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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  October 23, 2019 2:00pm-5:00pm BST

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our latest headlines, the bodies of 39 people are found in a lorry container in essex. a25—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. this is an absolute tragedy, and a very sad day for essex police and a very sad day for essex police and the local community. we continue hello, you are watching afternoon to work alongside partner agencies live. i am simon mccoy. today at to work alongside partner agencies to find out what led to these tpm... bodies live. i am simon mccoy. today at tpm. .. bodies found live. i am simon mccoy. today at tpm... bodies found in an essex deaths. glory. i25—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. this is an absolute tragedy. we will they said that we couldn't open the continue to work alongside many withdrawal agreement, and we did. they said we couldn't get rid of the partner agencies to find out what backstop, and we did. they said we couldn't get a new deal, and we did. happened. i am reporting live from questions about the future of fracking in the uk is the public g rays happened. i am reporting live from grays the lorry is parked. the spending watchdog raises serious concerns. coming up... tackling hype police are carrying out intensive forensic work of the scene. the pressure, could taking pills at night rather than in the morning help patients? let's get the sport prime minister meets the labour leader to try to agree on a timetable for the brexit deal after the mps rejected his deal, but now. jane dougall is at the sports
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approved the bell in principle. they centre for us. and festivals and very sad news from the world of said we could not open the paralympics? yes, this is a story withdrawal agreement and we did they which the bbc has covered right from said we could not get rid of the backstop and we did, and they said the start, the belgian wheelchair racer was the 100 metres champion in we could not get a new deal and we did. questions about the questions 2012, silver medallist in rio in —— questions about fracking. as a 2016, so come on the surface, a watchdog raises concerns. i have the successful para—athlete, 2016, so come on the surface, a successful pa ra—athlete, but 2016, so come on the surface, a successful para—athlete, but what many people did not see was the sport with jane to go. some sad co nsta nt many people did not see was the constant excruciating pain suffered by marieke vervoort every single day. she said that she had actually signed euthanasia papers as far back as 2018 because she wanted to have news, at the age of a0 she was! she control over when her life would end. and that time came yesterday, died after suffering years of at the age of a0. she had an chronic pain and seizures. we will talk to you later on. we have met incurable degenerative muscle with that whether. dry weather at disease which caused her constant the moment. for a few there is going pain and triggered sleaziest. showers first diagnosed with the to be some heavy rain for the rest disease when showers 1a years old but she loved sport so much that she of the week. details also rain in continued competing. she said that europe where it has been causing sport was her medicine. euthanasia lots of problems. also coming up the is legal in belgium and it was after
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white house dismisses a testimony as her success in rio that she said she would follow that path if her a smear campaign condition worsened. tributes have white house dismisses a testimony as a smearcampaignfor white house dismisses a testimony as a smear campaign for the impeachment trial of president from. —— been paid to vervoort on twitter. president trump. and katharine merry, former british sprinter... hello, this is afternoon life. i am simon mccoy. the victims including a teenager were found on industrial and a former american diver has state in grays overnight. a 25—year—old man and a lorry driver said... the bbc sport website has had been arrested. let's go to the scene with ben brown. we are live at much more on this story, including a very moving film where vervoort talks about her life and her the waterglade industrial park in decision to end it through euthanasia. let's talk about the grays. the situation is that the lorry is parked they are just behind champions league now, last night, lots of goals for english sides, and the screens green. a lot of intense we expect the same tonight?|j
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lots of goals for english sides, and we expect the same tonight? i think it might be a different story police forensic work going on. they tonight, defending champions are trying to establish the identity liverpool, playing genk, the first time the two sides have ever met. of the 39 victims. they say 38 of but it is in belgium and liverpool don't have a great away record in them are victims, one teenager. also trying to work out the route of the the competition. however, they will have mo salah available, back from lorry. they know it came from injury. chelsea are also in action and that will potentially be a tough bulgaria originally and entered the match for the europa league united kingdom on saturday by champions, who travel to amsterdam to play ajax. ajax are in great form holyhead. it is thought it may have at the moment, they have beaten both come via dublin. a lot of work to be lyon and valencia, 3—0 both times. however, chelsea are also in great carried out as well as it form, with five wins in all competitions. the really tough match against a competitions. the really tough match identifying the dead. a 25—year—old againsta team, competitions. the really tough match against a team, we know how they performed last year, and now they have started this group winning both man from northern ireland has been arrested. the borisjohnson —— boris games comfortable. so, it's going to bea games comfortable. so, it's going to be a tough match, i don't think the johnson said this is an unimaginable five wins mean anything, other than hopefully we have some confidence, tragedy. he said he was shocked and but this will be a completely appalled and that his thoughts were different challenge which we will with the victims and their family. need to be ready for. commentary of we have this report from our tonight's matches are on 5 live. correspondent at the scene. the grim chelsea kicked off at five to six while liverpool get underway at
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eight o'clock. the welsh rugby union discovery was made early this morning at the back of the lorry. tea m eight o'clock. the welsh rugby union team met prince charles this morning as they continue their preparations for the world cup semifinal at the forensics officers are working at the scene, identifying the bodies weekend. his royal highness was at their training session in tokyo this will be a long complicated morning. wales play south africa in operation. the lorry came from yokohama on sunday. they have reached the semifinals afterjust bulgaria, but the people who died on scraping past france last weekend but they did lose to the springboks board are likely from your. police in the quarterfinals of the last came to scene after they were world cup. so of course they will be hoping not to repeat that. alerted by the ambulance service at meanwhile, england played their i:a0pm. early indications suggest semifinal against new zealand on saturday and you can listen to all that 38 are adults and one was a the action across the weekend on bbc teenager. a murder investigation was radio 5 live. a murder investigation launched, and lorry driver i25—year—old man from northern has begun in essex after 39 bodies ireland was arrested on suspicion of we re has begun in essex after 39 bodies were found in the back of a lorry murder. at this stage we have not parked on an industrial estate near identified where the victims are grays. police believe the lorry came from nor their identities and we anticipate this could be a lengthy from bulgaria and entered holyhead on saturday. the driver, a project. we are going to continue to 25—year—old man from northern ireland, has been arrested on suspicion of murder. the local mp work alongside other partner agencies to find out what caused joins me now from westminster. many
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these deaths. the police say this is a tragedy and their priority is to thoughts, we heard from boris johnson and others in the house of identify the victims and find out where they came from. they will want commons and i think you have been on to find out how the lorry bat from twitter as well responding to this? yes, good afternoon. and i have to bulgaria to essex. it arrived in say, it's absolutely shocking news that we've heard today. to think holyhead on saturday. police did not say where it came from. one about 39 individuals locked in the possibility is that it came from back of a container. the very act of dublin having arrived in the doing that is taking risks with republic of ireland from france. it pupils lives, it is a truly horrific is not known how long the lorry had thing to have happened to. obviously been parked in grays before the a tragedy for those 39 and their emergency services were alerted. a large cord and has been put in place loved ones, thoughts also for the around the scene. it is likely to be first responders, who must have faced something horrific? in place for some time to come. and absolutely. and they will have witnessed things which will stay timor, bbc and news. —— bbc news. with them for the rest of their lives. and i think we need to think very carefully about that. absolute, forensic work is carrying on as a utter respect for all those who attended the scene, because they've please have a tense operation. they done theirjob so professionally. i have had conversations with essex say that this could be a police, they've just grasped the time—consuming effort to identify the dead and to work out exactly investigation and are moving
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forwards. i have utter respect for what has happened. they are them, we are very fortunate in all appealing specifically to anyone our public servants who are doing with any information about the lorry their bit today. that said, they and its route. anyone who may have face a huge task, first of all they seen have got to identify those who were and its route. anyone who may have seen it from bulgaria coming to in the lorry, and by definition, holyhead and then down to grays in this is going to involve many essex. here is another report from cross—border investigations, are you our correspondent. desperate enough confident that the police have the facilities to do that? well, you are to risk their lives crossing the absolutely right, identification is busy shipping lane. they are coming going to be a major challenge. at in record numbers in small boats. it this stage, we have absolutely no is not confirmed that those who died idea of where these people have come today were migrants, but since the from, they are probably people from very different locations, we don't jungle camp was closed in calais, security was increased until very. know at this stage. but i am pleased that the home secretary has committed home office resources to as well as boats, migrants are found help with the identification in lori max. and process , help with the identification process, and obviously, everything that flows from that. make no mistake, this is a major incident the whole house will be shot by the and this will be a very big task for appalling news that 39 bodies had essex police to conduct this investigation. so, we must all been discovered and a lorry container in essex. this is an collectively make sure that they have all the support they need. this is one of those stories, we are all unimaginable tragedy and truly
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heartbreaking. i know that the obsessing about brexit, and then you thoughts and prayers are with all get a perspective moment, this is one of those? absolutely. it's one those who lost their lives and their loved ones. can we just think for a moment what it must've been like for of those... thankfully, these events those 39 people obviously in a are infrequent, but when they do happen, they knock you for six. to desperate and dangerous situation for their lives to and suffocated to comprehend the scale of 39 people dying in this way, it should make us deathin for their lives to and suffocated to death in a container. this is an all sit back and think. have we got unbelievable tragedy that happened in our country at this time. the the right perspective on everything? yeah, in terms of those that are local mp was among many giving their behind this, how confident are you condolences. she said it was sickening news. 0nce that they will one day face justice? well, we need to be determined to condolences. she said it was sickening news. once again campaigners say serious measures are make sure that they do. and one of needed to stop migrants dying. all the points that i will keep reiterating and reminding the we know is that 39 people who had government is that this is actually not something we can do by ourselves hopes and dreams and fears just like in this country. this is a trade you and me are no longer alive which is organised by major today. and this isjust you and me are no longer alive today. and this is just an unspeakable tragedy that really international crime gangs. there is could have been avoided. it is not a hell of a lot of money in it. so, they are very sophisticated in how the first time that people have died they are very sophisticated in how they manage this. and they are like this. 19 years ago, 58 people suffocated to death in the back of a trading from people's poker and giving misery to them. but we will
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only tackle it by working lorry. this is a reminder that people are as desperate as ever to risk everything to get to britain. a multilaterally with partners and agencies across the world will. we will have to tackle this short time ago, a young woman who collectively because this is a lives locally came to the scene to menace to humanity. the number of lay flowers. she said she wanted to show respect for those who had lost her life —— their lives here. a&e residents satisfied with their show respect for those who had lost experience has seen a slight rise, her life -- their lives here. death? that has never happened before and i according to the care quality am completely and utterly shocked commission. more people said they felt respected and had enough time and devastated that that has to discuss their condition, compared happened here today. especially in to discuss their condition, compared to the previous survey in 2016. but this area. my mum only works down the health watchdog said nhs trusts the road at my dad works down there. need to improve on waiting times. this is the area that i drive down all the time, for that to happen, i the chief inspector of hospitals is with me now. thank you very much for am shocked. why did you want to come coming in. the majority of people are happy with most aspects of their here? because these people are human treatment, we should say, but i think you are frustrated that beings. they are fleeing war and frankly, in the last 20 years, persecution and they come here for a things are not getting that much better? well, i will come back to better opportunity, only to live a regular life like me and you do that, let's focus on the survey, today. for them to risk their lives because this is a very important survey, of 50,000 people, who have
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like this, they deserve dignity, used a&e services. we hear a lot they deserve to have respect paid to about a&e but this is telling us them. that is why i came here and about a&e but this is telling us about people's experiences, which is very important. and we at the cqc laid flowers because it is the least wa nt to that i can do as a human being to very important. and we at the cqc want to focus on that. as you say, another human being. she spoke to me there is a lot of satisfaction, despite the pressures. a couple of weeks ago, we published our report another human being. she spoke to me a short time ago after she laid on the state of care and we emphasised the pressures which a&e flowers here. the forensic work departments are under. i have been continues. the forensic crime around some departments recently and they tell me the back and 10% more officers and their white suits are patients than a year ago. so they are working very hard. but despite working very hard. essex police have that, the majority of their patients sailed off this area. it is a very are very that, the majority of their patients are very happy with their care. that busy industrial estate. it is isa are very happy with their care. that is a testament to the work and dedication of stark staff working in causing a lot of disruption to businesses and they will try to a&e departments, but that is what is finish and open this area up as soon keeping it going. they need more as they can for the local support. what we have said on our businesses. that is the latest from report last week is that a&es can't g rays businesses. that is the latest from grays in essex. you are watching bbc solve this problem by themselves, news. borisjohnson the extra work coming into a&es grays in essex. you are watching bbc news. boris johnson has grays in essex. you are watching bbc news. borisjohnson has met the needs to be addressed by the wider liebert —— the labour system. we have challenged the health and social care system to
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address that. there are some particular learning points in this has met with jeremy corbyn. survey around specific aspects of has met withjeremy corbyn. during care, and we've asked trusts to look the prime minister's questions, mr at that and address them. there is an issue about pain control not johnson said the labour party had being as good as it should be, and willed the ends but not the means. patients not necessarily getting the know it will be up to the european discharge information they should get. we have asked them to look at union to decide if we will have an that. the waiting time issue is extension. are political related mainly to the pressure of work at the front door, and that correspondent reports. get ready for needs to be addressed to. the difficulty is that for everyone event, for one patient, it can be brexit on the 31st of october. it is the difference between suffering the date that we have been told that quite a lot and not. indeed, and we would leave the eu after do or thatis quite a lot and not. indeed, and that is the point. a&es are very important aspects of service, and die. now it looks virtually people need to be able to go to impossible to beat with a deal. the their a&e and get care they need. plan may be about to change. to a but a lot of people going to a&es delay, a general election or even don't actually need the care which both. borisjohnson the a&e provides cover the only delay, a general election or even both. boris johnson and jeremy reason they are going there is corbyn met earlier to talk about because that is the part of the brexit and the next steps. but no service which they can access easily. what we have said is that we particular agreement was reached. at have got to create services in the prime minister's questions, each community which meet those needs so blamed the other for the withdrawal that the people who really need a&e
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can get priority care. there are a dealt and put on hold.|j blamed the other for the withdrawal dealt and put on hold. i think it lot of people who are dying was a great shame that the house needlessly as a result of getting the wrong care. that is a fact. i'm willed the end but not the means. there is still time for the right honourable gentleman to do that. and just wondering how confident you are explain to the country how he is that that is something that will going to honour his promised to the improve? welcome to give your view isa improve? welcome to give your view is a bit of context about this, we've inspected every hospital in the country, with being back and country. he threw northern ireland re—inspected them and we are seeing undera bus, he ripped up real improvement across the board. protections for workers' rights and it is important to stress that hospitals are driving forward environmental standards. lost every improvement and again that is a vote along the way and tried to credit to the staff. a&e is the one prevent genuine democratic scrutiny area where we are not seeing that and debate. veteran conservative improvement and that is because of the pressure they are under. the number of patients attending is making it very difficult. when i go around a&e departments, i often go asked them to ignore the dates and to places that were built in the look over the legislation. will you 19605 to places that were built in the 1960s and ‘70s, i was at one a couple of weeks ago which was built let us know that he is about to in the 1970s, it had a capacity of taper a reasonable timetable motion 35,000 patience per year, it is now so taper a reasonable timetable motion so this house can complete the task seeing over 100,000 patient per year. so, that is a measure of the
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pressure on these units. that is why of finalizing the details of the withdrawl bill so we can move on on they need support. so that the patients using them get the care a basis that might begin to reunite they need, but equally patients who the nation once again for the can be cared for elsewhere our code future? much will depend on the eu. for elsewhere, often in a better way. remember, some of the people if it agrees to push back exit until going to a&e are going down not because it is the best place, but because it is the best place, but because it is the best place, but because it is the only place they can go to. can ijust talk about january, boris johnson had if it agrees to push back exit until january, borisjohnson had said he would tried to call the election. because it is the only place they can go to. can i just talk about the culture, the issue of transparency, borisjohnson has already i think you've spoken in the past would tried to call the election. boris johnson has already tried would tried to call the election. borisjohnson has already tried to call for a general election twice, about managers who frankly feel the both times he failed. under the cqc is out to get them so they tend to hide the facts and there are fixed—term parliaments act he needs these events, i think you call them two thirds of mps to vote. and each never events a... yes, never events time and be said they would not are errors that are made, which until they could be sure a new deal cause harm to patients and it is a brexit was off the table. the particular kind of error, they are extension now secure should notjust very particular kind of error, they are very uncommon, particular kind of error, they are very uncommon, it is important to be long enough to scrutinise a bad stress, but they are a particular belt for a week or two longer. it kind of error because it is an error which should be easy to prevent. should be long enough to deliver a such as operating on the wrong part of the body, for instance. one general election or referendum or perhaps more realistically the person who had the wrong eye being operated on. indeed, absolutely, and former at leading to the latter.
