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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  October 25, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: borisjohnson calls on parliament to back an early general election in december, in return he's offering more time to debate his brexit deal. the eu will meet to decide whether to grant another extension. post—mortem examinations are due to begin on the 39 people whose bodies were found in a refrigerated lorry container in essex. uluru's final ascent. tourists climb the sacred red rock for the last time — much against the wishes of indigenous australians. good morning.
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barclays backtracks — customers will still be able to access its cash from post office branches, reversing its decision. but the post office network is still extremely fragile, according to a report by mps out today. wales name their team ahead of the rugby world cup semifinal. jonathan davies is fit for sunday's match against south africa, but liam williams is out with an ankle injury. and it's a bit of chili out of there this morning. scotland and northern ireland with widespread frost to start, heavy rain in england and wales. details later. it's friday, the 25th of october. our top story: borisjohnson will spend the next three days trying to persuade mps to back his plans for a general election on december the 12th. eu ambassadors will meet this morning, to discuss how much longer they should give the uk to achieve brexit, but they're expected to delay making a final decision until they know
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the prime minister has set out. let me talk through
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ambassadors will need for they will discuss how much of a brexit extension. not totally clear if we will get an answer today. it might well be next week. that answer is really important. when it comes to a vote on monday, and whether that general election happens, labour in particular are saying it all depends on whether a lengthy extension is granted or not. if they did vote it through, december 12 would be when the general election takes place. this morning it is farfrom clear thatis this morning it is farfrom clear that is going to happen. there is a big battle over the weekend to see if borisjohnson big battle over the weekend to see if boris johnson can big battle over the weekend to see if borisjohnson can try to strong—arm labour are disappointing. thank you very much for the moment. we'll be bringing you lots more on that throughout the programme. at 7.10, we'll be asking labour's diane abbott if she'll be backing an election on monday, and then at half past we'll be speaking to
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chancellor sajid javid. post—mortem examinations are due to begin today, into the deaths of the 39 people who died in a shipping container bound for britain. police are continuing to relocate the bodies from the port of tilbury to a nearby hospital, as they continue to question a lorry driver arrested on suspicion of murder. andy moore reports. police activity continued late into the night at tilbury port, where the bodies are being removed from the lorry container and taken to hospital. police said the dignity of the victims — 31 men and eight women — was the primary consideration. the lorry was moved to the port on wednesday, so that the lengthy task of removing and identifying the bodies can be carried out in a secure environment. police are yet to say how the victims died. the chinese ambassador to the uk said he had sent a team to essex to help police verify their identity, though he said their nationality had
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not yet been confirmed. most of us will stand in horror... at the home office in london last night, campaigners held a candlelit vigil to remember the victims — whatever their nationality. these people who are dying, they are not the other to be blocked out of our daily lives — they are people like you and me. this is believed to be the worst incident of its kind since 58 chinese migrants were found dead in the lorry container at dover in 2000. they died after the ventilation was blocked. they were smuggled into the country by a chinese snakehead gang. andy moore, bbc news. in a minute we'll speak to our correspondent, robin brant, in shanghai. but first, let's get the latest from andy now in purfleet. andy, it's still very much an ongoing investigation this morning? that's right. police have been given an extra 2a hours to question the lorry driver who was arrested early
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on wednesday morning. he has been named locally as mo robinson from northern ireland. a campaign to clear his name has been launched under the title justice for a clear his name has been launched under the titlejustice for a mole. it has been reported he actually called for an ambulance when he opened up the back of the truck and saw the migrants inside for the first time. meanwhile, in purfleet of the investigation continues. this is where the container was picked up on wednesday morning and driven a short distance, where it was found. emergency services turned up. there was a report in 2017 that said a 62 of the smaller ports along the east coast, including this one, were not normally manned by border officials. that same report said that zeebrugge was one of the most popular ports in europe that was being used by people smugglers. naga. thank you very much, andy moore. let's go to shanghai now.
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police here believe 31 men and eight women are chinese nationals. but reaction has there been? well, it's interesting that the chinese ambassador to the uk on social media continues to say the nationalities are yet to be confirmed. for the chinese government this is a huge tragedy. but the idea that a 39 chinese people would leave this country at some point, desperate to get to the uk, is not one that they are keen for the world to see. at this stage it is not clear, 100%, if these are chinese nationals. the news is being reported here. media here is controlled by the state. plenty of stories don't get through the huge walls of censorship. but this is being reported, certainly on social there is genuinely a sense of shock. at this stage i have to say
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it's possible that perhaps the chinese embassy officials in essex can help identify these people. chinese nationals living here require an id card since 2012. you need to submit a fingerprint most times to get that card. it may be, in terms of the gathering of biometric data, particularly with facial recognition technology in china, may be those chinese officials can actually help to identify these people very quickly. robin, thank you. quickquid, britain's biggest payday lender, is closing, leaving thousands of complaints about its practices unresolved. its american owners said it was exiting the uk market because of what it described as "regulatory uncertainty". the company had received as many as 10,000 compensation claims from customers who claim they were given loans they could not afford to repay. if they are upheld, those affected may only receive a fraction of their compensation. the system for reminding parents in england when to vaccinate their children is
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inconsistent, according to the national audit office. it found there was a mixed picture when it came to how parents were contacted to book appointments in different parts of the country. since 2012, there has been a fall in the uptake of nearly all vaccinations — including mmr — among pre—school children. the government said it was carrying out a review to improve services. huge crowds of people are hoping to climb australia's uluru — which was formerly known as ayers rock — today, before a permanent ban on scaling it takes effect tomorrow. indigenous people have long asked tourists not to scale the ancient sandstone rock because of its spiritual significance. however, hundreds have been queuing to make the ascent, but dangerous weather delayed the start for many. and we'll be speaking to our correspondent who's at uluru, in just a few minutes. nine minutes past six. that means we say good morning to sally. good morning. one of the brilliant
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things about there being a big sporting tournament on the other side of the world, an mornings like this i can bring you new news. wales have named their team for sunday's world cup semifinal. liam williams has been ruled out of the game against south africa with an ankle injury — leigh halfpenny will replace him. jonathan davies and hadleigh parks are in the team despite being injury doubts. england play new zealand on saturday, with eddiejones insisting all the pressure is off his side as they face the tournament favourites. manchester united finally ended their run of 11 away matches without a win. anthony martial‘s penalty saw them scrape a 1—0 victory over partizan belgrade in the europa league. arsenal, wolves and celtic also won. and five years after women members were allowed to join st andrews golf club, there are plans to give them their own changing facilities in the clubhouse. women have been changing in a separate
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building near the 18th green since they were admitted. five years it took. and also, it's not built yet. it is going to take a little time to build. it's great. five years after that decision, there are no plans afoot to make a private changing room. five years after there are plans? yes, it's happening, naga, it's happening. gorgeous pictures. i wonder what the portakabin is like when they have to go and get changed? not very glamorous. thank you. we are blessed this morning having matt right in the studio with us. good morning. good morning. this is a generic view. it is gorgeous. it will be a gorgeous start. things will change, not in a positive way. good morning. a lovely start for
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many. lovely bright, crisp and reasonably sunny. it is quite rusty at the moment. some parts of northern ireland done as low as —3. you will swap the sunshine for something more miserable. rain clouds putting on as we go through the day. a slight concern for those over the pennines and the welsh hills, the persistence of the ring today and into tomorrow. a flooding risk in the next 36 hours. there are problems on transport as well. that is all a little bit away. it is this area of cloud that is creeping towards us already. that stretches all the way to the mid—atlantic. when it moves in, it will keep piling on. clear skies at the moment, particularly across parts of northern, scotland and northern indian. here is where you have the best of the sunshine. heavy showers in the north and the central belt of scotland. gale force winds in the far north. clouding over to other parts of northern ireland and scotland. it is england and wales
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where it will turn much... hit and miss for a time in the south—east. almost two completely different days. 17 degrees towards the south east corner. still in single figures further north. as we finish the day, the persistence of the rain through the persistence of the rain through the night could start to cause problems. in excess of 100 millimetres of rain in some parts of wales. much of scotland and northern ireland will stay dry. cool and a chilly night again. a touch of frost. 15 degrees day low in the south—east corner. a misty start tomorrow. different sort of story to start the weekend. england and wales, lots of cloud, outbreaks of rain like. eventually it will turn drier. whether towards east anglia and the south—east as we go through saturday. brighter skies north and west. breezy across scotland with a mixture of sunshine and showers.
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cooler air pushing south. potentially 17 across kent. most places in single figures as we finished saturday. the cold air went out for all of us on sunday. the rain pushes into the near continent. we draw in north—westerly winds. at least for sunday most of us will have a dry and sunny day. a few showers in northern scotland, maybe one 01’ showers in northern scotland, maybe one or two in northern ireland, in the north west midlands. a sunny sunday after a wet saturday for most loving and unwell. temperatures nine to 11 degrees. it is going to be a weekend, you two. this is lovely, isn't it? we will look at the papers. let's take a look at today's front pages. the prime minister's offer of a december general election leads
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most of the papers. the guardian says borisjohnson has ditched his "do or die" pledge to leave the eu by the october 31st deadline. meanwhile, the telegraph focuses on mrjohnson‘s challenge to labour leaderjeremy corbyn, calling on him to "summon up the nerve" to hold an election, in a bid to end the brexit deadlock. the daily mirror leads on one of today's other main stories. the paper says a chinese people—smuggling ring known as the snakehead gang could be involved in the deaths of 39 people who were found in a lorry in essex on wednesday. and finally, featuring images of smiling children holding up thank you placards, the express leads on the introduction of a new cystic fibrosis drug, following years of families campaigning. let's have a look around who have seen what in the inside pages. this is not a weather—related story.
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if you have had a flight delayed because of the weather, how about a french bulldog in a tutu? what has that got to do with flight delays? the dog was on there as emotional support. the dog got quite emotional itself, apparently. and the flight, believe it was from gatwick to austin in texas, it got delayed 90 minutes. they had to remove the owner. none of which entirely explains the tutu. i don't know. maybe it is seen as a comforting thing. i was curious as to why he was wearing a tutu. ican wearing a tutu. i can tell you why a dog shouldn't wear a tutu, because it will get messy, potentially. ijust don't think messy, potentially. i just don't think pets should messy, potentially. ijust don't think pets should wear clothes. i really don't. i would like to take my dog on a flight. that would be brilliant. not for everyone else. why? she is gorgeous. we are talking about the rugby this weekend. we
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have had a little chat about the wales tea m have had a little chat about the wales team being announced overnight. a lot of the papers have got pictures of this man. look at his face. this is the press conference yesterday, eddiejones. in the mirror he goes on to say, england fans, drink a fair bit and be as loud as you possibly can. i am assuming that as people in the stadium, notjust assuming that as people in the stadium, not just at assuming that as people in the stadium, notjust at home. maybe at home as well. it is an early kick—off. a little piece here in the guardian from lewis hamilton. and how he is trying very hard to be green. iam how he is trying very hard to be green. i am going to explain that. it might sound a bit bonkers, how cana it might sound a bit bonkers, how can a formula 1 driver be green? i will explain that later. they called him the smiling assassin, don't they? they called him lots of things, yes. that is one of them. in lots of the papers this morning, this is something we are talking about later. who like submitting when they are wrong? yes, i have to do it a lot.
