasn't he, and he came to do the dance with us on the saturday night. and what a moment again, for you. you got to do it twice. that was an amazing moment, wasn't it? whatever happens, we are just going to carry on working hard. carry on, enjoy every day, put all the hours in. every single week, that's all we can do. just do our best and hope for the best. but thanks, everyone, who's supported us so far. we just got to carry on. we've got to carry on on this journey as long as we can. thank you. we'll be speaking to mike.
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as we've been hearing this morning the pound has slipped after the brexit vote. ben's in the city to tell us more. morning, ben. good morning, the heavens have openedin good morning, the heavens have opened in central london, but take a look at that glorious view. we are in the shadow of st paul's cathedral where they are trying to work out here in the city of london what happened and whether we are further forward in getting answers to questions business has about the deal and whether there is a possibility of a no deal exit. that is one of the biggest fear is not only for investors but the value of sterling and businesses trying to work out what happens next. there are two people with us today. claire isa are two people with us today. claire is a personal finance editor at the financial times and ian wright from the food and drink federation. are we any further forward ? the food and drink federation. are we any further forward? no real a nswe rs we any further forward? no real a nswers yet we any further forward? no real answers yet and a lot of debate and
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headlines but no real solutions to the concerns this place has about brexit? we are still in this familiar brexit holding pattern where the government pulls my adverts might say get ready for brexit but the answer for business and individuals is get ready for what? a no deal, the deal they may vote on today, a second referendum, a general election? this mood of uncertainty, much like the dark clouds over the city of london this morning, persists and the problem with that is businesses feel like they cannot make decisions and the main decision they can make is not to do stuff. so not to hire people, not to invest. the level of business investment has flatlined since the referendum and that is limiting economic growth and causing worry for individuals about whether they could be made redundant or lose theirjobs which affect spending. you are nodding and for your members
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in the food and drink industry, one that relies on imports and exports, no clarity about what they need to be thinking about. uncertainty is a big problem and we do not know whether it is no deal, although i think that's unlikely on the 31st of october but it could be no deal at the end of the transition period, the end of the transition period, the end of 2020. members want to balance out the uncertainty against scrutiny of the deal we have got. you would not buy a house with two weeks of notice without sending in surveyors and experts and yet we are being asked to approve this deal in two weeks. we want to see it subject to proper scrutiny. the transition period, that is creeping closer because the time we have for that transition get shorter the longer the delay goes on. 14 months now until the end of 2020 and businesses have been focused on the disruption ano have been focused on the disruption a no deal could cause but the secondary worry is the transition period, will it be long enough to
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sort out big relationships with trade, regulation and the new environment they will trade in, and not knowing these short—term decision—making necessities means they need to delay decisions is increasing. i am worried about asking you about what your members wa nt to asking you about what your members want to because i suppose it is a nswe rs want to because i suppose it is answers and clarity but what do they tell you they need to hear from government? you speak for a tell you they need to hear from government? you speakfor a lot tell you they need to hear from government? you speak for a lot of members in the food and drink industry. they want to know how we will get a comprehensive free trade agreement with our biggest customer and supplier, europe. that is the most important thing. many members would want to be in a customs union said the debate on that being reopened is a good thing. we are open to free trade agreements with other countries. we negotiated ttip, an american free trade deal with the whole of the eu and political reasons meant that went west but
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there is an opportunity and absolutely the keystone of this is a european free trade agreement. we will talk more later but thank you. lots of questions still very few a nswe rs. lots of questions still very few answers. we will talk more about this and look at your personal finances after eight, showing what difference it could make to the money in your pocket but before that the news where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. two people have been arrested this morning in connection to racism reported at the match between haringey borough and yeovil at the weekend. haringey‘s goalkeeper says he was spat at and had a bottle thrown at him, which led to the manager taking off his players. the men arrested are from somerset and are being held on suspicion of racially aggravated common assault. one of the world's leading fund managers from capital group in london has been forced to resign after the bbc discovered he'd