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that was a very interesting case. i delay looks certain. a general was talking at a meeting recently and highlighted it. it was a patient election pretty likely, the question is when. having an operation on an eye, which is done while you are awake, so your and to tell us exactly what is going conscious and you can talk to to happen next, we go to vicki young people. the surgeon operated on the wrong eye. and we ask that patient, who is in westminster.” why didn't you challenge, why didn't you just say, that's the wrong eye, to happen next, we go to vicki young who is in westminster. i think the question is whether borisjohnson is willing to break the promise that he doctor? the answer we got was, well, i thought the doctors knew what they made to leave the eu with or without we re i thought the doctors knew what they were doing. you can laugh but a deal by the 31st of october. is he actually, it encapsulates the feeling of loss of power you have prepared to go back on that? except when you are a patient. i have had maybe a short delay, labour are operations on my eyes, i know saying they are offering that to exactly how that man felt. you have to put yourself in the control of him. but downing street said it was the people looking after you. the all inconclusive. is he willing to culture we want to challenge is a do that or is he now determined to culture we want to challenge is a culture that doesn't open itself up try and get a general election? to bringing in other people is views neither of those two things are about safety. and that keep people easy. if the belt i got a second reading which is really the first we need to bring in other patients. stage of the parliamentaryjourney, if that is to progress, it could be we need to give people power, not
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disempower them so they can't raise amended, it could be changed and concerns. i think one of the key changed to something he does not wa nt changed to something he does not aspects of a good safety culture is want to. most people think that an election would be needed. all the that everyone can raise concerns, eve ryo ne that everyone can raise concerns, everyone in the staff, but patients as well. and that is the culture we are trying to generate a mother prime minister is 23 ministers short transparent culture. the nhs, as i ofa prime minister is 23 ministers short of a majority. that makes it incredibly difficult to govern your say, we have seen improvement in nhs the attraction for going for a hospitals over the last few years, and that is a very strong, positive general election is obvious. 0f side, that the leadership culture is course there is always a risk. how he will get to that is more improving. the message i gave at the meeting where we discussed this was difficult because under the that i think the nhs is best placed fixed—term parliaments act, he needs to drive forward the safety culture two thirds of mps to agree with him. jeremy corbyn said that if the eu for many years a. you haven't mentioned the word money, which is offers a delay until the end of perhaps unusual in interviews like this, is that an issue? healthcare january, which means that no deal cannot happen until that point, then can this, is that an issue? healthcare ca n always this, is that an issue? healthcare can always take more funding so i am he would be happy to vote for a not going to argue against money. general election. we are not there but if you look at our recent yet. there are some labour mps who report, we've said that the strongest need for funding is a are concerned about the prospect of long—term, sustainable funding for are concerned about the prospect of a general election. while the social care. social care and healthcare, working closely together. having said that, there is attention is on what borisjohnson a lot you can do within the current
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does next, this putsjeremy corbyn financial framework and if you go to ina does next, this putsjeremy corbyn in a difficult spot. yes jeremy the really good hospitals, who have really turned around their quality, corbyn and his supporters want a they will say, if you focus on quality, the money will be much general election because they back easier to manage. professor ted him to win. they say despite his baker, thank you very much for poor personal ratings and the fact coming in. blood pressure drugs that are taken everyday would be more that the labour party is behind the conservative party in the polls, effective taken at night rather than first thing in the morning garay new they say hang on this happened in research. the study of 20,000 people 2017, we did better than everyone in spain says switching to an thought, but they got a higher evening dose gives more protection against heart attacks and strokes. dominic hughes has more. portion of the vote. if you back jeremy corbyn, then you think that is what is going to happen again. it adds to a growing body of there are many in his party in evidence that our own body clocks parliament to do not agree. labour might influence the way medications affect us depending on what kind of day we take them. these and spanish party m ps parliament to do not agree. labour party mps knock on doors all the time and they say thatjeremy corbyn researchers took 19,000 participants, split them into two is not a good vote for them. if it random groups, gave one set their blood pressure medication in the came to the point of some kind of morning, and another set the vote on election, how many labour medication in the evening. the evening group half to their risk of mps would be willing to go along having a heart attack, stroke or with that? would there be a big heart failure. and it is felt that
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rebellion? vicki young there in because blood pressure drops naturally in the evening, the westminster. you are watching afternoon live. these are the medication was more effective at keeping it under control at night, headlines. 39 bodies are found in a and then continued to have that lorry in grays. a 25—year—old driver effective during the following day. the researchers in spain say this is a very simple piece of advice, that from northern ireland have been is free and could save thousands of arrested. this is after mps have lives. but the british heart foundation are urging people not to rejected to vote on his brexit bill change the time they take their medication without speaking to a doctor first. alice is in three days. a smear campaign, the medication without speaking to a doctorfirst. alice is the business news in a moment, but first a headline sponsor at 39 bodies are found ina headline sponsor at 39 bodies are white house hits back after a senior diplomat‘s testimony in an found in a lorry container in essex. a driver, from northern ireland, has been arrested. borisjohnson meets impeachment requirement. in sport... this woman who - gold and silver jeremy corbyn amid uncertainty over what happens next with brexit. it is after m ps what happens next with brexit. it is after mps rejected the prime minister's plans to pass his brexit this woman who won gold and silver paired she died after suffering yea rs of paired she died after suffering years of chronic pain. 0n night of bill in three days. the fracking industry is progressing at a far champions league action. this is the slower pace than originally predicted, according to the public spending watchdog. yes, here are
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first time the two sides will face each other in european competition. and prince charles has met the welsh your business headlines on afternoon live. the head of boeing's by and prince charles has met the welsh rugby union team i had at their huge semifinal rugby cup. he was at the commercial planes division, kevin mcallister, was ousted on tuesday, the highest profile sucking so far training session. i will be back and in the wake of the crash last 0ctober which killed 189 passengers more stories and abets. and crew. —— highest profile sacking. the company named as the preferred bidderfor british 39 people have been found dead sacking. the company named as the preferred bidder for british steel, from turkey, has failed to agree a inside a lorry container. it is deal to save it from collapse, believed that it travelled from putting 5000 jobs directly at risk. bulgaria to the uk on saturday. it british steel was put into compulsory liquidation in may, after was discovered in waterglade talks breakdown. the company has industrial park. 38 adults and one teenager were pronounced dead at the scene. until thursday to maintain its teenager were pronounced dead at the exclusive access to the companies scene. a 25—year—old man has been books as it attempts to strike a arrested on suspicion of murder. let's get more. he is a former metro deal. and the japanese company will office police officer. what was your have more control over the property reaction when you heard what happened today? shocking. there are start—up wework, increasing its
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sta ke. start—up wework, increasing its stake. the co—founder adam newman will leave the board but will retain three sides of this. the officers observer status. the deal marks the end of a two module period at attending the scene which will be harrowing. it is a tragic scene. wework, once valued at nearly £38 billion. —— tumultuous period. there is a humanitarian side around boeing, hoping to get the troubled identification of the victims, informing their families and the 737 max back in the skies? repatriation of the bodies. and then you have got the investigation absolutely right, that is what they signed and that is going to be very said today, where they said they have reported a sharp drop in long—winded and complicated for essex police. but we must know is third—quarter earnings, mostly linked to the grounding of that 737 that 39 people were in a desperate max. this, after those two fatal crashes last year, including the situation to have decided to get into that container one way or disaster in which 189 people were another. people are doing this every killed. that resulted in the grounding of all of the 737 max day. this is a small number and i do plains, which was a top—selling plane for boeing. they say that the not want to diminish the 39 people halt in those deliveries has that have died. in the year 2060 accounted for $900 million lost earnings. but on tuesday, we saw chinese victims died in the back of boeing sack its highest profile a container and over. what is executive to date, as a result of this, the head of commercial airlines, kevin mcallister. and
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different is the route that was also, today, they have said that taken. if we believe that the they do expect that aircraft, the 737 max, to return to the skies victims boarded in bulgaria, they before the end of the year, which has come as a surprise to some. travelled across ten countries. they would have been locked in there the vivienne nunis is on the ground for us vivienne nunis is on the ground for entire time. with no facilities and us in the new york stock exchange with the details. vivienne, boeing limited food and water and these are really feeling the effects of the people who are making this journey grounding of the 737 max, aren't because they want a better life or they, in this latest report? the they have been promised a better life. some have paid for this journey. how much would they have company certainly is feeling the effects, alice, profits have more than halved for the last three paid? we don't know the identities months and earnings per share are down to around $2, from over $4, of the victims. they are unlikely to much of that due to this grounding be bulgarian. my opinion, is that by civil aviation authority is around the world of the 737 max. they are vietnamese or chinese, it revenue figures are disappointing as is an early gas. vietnamese will be well. the three months up to the current month, revenue was down to $20 billion, this time last year it charged 20,000 us dollars. they will was $25 billion. so, a 20% drop. boeing has said some of the loss of go through russia across you cane and then brought into europe that sales of the 737 max have been
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way. that fits the profile if they ameliorated slightly by slightly higher sales of other aircraft. but are vietnamese or chinese. equally the effect of it has been immense. many victims... it has around 350 of those aircraft sitting on the tarmac waiting to be delivered, so, a difficult time for are vietnamese or chinese. equally many victims. .. traffickers are vietnamese or chinese. equally many victims... traffickers are making successfuljourneys boeing at the moment. and they have many victims... traffickers are making successful journeys and putting people to work. it affects now issued a report saying that the every aspect of life in the uk. in mechanical and design problems for the boeing slight control system we re the boeing slight control system yourformer role, were key factors in the 77 max every aspect of life in the uk. in your former role, you will know people who have opened the back of a disaster. and also, there has been a lorry and faced the most dreadful major management reshuffle ahead of today's earnings? yes, just after we scene lorry and faced the most dreadful scene and presumably none of these people will be carrying any form of saw that report from indonesian document. they will have been told investigators blaming design and not to. how do you start that mechanical problems of the 737 max for that fatal crash earlier in the year, we saw a big reshuffle at the investigation? sadly, this is a top, kevin mcallister, the highest executive in charge of the challenge for essex police, they are commercial division at boeing, not a large force. they have a very having been fired. earlier in the small human trafficking unit. they month we also saw dennis mullen but, the ceo, stripped of his chairman role as well. he actually will have the help of other departments, testify before congress next week
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but that identification is paramount over two days, and there will be a at this stage. you have been got to lot of attention on that. and yet, the silver lining for boeing today, start the investigation in the as they say that they expect that source country. and you have got to deeply troubled 737 max to return to the skies before the end of the engage other agencies such as year, does that come as a surprise? europol, interpol and the source boeing have been saying that for a countries law enforcement agency. while. but a lot of the big airline victim identification is important companies here, like united or american airlines, they have said and it could take some time. we are they will only start rescheduling going to have to start looking at they will only start rescheduling the plane from next year. so it does clothing labels, where the clothing not really equate to the same thing. comes from, what any other small we are waiting for regulators items of property that they have everywhere to give the green light on this plane. boeing for its part that could help identify firstly the has said it has finished with the source country and then the training update and software updates investigation really starts. and it expects the plane to be back in the sky by the end of the year. absolute horror in the news this it also says it will increase morning. i wonder if at some point production of the plane from 40 month to 60 month over the next year. so shares this morning have it turns to anger that site, because opened up slightly in boeing. investors are confident that we there are people behind this who could see the 737 max back in the knew exactly what the risks where sky by the end of the year. vivienne and had presumably made money out of this. well, human trafficking is the
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nunis, for us, from new york, thank second largest income generator for you very much. shall we have a look organised crime according to some reports. it is a huge business. when at the markets? yes, the ftse-100, iam training reports. it is a huge business. when i am training law enforcement, i trained them to look at it as a business because that is the only mostly comprised of exporting way you can disrupt it. the companies which earn their revenues in dollars, is currently up. beginning of this and the end of however, london shares, for the most this is human tragedy. there are many people in parts of the world who are seeking a better life and part, underperforming compared with their european counterparts. the dax traffickers will prey upon them. in frankfurt has dipped somewhat. they would have told people that also, the pound has firmed up they are going to a better life that against the dollar and the euro in the last couple of hours, on the they are going to a better life that they are going to a better life that they are going to have jobs and they can send money back to their european union saying they are families and generally, that is all prepared to grant the delay on lies. some will be economic migrants, but the majority willjust brexit. a 120-year-old danish disappear into an underground network of criminality in the uk. lighthouse has been moved to stop it from falling into the sea. it weighs disappear into an underground network of criminality in the ukw is really good to talk to you. thank you so much for your time. fracking around 700 tons. so, shifting it was quite a task.