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ba rclays have yes, i have to do it a lot. barclays have done that. they came on the programme a couple of weeks ago and said they would stop free cash withdrawals from post offices. there is a lot of public pressure on them, also from mps and the industry. they reversed that decision. we are looking at that later. also, her post offices are in big trouble. their future later. also, her post offices are in big trouble. theirfuture is in doubt. this i find really interesting. the percentage of mums 110w interesting. the percentage of mums now working is at an all—time high. three quarters of mothers are now in work. that is compared to 62% to 20 yea rs work. that is compared to 62% to 20 years ago. two different reasons for it. apparently women are better educated now. they get to a point in their career where they come back after maternity. also, women have to work a lot more sense austerity. single mums are taking on part—time work. do you want an earworm? i like this headline. under a pound, do you want an earworm? i like this headline. undera pound, overa pound... this is the owner of the world's
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largest collection of one box memorabilia. jill fell in love with the little one built and amassed 1703 items. it was recognised as the largest collection in 2016. she is selling up. that is your earworm for the morning. i give very much. —— thank you very much. i bring to the total pet ownership with a twist. there are more and more people who have chickens as pets. around 500,000 in the uk. but the rspca is saying that a lot of people are getting them not thinking it through and then find they don't like the noise, they don't like the mess, so they are dumping them. particularly, peopled by a cockerel and then they say, it's noisy. idid and then they say, it's noisy. i did have a neighbour who bought one thinking it was just a normal
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chicken. it lasted two days. it disappeared. hopefully it went to another place where people were obsessed about the noise. you have got more pet facts in your plane thing. they are animals, —— animals and emotional support. air carriers can accept emotional support. air carriers can a cce pt m ost emotional support. air carriers can accept most different types of animals as emotional support, including hedgehogs and marmosets. ican including hedgehogs and marmosets. i can safely say i've never sat next to any of those animals. whatever works. if it works for the people in the air, that is good. it's fine. thank you. one some gorgeous views? promised you then. huge crowds are hoping to climb one of australia's best—known landmarks today — the giant rock, uluru, before a permanent ban on scaling it takes effect tomorrow. hundreds have been queuing up to make the ascent on the tourist hotspot, formerly known as ayers rock, but high winds have delayed
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the start for many. phil mercer is there for us now. that amazing backdrop behind you, phil. take us through what is happening there today? well, this has got to be, what you can see behind me, one of the most stunning sights in all of australia. this is uluru, a giant rock in the australian desert. in a few hours the last remaining climbers who have scrambled to the top of this big red monolith in australia, will be coming down. what we will see in the next couple of hours is the climb officially closed for good. rising from the desert, uluru is breathtaking. indigenous australians say it has a power and a spirituality like nowhere else. this is generally the most popular time of the day for people who want to get to the top of the rock, to start their ascent. it's pretty cool, it's
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quite windy as well. today is obviously their last opportunity to do that. all the way through, local indigenous people have urged people not to try to reach the top of uluru. for them, it's a sacred place. land is at the heart of indigenous culture and climbing the rock is deemed to be culturally insensitive. but these climbers are putting their ambitions first. it's a good feeling being up there. it's probably not going to be a real good feeling when they say you can't. i don't believe that all aboriginal people think that and feel that. some we've spoken to say they don't really care. i think it's really disrespectful, but we climbed yesterday. only because it's been our dream. once you got there it was incredible. it was spiritual when you got to the top, and my boyfriend did propose, so i think it was a pretty good experience! tribal elders say there will be an overwhelming sense of relief when the climb finally closes. the burden will be lifted as of today, as i am speaking.
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i can feel it. now it's time for the climb to have a good rest and heal up. while some are rushing for one last climb, most visitors keep their feet firmly on the red desert floor. because it's the fact that it's a sacred place and i don't feel like being sacrilegious! so, no, i'd ratherwalk round. it's not universally popular, but closing the climb will bring to an end years of distress for aboriginal people. phil mercer, bbc news, uluru. it's really interesting hearing people talk about that place. i am not sure how often you have been there yourself, but is there a sense of it having a certain kind of spirituality? do you get that feeling when you are there? well, first of all when you fly in from places like sydney you do see the
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rock and it emerges out of the desert floor in this spectacular way. it certainly has a great physical presence. and when you get up physical presence. and when you get up close, depending on what time of day you go, it looks different. the light of changes at certain times of the day. it has this presence that is almost overpowering. i think that sense of spirituality, the appreciation of the spirituality, is enhanced when you speak to aboriginal people. every nook and cranny, every cave, every ridge, every pa rt cranny, every cave, every ridge, every part of this battered rock, has a spiritual significance. they tell a story, those bits of the rock, of creation going back to the feats of ancestral beings. when you hear those stories from the mouths of indigenous people, when you look them in the eye, you can see how much it means to them. quite clearly it rubs off on people like myself. uluru is a majestic rock in the centre of australia. and for
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indigenous people it is like a cathedral, it is like a temple, a synagogue, a mask, it is of vital importance, spiritual and cultural significance. morning, phil. it's naga. got to be clear as well, it is not an easy thing to do. there have been some tragedies on the rock, happened there? people have died? since the 19505, more than 35 people have lost their lives. it is not for the faint—hearted. yesterday we were here pretty early and there were hundreds of people trying to get up. they opened the gates, they were letting people through, it may be groups of about 50. quite a few people got a few metres up and realised they couldn't do it. it is quite a brutal climb. there is the assistance of a train. up and down ta kes assistance of a train. up and down takes about three hours. very fit
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people find it quite a challenge. of course, at the end of the day that won't be any one's business any more. the climb will close in two or three hours. phil, thank you very much for showing us around. beautiful. absolutely stunning. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: do you know, me and your mum are going to get dragged in. they sent a letter about it last month, said we're going to get a fine, love! debt and zero—hours contracts come under the spotlight in ken loach‘s new film. we'll speak to two of its stars before nine. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alice salfield. the school system urgently needs overhauling to break the link between exclusions and knife crime. that's according to a cross—party group of mps which found less time in the classroom led to children
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being at greater risk of exploitation and violence. the group is calling for an end to part—time education for excluded pupils. in response, the government said permanent exclusion should only be used as a last resort. london has some of the lowest uptake of childhood vaccinations in the country. the national audit office says there is no consistent system across the nhs in england for reminding parents to vaccinate their children. the royal college of gps is supporting the report's calls for a more standardised approach. the figures in london are markedly lower than elsewhere in the country, which is down to a number of factors. it's a population where there are a lot of people moving, more than elsewhere in the country. it's a problem with the primary care workforce — gps, nurses — so there are strains there. and there are some problems around keeping data — good records — around who is living where, when they moved, and getting
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that into nhs systems. people will be able to have their say on luton airport's long—term expansion plans from today. it's the second public consultation on proposals to increase passenger numbers over the next 20 years to 32 million a year. plans are for a second terminal north of the runway and extensive new airfield infrastructure. let's take a look at the travel situation now. it all looks like it's running well on the tubes at the moment, and no other reported problems on public transport. but on the roads this is the westbound traffic on the a13. you can see there it's building from dagenham into barking. elsewhere there's the usual northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach. it's slow from the woolwich road flyover. and in holloway, hornsey road is closed southbound from seven sisters road to tollington road for emergency water work. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a reasonably mild start out there this morning. you might get a little bit of brightness first thing,
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but the cloud will very quickly take over, bringing us some patchy light rain. it is going to be quite breezy today, as well — the wind really starting to strengthen. now first thing this morning you might get a glimmer of brightness but that cloud moving in quickly. mainly light and patchy rain to follow — you might get a heavier burst. dryer towards the end of the day with glimmers, maybe, of brightness towards this evening, and temperatures between 15 and 17 celsius, so actually feeling quite mild. now overnight, largely dry but towards the west, the north, you mightjust catch the edge of that rain. still cloudy, though, overnight, as well, and the minimum temperature mild again — 13 to 15 celsius. we hang onto that breeze, as well — quite a brisk south—westerly. now as we head into saturday we've got another band of rain heading in our direction, turning it rather wet for much of the day, actually. some heavier bursts mixed in there. it will clear, though, overnight. drier, brighter, some sunshine, but it is going to feel colder on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now, though, it's back
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to naga and charlie. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. good morning, it is 6:30am exactly. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning... with a pre—christmas general election on the cards — will labour back it or block it? we'll be asking labour mp diane abbott how she plans to vote. for the perfect wave, forget the coast — we'll be at this brand—new surfers' paradise — right in the middle of the countryside. and we'll bejoined by two of the team behind sir attenborough's stunning seven worlds, one planet — the series he hopes will be as influential on climate change, as blue planet was on plastics. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. borisjohnson will spend the next three days trying to persuade mps
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to back his plans for a general election on december the 12th. eu ambassadors will meet this morning to discuss how much longer they should give the uk to achieve brexit, but they're expected to delay making a final decision until they know if the election is going ahead. most eu states are understood to favour a three—month delay, but france has argued for a shorter extension. police have been granted more time to question a lorry driver in relation to the deaths of 39 people in a shipping container. 25—year—old mo robinson, from county armagh, was arrested on suspicion of murder on wednesday. post—mortem examinations are due to begin on some of the victims later today. quickquid — britain's biggest payday lender — is closing, leaving thousands of complaints about its practices unresolved. its american owners said it was leaving the uk market because of what it described as "regulatory uncertainty". the company had received as many as 10,000 compensation claims from customers who claim they were given loans they could not afford to repay. if they are upheld, those affected may only receive a fraction of their compensation.
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if heights make you uneasy, then the latest sky—high observation deck built in new york might not be for you. located 1,000 feet above street level, on a brand new skyscraper, it's one of the highest outdoor observation decks in the world. it's a deck, you said desk. i think a desk would be quite good up here, it's fantastic. how could you not enjoy that view? for real thrill—seekers, there's a glass bottomed floor where you can see the streets below, and even angled glass, so you can lean out above the city. 0h, oh, look at you! i could do it but... i would fall over. oh, look at you! i could do it but... iwould fall over. 0h oh, look at you! i could do it but... i would fall over. oh you would... i would actually have to
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hold onto the wall i would be leaning against it, loving it. are you at the front of roller—coaster is and all the rest of it?|j you at the front of roller—coaster is and all the rest of it? i don't like roller—coaster is, that feeling of being there and waiting. i don't do anticipation well.|j of being there and waiting. i don't do anticipation well. i love new york but i don't think i will go there. they have one in the grand canyon. they did, and it developed a crack! i'm going to seamlessly segue because you don't have to go to a place like that to get a high this weekend if you like your rugby... 0h! it is coming to you saturday and sunday. two semifinals. home nation involves. what a weekend. so wales have named their team sunday's rugby world cup semifinal against south africa. leigh halfpenny will replace the injured liam williams. jonathan davies is in the starting 15 despite missing the quarterfinal.