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broken investment rules. mark denning helped to manage more than £200 billion of investors' money. but the panorama programme has uncovered evidence that suggests he was secretly acquiring shares for his own benefit. mr denning denies any wrongdoing. and you can see more on that story on panorama at 8:30 this evening on bbc one. over 50 years after some drinking pals from essex decided to travel the world in a double—decker, they've reunited in the same bus. they left leigh—on—sea to travel to 30 countries, including iran, india and mexico. they bought the routemaster bus from a scrap dealer for £145 before setting off for theirjourney which attracted headlines wherever they went. they found themselves in war zones and floods. i just wanted adventure. something inside mejust wanted to go out there and see a bit more of the world. i was 19, just adventure hungry, if you like. and you can see more that
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story on inside out east on bbc one at 7.30 tonight, or on the bbc iplayer. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube... problems on the overground due to a signal failure at highbury and islington. jubilee line — mechanical issues on trains. a look at the roads, and, in wandsworth, the a3 west hill is closed between upper richmond road and tibbet‘s corner for gas works. over in west norwood, leigham court road is blocked at glennie road because of a collision. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. it's been a rather wet october so far, but there's a lot of dry weather in the forecast for us this week. having said that, it's a damp and drizzly start to monday morning. always plenty of cloud around today. but it should turn dry as we head through the afternoon. now the rain comes courtesy of this weather front out towards eastern areas today, so it's rain in the east, drizzle in central london,
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and a little bit drier further west. it should turn dry just about everywhere through the afternoon. always lots of cloud, and added wind chill, as well. highs of 13—14 celsius, but cooler, of course, with exposure to that north—easterly wind. overnight tonight, it should turn dry for most of us. plenty of cloud again towards eastern areas. we will see some clear spells and, in the clear spells, temperatures could drop as low as 3—4 celsius. there will be some mist and fog patches forming into tomorrow morning and they could be quite slow to lift and clear. but tomorrow, dry with light winds and some spells of sunshine. there could be more rain towards eastern areas again on wednesday. plenty more on bbc london facebook and twitter and the website. i'll be backin and twitter and the website. i'll be back in half an hour. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker in salford and naga munchetty in westminster. our headlines today...
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boris johnson's brexit agreement is back in parliament — as the government tries again to get mps to vote on it. good morning. yes, i'm here in westminster, where ministers say they'll push ahead with plans to leave by october 31st — despite the prime minister being forced to ask the eu for an extension at the weekend. the pound slips in early trading after the delay on the brexit vote. i'm here in the heart of london's financial district to get reaction and to find out what it means for your wallet. the duke and duchess of sussex speak about struggling in the spotlight — prince harry says he and his brother have "good days and bad days" amid reports of a rift. this role, and part of thisjob and this family being under the pressure that it's under inevitably, you know, stuff happens. but look, we're brothers. we'll always be brothers. we're certainly on different paths at the moment, but i will certainly always be
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there for him as i know he'll always be there for me. good morning. the tears flow for andy murray as he wins his first singles title since career—saving hip surgery. he won the european open in antwerp. and mike gets to keep dancing. we'll catch up with him after a hip—thrusting samba saw him survive the strictly dance off. we have just had the lowest ever night temperatures since the beginning of may. so there is some frost here and across northern ireland, but you will see sunshine for england and wales. more cloud, showers and rain in the south—east. more details in 15 minutes. good morning from a rainy westminster. it's monday, october the 21st. our top story. the government will push again today for mps to vote on borisjohnson's brexit deal. it comes after a bruising weekend
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for the prime minister, in which he was forced to ask the eu for an extension to his planned leaving date of october the 31st. let's take a quick look at what's in store. ministers will try for another meaningful vote this afternoon — that's where mps can indicate whether or not they support the prime minister's deal in principle. whether that vote goes ahead is a decision for the speaker, john bercow. the government will also bring forward legislation to implement its eu withdrawal agreement bill. that would start the legal process of the uk leaving the eu. meanwhile, the court of session in edinburgh — that's scotland's supreme civil court — will sit today to consider whether mrjohnson acted unlawfully by failing to sign his letter to the eu, which asked for an extension to the brexit deadline. let's talk now to our political correspondent, jessica parker.