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has divided opinion in the uk in recent yea rs. for more than a century it has stood has divided opinion in the uk in recent years. it captures gas deep on these shores protecting sailors underground peer the industry has and ships alike. but coastal erosion said it has huge potentialfor had finally caught up with the rubjerg knude lighthouse. supplying energy. but a watchdog it would have to be abandoned, demolished or moved. group says that fracking has and in the end, they went for option number three. progressed at a a smaller pace. here translation: it is a really big day for us. we have been on the sidelines from the beginning, when we did not even know if it was possible to move the lighthouse. is our correspondent. but it was possible. the shale gas boom in the usa. it's had energy prices tumbling. a downing street official told the then prime minister david cameron, the entire structure lifted up who predicted a shale gas bonanza by hydraulics and slowly carried at the dizzying speed of up to eight metres per hour. in the uk. it was pushed along two tracks, a process described as being one report said it'd generate something like skating on rails. £38 billion in revenue and create 6a,000 jobs, thousands of spectators looking with a00 wells being fractal a year. on as the lighthouse was moved some but the uk is not the us. 70 metres, more than 200 feet. translation: i felt very people are angry at many earthquakes. we do not need a whole confident but, of course, i am very relieved
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now that it is done especially as it is so important for northern jutland but also new industry. consumers do not want for the whole of denmark. once it had reached its destination, this on their doorstep. is toxic. it concrete was poured in, to provide support. this whole operation is expected is not the time to be introducing a to safeguard the lighthouse for another a0 years or so when, new industry. we need to look at presumably, everyone will come back and do it all over again. alternatives. the uk's geology has proved very different, too. the report says just three wells have been tracked, and there is no sign tim allman, bbc news. of lower prices. the economic benefits around fracking now are very uncertain, not least because the government have a back, with matt taylor. good doesn't really know how much shale gas could be extracted from england. the government itself doesn't think afternoon to you, what a day it is that it will have a significant impact on gas prices, for some of you, sparkling autumn day in liverpool at the moment, blue which are set internationally, and the scale of the shale gas skies overhead. things are set to change over the next few days, industry, if it were to take off particularly in north—west england in the uk, wouldn't really and wales. first of all, we can see be significant enough to change that much. and wales. first of all, we can see a couple of weather fronts possibly merging together in the next 2a but north sea oil took a long time to get going, hours, not causing too many issues. the shale firms maintain. further to the south, this weather front is going to come across england and wales, on friday and they are still optimistic. if the saturday. north—west england, also wales. these are the areas which
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gas still there, is it still could have as much as 100 millimetres of rain. that could producible is a good quality? we cause flooding and travel problems would answer gas, gas, gas. and then as we go into the start of the after that it is for the uk weekend. so enjoy the brighter weather while we have got it. some policymakers to decide how quickly they want to exploit that source. cloud in the south, producing some rain this afternoon into the evening rush—hour. that rain will be on the move tonight pushing across scotland, clearing away from northern ireland. both of those weather fronts start to come together across england and wales, meaning plenty of cloud, a man has been arrested for stabbing temperatures not dropping as much as last night, but in the small gap people to death. the victims have between, this is where we could see been named, they were both 17 years some mist and fog first thing old. the police say they were tomorrow morning. so, a bit of a stabbed as part of a targeted attack chilly start. through the day, the patchy rain and drizzle in england at around midnight on saturday. a and wales gets heavier through the midlands and eastern england into met in milton keynes has been the afternoon. northern england question on suspicion of dose counts of murder. —— two counts of murder. brightening up in the afternoon. very blustery winds, if not gale force, in scotland. compared to the past couple of days, temperatures on the acting ambassador to the ukraine the slide. colder air will be
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sense that he had been told that pushing in on thursday night, into president trout made the supply of friday. particularly in the northern military aid conditional. here is half of the uk. that will be fighting with warmer air coming up our washington correspondent. this from iberia. because the temperature difference is quite a bit, it means really has been the most explosive so really has been the most explosive so far in the impeachment inquiry, the rain will get heavier and heavier. most will start off on no doubt about that. a 15 page friday dry and frosty with sunny opening statement from the spells and showers for scotland, particularly further north. the ambassador leaked out and a detailed this back and forth involving other winds picking up in the south but after the sunny start, rain developing quite widely. state department officials other temperatures getting up towards 17, just eight or nine across northern ambassadors. the deal that president trump wanted to make the ukraine areas. the pennines, snowdonia, a investigate his political opponent. bit of wet snow mixed in with the rain. eventually making a move towards the south—east, introducing brighter and fresher weather across the north. that will be with us all it was a shadow foreign policy and by the time we had sunday. sunday could be a frosty start but compared he fingers a number of people. the to saturday, which will be very wet democrats are really buoyed by this for some of you, most will see some which means they are going to push long sunny spells. i will have more on even harder. the republicans are
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details on that throughout the standing by the president, but this afternoon. and now it is time for isa standing by the president, but this is a big problem for him. there is a the headlines. narrative that sent out how he went about putting pressure on ukraine. quick trip to the south of france to cheer you up with some good weather. but i have some sad news for you. this is southern france this morning. it is a bleak looking scene and it has been repeated across many areas. in the last 2a hours, we have seen areas. in the last 2a hours, we have seen around 350,000 lightning strikes in and around spain and southern parts of france. we have torrential rain storms. all of the south of spain are getting at. yes
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hello, you're watching they are. a lot of trees brought afternoon live. down. this is not the scene you iam simon i am simon mccoy, today at 3pm... a murder investigation is under way. a think about in morocco. the umbrellas are out. this is some of the flooding we saw in spain. the 2a year right —— the 2a—year—old worst affected areas was the driver was arrested. this is a very northeast of barcelona. they saw sad day for the local community. we about a month's worth of rainfall in about a month's worth of rainfall in about an hour. this morning in and will continue to work alongside many other partner agencies to find out across france, they have been what led to these deaths. the prime mopping up from the rain last night. minister it meets with the labour the rain has continued to fall. 200 leader to get a timetable. they said mm has fallen for some. the sort of that we could not open the withdrawal agreement, and we did. they said we cannot get rid of the things happened around six times a backstop and we did. they said we year. is timed... there rain in could not get a new deal and we did. questions about the future of fracking in the uk. the public spending watchdog raises spain. the rain in italy. i still serious concerns. coming up... and all the support. tributes have
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can't think of a rhyme for italy. been made to marieke vervoort, who i'm still trying. i've got an hour won gold in london in 2012. she died to think of it. what is happening at the age of a3 byte euthanasia here? we have enjoyed a little bit after suffering years from pain. ofa dry here? we have enjoyed a little bit of a dry spell, but it is about to change. you can see there in the here the weather. sunshine at the distance, this is the fog clearing. the sunshine has come out. actually moment, but rain clouds are on the most of us have been enjoying a way back. there has also been some heavy rain other places in your. longer drier spelled. by it is not going to last too long. here are the also coming up a smear campaign, the weather charts. we have two weather white house dismisses a senior diplomat testimony to the fronts converging. friday into presidential impeachment inquiry. saturday this weather front is going to sneak across the area and we want to sneak across the area and we want to keep on close eye on it. for much of wales. the heavy rain will come with a flood risk. now, the rain is you are watching afternoon live. a murder investigation has begun after limited to the far west of scotland the bodies of 39 people were found and northern ireland. the rain will
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become heavy here through the day. for the most it will be dry and it ina the bodies of 39 people were found in a container in essex. they were found on industrial estate in grays. will stay that way into the evening. 0vernight, the areas of cloud and rain willjoin forces. we can see and more reports. the grim discovery was made early temperatures drop to four or 5 this morning on the back of a lorry degrees. the rain will clear away at an industrial park in grays. forensic officers are from the west of scotland and working at the scene. police say identifying northern ireland later. lots of the bodies will be a long and complicated operation. the lorry came from bulgaria, cloud for england and. rain and but the people who died on board drizzle here and there, but it will are unlikely to be from europe. be heavier in the midlands. it means police came to the scene after they were alerted by the ambulance service at 1.a0. the rest of the uk will brighten up. some gals in northwest scotland and 39 people were pronounced it will bring colder air. the colder dead at the scene. early indications suggest airwill that 38 are adults. it will bring colder air. the colder air will push and across the you one was a teenager. keep going from thursday to friday. the warm air is trying to come up, i think the whole house will agree but it is in the dividing line where that this is truly a shocking we see the weather fronts gain incident. my thoughts and all thoughts our condolences are with intensity. friday, a frosty and the victims and their loved ones at this utterly terrible time. i'm sure
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bright start with some sunshine. the gals will develop in the north of the whole house will also convey scotland. sunshine will give way their condolences at this sad time. until cloud and rain quite lam their condolences at this sad time. i am completely and utterly shocked extensively through england and. any and devastated that that has brightness will be towards the actually happened here today, especially in this area. my mum south. the rain across england and works down the road, my dad works where will sit there over friday and down there. this is an area that i saturday. that will cause problems drive down all the time, so for that to happen is completely shocking. and eventually it will make a shift towards the south and by the time we a murder investigation was launched and the lorry driver, a 25—year—old get to sunday, all of us will be in man from northern ireland, was arrested on suspicion of murder something a little bit drier, a and remains in police custody. at this stage, we have not little bit clearer and a bit sunnier 00:31:33,690 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 hopefully. you are up to date. identified where the victims are from or their identities, and we anticipate this could be a lengthy process. we will continue to work alongside many other partner agencies to find out what led to these deaths. police say this incident is an absolute tragedy. their priority is to identify the victims and find out where they came from. they will also want to find out how the lorry got from bulgaria to essex. the lorry arrived at holyhead
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in wales on saturday. police didn't say where it had come from. one possibility is that it came from dublin, having arrived in the republic of ireland from france. it is not known how long the lorry had been parked up in grays before the emergency services were alerted. a large cordon has been put in place around the scene. it is likely to be there for some time to come. andy moore, bbc news, grays. as we have been hearing the police believe a king from bulgaria. police had tried to —— police are trying to identify the victims. we have another report. desperate enough to risk their lives, crossing the busiest shipping lane in the world. they are coming in record numbers in small boats. it is not confirmed that those who died today were migrants, but since thejungle camp was closed
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in calais and security was increased at dover, smugglers have found new routes. as well as boats, migrants continue to be found in lorries. today's discovery is the worst tragedy of this kind in recent years. the whole house will be shocked by the appalling news that 39 bodies have been discovered in a lorry container in essex. this is an unimaginable tragedy and truly heartbreaking. i know that the thoughts and prayers of all members are with those who lost their lives and their loved ones. can we just think for a moment of what it must have been like for those 39 people, obviously in a desperate and dangerous situation, for their lives to end, suffocated to death in a container? this is an unbelievable human tragedy that happened in our country at this time. the local mp was among many giving their condolences. she said it was sickening news, and people—trafficking is a vile and dangerous business. once again, campaigners say serious measures are needed
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to stop migrants dying. all we know at this point is that 39 people, who had hopes and dreams and fears like you and me, are no longer alive today. and this is an unspeakable tragedy that could have been avoided. it is not the first time people have died like this. 19 years ago, 58 people suffocated to death in the back of a lorry in dover. today's tragedy is a reminder that people are as desperate as ever to risk everything to get to britain. lisa hampele, bbc news. a little earlier the mpjackie price said there needs to be a collective approach to tackling these issues. 0ne approach to tackling these issues. one of the points i will keep re—irrigating is —— reiterating is that this is not something we can do by ourselves. it is an international
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trade. there is a hell of a lot of money in it and they are very sophisticated and how they manage it. they are trading on people's hope and delivering misery to them. we will only tackle it by working minor lottery across the world. we will have to collectively tackle this because this is a menace to society. we are going to go live to the scene with our colleague ben brown. yes, iam in a real shock around here in grays. 39 bodies discovered in the back of the lorry. 0ne discovered in the back of the lorry. one of them was a teenager. let's just show you the scene. behind the green screened off area where the police officers are, there is a police officers are, there is a police van and behind that is the lorry. it has been there since it was discovered at 1a0 this morning. that is when the ambulance service
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arrived. the police have said that this is a real tragedy and they are trying very hard to identify those who have lost their lives, the victims. and also to establish the route that the lorry took. it is not a king from bulgaria originally. it entered the united kingdom via holyhead in north wales, but it is not a came in via dublin. that is the presumed route, but that has not been confirmed to. the essex police are working alongside the national crime agency. they are asking anybody who may have seen the lorry anywhere along that route to get in touch with them and to give them some information. as i say, people here are very shocked. people have been laying flowers just outside the gates in this industrial estate at the water glade industrial estate because they say they want to show some respect for those who lost
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their lives. we spoke to one young woman who lives locally who said these are people who are probably just coming to make a better life for themselves and they have ended up for themselves and they have ended up paying with their lives. she wa nted up paying with their lives. she wanted to lay flowers. i think we can get the thoughts of the road couege can get the thoughts of the road college association. thank you for being with us. what are your thoughts about what the prime minister has cold an unimaginable tragedy? it is an absolute appalling tragedy. 0ur tragedy? it is an absolute appalling tragedy. our thoughts are with the people who died. the circumstances are horrific. as you can tell from the pictures behind you, a refrigerated trailer, so it is very likely it was very cold and very dark. there would have been no air. these unfortunate people who had been promised a safe crossing in fa ct been promised a safe crossing in fact they may have spent up to five daysin
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fact they may have spent up to five days in the back of the sealed freezing cold container that eventually gust them their lives. talking about the route they took, we think it is very likely that from bulgaria they went to ross layer to dublin and then down to holyrood had. —— holyhead. the reason why smugglers are taking that alternative route is because of the improved security at the dover route. and the chances of being caught a much greater there. as far as your members are concerned how worried are they about people smugglers and what kind of steps can they take to counter this? what is your advice to your members? we all
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have a part to play insecurity. we are up against extremely cynical and manipulative, very well organised gangs who will stop at nothing to relieve people of their money and then put them in harm's way. certainly in regards to lorry drivers, they are very frightened. they have been at many cases threatened with violence, with baseball bats, with roadblocks, with all sorts of threats and there is also undoubtedly cases of bribery happening as well with some of these gangs. 0ur happening as well with some of these gangs. our advice has always been don't park up near ports. is better to park up and rest further away where he will be safer. be very vigilant. make sure you check your vehicle for any sign of temper or damage, but even so, these gang masters have become adept at breaking into containers and making
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it look like they have not been. theorem of the hinges without breaking the locks and then put them back again. it is very hard in those circumstances to tell whether the lorry has been tampered with. circumstances to tell whether the lorry has been tampered withm terms of what the government and the border authority is doing, should they be doing more in your view? absolutely. we will always cool on the government to do everything they can to make this all important trade safe. 98% of everything we have comes on the back of a lorry. that cross channel trade while you're talking about brexit or post—brexit is crucial. protect the lorry drivers, improve the security and where appropriate stop and check. 0bviously where appropriate stop and check. obviously it is impossible to stop and check every lorry. we all have a pa rt and check every lorry. we all have a part to play, the drivers the police and the government. rob mckenzie thank you very much for talking to us.