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let's head to yokohama now — where our sports correspondent andy swiss who has found some fans. you have got some friends with you. i have. it's a bit wet. we have got the edge of a typhoon at the moment. we have had torrential rain all day but i'm delighted to bejoined by a group of intrepid fans who have joined me. we have five pink lions supporting england and over here, wales supporters for sunday. we will start with the pink lions. andy, who are the pink lions? myself, andy, scotty, helen, tracey. and briefly, why are you the pink lions? we were six ex army lads who decided to go ona six ex army lads who decided to go on a lions tour, went to new zealand
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in 2017 after all army careers. a couple of hundred people a day shaking our hands saying it looked great, which we could do it. we said, right, let's do lions in pink toys and that was the idea. how confident are you about england's chances? the fact new zealand are switching their team around which they didn't do the whole of the last world cup, i think they are on the back foot. i am confident we can do this. how excited are you to be here injapan? this. how excited are you to be here in japan? i'm trying to contain myself. i can't believe we are here, it is awesome. can't believe it. it's surreal. awesome. what is your name? helen. how excited are you and how optimistic for england?” name? helen. how excited are you and how optimistic for england? i think we will win, we will do this. can't wait that pillow who will be the star? old... all of them. what do
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you make of the experience injapan? it's amazing. we haven't stopped since we got here. people are fantastic, everyone is so helpful, we don't want it to end, it's been amazing. can i ask you, in terms of england's chances? the all blacks are incredible, do they have what it ta kes ? are incredible, do they have what it takes? england to beat them, yes. that's what i'm looking for and i expect it to happen. that confident? absolutely. now we come to steve, the one wales fun up against these five lions. south africa, how confident are you? 100% confident. confident are you? 10096 confident. not the best game against france. we have had the bad game, put that behind us and we can go all the way to the final. bad news about liam williams being out. a shame, but no problem at all, leigh halfpenny can
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get the point. what does it mean for wales to reach the cup final? we would be delighted. parties in the streets, parties in the streets. they are a physical team, south africa, any worries? no worries at all. we have put our nemesis behind us. all. we have put our nemesis behind us. we have south africa to beat and then hopefully these lions after that! laughter ian mccrea a quick score prediction for wales. wales 25-8 south africa. andy, but england? 30-22. within seven or eight. and a wales- england final. let's do it! fantastic, thank you all very much forjoining us. i appreciate it in this weather. from
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appreciate it in this weather. from a rather soggy at yokohama, back to you, sally. it looks like you are somewhere in the uk! thank you very much indeed, and thank you to those brilliant fans who have travelled all that way. lucky people. tomorrow, england new zealand, you know the all blacks will score tries. england cannot get away with a kicking game. all blacks will score three tries before you blink. a perfect encounter in so many ways because anything can happen. be positive about it. got to be. we will see you later on. it is 22 minutes to seven. so the prime minister borisjohnson wants an early general election, but he'll need the support of at least 434 mp5 to make it happen. that means relying on the support of other parties in parliament. let's talk to representatives of two of them now. kirsty blackman is from the snp, and sam gyimah is a former conservative who became a liberal democrat last month. thank you both very much for your time this morning. kirsty, in
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theory, there may be a vote on monday if the eu... there are a lot of ifs. if the eu grant the extension, if boris johnson of ifs. if the eu grant the extension, if borisjohnson brings the vote, how will the snp vote on the vote, how will the snp vote on the december 12 general election prospect? we have been clear and consistent throughout that we are very keen to see a general election but our priority is to see the extension granted. we need to see what happens later around the extension and make sure that is granted. the other thing is that borisjohnson granted. the other thing is that boris johnson cannot use granted. the other thing is that borisjohnson cannot use this on monday to ensure he has more time to consider his brexit bill, to give that kind of week and a half. any brexit is bad for the people of scotland. boris johnson's brexit is bad for the people of scotland. borisjohnson's brexit is even worse than theresa may's so i don't want to see on using this opportunity to push that through the house. the question was, and i
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understand this is notional at this stage, if the eu grants the longer extension, 31st of january, stage, if the eu grants the longer extension, 31st ofjanuary, how would the snp vote on the december 12 general election prospect? we are very keen for there to be a general election but... just try to be clear. what you are saying doesn't ta ke clear. what you are saying doesn't take into account all of the circumstances. does that mean boris johnson has the ability to bring his brexit bill back to parliament and force it through? that is the other thing to consider, even if those two hypotheticals pan out we need to think about whether this allows him to push through his brexit and drag us to push through his brexit and drag us out of the single market and customs union and we need to see what happens with that on monday. sam, liberal democrat mp now, the same question. on the basis of the eu giving the extension, where is the liberal democrat stance? our preference has always been that the way to resolve this is to go back to the people in a confirmatory
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referendum to deal with brexit on its own and have that referendum, we are happy to have it on boris johnson's deal with will remain on the ballot paper so we focus on the issue at hand. what borisjohnson's does is it muddles brexit with skills and everything else which is what he wants to do. to answer your question specifically, if we have the long extension which, by the way, borisjohnson is busily campaigning to get the french to veto,if campaigning to get the french to veto, if that were to be the case on monday and we had a vote on it, one of the things, just like the snp have said, that we will be cautious about is not allowing boris to essentially hold parliament at hostage to pass a deal that we all know is flawed. he cannot have it both ways. to force us to vote for his deal and forced parliament to have an election. he has to choose a.i have an election. he has to choose a. ithink have an election. he has to choose a. i think all of this is a big distraction from the fact that he had to admit yesterday that the only
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purpose of his government, its central mission, to deliver brexit by 31st of october, do or die, has failed. and so he has created this situation where you don't know what you are talking about, you are asking about these hypotheticals because it distracts us from acknowledging the fact he has failed to. that is the issue today. sam, so much of this seems to revolve ultimately around trust. i am trying to get a very clear picture of, what is the reassurance you could get in relation to what you are asking? would borisjohnson try relation to what you are asking? would boris johnson try to relation to what you are asking? would borisjohnson try to push through his agreement in the interim period? are you saying the prime minister has to say that he will not do that, categorically, when, on monday... what are you looking for, what reassurances do you need? there isa zero what reassurances do you need? there is a zero trust between parliament and the johnson government. in the la st and the johnson government. in the last 12 hours he has told us he wants an election on december 12. he has said he will only bring his deal back if he gets that election. i
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thought he was telling the country la st thought he was telling the country last week that this is the best deal and he wanted to get it done. he also told us his government will go on strike if we don't vote for an election, and therefore he will pull the all—important domestic abuse bill, and he has told us that he is going to veto the extension, which would not make an election possible. you can see why there is a zero trust for the johnson government. i don't think any assurances that this downing street can give us is worth the paper that it is written on because you have a prime minister who is always playing games. he claims he wants to get brexit done. all the dispute with parliament from two days ago was getting the timetable right for proper scrutiny and then he pulled the deal. if it is such an excellent deal, why did he not want parliament to scrutinise it? there is a zero trust and i see no assurances he could give us. if you want an election he should table the motion, we will consider that on its own merit. all this gamesmanship
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is not statesmanship and boris must back away from it. there is another way of looking at it, which is that some people would say there appear to be progress for the first time on an agreement with the second vote. so why not let the government carry on doing that if... a lot of people using the same language. we want to get something done, we want to achieve something, so why not let the governance carry on with the process , the governance carry on with the process, what is the problem? there has been progress because the 19 labour mps voted for the second reading of this bill. it has numerous other stages but 19 of them aloud borisjohnson the freedom to be able to take this, whatever the programming works out, to take the three parliament. this is a bad deal, it explicitly removes protections for workers' rights that we re protections for workers' rights that were put in theresa may's deal. nonetheless, the majority of mps voted for it. at the second reading,
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absolutely, and i am very upset and furious that the labour party did that. my constituents are really shocked that the labour party allowed boris johnson shocked that the labour party allowed borisjohnson to take this deal three parliament when it is worse than theresa may's, when they know it will make the most vulnerable people in our society even worse off than they currently are, when they know it will cost jobs, it will cost people £2000 each, a huge amount. the majority of mps each, a huge amount. the majority of m ps voted each, a huge amount. the majority of mps voted in favour. boris has a choice. if this deal is as excellent as he wants it to be, he can bring it back before parliament and give it back before parliament and give it time for proper scrutiny. it was his decision to pause brexit when he has been telling the country he wants to get brexit done. it is not the decision —— it is downing street's a decision. boris johnson is threatening to pull the bill if any amendments happen. he has already pulled it once and suspended discussions. he is behaving like a
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spoilt child. he is trying to get things on his term and actually this exercise was all about bringing back control. not bringing back control to the executive, but to the elected representatives, which is parliament. he needs to listen to parliament. he needs to listen to parliament and parliament does not wa nt parliament and parliament does not want this bill to go through. we will leave it there for now. kirsty blackman, sam gyimah, thank you for your time. out that was clear, wasn't it? it is a confusing picture and we are doing all we can to get clarity. the timeline... it would be so clarity. the timeline... it would be so nice if there were a clear timeline, but there is a variety of timelines. we will try to drill down but this morning it will be if this happens then that will happen and if that happens then that will happen but we will try to get clarity from all parties across the spectrum. it is 16 minutes to seven. one minute late to you, what you always aim to get there at quartet two. people time their days, their mornings, when they leave the house stops i'm
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going to miss the bus. complicated weather picture. when you offer some clarity? i will try my best. maybe a waterproof jacket afternoon. clarity? i will try my best. maybe a waterproofjacket afternoon. so if you will see skies like this this morning pulled up some sunshine, a chilly start, northern ireland, scotland, widespread frost. later on we swap the bright skies for much darker skies, particularly across england and wales. they could be some very heavy rain around causing problems. particularly pennines, southwest moyes, by the evening rush hour lots of rain and into tomorrow we could see minor flooding. it is all courtesy of this area of cloud, stretching all the way back into the mid—atlantic. it is piling towards us mid—atlantic. it is piling towards us and we'll continue to run right across the uk throughout. at the moment there are clear skies, which has led to the frost overnight. —3 in northern ireland at the moment, freezing around much of scotland. few showers in the north west of scotland and gail is blowing. wind is picking up in the south and after
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a bright enough to start across england and wales, the cloud will gather. rain hit and miss across the south—east, but becoming a persistent through wales, much of northern england making for a very unpleasant afternoon a. that area of rain separates two completely different air masses. in the south, any brightness, 17 or 18 degrees possible. further north, even with sunshine, only seven or eight. perhaps a 10 degrees difference. with that contrast continuing, the rain keeps falling, northern england, parts of north—west england, parts of north—west england, wales, south east corner avoiding most of that but windy with gales across the south, still wind it with gales in the far north but clear skies and a touch of frost to ta ke clear skies and a touch of frost to take us into the start of the weekend. we start the weekend still with that contrast, north and south. england and wales seeing the cloud, aspects of rain, scotland and northern ireland bright, breezy, with showers. the rain could turn to wet snow across the tops of the pennines and welsh hills before it clears from these areas. brightening
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up, gets better tomorrow, across northern and western parts of england and wales. what it was east anglia and the south—east, but still in parts of kent we could see 17 degrees. more of us feeling chill as we finish saturday. that's chilly airwill we finish saturday. that's chilly air will push down for all. the blue on the chart here is the weather front bringing the rain to finish saturday in the south—east. previous to the continent, lingered longer across the channel islands on sunday before easing away. then more sunshine on sunday, may be a few showers north of scotland, 102 drifting down to the irish sea but a sunny sunday after a frosty site. temperature is only just sunny sunday after a frosty site. temperature is onlyjust about into double figures. cool it feel will continue into next week, as well. that's how it looks, i will have more later. see you later, thank you. a couple of weeks ago we were talking about the post office and barclays' decision to stop customers being able to use it for cash withdrawals. now there's been a change. what's going on here, nina? good morning. this is unusual, big business