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another crazy week. what should we see happen today? the government is going to try to go for another meaningful vote, vote on the deal in principle after things didn't go according to plan on saturday. they wa nt according to plan on saturday. they want a straight up and vote on the deal. whether the speaker will allow it is the big question. we should find out around mid afternoon, around 3.30. the suspicion in westminster is that perhaps around 3.30. the suspicion in westminster is that perhaszohn bercow won't allow it because he will see it as too similar to what the government tried to do on saturday. so we have to wait for this ruling, and the government are going to start the process of introducing the legislation that is necessary to turn this deal into law. so while all of this is going on, if it isn't passed, you have a series of amendments that may be put through as well. and all of this with ten days. it is october the zist with ten days. it is october the 21st day. october the 31st is the infamous deadline. ministers insist they can do this by the 31st of october. but a lot of people in
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westminster are more sceptical. why? because if the bill passes its second reading tomorrow, a whole host of amendments could be checked m, host of amendments could be checked in, whether as a customs union, whether it is a referendum or whether it is a referendum or whether it is about making sure there is no deal at the end of the transition period, and it has to get through the house of lords is false. it will be interesting to see whether the government gets through a programme motion to control the timing of the bill, but they could even lose that vote. the government wa nts to even lose that vote. the government wants to be seen to be trying to get on with brexit. some will suspect that whether it is the meaningful vote or trying to push through this legislation, it is all about trying to create this narrative of people versus parliament, that it is parliament frustrating brexit, not borisjohnson. parliament frustrating brexit, not boris johnson. thank you. i will be talking to hilary benn in about five minutes. but dan has the rest of the news. the duke of sussex has
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admitted he and his brother are "on different paths" amid reports of a rift. in an interview with itv, he said they have "good days and bad days". the duchess of sussex said that adjusting to royal life had been hard and that she wasn't prepared for the scrutiny of the tabloid press. jon donnison reports. filmed during their recent trip to africa, this documentary reveals that, despite appearances, the royal couple are at times struggling. harry says he sees his mother diana in every camera and flash bulb. every single time i see a camera, every single time i hear a click, every single time i see a flash, it takes me straight back. so, in that respect, it's the worst reminder of her life, as opposed to the best. meghan says she's been shocked by the level of press intrusion, even though herfriends had warned her before she got married. my british friends said to me, "i'm sure he's great,
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but you shouldn't do it, because the british tabloids will destroy your life." and i very naively, — we're american, we don't have that there — "what are you talking about?" prince harry talks about the relationship with his brother. inevitably, you know, stuff happens, but, look, we're brothers, we will always be brothers. we're certainly on different paths at the moment but i will always be there for him, as i know he will always be there for me. prince harry acknowledges he sometimes needs support, saying he still struggles with mental health issues. i thought i was out of the woods and then, suddenly, it all came back, and i suddenly realised that this is something that i have to manage. look, part of this job and part of anyjob, like everybody, means putting on a brave face. the turnaround from a sunny wedding day a year and a half ago is very sharp. jon donnison, bbc news.
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keep your comments on that coming we'll speak with the royal historian kate williams at 08.20 to get her assesment of the royal couple's interview. abortion and same—sex marriage will become legal in northern ireland at midnight tonight. the change will happen because of legislation passed at westminster with no devolved government at stormont. the assembly there will meet for the first time in two and a half years to debate the change in law today. two men have been arrested following reports of racist abuse the game between haringey borough fc and yeovil town was abandoned after one of the home players was allegedly spat at and another verbally abused. the men — aged 23 and 26 — were arrested on suspicion of racially aggravated common assault. spikes in air pollution trigger
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hundreds of heart attacks, strokes and acute asthma attacks in cities across england compared to days when the air is cleaner. that's according to new research from king's college london, which found there are significant short—term health risks caused by polluted air which also contributes to up to 36,000 deaths each year. we will be back in the studio here shortly, but let's return to westminster, where naga is looking forward to another day of brexit drama. hold onto those notes! last month, the prime minister boris johnson said he'd rather be "dead in a ditch" than ask the eu for an extension to his brexit deadline of october 31st. but on saturday night, that's exactly what he had to do. one of the architects of that climb—down was the labour mp hilary benn, whojoins me now. are you proud of what you have
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achieved with this amendments? well, the purpose of the act was to safeguard the country from crashing out on the 31st october without a deal. the majority of mps from all parties think that that would not be in the national interest because of the damage that it would do. therefore, that is why we tried to pass the bill. it became an act and borisjohnson did pass the bill. it became an act and boris johnson did have pass the bill. it became an act and borisjohnson did have to send a letter he said he never would because that is the look. then there was the letwin amendments. did you vote for that and why?” was the letwin amendments. did you vote for that and why? i did, because we need to keep open the safeguard that the act provides, depending on what happens between now and the 31st of october. if the deal had gone through on saturday without that amendment that oliver letwi n without that amendment that oliver letwin put down and then the subsequent legislation wasn't to pass, we could have ended up falling over a cliff and living without a deal at the end of the 31st of