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thank you very much for talking to us. here at grays in essex, the police work continues and they are warning it might be a long process to identify the 39 people who have lost their lives. and to work out where the lorry came from and the route it took. you can see behind me the police activity behind the green panels that are shielding what they are doing. that work is intensifying now. the national crime agency is joining the essex police and really their work isjust joining the essex police and really their work is just beginning. joining the essex police and really their work isjust beginning. back to you, simon. ben brown there in grays. borisjohnson to you, simon. ben brown there in grays. boris johnson has to you, simon. ben brown there in grays. borisjohnson has met labour leaderjeremy corbyn over uncertainty about what happens next in brexit. this comes after the mps rejected the prime minister's plan. during the prime minister questions today they say the mps have willed the ends but not the means. it was
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now the eu's decision whether or not to granta now the eu's decision whether or not to grant a extension. jeremy corbyn said that the mps must have the necessary time to improve on this verse the terrible treaty. get ready for brexit on the 31st of october. it is the date we've been told the uk would leave the eu, do or die, for months. but after yesterday's events in parliament, it now looks virtually impossible to meet with a deal. so the plan may be about to change... get ready for brexit. ..to a delay, a general election or even both. borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn met earlier to talk about brexit next steps, but it is understood that no particular agreement was reached. and at prime minister's questions, each blamed the other for the withdrawal bill being put on hold. it was a shame that the house, as it were, willed the end but not the means, but there is still time for the right honourable gentleman to do that and to explain to the people of this country how he proposes to honour his promise that he made repeatedly, and deliver on the will of the people and get
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brexit done. he threw northern ireland under a bus. he ripped up protections for workers' rights and environmental standards, lost every vote along the way and tried to prevent genuine democratic scrutiny and debate. veteran former conservative ken clarke urged the prime minister to ignore the dates and agree a longer timetable to look over legislation. will he, having reflected, let us know that he is about to table a reasonable timetable motion so that this house can complete the task of finalising the details of the withdrawal bill so we can move on on a basis which might begin to reunite the nation once again for the future? much will depend on the eu, though. if it agrees to push back brexit day to january, as parliament wanted, ruling out a new deal exit next
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week, borisjohnson had said he would try to call the election. boris johnson has already tried to get a general election twice in recent months and on both occasions, he has failed. that is because under the fixed—term parliaments act, he needs two thirds of mps to vote in favour and both times, opposition parties said they wouldn't until they could be sure that a new deal brexit was of the table. the leader of the snp is certainly keen to go to the polls. the extension now secured should not just be long enough to scrutinise a bad bill for a week or two longer. it should in my view be long enough to allow a general election or a referendum, or perhaps more realistically, the former, leading to the latter stop for now, delay looks almost certain, a general election pretty lightly. the question is when. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. let's go to our here correspondent
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whojoins me from brussels. some confusion as to what we are going to be hearing and from whom. do we know if we are going to get an extension? we won't know until the eu27 leaders, the other 27 countries, have decided amongst themselves. all the indications are that they are going to grant to one. it would be really, really unexpected if they did not. it could happen, it would ta ke did not. it could happen, it would take one country to say no. and people think that france has been the country that has been a little bit difficult and could be again. nobody really sees the french or anyone else say no. the question is how long and how much of a discussion with there be about the extension. it is being recommended
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that the 27 have an extension. junker is having phone conversations with people about the extension. this is an information session where they will have an initial chat. they will all talk about the fact about how the process will work and ideally how they want to do it without convening leaders back for a summit. the expectation is a could be at the end of the week if we hear if they all go for that 31st of january date. that is the one that the uk letter has requested and it would leave the eu not looking like it's trying to interfere in the uk process. there are some, the french, who think it can be sooner to put pressure. there are others who think is that even enough time, january? we will see at the end of the week, but it is almost certain that this
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extension will go through. last time he went through this and i'm losing track, it was made clear that there had to be a good reason for an extension. that is something frankly i don't know what the british can say. the question and it has been raised today by michel barnier, by the french and others is what would the french and others is what would the uk use it for? would it be longer? is there an agreement to move towards an election and that would be something that would be a clear signal that a reasonable amount of time to january is needed to get all of the sordid. those sorts of things could be indications coming. they depend on agreement in the uk which has not been forthcoming so far. i think if you cast your mind back again, we heard
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this from the eu. they said we need to know the reasons. we know push comes to shove, the eu actually does not mind if there are reasons. they wa nt to not mind if there are reasons. they want to avoid a new deal and i think they will do so again. ok, damien, thank you for now. you are watching afternoon live... these are our headlines. 39 bodies are found in a lorry in grays. a 25—year—old driver from northern ireland has been arrested. boris johnson from northern ireland has been arrested. borisjohnson meets from northern ireland has been arrested. boris johnson meets jeremy corbyn over uncertainty of what happens after brexit. the fracking industry is progressing at a far slower pace that are viciously projected. in sport attributes are being paid to marieke vervoort who won gold in london in 2012. she has died at the age of a0 after years of chronic pain via euthanasia and.
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chelsea travelled to amsterdam to play in the championship sleep. the defending champions... prince charles has met the welsh rugby union team i had as their huge semi final against south africa. his royal highness was at a training session. i will be back with more at 130 -- session. i will be back with more at 130 —— 3:30pm. session. i will be back with more at 130 -- 3:30pm. 39 session. i will be back with more at 130 —— 3:30pm. 39 people have been found dead in a container in grays. it is believed to have travelled from bulgaria into holyhead on saturday. they were discovered in waterglade industrial park in the early hours of this morning. 38 adults and one teenager were pronounced dead at the scene. a 25—year—old man from northern ireland has been arrested on suspicion of murder. thank you for
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joining us. we cannot speculate too much as to what is behind this, but clearly we are looking at migrants who have died as a result of somebody‘s actions. who have died as a result of somebody's actions. it is difficult to say if they where a group of migrants or traffic people at this stage. in places it is quite a sophisticated organisation. is problematic for the 39... i'm sorry we have a real problem with the sound. we will try to reestablish the link. you are watching afternoon live from bbc news. we are talking a lot about what is happening with brexit. we have heard that boris johnson has met the labour leader
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this is a made continued uncertainty of what happens with brexit. the meeting is coming after the mps rejected to fast—track the veil that he tried to get through parliament last night. let's go to vicki young whojoins me now last night. let's go to vicki young who joins me now from westminster. yes, all ice are on brussels to see when they are going to make that decision about granting an extension of article 50 and of course how the prime minister will respond. whether he thinks it is worth pushing ahead with the withdrawal agreement or whether he tries to get a general election. neither of which are straightforward. let's have a look at what labour might do. i am joined bya at what labour might do. i am joined by a labour at what labour might do. i am joined bya labourmp. at what labour might do. i am joined by a labour mp. what have you made of what has happened to the last 2a hours given that the second reading did get through with the help of some of your colleagues? yes, some
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did vote for second reading on the obvious and very clear message that they wanted to see the spell improved. that there are a lot of concerns about the content and the potential implications on the economy, which is why i have been pressing very hard to get an economic impact on the deal. the government seemed very content not to even bother to produce. the ramifications of this deal will be with us for many generations to come. you want a second referendum and you have managed to persuade jeremy corbyn and the other leadership to push for that. do you think you have the numbers in the house of commons if we ever get to the point where the bell comes back and could be amended? the key issue is we need a democratic mandate. we wa nt to is we need a democratic mandate. we want to see it improved in parliament, we want the best brexit deal we can get. the reality is any
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deal we can get. the reality is any deal is going to damage our economy and so it is only right that it goes back to the public and for them to have the final say. some say it should be a general election, my concern with that is that we had a general election and it did not solve this issue we had a hung parliament. we need to go back and asked him specifically about brexit. it seems like borisjohnson wants a general election possibly before chris met —— for christmas. jeremy corbyn says when to go past the extension that that means the no deal could not happen but he wants a push for a general election do you wa nt to push for a general election do you want to go for that? the issue is there is another no deal cliffhanger waiting for us after 2020. if this passes parliament it is only the
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beginning of long negotiations about our future with the eu. we are going to have to be talking about brexit for some time. i think it is only right that we get a democratic mandate for what that should be going back to the public. in the general election we should be talking about that publics health service, schools, etc, but if we do not talk —— resolve brexit first that will all get deleted. might it sounds like he would not vote for a general election. at this stage now. we cannot have a general election thatis we cannot have a general election that is completely dominated by brexit. people do not vote for political parties on brexit lines. each party has members and it was very different views on this issue. it has divided the nation we need to get a solution and an answer in a
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referendum and then have a general election about taking the country forward. thank you. there are lots of labour and pennies who agree with that. —— labour mps. some fearthat labour party might not win that general election. and if it came to a vote, boris johnson general election. and if it came to a vote, borisjohnson would need labour mps. let's have a look at the weather and matt taylor is here. that is the south of france, but it is not how we would normally associate the south of france. not really a picture postcard scene. the winds are whipping up your it lots of flooding. let me show you where we have seen some lightning in the last 12 hours. running up from the last 12 hours. running up from the balearic islands. we have seen amounts 350,000 lightning strikes in
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the space of 2a hours. amounts 350,000 lightning strikes in the space of 24 hours. is this unusual or is it that we can track things? we can track it. it happens every few months. this is just a very ferocious one. the big cold drop they cool in spain this is where cold air goes ahead and push his relentless rain. it is almost a repeat of this. it is notjust in france and spain. this is morocco. not a place where you think you would see puddles on the ground. lots of rain here. in spain, the scenes came from catalonia. the rivers are running to the street. a month worth of rain in an hour. that is the rain of spain. yes, the rain
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in spain has moved on to france. this is the scene from this morning. i spoiled that i was talking about italy. we will get there. improving conditions in spain and france yes and they will be complaining bitterly in italy. we had to cool an extra support for that rhyme. let me show you what is happening next. a lot of the pressure will go to the uk. it will be stormy in italy as well. let's find out what is happening here because we have run out of framing. slightly drier spell. i wish i could say it was going to last. enjoy the sunshine it is going to be the last of it. they will be more heavy rain clouds and across england and where in particular. there are two weather fronts come together across the uk,
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but they will clear away. it is this one that will come across england and wales. the great concern is northwest england and wales. heavy rain flood risk and some travel disruption. keep tuned to your forecast for later on. this afternoon most will finish dry. the latest weather will be the far west of scotland. strengthening winds. the rain will be on the move. it will turn clear and showery weather. very breezy. lots of cloud. it will not be so cold tomorrow because of that. particularly across the midlands and east wales some mist and fog possible. it would be frost free hopefully. the weather front will marriage. the rain will be heavier. heavy in the midlands. the
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sunshine will come out for some. pretty windy here and compared to the past few days the temperatures will drop. the weather front will introduce colder weather into thursday. and warm weather from iberia will come towards the north. we will see this weather front where those two clash. let's look at the details. friday, bright, sunny, frosty start. many parts for northern ireland and scotland will have a bright day. it will be whether and windier in northern england and across wales. eight or 9 degrees in the north. there could be some wet snow mixed in. notice friday into saturday the weather front is still wiggling around. eventually on saturday it will go towards the southeast corner. bringing colder brighter conditions. it will be a weekend of two halves
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for some of you. most of you have a frosty start but lots of sunshine and dry weather to calm. you are up—to—date with the latest weather on afternoon live. this is bbc news, our latest headlines... the bodies of 39 people are found in a lorry container in essex. a25-year-old man has been
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arrested on suspicion of murder. borisjohnson arrested on suspicion of murder. boris johnson and jeremy corbyn failed to agree a new timetable for getting the brexit legislation through parliament, after mps rejected the prime minister's three—day plan but approved the bill in principle. questions about the future of fracking in the uk as the public spending watchdog raises serious concerns. let's get the sport now, with jane dougall, and we start with some very sad news from the world of paralympics? yes, simon, it is heartbreaking and this isa simon, it is heartbreaking and this is a story which the bbc has covered from the start. the belgian wheelchair racer marieke vervoort was the champion in london, and silver medallist in rio, on the surface, such a successful para—athlete. what surface, such a successful pa ra—athlete. what many surface, such a successful para—athlete. what many people didn't see was the constant, excruciating pain which she suffered every single day. she said that she had signed euthanasia papers as far back as 20 oh wait because she wa nted back as 20 oh wait because she wanted to have control about when
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her life would end because of that pain. that time came yesterday, at the age of a0. vervoort had an incurable, degenerative muscle disease which caused all of that pain and also triggered seizures. she was diagnosed with it when she was 1a but she loved sport so much that she continued to compete and battled through it. she said that sport was her medicine. euthanasia is legal in belgium, where she is from, and it was after her success at rio that she said she would follow that path her condition worsened and that time did come. her fellow athletes have been paying tribute to her on twitter. a fellow belgian cyclist said... and katharine merry, the former british sprinter, world number one 0lympic a00 metre medallist, said...