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admitting they are wrong! you might remember we spoke to barclays about this controversial decision a couple of weeks ago. barclays had said that it was pulling out of the post office banking framework. there was a huge outcry, mps around businesses. lots of customers got in touch, they piled on saying it wasn't fair on customers and could jeopardise the viability of the future of the post office. they have made a u—turn on that decision and have been persuaded to rethink. ba rclays customers have been persuaded to rethink. barclays customers will be able to ta ke barclays customers will be able to take their cash out from post offices. who persuaded them? interesting, isn't it? latertoday we will hear from the business, energy and industrial strategy committee, who found that they were going to criticise... this is part ofa going to criticise... this is part of a wider review into the future health of post offices. they found some good news, despite around 1000 branch closures there are still 11,500 branches open. but in less
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good news, they found that despite the fact they were open, their future is in jeopardy. the fact they were open, their future is injeopardy. they said they could beat fragile and close to colla pse they could beat fragile and close to collapse and that is because they are becoming less relevant to everyday life. they want mps to review the franchising of what they call crown post offices, which had a big post offices that used to be independent on the high street. now they have gone inside big shops like wh smith and that has made them less popular. they also want the government to make a long—term financial commitment in terms of subsidies. in the past year, it paid £60 million towards them. before that it was 50 million, but there are no plans for how much money they we re are no plans for how much money they were put in after that. they say they want post to still be an integral part of our lives for things like claiming benefits and passports, driving licences. we do a lot of that online now. as we found out when we spoke to some shoppers in manchester there are mixed
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feelings about how much we still the post office. last time i went into a post office was last week to pay my rent, but quite often i also go in to get stamps or envelopes or postal orders. i don't really use them no more. there's no need to. i don't need to. they're obsolete, as far as i'm concerned. i've just come out the post office. i've just returned an item, so that's about the only thing i do in the post office. there is still huge affection for the post office. i use it all the time for posting letters, surprisingly enough. do you? i do! fancy that! . special delivery, important documents. i like going to the post office stop you people will be sorry if it disappears. the government says they won't allow it to happen. they have put £2.11 billion of investment into it
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interestingly, barclays say it is still not convinced about the long—term sustainability of the model of people taking out cash from the post office. nothing is certain long—term. 6:52am. about half of those living with cystic fibrosis in england are expected to benefit from a life—changing drug after the success of a three—year fight to make it available on the nhs. the drug is said to slow the decline in lung function — the main cause of death for people with the disease. we're nowjoined by lucy baxter, who was diagnosed at the age of two and joined the campaign to make this possible. good morning. good morning. we have spoken to you before on this programme when you are campaigning for this to happen. just explain to people. there is a day late now. it has been officially authorised. you think ina has been officially authorised. you think in a month you will physically get the drug. they have said in about a month they will start the logistics of everyone getting the drugs and! logistics of everyone getting the drugs and i will hopefully be on it. so people understand, what will be the tangible difference for you?
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what potentially could change for you? my lungs will obviously be better, i will be able to breathe more easily. i will have more energy, won't be as tired, i will put more weight on because people see i struggle to put on weight and it will give me consistency and stability in my life rather than not knowing day—to—day how i will feel. what has been the problem so far? between the drug company and the nhs, it has been discussing the prices and unfortunately people with cystic fibrosis have been stuck in the middle of it. it is really good to hear the news. the health secretary at matt hancock has said it is wonderful news and they have agreed this deal. it is great value for money for the nhs because that has been the problem, finding this cash and justifying it. yeah, has been the problem, finding this cash andjustifying it. yeah, and i think now we have access to these drugs they will be less hospital admissions and ultimately i think we will save the nhs money through that so it will be better in a long run.
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ican so it will be better in a long run. i can only imagine the frustration that he felt for so long, campaigning, in the sure knowledge that there is a product that could tangibly affect your life just out of reach. yeah, it was really difficult to hear that there was a drug that would change my life and yet i couldn't have access. in some ways it would have been better not knowing so i could carry on. i was determined that we would get it and i still had hope we would get it and kept going for it. give us an idea of what everyday life is like for you in the meantime before this drug in terms of managing cystic fibrosis. i do an hour or two of treatment in the morning and then at night, tablets, physiotherapy and inhale nebulisers and i do a lot of exercise, sort of keep myself well asi exercise, sort of keep myself well as i can. do you take all these drugs? yeah, that is a selection of what i take in a day to day life,
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yeah. how many... how will this new drug affect the number of drugs you are taking? ultimately it will reduce the drugs i'm taking, it will reduce the drugs i'm taking, it will reduce my treatment i have to do which will be good. it is exciting to think about, really. it manifests what it means to you. you have lived with this for a very long time. i've had it all my life but diagnosed when i was too so i haven't known anything different. it will be exciting to feel better. did you get notification ahead of the official announcement that it would happen? no, ithink announcement that it would happen? no, i think they wanted to keep it under wraps and tell us all at the same time. i saw it yesterday and was in complete shock and was crying. i went to tell my mum and we we re crying. i went to tell my mum and we were both crying, like, oh, my gosh, it's finally happening. we have dreamt and thought about this and we are so close to getting it now that i can't actually get it, it is unreal. absolutely. maybe you will come back and talk to us when you
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are having the treatment and see if the changes have been made for you. thank you. thank you, congratulations. that should make you feel good. it is a 6:56am, we will be back with the headlines, find out what is happening where you are now. good morning from bbc london, i'm alice salfield. the school system urgently needs overhauling to break the link between exclusions and knife crime. that's according to a cross—party group of mps, which found less time in the classroom led to children being at greater risk of exploitation and violence. the group is calling for an end to part—time education for excluded pupils. in response, the government said permanent exclusion should only be used as a last resort. london has some of the lowest uptake of childhood vaccinations in the country. the national audit office says there is no consistent system across the nhs in england for reminding parents to vaccinate their children. the royal college of gps is supporting the report's calls for a more standardised approach.
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the figures in london are markedly lower than elsewhere in the country, which is down to a number of factors. it's a population where there are a lot of people moving, more than elsewhere in the country. it's a problem with the primary care workforce — gps, nurses — so there are strains there. and there are some problems around keeping data — good records — around who is living where, when they moved, and getting that into nhs systems. people will be able to have their say on luton airport's long—term expansion plans from today. it's the second public consultation on proposals to increase passenger numbers over the next 20 years, to 32 million a year. plans are for a second terminal north of the runway and extensive new airfield infrastructure. let's take a look at the travel situation now. it all looks like it's running well on the tubes at the moment, and no other reported problems
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on public transport. but on the roads we've got traffic as usual on the blackwall tunnel southern approach. it's slow northbound from the woolwich road flyover. elsewhere, the a13 is slow westbound from dagenham into barking. and in holloway, hornsey road is closed southbound from seven sisters road to tollington road for emergency water work. now the weather with kate. good morning. it's a reasonably mild start out there this morning. you might get a little bit of brightness first thing, but the cloud will very quickly take over, bringing us some patchy light rain. it is going to be quite breezy today, as well — the wind really starting to strengthen. now first thing this morning you might get a glimmer of brightness but that cloud moving in quickly. mainly light and patchy rain to follow — you might get a heavier burst. drier towards the end of the day with glimmers, maybe, of brightness towards this evening, and temperatures between 15 and 17 celsius, so actually feeling quite mild. now overnight, largely dry but towards the west, the north, you mightjust catch the edge of that rain. still cloudy, though, overnight,
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as well, and the minimum temperature mild again — 13 to 15 celsius. we hang onto that breeze, as well — quite a brisk south—westerly. now as we head into saturday we've got another band of rain heading in our direction, turning it rather wet for much of the day, actually. some heavier bursts mixed in there. it will clear, though, overnight. drier, brighter, some sunshine, but it is going to feel colder on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now though it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: borisjohnson calls on parliament to back an early general election in december, in return he's offering more time to debate his brexit deal. the eu will meet today to decide whether to grant
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another extension to the uk. post—mortem examinations are due to begin on the 39 people whose bodies were found in a refrigerated lorry container in essex. uluru's final ascent — tourists climb the sacred red rock for the last time, much against the wishes of indigenous australians. improving rural mobile coverage — phone operators come to an agreement with the government to fund a network of masts. they will all share more than 90% of the country will get 4g coverage from all 4 mobile companies. in weather, it is a bright but chilly start across the country at the moment. grey clouds are gathering. lots of heavy rain for england and wales. details of that later. wales named their team ahead of the rugby world cup semifinal. jonathan davies is fit for sunday's match against us —— south africa but liam williams is out with an ankle
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injury. it's friday, the 25th of october. our top story. borisjohnson will spend the next three days trying to persuade mps to back his plans for a general election on december the 12th. eu ambassadors will meet this morning to discuss how much longer they should give the uk to achieve brexit, but they're expected to delay making a final decision until they know if the election is going ahead. in a moment we'll speak to our correspondent adam fleming in brussels, but first let's get the latest from our political correspondent nick eardley in westminster. so, take us through the options here? boris johnson said so, take us through the options here? borisjohnson said it loud and clear, a december the 12th general election, how about that? that is his plan. getting there is another matter because the opposition parties, who he needs to get over the line this time, you need two thirds of mps to vote for it to make an election happen early, the
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opposition parties don't sound all that convinced. labour is still weighing up its options. dozens of labour mps opposed to the idea of an early election. the snp and the lib dems, about 20 minutes ago, didn't sound convinced at all. let me take you through what happens in the next few days. you have got a meeting of eu ambassadors today. that will be important if they come up with a brexit extension offer, although there are some signs that may not happen until next week. if they did say the end of january, a few months to sort things out, it makes it more likely but far from guaranteed the opposition parties would get on board when it comes to thatvote on monday. if two thirds of mps were to vote for that 12th of december, christmas election, a busy few weeks ahead of campaigning. just one thing. the government is also saying if it doesn't win the vote on monday, it will basically go on
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strike. it will stop passing legislation and do as little work as possible. to convince everybody that parliament is not working. thank you. let's talk now to the bbc‘s europe reporter, adam fleming, in brussels. eu ambassadors are meeting today, not eu leaders, yes? yes. the plan was that the donald tusk, the president of the european council, would speak to the leaders over the phonein would speak to the leaders over the phone in the last few days, avoiding the need for a summit. then you would have the ambassadors, the representatives of the member states, making a decision this morning. that decision would be done in writing, just them signing a bit of paper. the discussants have not gone quite as smoothly as the eu might have hoped. —— the discussions. there is still a discussions. there is still a discussion between most of the countries, including germany, who says, yes, the extension was in the prime minister's letter, making the new brexit date the 31st ofjanuary next year. then you france saying,
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hang on, surely the best way to get the deal through is a short sharp shock of a really short sharp extension until the 15th of november. and that is the tussle thatis november. and that is the tussle that is going on. you speak to eu diplomats and they are desperate and not get embroiled in british domestic politics. i think that ship has sailed. domestic politics. i think that ship has sailedm certainly has, yes. thank you for explaining that. we'll be bringing you lots more on that throughout the programme. in a few minutes we'll be asking labour's diane abbott if she'll be backing an election on monday. and then at half past we'll be speaking to the chancellor, sajid javid. that is coming up later. the rest of today's stories. post—mortem examinations are due to begin today, into the deaths of the 39 people who died in a shipping container bound for britain. police are moving the bodies from the port of tilbury to a nearby hospital, as they continue to question a lorry driver arrested on suspicion of murder. andy moore reports. police activity continued late into the night at tilbury port, where the bodies are being removed
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from the lorry container and taken to hospital. police said the dignity of the victims — 31 men and eight women — was the primary consideration. the lorry was moved to the port on wednesday, so that the lengthy task of removing and identifying the bodies can be carried out in a secure environment. police are yet to say how the victims died. the chinese ambassador to the uk said he had sent a team to essex to help police verify their identity, though he said their nationality had not yet been confirmed. most of us will stand in horror... at the home office in london last night, campaigners held a candlelit vigil to remember the victims — whatever their nationality. these people who are dying, they are not the other to be blocked out of our daily lives — they are people like you and me. this is believed to be the worst incident of its kind since 58 chinese migrants were found dead in the lorry container at dover in 2000.