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october. so the amendment said, the deal is not approved until the legislation has passed. and that protects the effect of the act, which is trying to make sure we don't leave without a deal, whatever else happens. i suppose it is an open goalfor you in many ways. as a labourmp, you open goalfor you in many ways. as a labour mp, you just don't trust borisjohnson, do labour mp, you just don't trust boris johnson, do you? well, with some reason. he said he would never send a letter, and he has done so. but really, this is about parliament saying, and we have very different views, those of us who supported the legislation, completely different views about how this my end, but what brought us together was that we realise that leaving without an agreement is really bad for the country because of what it would do to our economy and our future prospects. what happens next? even if the speaker, john bercow, doesn't allow a meaningful vote today, what happens next in terms of labour mps in particular trying to add more
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delay to this deal getting through being scrutinised by october the 3ist? being scrutinised by october the 31st? i don't think that scrutinising the agreement that the prime minister has brought back is delay, it is parliamentarians doing theirjob. it was only produced last week. we have yet to see the bill. so normally, you get legislation, you have a chance to read it and put down an amendment. but asjessica parker were saying a moment ago, i think you are likely to see an amendment seeking to put this whole deal back to the british people, because that is the way to get brexit done. you are likely to see an amendment saying we should remain ina an amendment saying we should remain in a customs union, which would help to solve part of the problem on the border between gb and northern ireland and were there will now be a customs border, another thing that borisjohnson said he would never agree to. the feeling i'm getting is that you would not vote for this deal as it stands. i would not vote
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for this deal unless, and this is the compromise, it goes back to the people for them to decide. is this what you had in mind? and that can get brexit done, because we have now had four times in which the house of commons has been unable to pass a deal and i completely understand those who say we would like to get this first phase over. i think the best way of doing that now is to let the people of the site, because the people began the process back in june 2016. you are sitting here as a member of the labour party. your colleague keir starmer has commented on how the front bench isn't pushing forward for another amendment for a second referendum and thatjeremy corbyn, the implication is that he isn't taking ownership of this. surely the leadership needs to come from the front? i don't agree with that. keir starmer also made the point that the motions that have been most is axel —— successful have been most is axel —— successful have been those that have cross—party
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support. it is notjust about what one party is to put or another, it isa one party is to put or another, it is a range of mps coming together in the national interest to propose what we think is best for the country, and i think it is perfectly sensible to carry on with that approach as we consider the bill, which we presume will come through its second reading tomorrow. which we presume will come through its second reading tomorrowlj which we presume will come through its second reading tomorrow. i ask because there was a lot of doubt the jeremy corbyn has shown effective leadership of the labour party and been an effective leader of the opposition. do you genuinely believe that if there is a general election in the next few months, it is unclear as to when that will be, that he will be able to win that, having failed to block, so far? let's ta ke having failed to block, so far? let's take the leadership that jeremy corbyn has shown over the last few months. we are now the only major party promising to take the question of the final deal back to the british people in a referendum. even though he has not said whether
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he will be remain or leave? that is what the conference decided. i think the vast majority of labour party members will be campaigning for remain in that referendum. but that is leadership. of course i hope we win the general election. we will be working hard to make sure we are successful. it is in the hands of the voters to decide. but faced with the voters to decide. but faced with the choice between on the one hand, borisjohnson, who says he would go for a no—deal brexit unnecessary, and on the other hand the liberal democrats, whose policy is to cancel the referendum result and say it never happened, the compromise in the middle is what labour is offering, which is a referendum in which people can choose between the deal that has been negotiated, and i don't agree with it for all the reasons that keir starmer has set out, but we are prepared to put that to the people alongside remain and then the people decide. i don't know what the decision will be, but it will get this phase of the brexit process over. either we will leave