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the former american diver who won four 0lympic the former american diver who won four olympic gold medals said... heartbreaking, so much to process. so much respect. the bbc sport website has much more on this story, including a very moving film where vervoort talks about her life and her decision to end it through euthanasia. let's move on to football. champions league, england teams playing last night, quite a few goals, what about tonight? yes, manchester city scored five and so did tottenham last night. but i think it will be slightly different tonight. defending champions liverpool play genk. it is the first time the two sides have ever met in european competition. but it is in belgium and liverpool don't have a great away record in the competition. however, they do have mo salah available, back from injury. chelsea also in action and potentially it will be a tougher match for the europa league champions, chelsea travel to
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amsterdam to play ajax. ajax, in great form at the moment, they have beaten lille and valencia 3—0 both times. however chelsea are also on a great run with five wins in all competitions. a really tough match against a competitions. a really tough match againsta team, competitions. a really tough match against a team, we know how they performed last year. and how they have started this group, winning both games comfortable. so it's going to be a tough match, i don't think the five wins mean anything, other than hopefully we have some confidence. but this will be a completely different challenge which we need to be ready for. commentary of tonight's games are on 5 live, chelsea kicked off at five to six while liverpool get underway at eight o'clock. the welsh rugby union tea m eight o'clock. the welsh rugby union team met prince charles this morning as they continue their preparations for their world cup semifinal at the weekend. his royal highness was at their training session in tokyo. wales play south africa in yokohama on sunday. they reached the semifinals after just scraping on sunday. they reached the semifinals afterjust scraping past france last weekend. but don't forget they lost to the springboks
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in the quarterfinals of the last world cup. we've been pretty lucky i think especially up with injuries. 0bviously got five back rowers, so, it's not the best of news, losing josh nvidia, but we have got cover, 0wen coming into training, has been great. he has brought energy, which is good. that is the sport for now, i will have more for you in the next hour or so. a murder investigation has begun in essex after 39 bodies we re has begun in essex after 39 bodies were found in the back of a lorry parked on an industrial estate near grays. police believe the lorry is from bulgaria. we are now hearing from bulgaria. we are now hearing from bulgarian authorities that it was in fact registered in bulgaria bya was in fact registered in bulgaria by a company owned, they say, by an irish woman. this is from bulgaria's foreign ministry. the bulgarian embassy in london received
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information about the registration from british police. registered in a bulgarian city under the name of a company owned by an irish citizen. that news of just company owned by an irish citizen. that news ofjust coming in. it entered the uk at holyhead in north wales on saturday. the driver, a 25—year—old man from northern ireland, has been arrested on suspicion of murder. baroness butler—sloss is the co—chair of the parliamentary committee on modern slavery and she joins us now from westminster. and i suspect, not surprised to hear of another tragedy of this nature? well, i'm not surprised but this is a horrific event. 39 people, 38 men and one teenager, is worse, i think, event. 39 people, 38 men and one teenager, is worse, ithink, than anything we've had for many years. and how confident are you, given that at the moment none of these victims has been identified, that the perpetrators will be found? victims has been identified, that the perpetrators will be found ?m may be very difficult. 0ne the perpetrators will be found ?m may be very difficult. one of the major problems, and i spoke in the lords on the queen's speech
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yesterday, about the lack of control over maritime ports, airports are properly controlled, but anyone seems to be able to come in, and i particularly mentioned holyhead, where a lot of albanians came through, who turned out eventually to be slaves. it seems to be a very convenient route. why convenient? well, because i don't think there are proper checks are there. the border control people have a real problem, they do not have any advance information as to who is travelling by vehicle across on the ferries coming into our maritime ports, whether it is dover, where a lot of victims come through, or holyhead or any of the other ports. of course, there is an issue here because we are all in the eu, for now? yes, but we are not in the schengen area. so, you think that someone schengen area. so, you think that someone has found there is a particular weakness at this particular weakness at this particular port and has taken advantage of that? yes, i think they
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are taking advantage of a number of ports. because a number of victims of modern slavery have come through dover. and it's obvious, the albanians and others must have come through holyhead. but they are only two of many ports. that is the investigation side of this, let's just talk about the human side. how desperate, how bad, must things be, that you would even consider climbing into the back of trucks with 38 other people and put yourself at such risk? well, where there is high unemployment, people finding that they can't get a job, therefore they can't get a living, and they are offered very attractive ideas, for going into western europe, whether it be the united kingdom, spain, france, germany, italy. but particularly the united kingdom. and i think the traffic feel it's actually quite easy to get into the united kingdom. and look at the albanian gangs we have at the
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moment in the uk. they all got in. we shouldn't be allowing the crooks and the undesirables in and we certainly should have controls at the maritime ports. but there is a problem. if you stop the vehicles, then you clog up a whole line of vehicles, and that may take a very long time. but getting the advance information is what i understand is really the problem for the border control people. who are the masterminds behind this, where is the money going? well, the money is going to the traffickers. and there are some very, very... going to the traffickers. and there are some very, very... i going to the traffickers. and there are some very, very... i mean, going to the traffickers. and there are some very, very... i mean, this is one of the second or third most valuable illegal trades in the world. you've got guns, you've got drugs, and you've got slaves. and the slaves, it goes into billions. and there are millions and millions of slaves across the world. and there are millions and millions of slaves across the worldlj and there are millions and millions of slaves across the world. i know that human slavery is a huge issue for you but there is quite a jump from talking about slavery, and
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there was perhaps migrants, we don't know who they are, who just want a better life? yes. some of them, trying for the better life, may not have got somebody at this and prepared to fix them up. but if they are going to be picked up, it is quite likely they will end up in forced labour. i mean, 39 men, 38 men and a boy, will almost certainly go either onto a construction site, onto agriculture, or on to hospitality or a number of other areas of business here, where they can makea areas of business here, where they can make a great deal of money and pay them very little, if anything at all. i've seen some news which changes things a bit, the uk police are now saying they believe the lorry and container found with the dead bodies travelled from zeebrugge into purfleet, and docked in the thurrock area shortly after 12.30 this morning. underlining your point that there are several ports onto
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yes, isn't that sad? yet another port where we know people are coming in illegally, and not all of them but many of them will end up in restricted circumstances and being made to work to such an extent that they would qualify as a slaves. we remember the chinese, the 60 people who were found dead in a container lorry some years ago, the message about the risk is clearly not getting those who should need to hear it? no, and i think what needs to be done is a great deal more work in the countries of origin. the countries of origin, particularly albania, bulgaria, romania, nigeria, vietnam, and there are many others, but those are the countries that come to mind with me at the moment. and if much more work could be done on getting work for them, and also getting the message out i mean, bulgaria does take a real interest in human traffic. i have attended a number of parliamentary groups in
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bulgaria, hosted by bulgaria, and i must add that they have let this through. if in fact it has come... well, it seems to have come from bulgaria. you say sad, are you angry? an act and i'm not angry. yes, of course i'm angry with the perpetrators. but itjust is such a sad trade. and they are making money out of human suffering. and just as a final thought, how do we end this, how does this stop? a lot more awareness, a lot more communication, spending money in the right place, getting parliamentarians to have a real go at their executives, at their governments. we, thanks to theresa may, past the modern slavery act in 2015. it is not perfect, it's not been properly implement it in some ways, but my goodness me, it is
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at least a start. australia has done it, and other countries. so, that's the way to go forward. but the ordinary people need to know about it. and if you see someone who doesn't look to be right, rather like british rail telling you, let's sort it, tell the police, or tell social services, particularly with children. and children are trafficked as much as adults. children. and children are trafficked as much as adultsm children. and children are trafficked as much as adults. it is very good to hear your view, baroness butler—sloss, thank you very much forjoining us this afternoon. and we are just seeing more on this, that they police are saying, we now believe that the lorry and the container travelled from zeebrugge, as i say, police believe the lorry and container originated in ireland, but obviously it isa originated in ireland, but obviously it is a complexity picture, as we we re it is a complexity picture, as we were just hearing. the it is a complexity picture, as we werejust hearing. thejob it is a complexity picture, as we were just hearing. the job of the police will be to try to piece together the route, but most
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importantly, the identity of those 39 victims. and that, they say, could be a very long process. we will keep you updated with any developments. ben browne is still in g rays developments. ben browne is still in grays and he will bring us more when he gets it. now, fracking has divided opinion in the uk in recent yea rs, divided opinion in the uk in recent years, some local communities have raised concerns about the environmental impact of the technique, which captures gas found deep underground in a shale rock. the industry itself claims it has the potential to supply energy. today, the national audit office says fracking has progressed in this country at a far slower rate than originally predicted, and that it is losing public support. here is our environment analyst roger harrabin. the shale gas boom in the usa. it's had energy prices tumbling. a downing street official told the then prime minister david cameron, who predicted a shale gas bonanza in the uk. one report said it could generate £38 billion in revenue and create 6a,000 jobs,
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with a00 wells being fractal a year. the fracking hype began. but the uk is not the us. people are angry at mini earthquakes. we don't need a whole new gas industry. consumers do not want this on their doorstep. it's toxic. every community that's been faced with fracking is vehemently opposed to the industry. it is not the time to be introducing a new industry. we need to look at alternatives. the uk's geology has proved very different, too. the nao says just three wells have been fracked, and there is no sign of lower prices. what's more, the project is losing support. the economic benefits around fracking now are very uncertain, not least because the government doesn't really know how much shale gas could be extracted from england. the government itself doesn't think that it will have a significant impact on gas prices, which are set internationally, and the scale of the shale gas industry, if it were to take off
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in the uk, wouldn't really be significant enough to change that much. but north sea oil took a long time to get going, the shale gas firms maintain. they say they're still optimistic. if the gas still there, is it still producible and is it good quality? we would answer yes, yes and yes. and then after that it is for the uk policymakers to decide how quickly they want to exploit that source. there is plenty of shale gas available, they say, and no local environmental problems have been caused. but this is political now. roger harrabin, bbc news. 0ur our main headlines... 39 bodies are found ina our main headlines... 39 bodies are found in a lorry container in essex. police say a 25—year—old driver from northern ireland has been arrested. borisjohnson beach northern ireland has been arrested. boris johnson beach jeremy corbyn amid uncertainty over what happens next with brexit after mps rejected
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plans of the prime minister to pass his brexit built injust plans of the prime minister to pass his brexit built in just three days. as we have been hearing, the fracking industry is progressing at afar fracking industry is progressing at a far slower pace than originally predicted, according to the na over. yes, here are your business headlines. he had of bowing's commercial planes division was ousted on tuesday, the highest profile sacking so far in the wake of the crash which killed 189 passengers and crew. the company named as the preferred bidderfor british steel, ataer holdings, of turkey, has failed to agree a deal to save it from collapse, putting 5000 jobs directly at risk. british steel was put into compulsory liquidation in may after rescue talks with the government broke down. ataer has until thursday to
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maintain its ten week exclusive access to the companies box as it attem pts access to the companies box as it atte m pts to access to the companies box as it attempts to strike a deal. and wework has been thrown a multibillion—dollar lifeline from softbank which will give the japanese company more control of the troubled property start—up, increasing its stake in the office space sharing company to roughly 80%. co—founder adam newman will leave the board but retain observer status. the deal marks the end of 88 speed at wework, which was once valued at nearly $38 million. thomas cook, and the blame game continues? exactly. former thomas cook executives have been talking to mps today to try to establish what went wrong the company, what led to the demise. it is not thrown together, this, you know! it really isn't!