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they died after the ventilation was blocked. they were smuggled into the country by a chinese snakehead gang. andy moore, bbc news. in a minute we'll speak to our correspondent, robin brant, in shanghai. but first, let's get the latest from andy now in purfleet. good morning. andy, it's still very much an ongoing investigation this morning? that's right. police have been given an extra 24—hour is to question the lorry driver who then arrested. he is 25 years old, from northern ireland. he is being named locally as mo robinson. family and friends have launched a campaign to clear his name. they say he was the man who called the ambulance service when he opened the doors of the container and saw the migrants inside. meanwhile, the investigation in purfleet continues. a report in 2017 said this was one of 62 east
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coast ports that was not normally manned by border officials. that same report said that it is the burger was one of the continent for people smuggling. —— zeebrugge. let's go to shanghai now. good morning. police here saying they believe these people are chinese nationals. what response has there been there? yeah, let's talk about that. that is all essex police have said. they believe they are chinese nationals. on two occasions yesterday, and earlier this morning, the chinese ambassador in london, in a social media post, has made it clear that the nationality has yet to be confirmed. so casting some doubt maybe at the moment and where these 39 people have come from. the news is being reported here in china. there is some censorship, it
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would appear, of the words chinese nationals. there has also been an editorial in the state—controlled global times newspaper, fiercely nationalistic, saying the uk and the european union must bear some response ability for what has happened to these people. there is a chance maybe some of those chinese embassy officials who have gone down to essex could help rather swiftly identify the people because if they are chinese, chinese nationals living on the mainland require an id ca rd living on the mainland require an id card since 2012. you had to give a fingerprint to get that. if they fall into that group, there is the chance that may be the official can help swiftly identify some or all of those 29. thank you very much. robin brant reporting from shanghai. within the past few minutes, the government has announced a new mobile phone deal to improve rural coverage. nina's got all the details for us. it is one of those stories we feel like we talk about a lot. what will
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this do? we talk about it a lot because how annoying is it? my phone didn't work at a wedding recently. one of my friend's farmstead work because she was with vodafone. basically two thirds of the country do all four of the work for everybody. they got together and said, let's find a way of making thatis said, let's find a way of making that is close to 100% as we can. they need to build new masts for that to happen. they need to pool resources . that to happen. they need to pool resources. for that they needed cash. they went to the government and said, can you invest if we invest and we can make, heads of coverage for the entire country? the government has announced a £1 billion deal to make that happen. 530 million will come from the big four. 500 million from government. this is new money that has onlyjust been confirmed. they say this is world first. all four will invest in the network and by 2025, they say, more than 90% of the country will be
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covered. a few caveats. nicky morgan has said it is not yet a done deal. we need to see the industry move quickly. it is not certain the 2025 deadline will be met. they see it is just an ambition. a little later we will talk to vodafone about whether or not they can really make that a reality and stop those annoying moments. what time are we talking to vodafone? ten to eight. brilliant. thank you. let's return to one of our main stories now, and the shocking deaths of 39 migrants in a shipping containter. labour say one of the solutions would be for there to be safe and legal routes for refugees to enter the uk. diane abbott is the shadow home secretary, and she joins us now. good morning, diane abbott, thank you for talking to us. first of all, your reaction to this awful, awful incident, this awful news? it was a horrible incident. the whole house of commons, actually, was united in
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horror. i mean, it's the most appalling way to die. and the truth is that even now the persons that have died, their relatives won't know that they are dead. and won't know that they are dead. and won't know what a horrible death they encountered. how do you think refugees, asylum seekers, should be treated now when we see this increase in the number of victims being trafficked? well, there are a number of things that we need to think about in response to this tragedy. first of all, there appears to be an issue about security at the smaller east coast ports. and we need to look at it because clearly, because actually checks are much better now at dover and the bigger ports, it may be that people traffickers are more likely to use these smaller east coast ports. the labour party, in the 2017 election,
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called for a 500 more border guards. we actually have to look at the security. the other thing we need to do, people trafficking is an international trade. and we need to work internationally. the worry is that if we were to come out of the eu we would lose access to the european arrest warrant, we would lose access to very important european data bases, crime lose access to very important european databases, crime and missing persons, so it's really important the government makes clear that even if we were to come out of the eu, they are going to make sure that we don't lose that important security cooperation. in terms of refugees generally of course, we need to look at having safer and legal routes for refugees. need to look at having safer and legal routes for refugeesm need to look at having safer and legal routes for refugees. if there we re legal routes for refugees. if there were a labour government, how would you ensure this incident, an incident like this, a tragedy like this, wouldn't happen again? you would be facing the same numbers, the same budgets? it is what i have
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said. we need to look at international cooperation. this is an international trade. if you are not working internationally, not just with the eu but un agencies, you are never going to check it. the other thing we would look at is the safety a nd other thing we would look at is the safety and seniority —— security at the smaller ports. those are the two things we would immediately do when we are in government. can we talk about what is happening now with brexit? what we have been trying to do all morning, diane abbott, try to explain to our viewers the ifs and buts and the conversations happening around brexit, and try to get a timeline. what is your understanding of where we are now in terms of an extension, when brexit will or won't happen and why a general election has been called for by the prime minister? well, boris johnson is calling for a general election, it isa calling for a general election, it is a bogus call for a general election. what we need to know first
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and foremost is what sort of extension europe is going to give us. extension europe is going to give us. and we should know that by the end of today. the other thing the opposition parties want to know is that we are not going to inadvertently go into a no—deal brexit. so we want commitments. we wa nt brexit. so we want commitments. we wantan brexit. so we want commitments. we want an understanding that a no—deal brexit is off the table. but of course if we have commitment on taking a no—deal brexit off the table, and when we know what sort of extension we are going to have, the labour party is up for an election. party members are up for an election. we don't want boris johnson in power a minute longer thanis johnson in power a minute longer than is necessary. can you explain to me what it looks like, what boris johnson has to say to convince you that no deal is off the table? johnson has to say to convince you that no deal is off the table7m would help if he actually said it. it would help if he actually said it. and it would help if he actually
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committed to it. it is still a problem because what people now know is that borisjohnson doesn't always tell the truth. but it would help if he actually said it, that we are committing to taking no deal of the table. and of course as i said, we need to hear from table. and of course as i said, we need to hearfrom europe table. and of course as i said, we need to hear from europe what sort of extension they are going to give us. of extension they are going to give us. so when it comes to monday, and there will be a vote, what will you be doing? as i have said, we need to know what sort of extension we are going to get. we need boris to commit publicly to taking your deal off the table. but the labour party is upforan off the table. but the labour party is up for an election. our members are upforan is up for an election. our members are up for an election. obviously the december date is a ridiculous date. we have not had a general election at christmas for over a century. but the labour party is up foran century. but the labour party is up for an election. ok, let me get more clarity from you, if you wouldn't
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mind. today the eu ambassadors are meeting to decide on an extension. if january 31 is the given extension, as is largely expected, although there is some dispute, we understand, between leaders. if it is january to 31st, would you vote for a general election?” is january to 31st, would you vote for a general election? i can't speculate as to what kind of extension the eu will give us. when we know, that's when we will set out our position on an election. there is no point in speculating now, particularly when we will know by the end of the day. you have said december is a ridiculous time to have a general election. i know you don't want to speculate, but i am asking you the question. the eu grantan asking you the question. the eu grant an extension to the end of january, boris johnson grant an extension to the end of january, borisjohnson says december the 12th is the proposed aid for a general election. without a doubt you were to say now? that is a whole series of ifs. there are two. one which is largely expected... the eu
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extension. the second bit, another is speculation, but it is likely borisjohnson will is speculation, but it is likely boris johnson will announce december the 12th as the date. you are going to be discussing this, you are going to be discussing this, you are going to have a plan in place. have you already decided now?” to have a plan in place. have you already decided now? i don't know what the eu was going to decide. there are a lot of moving parts —— parts in the decision. december the 12th, there is a reason why we have not had a christmas election for over a century. we just have to wait and see what the eu is saying first and see what the eu is saying first and foremost and we just have to wait and see whether borisjohnson is willing to say publicly and in terms that no deal is off the table. diane abbott, shadow home secretary, thank you for talking to us. in 18 minutes past seven speaking to the chancellor in about ten minutes. there is no clarity with the weather, is there, matt? complicated. let's call it
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complicated. sunday. how do you like your autumn days? crisp and clear? sonny. you have got it. and the clocks go back as well. we get an extra hour in bed. good morning. some of you start this morning bright and cold. scotland and northern ireland widespread frost. england and wales, don't leave home without the rain jacket. rain clouds said to lou large. —— loom large. particularly across the pennines, the welsh hills and the south west moors. this is where we could see persistent rain to take us into tomorrow, bringing the risk of flooding. making things difficult if you are on the move in the next 36 hours. what is bringing it is this area of cloud. you will noticed before that advances we have got clear skies around. a few sherrock lives in north—west scotland. turning wintry over the hills. snow here and there. chillier to the
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north of the uk. a gale force wind to go with it as well. most start bright. sunshine hazy for england and wales, then turning grey. persistent rain settling in across wales, spreading into northern england and the midlands. a few splashes towards the east. gale force winds across the south. a warm wind. 17, 18 degrees in the southern half of england and wales. northern half of england and wales. northern half of england and wales. northern half of the uk 10 degrees cooler. a contrast to playing out. between those contrasts we will see persistent rain in the evening. the rain sits all night long. avoiding the south—east corner. gale force winds here. avoiding parts of scotla nd winds here. avoiding parts of scotland and northern ireland. clear skies and showers. another frosty night. 15 degrees in the south—east corner. still the contrast to start the weekend. heavy rain for the early risers across much of northern
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england, wales and the south—west. a better day. the rain cleared through. turning right across east anglia and the south—east later. still windy. most of the parts will see the sunshine. showers in the north—west of scotland. more of you feeling a chill by the end of saturday. 16 or 17 encounter by the afternoon. the cold air will be with us afternoon. the cold air will be with us all as we go into sunday. the rain that goes with it. still very close to the channel islands as we started sunday. i promised you a bright day. for the vast majority it will be. crisp start. a few showers in western scotland. for most it will be a sunny sunday and a chilly one. temperatures as high as 17, 18 in the south—east corner. temperatures barely into double figures for someone sunday. there has been one upside to the clear, crisp conditions in northern scotland. these are the scenes of the aurora borealis last nightjust
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off the north coast of scotland. a lovely shot. showing it across the angus coast in the east as well. there is a chance you might see them again tonight if you get a clear skies. have you seen them in real life? never. interesting to see them in scotland. if you are looking in the uk, that would be the place. i was think i have to go to norway or somewhere like that. a lot of the time you get them in northern scotland. we need to spend more time up there. let's go! huge crowds are hoping to climb one of australia's best—known landmarks today — the giant rock, uluru — before a permanent ban on scaling it takes effect tomorrow. hundreds have started to make the ascent on the tourist hotspot. phil mercer is there for us now. you are lucky enough to have that gorgeous view behind you. tell us more about what is happening today?