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on that deal or if the british people have change their mind, we would remain. you have made clear you will not be voting for the deal, butjohn lance has tweeted that labour rebels will face deselection at the next election if they vote for this deal. some have indicated that they are willing to do that. is that they are willing to do that. is that fair? i am not in favour of this approach myself. in the end, each member of parliament has a responsibility to do what he or she thinks is right and you weigh up the views of your constituents, how they voted in the referendum, what you think of the deal and what is in the national interests. i hope, having said that, that all labour mps will vote to oppose the deal because it is even worse than theresa may's deal and it would result in the ha rd est of deal and it would result in the hardest of hard brexits and that is not in the interests of businesses, thejobs of not in the interests of businesses, the jobs of people who work in those businesses in the future of our economy. hilary benn, thank you very
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much. you may not have seen it, but iam very much. you may not have seen it, but i am very wrapped up. it is cold. look at this awesome picture. look at the leaves on the ground, damp ground this morning in front of the houses of parliament and the palace of westminster. carroll, we are definitely into autumn. we certainly are. in london, it is 11 degrees, but the brisk wind is making it feel chilly. it is chilly, but with clearer skies across the highlands. some lovely pictures have been sent in from the weather watchers like this one. we havejust had in from the weather watchers like this one. we have just had the lowest overnight temperature we have seen since early may. and temperatures could fall still lower. there is some thrust in northern
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ireland. it will be a mainly dry start, but we are looking at chilly nights this week. the south—eastern quarter has been watching rain moving through the course of the night. showers dotted across other parts of england and wales, some of those coming in on a brisk northerly or north—easterly wind. for the rest of the uk, we have a ridge of high pressure a cross of the uk, we have a ridge of high pressure across us, so things are relatively quiet. this morning, there are clear skies where we have there are clear skies where we have the frost, so there is sunshine across scotland and northern ireland. clown building into the course of the day. scattered showers in other areas. the thicker club will introduce not just in other areas. the thicker club will introduce notjust showers, but more rain across scotland. we will also see thicker cloud across north—western parts of northern ireland. for england and wales, we are looking at sunny skies with the rain turning will patch in nature. and this morning? wind is easing through the afternoon. this evening
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and overnight, you see all this cloud being replaced in the north—west by some rain and gusty winds, especially with the exposure. but move away from the north west of scotla nd but move away from the north west of scotland and we have variable amounts of cloud, some clearer skies and we could see dense and patchy fog tomorrow morning across parts of southern wales and southern england. it will be a more chilly night for most, especially where we have —— apart from where we have the cloud and rain, where it will be milder. where it does clear, we will see sunny skies developed for england and wales. if you sunny spells across scotland and northern ireland, but you will have a fair bit of cloud. soa so a bit ofa so a bit of a mishmash for the next
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few days? topsy-turvy, yes. she has got everything. thank you. so naga is down at westminster today and she will speak to more mps later. we are looking at other stories in the studio. since the beginning of their relationship, the duke and duchess of sussex have rarely been out of the spotlight. now in an interview with itv, they've opened up about the pressures they face as a family. prince harry talked about continuing to manage his mental health and the rumoured rift with his brother william while meghan shared how her friends had voiced concerns about the scrutiny she would face as a royal. let's take a look at what they said. look, we're brothers, we'll always be brothers. we're certainly on different paths at the moment, but i will always be there for him, as i know he'll always be there for me. we won't see each other as much as we used to because we're so busy, but i love him dearly and the majority of the stuff, well, the majority of the stuff
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is created out of nothing. it's just hard every day? it's management. it's constant management, as you know and as a lot of people watching this probably know as well. i thought i was out of the woods, and then suddenly it all came back and i realised, "no, this is something that i have to manage". look, part of this job and part of anyjob, like everybody, means putting on a brave face. when i first met my... now husband, my friends were really happy because i was so happy. but my british friends said to me, "i'm sure he's great, but you shouldn't do it because the british tabloids will destroy your life". and i very naively — i'm an american, we don't have that there — "what are you talking about? that doesn't make any sense". i didn't get it. so it's, um... yeah, it's been complicated. the biggest thing that i know is that i never thought that this would be easy, but i thought it would be fair. and that's the part that's really hard to reconcile. but i don't know, ijust take
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each day as it comes. there has been a huge reaction to that online. well, along with many others, royal historian professor kate williams was watching last night, and joins us now from buckingham palace. let me ask you about your take on what you saw last night. first, it is probably important to set the context. it was an unprecedented insight into royal life, wasn't it? yes, it was. we had an unprecedented insight as well into harry and meghan's feelings and it was very wide—ranging, particularly into harry's feelings about his mother, about feelings that he can't protect
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his wife, and meghan herself into the intrusion that she felt, that she felt it hasn't been fair. the british tabloids were destroying her life. so it is an unprecedented insight into their lives and we clearly see that harry feels that the traditional royal strategy of saying nothing and letting negative coverage blow over, he feels that isn't working and he has to take action. and he must also note that whenever something like this is put out there, scrutiny goes up, even to the point that the timing of the documentary is being questioned because kate and william are involved in a tour of pakistan at the same time. one of the arguments last night was, why put this out now when your brother and sister—in—law are in an important or elsewhere? so everything comes under scrutiny. obviously, the thing is with the timing question that the royals are