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today, in front of mps, it has been the turn of the official who was responsible for the costly 2007 merger with my travel, and also harriet greene, his successor. both she and, in another hearing, the most she and, in another hearing, the m ost rece nt she and, in another hearing, the most recent chief executive, peter frank hauser, said huge amounts of debt at the company where one of the key factors for the demise of the travel company, that effectively all the profits that they were making after that 2007 acquisition were effectively working to service the debt, or interest on the debt. when he was challenged by rachel reeves on the committee, he said that he has his hands tied, he said he found hisjob impossible has his hands tied, he said he found his job impossible due has his hands tied, he said he found hisjob impossible due to has his hands tied, he said he found his job impossible due to the debt, and maybe they should have done something about that debt, he said? 0bviously something about that debt, he said? obviously you have got people blaming the ones who came before?
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absolutely, and harriet greene also said on wednesday that she inherited a huge wall of debt. interesting that you mention rachel reeves, she is the mp for leeds west and chair of the business and industrial strategy select committee which was listening to those executives today, let's talk now to our guest, to give us let's talk now to our guest, to give usa let's talk now to our guest, to give us a legal perspective on this. she isa us a legal perspective on this. she is a partner at a law firm. really good to talk to you. we were mentioning rachel reeves, chair of this committee which was listening to all of these thomas cook top bosses, and she said today, look, eve ryo ne bosses, and she said today, look, everyone keeps but blaming everyone and everything else except for themselves for the collapse of this company. do you think there is some truth in what she was saying? yes, definitely. we have heard from the management, the outgoing management as well as the more historical management today, and obviously the auditors, and everybody seems to be
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citing different factors involved in the companies collapse. it is interesting, because what of this repeated acrid accusation from harriet greene today, and also from mr frankhauser that essentially, it was the debt that was to blame? the debt was acquired in around 2011 and they never really managed to shift it, for many years they seem to just be paying off the interest, and it was something which eventually was unsustainable, particularly in view of the more recent volatility of the travel market. but peter fankhauser said something should have been done about that, something should have been sold off? i completely agree. i think the issue particularly with the airline and part of the business which appears to have been the most profitable, the airline, was that from what i have read, it looked as though, had they sold that off at an
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earlier stage, actually the company would have gone into insolvency even earlier than it would have gone into insolvency even earlierthan it did. would have gone into insolvency even earlier than it did. to a large extent, what's done is done, the company was forced into a state of collapse, putting around 9000 jobs at risk. there has now been a happy ending with hays travel buying up much of thomas cook. from a legal perspective, particularly in terms of some of the levels of executive pay which have been shelled out here, what outcome can we expect from these hearings before mps? well, the purpose of the inquiry is to try and establish what went wrong and who might be responsible for what went wrong. at the moment they are looking at the directors themselves, as well as the companies auditors, and to some extent the government, for failing to bail the business out. but from a legal perspective, i think a lot of the accountability does sit with the directors, who had responsibility is to watch the company stakeholders, which included employees, customers,
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suppliers, and, of course, the banks as well as their creditors. we will have to leave it there. many thanks. the markets? it is interesting to flag up what is happening with the pound today because we saw it dip earlier in the morning against the dollar, and then this afternoon we have seen it strengthening. keeping a close eye on that. ok, see you later. to the united states, the white house has dismissed a senior diplomat‘s testimony to a presidential impeachment inquiry as a smear campaign. presidential impeachment inquiry as a smear campaign. the acting ambassador to ukraine said he had been told that president trump made the supply of military aid conditional on ukraine investigating his political rivaljoe biden. here
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is our washington correspondent gary 0'donoghue. this really has been the most to close if so far in the impeachment inquiry. no doubt about that. 15 pages opening statement from the ambassador, leak out, and it details the two and fro, involving state department officials, other memos of the national security council, other ambassadors, and the deal president trump wanted, to make ukraine investigating his political opponent in return for military aid and for a visit to the white house. the ambassador is very clear that it was ambassador is very clear that it was a fundamental undermining of us— ukraine relations, that it was a sort of shadow for policy, and he goes a number of people, democrats are goes a number of people, democrats a re really goes a number of people, democrats are really buoyed by this, they are going to push on even harder. republicans still standing by the president, but this is a big problem for the president now, because there isa for the president now, because there is a filmic narrative of these last few months, set out exactly how he went about putting pressure on
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ukraine. gary o'donoghue there, talking to us earlier. headlines coming up, but first a look at the weather, with matt taylor. hello, for some of you it took a while to brighten up after a foggy start. this was somerset in the early afternoon. at least for most, it has been a dry 2a hours, but it is not going to last. we can see two weather fronts converging, and later, friday into saturday, this is coming up from the south—west, across the same sort of areas, producing some heavy and prolonged rain. into the start of the weekend, particularly for wales and north—west england, we will have to keep a close eye on this. there could be a flooding risk and possible travel disruption. at the moment, though, most of us finishing the day dry. a bit of rain the south—east. more persistent rain across scotland. the rain then pushes eastwards through the night.
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all of that crowd across england and wales in particular will keep temperatures up tonight compared with last night. a few mist and fog patches. temperatures just about holding up, a bit ofa patches. temperatures just about holding up, a bit of a fresh start on thursday. some heavy, thundery showers pushing it later. brightening up across northern and western areas. parts of the midlands and eastern england will turn a bit wetter during the day. temperatures tomorrow starting to turn a bit cooler than we have seen over the past few days, that is because of colder air trying to come into the north atlantic, which is going to clash with warmer air coming from the mid—aplin took. as they clash, it will fire up this weather front as we go through into the start of friday. —— the mid—atlantic. elsewhere, whilst the wind will be
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picking up, lots of cloud and outbreaks of rain developing widely for england and wales although there will be something brighter in the south—east corner. 0n will be something brighter in the south—east corner. on friday night, into saturday, the weather front comes across roughly the same sort of areas. could have some wet snow mixed in with it across the tops of the hills in wales and northern ireland. is it clear through into sunday, the second half of the weekend is looking drier and sunnier. but it will be a chilly and frosty start. hello, you're watching afternoon live. i am simon mccoy.
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today at apm. the bodies of 39 people are found in a lorry container in essex. a 25—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder. this is an absolute tragedy. a very sad day for essex police and the local community. we will continue to work alongside many other partner agencies to find out what led to these deaths. i am ben brown reporting live from the scene. and the police are about to make a statement in the next few minutes. with more details about what happened. we are also expecting within this hourfor happened. we are also expecting within this hour for the lorry to be moved away by the police for further investigation. boris johnson and jeremy corbyn failed to agree a new timetable for getting the brexit legislation through parliament, after mps rejected the prime minister's three—day plan but approved the bill in principle. they said that we couldn't open the withdrawal agreement, and we did. they said we could not get rid of
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the backstop and we did. and they said we could not get a new deal and mr speaker, we did. questions about the future of fracking in the uk as the public spending watchdog raises serious concerns. let's get the sport now, with jane dougall. the 100 metre wheelchair racer marieke vervoort has died at the age of a0 because of euthanasia appeared she has been suffering for chronic painfor she has been suffering for chronic pain for years. we will talk to the lady. —— we will talk to you later. thank you, the changing colours might look great, but the changing weather will bring more of those leaves to the ground. also coming up a smear campaign, leaves to the ground. also coming up a smearcampaign, that leaves to the ground. also coming up a smear campaign, that is how the white house describes a senior member's testimony.
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hello, this is afternoon live, i am simon mccoy. a murder investigation has begun after the bodies of 39 people have been found in a lorry container. the 38 people including a teenager were found early this morning. a 25—year—old man from northern ireland was arrested. let's go live to the scene with ben brown. yes, the lorry is stilljust behind this green screen behind me. the police forensic work is continuing. we are expecting it to be moved in the next few minutes. they told us they are going to be taking it away for further examination. we are hearing that the deputy chief is going to come and talk to us, tell us going to come and talk to us, tell us about the latest details. we know that 39 people one of them a
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teenager died back in the container. a 25—year—old man was arrested on suspicion. the route into the uk is still unclear. we know according to the bulgarian prime minister, it had bulgarian number plates, the country has no other connections. the route that we had been hearing that the lorry took was into holyhead in north wales down to essex. there are other reports saying that it came from... we are waiting to hearfrom the deputy chief constable. they are working with the national crime agency and the board agency as well. we have this report from our correspondent. the grim discovery was made early this morning on the back of a lorry at an industrial park in grays. forensic officers are working at the scene.
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police say identifying the bodies will be a long and complicated operation. the lorry came from bulgaria, but the people who died on board are unlikely to be from europe. police came to the scene after they were alerted by the ambulance service at 1.a0. 39 people were pronounced dead at the scene. early indications suggest that 38 are adults. one was a teenager. i think the whole house will agree that this is truly a shocking incident. my thoughts and all thoughts our condolences are with the victims and their loved ones at this utterly terrible time. i'm sure the whole house will also convey their condolences at this sad time. i am completely and utterly shocked and devastated that that has actually happened here today, especially in this area. my mum works down the road, my dad works down there. this is an area that i drive down all the time, so for that to happen is completely shocking.
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a murder investigation was launched and the lorry driver, a 25—year—old man from northern ireland, was arrested on suspicion of murder and remains in police custody. at this stage, we have not identified where the victims are from or their identities, and we anticipate this could be a lengthy process. we will continue to work alongside many other partner agencies to find out what led to these deaths. police say this incident is an absolute tragedy. their priority is to identify the victims and find out where they came from. they will also want to find out how the lorry got from bulgaria to essex. the lorry arrived at holyhead in wales on saturday. police didn't say where it had come from. one possibility is that it came from dublin, having arrived in the republic of ireland from france. it is not known how long the lorry had been parked up in grays before the emergency services were alerted. a large cordon has been put in place around the scene.
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it is likely to be there for some time to come. andy moore, bbc news, grays. we have seen some cctv images of the lorry arriving. about 20 minutes before the alarm was raised. it seems as though the lorry had not been here very long before the ambulance service arrived and then the police were called as well. let's get this report from our correspondent lisa. desperate enough to risk their lives, crossing the busiest shipping lane in the world. they are coming in record numbers in small boats. it is not confirmed that those who died today were migrants, but since thejungle camp was closed in calais and security was increased at dover, smugglers have found new routes. as well as boats, migrants continue to be found in lorries. today's discovery is the worst tragedy of this kind in recent years. the whole house will be shocked by the appalling news that 39 bodies have been discovered in a lorry container in essex. this is an unimaginable tragedy and truly heartbreaking. i know that the thoughts and prayers of all members are with those
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who lost their lives and their loved ones. can we just think for a moment of what it must have been like for those 39 people, obviously in a desperate and dangerous situation, for their lives to end, suffocated to death in a container? this is an unbelievable human tragedy that happened in our country at this time. the local mp was among many giving their condolences. she said it was sickening news, and people—trafficking is a vile and dangerous business. once again, campaigners say serious measures are needed to stop migrants dying. all we know at this point is that 39 people, who had hopes and dreams and fears like you and me, are no longer alive today. and this is an unspeakable tragedy that could have been avoided. it is not the first time people have died like this. 19 years ago, 58 people suffocated to death in the back of a lorry in dover.
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today's tragedy is a reminder that people are as desperate as ever to risk everything to get to britain. lisa hampele, bbc news. we have heard the prime minister describe what has happened here as an unimaginable tragedy. a reaction of shock from the home secretary as well. the local mpjackie doyle price has been talking about how interview people traffickers are violent and dangerous. one of the points that i will keep reiterating and reminding the government is that this is not something we can do by ourselves in this country. this is a trade which is organised by major international crime gangs. there is a hell of a lot of money in it. they are very a hell of a lot of money in it. they are very sophisticated in how they manage this. they are trading on people's hope and delivering misery to them. we will only tackle it
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working multilaterally with other partners across europe and the world. we will have to collectively tackle this because this is a menace to humanity. that was jackie doyle price, the local conservative member of parliament. a huge amount of work for the police to do in terms of identifying the 39 victims. the work only beginning on that. they warned that it could be a long process. also trying to establish the route that the lorry took across europe. they are trying to work out how it came into the united kingdom this industrial estate. the police are coming to talk to us and then they are saying that the lorry will be moved. we will come back to you and that happens. boris johnson moved. we will come back to you and that happens. borisjohnson has met with jeremy corbyn amid that happens. borisjohnson has met withjeremy corbyn amid uncertainty over what happens next with brexit.
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the meeting comes after mps rejected his plans to fast—track a bill through parliament. through prime minister questions he said that prime ministers —— ministers had willed the end but not the means. court —— jeremy corbyn —— jeremy corbyn said they need to have the time to review this deal. get ready for brexit on the 31st of october. it is the date we've been told the uk would leave the eu, do or die, for months. but after yesterday's events in parliament, it now looks virtually impossible to meet with a deal. so the plan may be about to change... get ready for brexit. ..to a delay, a general election or even both. borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn met earlier to talk about brexit next steps, but it is understood that no particular agreement was reached. and at prime minister's questions, each blamed the other for the withdrawal bill being put on hold. it was a shame that the house, as it were, willed the end but not the means, but there is still time
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for the right honourable gentleman to do that and to explain to the people of this country how he proposes to honour his promise that he made repeatedly, and deliver on the will of the people and get brexit done. he threw northern ireland under a bus. he ripped up protections for workers' rights and environmental standards, lost every vote along the way and tried to prevent genuine democratic scrutiny and debate. veteran former conservative ken clarke urged the prime minister to ignore the dates and agree a longer timetable to look over legislation. will he, having reflected, let us know that he is about to table a reasonable timetable motion so that this house can complete the task of finalising the details of the withdrawal bill so we can move on on a basis which might begin to reunite the nation once again for the future?