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well, clymers i've got another five minutes to make the ascent up uluru. —— climbers. it is almost four o'clock in the afternoon here in australia's central desert in the northern territory of australia. all the way through the day people have been making their way up slowly. an arduous climb from the base to the top will stop today is a monumental day. the day that aboriginal people have been asking for for many years. rising from the desert, uluru is breathtaking. indigenous australians say it has a power and a spirituality like nowhere else. this is generally the most popular time of the day for people who want to get to the top of the rock, to start their ascent. it's pretty cool, it's quite windy as well. today is obviously their last opportunity to do that. all the way through, local indigenous people have urged people not to try to reach the top of uluru.
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for them, it's a sacred place. land is at the heart of indigenous culture and climbing the rock is deemed to be culturally insensitive. but these climbers are putting their ambitions first. it's a good feeling being up there. it's probably not going to be a real good feeling when they say you can't. i don't believe that all aboriginal people think that and feel that. some we've spoken to say they don't really care. i think it's really disrespectful, but we climbed yesterday. only because it's been our dream. once you got there it was incredible. it was spiritual when you got to the top, and my boyfriend did propose, so i think it was a pretty good experience! tribal elders say there will be an overwhelming sense of relief when the climb finally closes. the burden will be lifted as of today, as i am speaking. i can feel it. this now it's time for the climb to have a good rest and heal up. while some are rushing
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for one last climb, most visitors keep their feet firmly on the red desert floor. because it's the fact that it's a sacred place and i don't feel like being sacrilegious! so, no, i'd ratherwalk round. it's not universally popular, but closing the climb will bring to an end years of distress for aboriginal people. phil mercer, bbc news, uluru. really interesting hearing from people, indigenous people and tourists about the kind of spirituality of the place.” tourists about the kind of spirituality of the place. i think you have been there once or twice before yourself. talk to us about what it feels like? when you arrive by plane and you are lucky enough to see uluru out of the cabin window on the aircraft, you get an immediate sense of how colossal this rock is.
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it is almost like it is emerging from the red desert floor. you get a sense of the size of it. the closer you get, the more in tune you become with the spiritual nature of the rock. and that's because all around there are various signs and bits of information telling you that every nook and cranny, every cave, every ridge, tells the story of indigenous creation. and that feeling of spirituality is only enhanced when you speak to aboriginal people. they say that there is nowhere else like this in australia, nowhere else as a spiritual and is culturally significant for them. phil, thank you very much. it has been really interesting seeing that. i think of people will want this last—minute experience. it is a stunning piece of landscape. you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning: we'll be joined by two of the team behind sir david attenborough's stunning
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seven worlds, one planet. the series he hopes will be as influential on climate change, as blue planet was on plastics. some lovely images of this morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alice salfield. the school system urgently needs overhauling to break the link between exclusions and knife crime. that's according to a cross—party group of mps which found less time in the classroom led to children being at greater risk of exploitation and violence. the group is calling for an end to part—time education for excluded pupils. in response, the government said permanent exclusion should only be used as a last resort. london has some of the lowest uptake of childhood vaccinations in the country. the national audit office says there is no consistent system
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across the nhs in england for reminding parents to vaccinate their children. the royal college of gps is supporting the report's calls for a more standardised approach. the figures in london are markedly lower than elsewhere in the country, which is down to a number of factors. it's a population where there are a lot of people moving, more than elsewhere in the country. it's a problem with the primary care workforce — gps, nurses — so there are strains there. and there are some problems around keeping data — good records — around who is living where, when they moved, and getting that into nhs systems. people will be able to have their say on luton airport's long—term expansion plans from today. it's the second public consultation on proposals to increase passenger numbers over the next 20 years to 32 million a year. plans are for a second terminal north of the runway and extensive new airfield infrastructure. let's take a look at
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the travel situation now. on the tubes there are minor delays on the jubilee line due to a train shortage. heading through palmers green, there's westbound traffic on the north circular towards arnos grove, with delays back to the a10 at the great cambridge interchange. on the m25, traffic is down to two lanes approaching junction 6, godstone, following a collision, with delays back towards the clacket lane services. and also on the m25, clockwise traffic is slow from junction 30, a13, towards the dartford river crossing following an earlier breakdown on the qe2 bridge. now the weather with kate. good morning. it's a reasonably mild start out there this morning. you might get a little bit of brightness first thing, but the cloud will very quickly take over, bringing us some patchy light rain. it is going to be quite breezy today, as well — the wind really starting to strengthen. now first thing this morning you might get a glimmer of brightness but that cloud moving in quickly. mainly light and patchy rain to follow — you might get a heavier burst. dryer towards the end of the day with glimmers, maybe, of brightness towards this evening, and temperatures between 15 and 17 celsius, so actually
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feeling quite mild. now overnight, largely dry but towards the west, the north, you mightjust catch the edge of that rain. still cloudy, though, overnight, as well, and the minimum temperature mild again — 13 to 15 celsius. we hang onto that breeze, as well — quite a brisk south—westerly. now as we head into saturday we've got another band of rain heading in our direction, turning it rather wet for much of the day, actually. some heavier bursts mixed in there. it will clear, though, overnight. drier, brighter, some sunshine, but it is going to feel colder on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now though it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. borisjohnson will spend the next three days trying to persuade mps to back his plans for a general election on december the 12th. eu ambassadors will meet this morning to discuss how much longer
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they should give the uk to achieve brexit, but they're expected to delay making a final decision until they know if the election is going ahead. most eu states are understood to favour a three—month delay, but france has argued for a shorter extension. in the last few minutes the shadow home secretary diane abbot told us labour would not decide whether to support the election until they knew what extenstion was on offer from the eu. we just have to wait and see what the eu is saying, first and for most. and we just have to wait and see whether borisjohnson is willing to say publicly and in terms that no deal is off the table. police have been granted more time to question a lorry driver in relation to the deaths of 39 people in a shipping container. 25—year—old mo robinson, from county armagh, was arrested
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on suspicion of murder on wednesday. post—mortem examinations are due to begin on some of the victims later today. quickquid — britain's biggest payday lender — is closing, leaving thousands of complaints about its practices unresolved. its american owners said it was leaving the uk market because of what it described as "regulatory uncertainty". the company had received as many as 10,000 compensation claims from customers who claim they were given loans they could not afford to repay. if they are upheld, those affected may only receive a fraction of their compensation. coming up on the programme, matt will have all the weekend's weather for you. now sally is here with the sport. now sally is here with the sportm is raining in yokohama, where we saw and it's west this morning. good morning, everyone. it's semifinal weekend at the rugby world cup and two huge matches facing england and wales. champions new zealand stand in england's way as they bid for a third title in the row while south africa await wales. and it's been some journey so far.
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that is the road so far. 2003 world cup winner with england mike tindell joins us now from tokyo. good morning. great to see you. how do england beat the all blacks? good morning from a very miserable tokyo. the weather is horrendous, hopefully it clears up for tomorrow. can't even see anything out of the window, it is that bad. it is a massive day for english rugby again tomorrow. going into this match, the team will believe they have a chance. i think they are in great form. i think they area team they are in great form. i think they are a team new zealand will be worried about and hopefully they have contained all that energy, built it up through the week and they can deliver it on the field tomorrow. eddie jones has been playing a clever game this week. his press co nfe re nce was playing a clever game this week. his press conference was a masterclass in placing the pressure on the opponents. will new zealand genuinely be bothered by that? look,
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i don't think so! i think... i think eddie, one of his massive strength, his ability to be able to put pressure on the other team, protect his players, allow them to go out and deliver what they can do. it won't bother in new zealand, they have been around the block a few times. the most successful country in rugby world cup. i hope what we get is both teams play at the best of their level and hopefully england can come through and ensure that they deserve to win this thing and put a marker down. where will tomorrow's game be one? who should we look out for? with forward to coming back in and farrell moving out to 12, we will see us playing a very tactical kicking game, trying to push new zealand back. the problem is you don't want to give the ball away too much to new
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zealand, you have to have that possession against them or if you give them too many shots they will score tries and make it difficult. we have to be smart with our kicking game, but you want the likes of to a la nky game, but you want the likes of to a lanky up forward, so strong in terms of the team. new zealand trying to steal the ball back when it goes over. everybody needs to step up. all of your big players need to play. billy has been quiet by his standards, and tomorrow is a big day for him to announce he is at this tournament. mike, charlie here. very much looking forward to 9am on saturday. give us a little insight from your insight. how do you deal with the aura of the all blacks? when you step on the pitch and see them out there and they have that thing about them, what was your approach to do something with that?