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a lwa ys timing question that the royals are always doing something. they are a lwa ys always doing something. they are always on a big tour. when harry put out the big media statement and he put out the indication of legal action, that was in his own tour, it didn't clash with william and kate but people said, you are undermining your own tour. so i don't think the timing is so relevant. it is not about william and kate. he said in the documentary that they are on different paths. it is simply about catching the wave of his own documentary that was quite recent. i think we are seeing a three pronged strategy from harry. he is not sitting quietly. we have had the big press statement that we were talking about a few weeks ago in which he talked about the intrusion on how meghan had suffered and how he saw his wife falling to the same forces as his mother. we have got the legal action coming both in the letter to the mailon action coming both in the letter to the mail on sunday and the voice mail hacking and we have the documentary which gives this insight into harry and there are these interviews where he talks at length about his feelings and mental
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health. so it is a three pronged strategy and i think harry is now going to see if this works. they are appealing to public opinion and hopefully to them, people. clicking on these stories. let me reduce some of the comments. izzy said, brilliant programme, makes me ashamed to see how the press have behaved towards meghan. caroline says, why does meghan think everyone is happy? most people would love to be contented. she is used to this public profile and she wants a worldwide profile, but only on her terms. another says, they should be allowed to live life and have the space to have that normal family life. ann says, you have to remember that she is an actress. did she really believe she could join the royal family and change values and traditions? so some people think, i can't believe they are under the scrutiny, leave them alone. and others say, you knew what you were going to get into, get on with your
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life. you are under scrutiny, but you have the privileges that come with that. i think meghan addressed that point last night, because she said, iwas that point last night, because she said, i was of course expecting scrutiny. they live in a royal goldfish bowl. but it isn't fair. and i think there is a point there. what we have seen ever since harry married meghan is that what meghan does is criticised. when other royals do the same, they are paid. for example, where we have the vogue editing, meghan guest edited vogue and it is seen as a strategy, whereas other royals have edited it and there was the today programme for charles, and that was all congratulated. we have had everything from strapless dress to nail varnish to editing magazines we re nail varnish to editing magazines were what meghan does is criticised when other royals are not. that is the key point, that there is going to bea the key point, that there is going to be a lot of scrutiny. they are the most scrutinised royal family or
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family perhaps in the world. but it is not fair family perhaps in the world. but it is notfairon family perhaps in the world. but it is not fair on meghan, the way it has been conducted. there is a clear point there. professor kate williams, good to talk to you. let us williams, good to talk to you. let us know your reflections on that programme last night. was it a wise idea or will it bring more scrutiny? time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. low pressure has been dominating the weather over the last few weeks or so, safer today it is quite nice to see an area of high pressure extending its way from the azores into the uk, giving us a window if fine weather. but this is front is bringing some outbreaks of
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rain across norfolk, suffolk, essex and towards kent and east sussex. the rain is easing off a bit into the afternoon. elsewhere, largely dry. sunny spells developing in wales, northern england, centraland northern scotland and northern ireland. maximum temperatures getting up to ten or 14 degrees. some cloud and outbreaks of rain in the far south—east of england, which tend to clear away through the night. much drier in the south—east. rain will spread its way into north—western scotland, the northern isles, but elsewhere a drier night and potentially quite cold. quite cold across england and wales with patchy fog as well. on tuesday high pressure is there in southern areas but you will notice this area of low pressure just to the north,, making things more unsettled across scotland. fog patches in england and wales could be fairly slow to clear that there will be sent and eventually across wales, the midlands, eastern and southern
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england with more clout to the further north you go and maximum temperature is 11 to 15 degrees. into wednesday, we have this low pressure in the north west bringing further outbreaks of rain and quite a bit ofa further outbreaks of rain and quite a bit of a breeze. there the south it is likely to be drier. a little weather front down towards the south—east of england bringing a bit more cloud and maybe some outbreaks of rain on wednesday. sunny spells in between and the rain gets heavy in northern ireland and the west of scotland. temperatures of 12 to 15.
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this is worklife from bbc news, with sally bundock and david eades. deja vu — we've been here before but could this be the week that westminster finally agrees on a brexit deal? live from london, that's our top story on monday the 21st of october. if at first you don't succeed, try and try again. we look at the chances of borisjohnson getting parliament to vote for his brexit deal.

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