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much will depend on the eu, though. if it agrees to push back brexit day to january, as parliament wanted, ruling out a new deal exit next week, borisjohnson had said he would try to call the election. boris johnson has already tried to get a general election twice in recent months and on both occasions, he has failed. that is because under the fixed—term parliaments act, he needs two thirds of mps to vote in favour and both times, opposition parties said they wouldn't until they could be sure that a new deal brexit was of the table. the leader of the snp is certainly keen to go to the polls. the extension now secured should not just be long enough to scrutinise a bad bill for a week or two longer. it should in my view be long enough to allow a general election or a referendum, or perhaps more realistically, the former, leading to the latter stop for now, delay looks almost delay looks almost certain, a general election pretty lightly.
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the question is when. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. what is the answer it. i know someone what is the answer it. i know someone who might know the answer. vicki young is at westminster. we don't know, do we? now, and everyone is waiting to see what the eu will do. a letter has been written by borisjohnson, if do. a letter has been written by boris johnson, if they do. a letter has been written by borisjohnson, if they come back and say yes then the extension will go to the end of january, but say yes then the extension will go to the end ofjanuary, butjurors could accept that. they could go to another date, but then parliament would have to fill out all of that. let's discuss it with a conservative mp. you have been trying to urge some of our eu counterparts to veto any extension. how is that going? extremely difficult. as the first—ever polish born and as a fluid public speaker, i've been trying to convince our friends and
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we re trying to convince our friends and were sought to veto any extension. the overwhelming sentiment of the british people is they want this done they are sick and tired of parliament blocking and obstructing our ability to leave the european union. as you know, the european union. as you know, the european union acts as a cartel and each country is petrified of moving away from the collective will of the european union. what have they said to you? i have not had an official response from the polish prime minister. but the minister for europe has rejected any possible consideration of poland extending a veto. very regrettable. they are claiming that if they prevent us from leaving on time, it will lead toa no from leaving on time, it will lead to a no deal. now. that is not correct. it would be if we got to the point that parliament did not vote for a deal. i believe the prime
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minister has negotiated the most pragmatic deal possible under the circumstances. he has given parliament three days to ratify that. we have been debating this issue for three years. the idea that mps are complaining they cannot read through a couple of hundred pages of documents over three days is preposterous in my view. there are many people in this parliament as you know, who are just part —— just trying to prevent brexit and having another referendum and a customs union. what should boris johnson to know if we think you will give an extension? should he bring the bell back or go for a general election?” think he has to go for a general election. we are getting ready for a one. i cannot see the brexit bell getting through this parliament when there are so many people in this parliament who are absolutely determined to prevent any
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recognisable form of brexit getting through. we need a general election and let the people decide. the problem is if we go to a general election and brexit has not been delivered, aren't you afraid you're going to be under pressure from the brexit party? we will be under extreme pressure from the brexit party. but if we go into a general election with a strong message of we've tried to deliver but they had prevented us from doing so, give us a strong majority voting for candidates conservative candidates who believe in this, vote for us, have us a small majority and let us finish this once and for all. ok, thank you very much. i think we're going to have to wait another day or two before we hear from the eu as to what they plan to do. let's get more
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on our main story. ben brown is a g rays on our main story. ben brown is a grays for us. we have had an update from the essex police. 0riginally, they had been saying that they thought the lorry in which 39 victims were found had come in through holyhead in north wales, possibly via dublin. but it now seems a different story. they are saying that they think after further inquiries that the trailer of the lorry travelled from zeebrugge and docked where we are. shortly after 12:30am. the tractor unit is believed to have originated in northern ireland. they are also saying that we believe the trailer left the port after 105 in the
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morning. a 25—year—old man is still in custody having been arrested on suspicion of murder. a rather different route than what we were originally told. it seems that it came zane from zeebrugge. we have seen some came zane from zeebrugge. we have seen some cctv pictures that were found from one of the businesses nearby showing the lorry coming into the industrial estate here in essex just after 1:20am and then the alarm was raised at 1a8 and. ——1:a0am. the ambulance came at that time a large number of ambulances arrived and then the police were alerted and thatis and then the police were alerted and that is when the 39 bodies were discovered. 38 of them adults and
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one teenager. the police are working very ha rd to one teenager. the police are working very hard to try and identify the bodies and to work out exactly the route that the lorry took. we understand it will be taken away from here up the road to the essex police headquarters for further forensic investigation. ben brown in g rays forensic investigation. ben brown in grays with the latest. will go back to him at the news conference from the police. some local communities have raised concerns about fracking which captures gas from underground. the industry says it has huge potential to supply industry. the watchdog says that fracking has progressed in a far slower pace in this country than predicted and it is losing public support. here is our environmental analyst. the shale gas boom in the usa. it's had energy prices tumbling.
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then prime minister david cameron, who predicted a shale gas bonanza in the uk. one report said it could generate £38 billion in revenue and create 6a,000 jobs, with a00 wells being fractal a year. -- 33 —— 33 billion pounds. the fracking hype began. but the uk is not the us. people are angry at mini earthquakes. we don't need a whole new gas industry. consumers do not want this on their doorstep. it's toxic. every community that's been faced with fracking is vehemently opposed to the industry. it is not the time to be introducing a new industry. we need to look at alternatives. the uk's geology has proved very different, too. the nao says just three wells have been fracked, and there is no sign of lower prices. the economic benefits around fracking now are very uncertain, not least because the government doesn't really know how much shale gas could be extracted from england. the government itself doesn't think
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that it will have a significant impact on gas prices, which are set internationally, and the scale of the shale gas industry, if it were to take off in the uk, wouldn't really be significant enough to change that much. but north sea oil took a long time to get going, the shale gas firms maintain. they say they're still optimistic. if the gas still there, is it still producible and is it good quality? we would answer yes, yes and yes. and then after that it is for the uk policymakers to decide how quickly they want to exploit that source. we will be using gas for many years to come. the frackers say we might as well use british gas, but frankly this has been a bad day for them. roger harrabin, bbc news. a man has been arrested after two teams have been stabbed to death. the victims have been named, they
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are both 17. the police say they we re are both 17. the police say they were stabbed as part of a targeted attack around midnight on saturday. 821—year—old man from milton has been questioned on suspicion of murder and attempted murder. the white house has dismissed a senior diplomat‘s testimony as a smear campaign. the ambassador to ukraine had been told that resident trump made military aid contingent on help into a political rival. a 15 page opening statement from the ambassador leaked out and eight detailed his back and forth involving other state department officials, members of the national security official to make ukraine
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investigate his political opponent in return for military aid and a visit to the white house. the ambassador it was very clear that it was a fundamental undermining of us and ukraine relations, it was a shadow foreign policy. he fingers a number of people. the democrats are very buoyed by this and it means they will push on even more. republicans are still standing by the the president but this is a big problem for him. a generation of children with special educational needs are being let down day after day that is according to a report of mps. the select committee strongly criticised reforms brought in. have a report. if i hadn't found the group here, then i wouldn't have known where to start. whether it's just a cup of tea, a chance to meet others in a similar
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situation or an offer of legal advice, this group of parents, who all have children with special educational needs, get together every week. how are you coping? i don't, most days. i get up and i get dressed in the hope that at least one of them might say, "i'm going to go to school today, mum," but it never happens. but you just keep going. we found we were discharged from speech therapist services three times at least, by the time he'd finished reception. and he's 15 now and he's still selectively mute i have a 13—year—old with autism. i couldn't get any social care assessment for him. we've just had one, but that's been three years of asking. it'sjust culture and people's attitudes towards children with disability, and it's a real shame. following an 18—month inquiry, the education select committee says the system is not working. it's no good just throwing more money at the system, or literally using a plaster, an elastoplast, to solve individual problems as they may arise. the government needs to give it strong direction and much more guidance to councils, to see this as a major area of social injustice in our country.
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it is shameful, and it is wrong. councils that run the services say they they have reached a tipping point with funding not keeping up with demand. the government says it's investing more and wants the system to work for every child. but for these parents, like thousands across the country, they just want their children to have the best possible chance in life and get the support they were promised. frankie mccamley, bbc news. blood pressure drugs that are taken every day would be more affected taken at night rather than in the morning, that is according to new research. switching to it evening dose gives more protection against heart attacks. it adds to a growing body of evidence that our own body clocks might influence medications
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effectiveness. the spanish research split 19,000 participants and split them into two groups. gave one morning medication and one in the evening. it is felt that because blood pressure drops naturally in the evening the medication was more effective at keeping it under control at night and then continue to have the effect during the following day. the researchers in spain say this is a very simple piece of advice that is free and could save thousands of lives, but the british heart foundation and are urging not to change the time without speaking to a doctor first. time for a look at the weather. here is not tailored. hello, most of us have seen the end of the day on a dry note. there is
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something wetter into the far west of scotland. it will push its way towards the east and north an island during the first half of the night. england and will come of these two areas of cloud are starting to merge into one. there could be said mist and fog as well. it will not be as cold tomorrow morning lots of cloud around. some rain and drizzle initially and it will turn heavy in the morning it will spread towards the morning it will spread towards the southeast and east anglia. a few showers around. strong dell force winds. it will be chilly thursday night into friday morning. friday into saturday, they will be some heavy rain wales in northwest england in particular.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines.
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police now say that a container in which 39 people were found dead arrived into purfleet from zeebrugge shortly after 12.30 this morning. the lorry driver, a 25—year—old man from northern ireland, has been arrested on suspicion of murder. the prime minister meets the labour leader to try and agree a timetable for a brexit deal, after mps rejected his plan to get it through in three days, but approved the bill in principle. they said we couldn't get a new withdrawal agreement and to be dead, they said we could not get rid of they said we could not get rid of the backstop and we did. and they said we couldn't get a new deal and we did. questions about the future of fracking in the uk, as the public spending watchdog raises serious concerns. sport now, on afternoon live. that shocking terrible news about the paralympics. yes, it really is.
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the belgian racer marieke vervoort had stand at the age of a0. through euthanasia. she shot to prominence after she won the 100 metres in the london paralympics. 0n the surface and successful pa ra— london paralympics. 0n the surface and successful para— athlete, but what many people didn't see was the co nsta nt what many people didn't see was the constant excruciating pain that she suffered every single day and she said that she had signed euthanasia papers as far back as 2008 because she wants her to have control. i'm that king yesterday. she had an incurable degenerative muscle disease which caused the pain and triggered seizures. she'd love competing and she said it was her medicine. euthanasia is legal in belgian. she said she would follow that path if her condition worsened.
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it is the only news conference at which i have ever tiered up, and i did so not because of the sadness of her situation, but because of the clarity and calmness in her thinking, and the joy that she had, that she took, from what she did have in her life. she described herself as a rich woman, because of the support and friendship that she had. but what she did in that news conference was to lay bare the unvarnished reality of living with a chronic disability. and the bbc sport website has much more on that story, including a really emotionalfilm more on that story, including a really emotional film where she talks about her life and her decision to end it through euthanasia. turning to football, champions league tonight, and the hope of more goals for an english team? last night there were two english teens playing, both of them scored five goals each, manchester city and tottenham. tonight i suspect it will be slightly
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different, defending champions liverpool taking on going, the first time the two signs will ever have met in european competition. but it is in belgium and liverpool do not have a good away record in the competition. however, they do have mo salah available, back from injury. chelsea are also in action and potentially it will be a tougher match for them, travelling to amsterdam to play ajax. ajax in great form, having beaten lille 3—0 and valencia also 3—0. however, chelsea are also on a good run with five wins in all competitions. really tough match against a team that we know how they performed last year, and how they have started this group, winning both games comfortable. so, it's going to be a tough match, i don't think the five wins mean anything other than hopefully, we have some confidence. that this will be a completely different challenge, which we need to be ready for. tonight's games will be on radio 5 live, chelsea
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underway just before will be on radio 5 live, chelsea underwayjust before six o'clock, liverpool at eight,. the welsh rugby union team met prince charles this morning as they continue their preparations for their world cup semifinal. his royal highness was at their training session in tokyo this morning. they play south africa in yokohama on sunday. they lostjosh navidi through injury but hooker ken 0wens thinks they have reached the semifinals relatively unscathed. we have been pretty lucky especially up with injuries. losing josh navidi is not good because he is a great player, but we have been quite lucky with injuries. that is all the sport for now, back to you, simon.