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yeah, look, you have got to respect. they are the best team at any rugby world cup in history. there is the hakka you have to deal with. you have to use that, use the hakka to fire you up. this week the boys will have thought about what is coming. it is going to be the biggest game you have ever played in every one of those players. what you have to do is think, i'vejust those players. what you have to do is think, i've just got to make sure i have my energy levels right, my emotional state in the right place, so emotional state in the right place, so it's best delivers a performance that will help me and others in the tea m that will help me and others in the team perform. for me, the hakka was firing me up as much as it fired them up. it is a great sign of respect to face it but you also have to use it to lift... like it lifts the crowd, lift yourself to know you are in the game and the fact that you need to deliver. if the lads can
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get that right, they can take this team. you talk about the aura of the all blacks, this is very much a changed all blacks. it is going through a transition. they have fewer ca ps through a transition. they have fewer caps in their back three. england can go and attack this team, they have to believe that. whatever goes with it they have to believe they can do it. great to talk to you this morning. hope the weather im proves this morning. hope the weather improves for you. that is mike tindall talking about england's a big game tomorrow. wales have announced their team this morning. they have a tough test on sunday against south africa. they are looking like they are patched together, wales. more on that in the next hour. manchester united's run of 11 games without an away win has finally come to an end. they beat partizan belgrade 1—0 in the europa league, anthony martial scoring from the penalty spot, to take united to the top of their group. arsenal staged a late comeback to beat portuguese side victoria 3—2 at the emirates. two stunning free kicks in the last 10 minutes from nicolas pepe — including this in injury time —
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rescued the game for the home side. celtic and wolves also won. celtic also came from a goal down to beat the lazio at celtic park. christopherjulien with the winner in the 89th minute. wolves also won, and rangers drew with porto. plenty to talk about, wales and england, in the next hour or so. i would help quiet the roads will be on saturday and sunday morning. i'm not sure. i will be busy here on bbc one. are you working? oh, ok! i won't be. i know! . let's return to our main story now and borisjohnson's efforts to secure support for a general election on december 12th. he says it's part of the efforts to "get brexit done" but critics claim the prime minister is trying to divert attention from the fact it looks almost certain he'll fail to meet his own october the 31st deadline. let's speak now to the chancellor of the exchequer, sajid javid. thank you for your time this morning. first of all, is your government still planning to leave
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on october 31? look, we've done everything possible to leave on october 31. you know, we got that deal that everyone said we couldn't get. we plant extremely carefully for a no deal outcome as well, just in case. but because of the actions of parliament, and especially of jeremy corbyn, we have had more dither and delay and now we have to accept dither and delay and now we have to a cce pt we dither and delay and now we have to accept we will not be able to leave on october 31 because parliament has requested an extension, and although we haven't heard back from the eu yet, it is likely, i think we just have to assume, that they will agree to the request of parliament, not something we wanted, but they will agree and probably offer a three—month extension. agree and probably offer a three-month extension. to be absolutely clear, your government now officially saying the 31st of october deadline is gone. well, it can't be met because parliament has asked for an extension and the eu, although it hasn't formally responded, i think everyone expects
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an extension from them and when that happens we will not be able to leave on the 31st of. that is exactly why we have turned round tojeremy corbyn and said, let's get brexit done. you have asked for more time. remember he voted for more delay last week. he said he needed more time to look at the deal that we presented to parliament. so we have said take an extra couple of weeks, yes, that will go beyond the 31st. not what we wanted but let's still get it done as soon as we can, within a couple of weeks, but in exchange you have to agree to that general election that you said you have always wanted. let me be clear, the reason we need the general election is first, we need a deadline to get this deal done. what jeremy corbyn has shown, that at every opportunity that he gets for dither and delay, he will take it. so we need a deadline to focus minds having an election on december 12 parliament would need to be dissolved on november six. the other reason we need to this election is
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we need to put an end to the zombie parliament. this parliament is dysfunctional, it isn't getting anything done, and the british people deserve certainty and a parliament that works for them again. if i heard parliament that works for them again. ifi heard you parliament that works for them again. if i heard you correctly, parliament that works for them again. ifi heard you correctly, you just said you have to agree this arrangement. or what? or it jeremy corbyn then will have to explain to... no, the prime minister has to explain. when we hearfrom number 10, for example, there are sources saying... we are talking to you now so saying... we are talking to you now so you saying... we are talking to you now so you can saying... we are talking to you now so you can confirm this. they are saying that if the other parties don't agree to what you want, which is december 12, you will start a new policy of effectively going on strike as a government. at the bare minimum of legislation will happen. is that what you are proposing? well, i think we have to accept things as they are a. the first is that this parliament already has shown itself as a dysfunctional. there are many things that are going
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on with this parliament, notjust brexit, and parliament is not willing to go ahead with even some of the day—to—day business. willing to go ahead with even some of the day-to-day business. forgive me for interrupting. what does a government on strike look like? i'm not talking about a government on strike... what does it look like? our focus is getting this arrangement with jeremy corbyn our focus is getting this arrangement withjeremy corbyn which is, let's focus on the most important thing right now, which is to get brexit done in the next couple of weeks, but at the same time let's agree to a general election. the think you are holding against the nation, if you like, is if they don't agree with you about what you want to do, what your government wants to do, what the prime minister wants to do, you will mothball things. that is a clear and obvious threat that you will stag nate obvious threat that you will stagnate everything so nothing gets done. it is jeremy corbyn that has been working continuously for a
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month after month, especially in the last few months, against the national interest. we are not talking about isjeremy corbyn. i would like you to account for your own government and not talk about him. what will your government do? the vote on monday, if there is one, goes against you. are you going to stag nate goes against you. are you going to stagnate parliament? actually, you say this isn't aboutjeremy corbyn, but the reality is you know this, and your listeners know this, is that we do not have a majority in parliament, and therefore, to get certain things done, it does depend on what the opposition does. and what we have seen in the last few weeks regarding the biggest issue facing this country, if we want to end the uncertainty around brexit, it is about getting this deal done. do you rememberjeremy corbyn said we wouldn't be able to get a deal? when we eventually got that deal he refused to vote for it. then when we said, let's have a timetable that can perhaps get it through, give enough time for scrutiny, he voted
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against that, as well. now he has said, he is on the record saying, if there is a delay by the eu, which is what he wants to see, of three months, he will back a general election. let mejust months, he will back a general election. let me just pick up on that very thought. we have been speaking to diane abbott this morning and she said very clearly... the question was, what can boris johnson say to give the reassurance to vote for a general election? she said it would help if borisjohnson said it would help if borisjohnson said out loud, no deal is off the table. is no deal off the table? well, diane abbott knows full well that if the eu agrees to her and her pa rty‘s request that if the eu agrees to her and her party's request for a further extension, more dither and delay, but a three—month extension, that's what she wants, then she knows full well, it is factually correct that you cannot have no deal if you have had a further extension, at least during that period. there cannot be no deal during the period of extension. that is what they want and they have said if they get that they will vote for a general
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election. let's see now what will happen. they will have the opportunity to vote for a general election on monday. let's see what they do and they can decide to work in the national interest, to end this zombie parliament, and let the british people decide to. remember, they have had two opportunities already in recent weeks to back a general election and for the first time in the history of our country, you have an opposition that is refusing to face the electorate. that cannot continue. the british people should decide. there is a lot of don't knows in the situation as it stands at the moment. that is a reality that we all have to try to deal with some help. you are the chancellor. do you know if the budget on november six is going ahead? the budget is not going ahead because we are planning now to dissolve parliament on the sixth, so clearly you can't have a budget. as of wednesday this week, you were saying it was going ahead. when i
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first set out the budget date, right from day one, we had said at that time that it was based on getting a deal. clearly we have tried everything to get that deal done. we cannot get that deal through because ofjeremy corbyn, and that now it means we have to prioritise and focus on getting this deal done, getting it at the time, and whilst a budget is hugely important, what is more important right now, i think, is getting brexit done and having a general election. sajid javid, thanks very much for your time. thank you. 7:67am is the time. bit late again, matt, sorry. people do set their mornings to the weather. we have all done it. you are carol or on, i can listen to this and then get started. matt is on, quick, get out, especially when i tell you what i'm going to tell you now. look at this,
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not bad. lovely start behind me in eastbourne on the south coast of england. good morning. iwish i could say we would stay with guys like that. some well but for others, great cloud pushing in and in parts of wales, northern england, western pennines, devon and cornwall, relentless rain later. that could come with a flood risk. this area of cloud stretches into the mid atlantic, pushing towards us and we will have almost a river across the southern half of the uk over the next 36 hours. to the north of it, clear skies. we already have rain showing up on the chart. most isn't touching the ground so it is not as wet as it looks but further north, the showers across the north and west of scotland. wintry over the hills, sleet and snow, gale force winds, but away from there, a frosty start, sunshine through the day, many staying dry but turning grey skies in scotland and northern ireland, look how the rain pushes across england and wales. south east corner, temperatures could hit 17 or
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18 degrees this afternoon if you get a bit of sunshine. further north, that rain band are sitting in between milder air in the south and chilly further north. temperatures only in single figures. quite a grotty rush hour this evening across northern england, north west midlands, wales and the south—west. the rain is persistent, good to see over 100 millimetres over the next 36 hours in parts of wales in particular. hence the flood risk. still there in the morning. clear skies across scotland, northern ireland, away from showers in the final. frosty, 15 degrees to start tomorrow in the south east corner. two ms is battling it out, in between the rain across northern and western england and wales to begin, it will be on the move, pretty wet across much of the midlands. turning whetted to east anglia, the southeast, late on. it means the rain relents and comes away from northern england and wales later on. sunny spells, one or two showers in scotla nd sunny spells, one or two showers in scotland and northern ireland. more of us into the cold air, but parts of us into the cold air, but parts of kent, sussex and the channel islands around 17 or 18. the colder
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winds out, the weather front that has been bringing the that pushes into the continent, lingers around the channel islands on sunday but otherwise bringing chilly winds from the north atlantic. showers do northern scotland, one or two drifting down through the irish sea into liverpool bay area. most will have a crisp sunday, lots of sunshine around. temperatures way down on what so of you experienced over the past few days and will do today. widely just about over the past few days and will do today. widelyjust about into double figures. feeling colder than usual and the chili you feel will continue into next week, but don't forget on sunday the clocks will be going back to ta ke sunday the clocks will be going back to take us into sunday morning. if you are up early for work you have an extra hour in bed. if you are at an extra hour in bed. if you are at a party, getan an extra hour in bed. if you are at a party, get an extra hour of party. if your parents of young children, who knows? that extra hour, you may use it, you may not. it is up to them, really. you speak from experience and fear.” them, really. you speak from experience and fear. i know what you