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let's get more on our top story. 39 people have been found dead in the container of a lorry in essex. let's go live to the scene and my colleague ben brown. yes, we are expecting to hear from the deputy of essex police, who has just arrived here at the scene and is going to be talking to us in the next few minutes, so we will hopefully bring you that live with the latest update. we are also expecting them to take the lorry that was discovered here in the early hours of this morning with 39 bodies in the back, they're going to ta ke bodies in the back, they're going to take that away in the next few minutes as well for further forensic examination. essex police have been giving us a bit more detail on how they think there's an, which a p pa re ntly they think there's an, which apparently originated in bulgaria, although that is not 100% clear at the moment, but they have been giving us a bit more detail on how it entered the uk. first it was said that it had come in into holyhead in
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north wales. now, it looks like it was the trailer of the lorry came in from zeee brugge, into purfleet, in essex, and then arrived at about 12.30 this morning, just after midnight. and then there was some cctv that we've seen of it arriving here in this industrial estate, the waterglade industrial park at about 20 past one in the morning. and then 20 past one in the morning. and then 20 minutes later, the emergency services were called, the ambulance services, were called, and so were the police. that's when the discovery was made, that appalling discovery, of 39 bodies, 38 of them adults, and one teenager, we are told, in the back of that refrigerated lorry. now, a 25—year—old man from northern ireland has been arrested, and is being held on suspicion of murder. we are told that the tractor part of the lorry was from northern ireland,
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but no more details about that at the moment. we are waiting for more details from the essex police and we are also expecting the lorry to be moved just down the road behind us. they've cordoned off this road a bit more extensively than it was earlier on, they have got some motorbikes ready to take the lorry away, for furtherforensic ready to take the lorry away, for further forensic examination. and ben, it looks as though somebody will be standing in front of the microphones very shortly, but it does look as though the lorry had not been there for very long before police were aware its existence there? a that's right. and we don't know yet who raised the alarm. it might have been the driver, or somebody in the area of this industrial estate, where it arrived. but clearly, when the ambulance service and then the police arrived an absolutely horrific discovery, 39 bodies crammed into the back, and we don't know how long they may have been dead for. we were talking to
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the road haulage association earlier, who said, thatjourney could have taken between three and five days, it is not clear. but obviously hellish conditions in the back of that lorry. the local mp is talking about the people traffickers as being vile and dangerous and the prime minister has talked about this being an unimaginable tragedy, how he is shocked and his thoughts have gone out to the victims and to their loved ones. there hasn't been anything like this since the year 2000, when the bodies of 58 chinese immigrants were found having crossed the channel in the back of a lorry. that was almost 20 years ago. this is an enormous number of deaths and i think it has taken everybody here by surprise. people have been shocked, people have been laying flowers. i think this is now the deputy to essex police, pippa mills, to give us an update, let's listen to give us an update, let's listen
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to what she has got to say. good afternoon, my name is pippa mills and i'm deputy here in essex police. we've been progressing our investigations at the scene here in grays throughout the day. in order to ensure we maintain the dignity of the people who sadly lost their lives, we will be moving the lorry and the trailer shortly. once that movement has happened, we will remain here to complete some scene examinations before we can allow all the business operators back to their premises. i would like to thank them for their co—operation and support throughout the day. this matter has attracted national and international interest and it's absolutely imperative that the operation is conducted with the utmost respect for the 39 people who've lost their lives. the lorry and the trailer will be moved to a secure location at tilbury docks so the bodies can be recovered, whilst preserving the dignity of the victims. we are yet to identify them and must manage
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this sensitively, with their families. i appreciate this sensitively, with their families. iappreciate how this sensitively, with their families. i appreciate how much attention this incident will continue to attract and the public and media appetite to understand what's happened. we also need to understand what has happened and essex police will be working with all of our partners to ensure this happens as quickly as possible. may iremind you happens as quickly as possible. may i remind you all that we have a 25—year—old man in custody on suspicion of murder. i will not be commenting on speculation of the identity of this man. may i ask of you all at this time, please, if you have any information which could help our investigation, please contact my detectives by calling essex police on 101. also, we have two telephone numbers for anyone with concerns about relatives to call. those numbers are... oh 800, 0560944 for those living inside the
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uk, 0044 2071580010 for those outside the uk. we will continue to issue information as soon as we are able to, but i do need to stress that this will be a lengthy inquiry. thank you all very much. so, that was the deputy of essex police, pippa mills, explaining that to preserve the dignity of those who've died, the 39 people who've lost their lives in the back of that lorry, that is still here on this industrial estate, they are now going to move that lorry, take it to a secure location, she said, so that the bodies can be recovered. clearly, they have yet to be identified. that is going to be a very long and painstaking effort by the essex police and other authorities, to try to identify those victims. we have as yet absolutely no idea where in the world they were from. but 39 bodies have to be identified, so they are going to take this lorry, with the
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bodies still inside that vehicle, away from here, to a secure location, so that that recovery operation of the bodies and the identification operation can be carried out, as she said, with the utmost respect for the victims. she was also saying that they've got more forensic work to do here at the industrial estate. she was appreciating that obviously it is impeding businesses in the area, but apologising to them, but saying, they will return this part of the waterglade industrial park to normal as soon waterglade industrial park to normal as soon they can. also warning people not to speculate about the identity of the man who is in custody at the moment, a 25—year—old man from northern ireland. that is all we know about him at the moment. the deputy saying, please do not speculate about his identity. appealing to any relatives or anyone who may be concerned to get in touch with them. that is the latest from here in grays in essex, i will hand
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you back to the studio. now on afternoon live — let's go nationwide, and see what's happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. just the one today, but boy, is this a story? let's go to amy garcia in leeds, who can tell us more about why the spores of unusual mushrooms are popping up all over the area. what on earth is going on? well, i'm sure you have heard of the saying that it sure you have heard of the saying thatitis sure you have heard of the saying that it is grim up north. well, it certainly has been lately with a very wet summer and autumn, but that rain has created perfect conditions forfun guy, rain has created perfect conditions for fun guy, and rain has created perfect conditions forfun guy, and experts are reporting record numbers this year, with rare varieties popping up. the royal horticultural society said it is the best year of fungi in the gardens for so many years with many different varieties. they've been spotted at harrogate in north yorkshire. if you're not looking for
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fairies under your toadstools, like me, and you're not too impressed by the look of them in your garden, they do have their uses, apparently. it is actually a really complex organism, fungi, and they work together with plants, sometimes to their depot meant, but for the most part, they are really beneficial, and some of them are host specific, so and some of them are host specific, so they have a symbiotic relationship with a particular type of tree —— to their detriment. relationship with a particular type of tree. -- to their detriment. are you feeling peckish, simon? the flourish of fungi does come with a health warning, don't them unless you are sure that they are edible, because some are extremely poisonous. here are some that have been connected from near harrogate. we have got several varieties here. one of these you can eat raw, apparently. this one, the trumpet of death. i'm not sure if i am so keen on the name, or the look of that one. if i am not on look north
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later, simon, you know why. and only someone up later, simon, you know why. and only someone up north can later, simon, you know why. and only someone up north can ever use later, simon, you know why. and only someone up north can ever use the phrase, it is grim up north. it's not a feeling shared anywhere else! thank you very much for that! if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can access them via the iplayer. and a reminder we go nationwide every afternoon here on afternoon live at a.30. donald trump has been tweeting about the situation on the border between turkey and syria, saying it has been a big success, he is now talking about it, we can hearfrom him in the white house. thank you very much. my fellow americans, i greet you this morning from the white house to announce a major breakthrough toward achieving a better future for syria, and for the middle east. it's been a long time. over the last five days, you have
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seen over the last five days, you have seen that a ceasefire that we established along syria's border has held, and it has held very well, beyond most expectations. early this morning, the government of turkey informed my administration that they would be stopping combat and their offensive in syria, and making the ceasefire permanent, and it will indeed be permanent. however, you would also define the word permanent in that part of the world as a somewhat questionable, we all understand that. but i do believe it will be permanent. i've therefore instructed the secretary at the treasury to lift all sanctions imposed on 14th october in response to turkey's original offensive, moves against the kurds in syria's north—east border region. so, the sanctions will be lifted unless something happens that we are not happy with. this was an outcome
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created by us, the united states, and nobody else, another nation, very simple. and we are willing to ta ke very simple. and we are willing to take blame and we are also willing to ta ke take blame and we are also willing to take credit. this is something they've been trying to do for many, many decades. since then, others have come out to help, and we welcome them to do so. other countries have stepped forward, they wa nt to countries have stepped forward, they want to help, and we think that's great. the nations in the region must ultimately take on the responsibility of helping turkey and syria police there border. we want other nations to get involved. we've secured the oil, and therefore a small number of us troops will remain in the area. the area where they have the oil. and we're going to be protecting it and we will be deciding what we are going to do with it in the future. in any event, by the moves that we've made, we're achieving a much more peaceful and sta ble area achieving a much more peaceful and stable area between turkey and syria including a 20 mile wide safe zone.
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an interesting term, safe zone, that's the term we're using, hopefully that is owned will become safe. thousands and thousands of people have been killed in that zone over the years. —— hopefully that zone will become safe. but it has been sought for many, many decades and hopefully we have got something which will be strong and hold up. turkey, syria, and all forms of the kurds, have been fighting for centuries. we have done them a great service, and we've done a greatjob for all of them, and now we're getting out. long time. we were supposed to be there for 30 days, that was almost ten years ago. so we are therefore 30 days, and now we're leaving. supposed to be a very quick hit and let's get out. and it was a quick hit, except they stayed for almost ten years. let someone else
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fight over this long bloodstained sand. iwant fight over this long bloodstained sand. i want to thank vice—president pence and secretary of state mike pompeo for leading the american delegation so successfully to turkey several days ago, along with national security advisor o'brien, i wa nt to national security advisor o'brien, i want to thank them very much. the american delegation negotiated the original five american delegation negotiated the originalfive day american delegation negotiated the original five day ceasefire that ended kurdish fighters to safely leave, and just got them to a point where frankly it enabled them to get out, to go, and move reallyjust a few miles in a slightly different direction. so, this enabled them to do so. countless lives are now being saved as a result of our negotiation with turkey an outcome reached
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without spilling one drop of american blood, no injuries, nobody shot, nobody killed. i havejust spoken to the commander—in—chief general masloom of the sdf kurds, and he was extremely thankful for what the united states has done, could not have been more thankful. general masloom has assured me that isis is under very, very strict lock and key, and that detention facilities are being strongly maintained. there were a few that got out, a small number relatively speaking, and they have been largely recaptured. i am also sure that he will be issuing his own statement very shortly. we had a great talk. but we've saved the lives of many, many kurds, he understands that. the
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war was going to be vicious and probably not very long. and i am very happy to have been involved in it, as are our vice—president, our secretary of state, and all of the other people in our team. by getting that ceasefire to stick, we've done something that's very, very special. but by getting the ceasefire after a tremendous amount of really tough for, for a very short period of days, that is something very special. our trips are safe, and the pain and suffering of the three—day fight that occurred was directly responsible for our ability to make an agreement with turkey and the kurds, that could never have been made without this short—term outburst. should turkey fail to honour its obligations, including the protection of religious and
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ethnic minorities, which i truly believe they will do, we reserve the right to reimpose crippling sanctions including substantially increased tariffs on steel and all other products coming out of turkey. we are now an economic powerhouse, like never before, and very importantly, like no other. our economic might is stronger than it's ever been. and our competitors are not doing. we also expect turkey to abide by its commitment regarding isis, as a backup to the kurds, watching over them, should something happen, turkey is there to grab them. further, we implore european countries to come and take those fighters that the us captured and bring them back to their countries for incarceration and for trial. untiljust for incarceration and for trial. until just recently, europe for incarceration and for trial. untiljust recently, europe has been
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very unresponsive in doing what they should have been doing for a long time. now is their chance to finally act. american forces defeated 100% of the isis caliphate during the last two years. we thank the syrian democratic forces for their sacrifices in this effort, they've been terrific. now, turkey, syria and others in the region must work to ensure that isis does not regain any territory. it's their neighbourhood, they have to maintain it, they have to take care of it. there were some political pundits who responded to turkey's offensive in syria by calling for yet another american military intervention. i don't think so. but halting the
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incursion by military force would have required deploying tens of thousands of american troops against turkey, a nato ally and a country the united states has developed a very good relationship with. including resident erdogan. the same people that i watched and read, giving the united states advice, where the people that i have been watching and reading for many years, they are the ones that got us into they are the ones that got us into the middle east mess... so, donald trump saying the situation in the border area between turkey and syria has been a complete success and claiming credit for it. we are taking you to grays in essex and the very sombre, grim task, of moving that lorry on which the bodies of 39 people were found in the early hours of this morning. the vehicle, registered in bulgaria, was found
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shortly before 1.ao registered in bulgaria, was found shortly before 1.40 this morning, and this is at the waterglade industrial park in grays you can see the painstaking process of moving the painstaking process of moving the lorry away so that the forensic investigation can continue. everyone inside the container, 38 adults, and one teenager, died. and the lorry driver, a 25—year—old man from northern ireland, has been arrested on suspicion of murder. plenty more to come in our news at five, that is up to come in our news at five, that is up next. but in the meantime, that is it from your afternoon live team, huw edwards will be bringing you the latest from grays and from washington and the rest of the headlines. but that is it from me, let's capture with the weather now with matt taylor. we had a foggy start in many places. this was somerset in the early afternoon. but for most it has been afternoon. but for most it has been a dry 2a hours but it is not going to last. we can see two weather
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fronts converging initially, but later, friday into saturday, coming up later, friday into saturday, coming up from the south—west, some heavy and prolonged rain. into the start of the weekend partly for wales and north—west england, we will have to keep a very close eye on the persistence of that rain which could come with flooding risk and travel disruption. at the moment, most finish the day dry going into the evening rush—hour. more persistent rain across the west of scotland, northern ireland, and the rain then pushes eastwards through the night. bit more rain through the midlands and south—east england but not too much to trouble us. all of that cloud across england and wales will keep temperatures up tonight compared with last night. a few mist and fog cheese. some dry and clear into northern ireland and western scotla nd into northern ireland and western scotland later. some heavy and thundery showers pushing in later. lots of cloud across england and wales initially. parts of the midlands and eastern england will
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turn better during the day, particularly for east anglia and the south—east. temperatures tomorrow turning a bit cooler. —— to turn better. we have got colder air trying to come in from the north atlantic. as these two clash, that is when we start to fire up this weather front which will be creeping towards us. as they clash, it will fire up this weather front as we go through into the start of friday. —— the mid—atla ntic. elsewhere, whilst the wind will be picking up, lots of cloud and outbreaks of rain developing widely for england and wales although there will be something brighter in the south—east corner. on friday night, into saturday, the weather front comes across roughly the same sort of areas. could have some wet snow mixed in with it across the tops of the hills in wales and northern ireland. is it clear through into sunday, the second half of the weekend is looking drier and sunnier. but it will be a chilly
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and frosty start.
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today at 5pm: essex police
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are investigating the deaths of 39 people, whose bodies were found in a lorry container. the vehicle is thought to have crossed the english channel from belgium to the uk, and police are investigating the possible involvement of organised crime groups. the bodies of 38 adults and one teenager were found inside the lorry container. a 25—year—old man from northern ireland has been arrested on suspicion of murder. this is an absolute tragedy and very sad day for essex police and the local community. we will continue to work alongside many other partner agencies to find out what led to these deaths. i'm ben brown live where the lorry was found. in the last minute or so, it has been driven away from here
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