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mean! who is getting the lie in and who is worrying about the kids and who is worrying about the kids and who will get an extra hour of partying in? those are the things. 7:50am. new plans have been revealed this morning for the uk's biggest mobile phone companies to share phone masts to improve rural coverage. nina's got all the details for us. everyone has been in the situation somewhere. if your phone working? mine isn't. can i bury iphone? can i borrow your eyes? it is a nightmare. this is a plan to get around it. at the moment in only two thirds of areas do all four of the big providers give you comprehensive coverage. the government along with the big four have come up with a plan to get that up to 95% by 2025. it sounds ambitious. maybe it is. let's speak now to scott petty, who's the chief technology officer at vodafone uk. good morning to you. sounds great, an important caveat within the report from nicky morgan, the digital secretary, it is not yet
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done deal. we wait to see the industry move quickly. the responsibility is now yours. iron we are committed to this deal. we have been working out for more than 12 months initially amongst ourselves, creating the framework. we worked with dcms building a model we thought was executable that would deliver fantastic coverage for the country but ensuring we had a choice for consumers no matter where they are in the uk, notjust in big towns and cities are we need to finish the contractual work. we are four competitors working together. you can imagine the legal wording of that contract, we need to be sensitive to competition law. that contract, we need to be sensitive to competition lawm could be a sticking point. the government will put in half a billion, you put in the rest. questions around how that pie will be sliced. we know in the past that bt have said they stand to lose, you stand to gain. do we know whether it has been finalised who were put in the most money? we will spend £530 million as an industry, we will spend different amounts based on our starting positions but the outcome
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is very fairfor starting positions but the outcome is very fair for all operators to get the country what it needs which is fantastic coverage. that amount has been agreed, has it? it has. we have had a treat tweet from lorenzo asking why so much has been spent on sg asking why so much has been spent on 5g when so many areas cannot get ag. do you have your priorities wrong chris and i don't think we have. 5g is important and it is important to have investment. many people will still be using ag handsets, so we are doing exactly the right thing and still creating opportunities for sg and still creating opportunities for 5g development into the next decade. 2025 i5 5g development into the next decade. 2025 is reasonably soon but not soon enough for some. are you sure you can reach the deadline? we are confident. we have built performance criteria into the framework and ofcom will have all the tools as a regulator to ensure they can finance or manage us regulator to ensure they can finance or manage us to get those performance deliveries to hit the
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targets. we know in the past with energy companies when they have to invest a vast amount, the consumer has taken a hit from that. can you guarantee we will not see our ta riffs guarantee we will not see our tariffs going up? we have found the most effective way for us to build this infrastructure. we are sharing our masts and the antenna we need to deploy the network. that is fantastic from an efficiency point of view and is also better for the environment. it means villagers can have a single mass rather than all four operators building a must. we are confident it fits into long—range planning to be able to deploy fantastic planning across —— fantastic coverage. this isn't set in stone. how soon will the deal be signed off? e—zine confident it will be, you have all agreed on the detail of it. it is a matter of crossing the is and dotting the t5. i think it will happen in the new
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year. good news but we can't all do the hokey coqui and post it simultaneously on the various networks at a wedding just yet. simultaneously on the various networks at a wedding just yetm that what you do? if we could, if all the networks worked. do people still do the hokey coqui? that and the birdie song. another 91 the viewers. you are watching breakfast. let's see what else is coming up. # you won't stop talking. # why don't you give it a rest?# their cockney rock made chas and dave a huge hit with fans. we'll be joined by dave peacock as he pays tribute to his former bandmate, who died last year. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alice salfield. the school system urgently needs overhauling to break the link between exclusions and knife crime.
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that's according to a cross—party group of mps, which found less time in the classroom led to children being at greater risk of exploitation and violence. the group is calling for an end to part—time education for excluded pupils. in response, the government said permanent exclusion should only be used as a last resort. london has some of the lowest uptake of childhood vaccinations in the country. the national audit office says there is no consistent system across the nhs in england for reminding parents to vaccinate their children. the royal college of gps is supporting the report's calls for a more standardised approach. the figures in london are markedly lower than elsewhere in the country, which is down to a number of factors. it's a population where there are a lot of people moving, more than elsewhere in the country. it's a problem with the primary care workforce — gps, nurses — so there are strains there. and there are some problems around keeping data — good records —
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around who is living where, when they moved, and getting that into nhs systems. people will be able to have their say on luton airport's long—term expansion plans from today. it's the second public consultation on proposals to increase passenger numbers over the next 20 years, to 32 million a year. plans are for a second terminal north of the runway and extensive new airfield infrastructure. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tubes thejubilee line has minor delays due to a train shortage. roadworks continue at the elephant and castle, slowing up westbound traffic on the new kent road with delays to the old kent road. heading through palmers green, there's westbound traffic on the north circular towards arnos grove, with delays back to the a10 at the great cambridge interchange. and on the m25, traffic is down to three lanes approaching junction 6, following a collision, with delays back towards the clacket lane services. now the weather with kate. good morning.
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it's a reasonably mild start out there this morning. you might get a little bit of brightness first thing, but the cloud will very quickly take over, bringing us some patchy light rain. it is going to be quite breezy today, as well — the wind really starting to strengthen. now first thing this morning you might get a glimmer of brightness but that cloud moving in quickly. mainly light and patchy rain to follow — you might get a heavier burst. drier towards the end of the day with glimmers, maybe, of brightness towards this evening, and temperatures between 15 and 17 celsius, so actually feeling quite mild. now overnight, largely dry but towards the west, the north, you mightjust catch the edge of that rain. still cloudy, though, overnight, as well, and the minimum temperature mild again — 13 to 15 celsius. we hang onto that breeze, as well — quite a brisk south—westerly. now as we head into saturday we've got another band of rain heading in our direction, turning it rather wet for much of the day, actually. some heavier bursts mixed in there. it will clear, though, overnight. drier, brighter, some sunshine, but it is going to feel colder on sunday.
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i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today. borisjohnson calls on parliament to back an early general election in december. in return, he's offering more time to debate his brexit deal. the eu will meet today to decide whether to grant another extension to the uk.
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post—mortem examinations are due to begin on the 39 people whose bodies were found in a refrigerated lorry container in essex. a£1 a £1 billion investment in improving rural mobile coverage. phone operators come to an agreement with the government to fund a network of masts they will all share. more than 90% of the country will get ag coverage from all four mobile companies. wales name their team ahead of the rugby world cup semifinal. jonathan davies is fit for sunday's match against south africa but liam williams is out with an ankle injury. elephant seals are here, too. very mysterious! the nation's favourite narrator returns this weekend with more wilderness and wildlife — starting with antarctica. and it may be hla and frosty start to your friday but blue skies are paired will be replaced by grey ones
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in parts of england and wales are lots of heavy rain to come. i've got the full details on that annual full weekend forecast. it's friday, the 25th of october. our top story. borisjohnson will spend the next three days trying to persuade mps to back his plans for a general election on december the 12th. eu ambassadors will meet this morning to discuss how much longer they should give the uk to achieve brexit, but they're expected to delay making a final decision until they know if the election is going ahead. in a moment, we'll speak to our correspondent adam fleming in brussels, but first let's get the latest from our political correspondent nick eardley in westminster. so borisjohnson says, "i want a general election on december the 12th". what happens now? opposition parties need to be convinced, charlie, and at the moment, they are not. labour is still hedging its bets this morning. the snp and the lib dems are not convinced by the offer that is on the table because
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they are worried that borisjohnson is trying to peg this to getting his brexit legislation through in the first week of november. but what is really interesting is for the first time now, we are getting the government admitting that its firm deadline of the 31st of october is not going to happen. have a listen to the chancellor, sajid javid. well, it can be met because parliament has asked for an extension and the eu, although it has not formally responded, i think everybody expects an extension from them. when that happens we won't be able to leave on the 31st and that is exactly why we have turned around tojeremy is exactly why we have turned around to jeremy corbyn and said, "let's get brexit done". i think that might be the first time a senior government minister has said explicitly the 31st of october is not happening. so what happens now? there will be some strong arming over the next few days to try to get labour on board. their votes are
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going to be absolute crucial if borisjohnson is to get the two thirds of mps he needs to force the early general election. labour doesn't sound totally convinced at the moment, though, have a listen to the moment, though, have a listen to the shadow home secretary, diane abbott. i don't know what the eu is going to decide. there's a lot of moving parts in their decision. but december the 12th, as i said to you, there is a reason why we have not had a christmas election for over a century. we just have to wait and see what the eu is saying first and foremost. and we just have to wait and see whether borisjohnson is willing to say publicly and in terms, that no deal is off the table. even if the labour leadership we re table. even if the labour leadership were to get on—board with the 12th of general election, there are many labour mps who don't agree and may well refuse to follow the leader in voting for it. one other thing, just
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to mention briefly, the government is saying that if the general election does not happen on the 12th of december, it is essentially going to go on strike and stop passing all but the most essential legislation. thank you. adam is in brussels for us. so today, i know are eu leaders are perhaps not in total agreement about how much of an extension should be granted if at all, but the ambassadors will make the decision today, correct? well, that was the plan because donald tusk, the president of the european council, who chairs the union macro summits, had phoned around the leaders so they wouldn't have to have a summit about this issue so he could reach a consensus position with all of them and then the ambassadors would meet this morning and just sign it off formally and it would all be done in writing and that would be the extension sorted with a minimum of fuss. it's been a bit more complicated than that. first, you had this dispute between a big group of countries, in fact, most of them
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including germany, who thought, " let's including germany, who thought, "let's sign up to the extension to the 31st of january that was in the prime minister's letter that he was compelled to write by parliament, let's go for that", but then emanuel macron of france said, "no, may be the best way to get a deal through parliament and focus everybody‘s mines at westminster is to have a really short extension only to the 15th of november or maybe the 30th", so 15th of november or maybe the 30th", so that dispute had to be settled. now you have the added complication of it is just not clear what is actually happening where you are with, is there going to be an election or not? is there going to be approvalfor the election or not? is there going to be approval for the timetable for considering the deal further in parliament or not? it now looks like they will make the decision on monday at the earliest. ok, decision on monday at the earliest. thanks, adam. time for the other main stories this morning. post—mortem examinations are due to begin today into the deaths of the 39 people who died in a shipping container in essex. police are moving the bodies
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from the port of tilbury to a nearby hospital, as they continue to question a lorry driver arrested on suspicion of murder. in a minute, we'llspeak to our correspondent robin brant in shanghai, but first let's get the latest from andy moore now in purfleet. andy, it's still very much an ongoing investigation this morning? well, the operation to remove the bodies from the lorry, from the container where they were found, is going on at nearby till report. last night —— tilbury fort. last night, the first 11 bodies were removed in private ambulances, escorted by police officers and taken to broomfield hospital in chelmsford where those postmortem exam nations will be carried out today. police say their primary concern is for the dignity of the victims. the chinese ambassador has sent a team down here to help in the operation to identify them, although the ambassador said it was not absolutely concerned that
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they were chinese nationals. meanwhile, the lorry driver, a 25—year—old from northern ireland, police have been given an extra 2a—hour is to question him. he has been named locally as mo robinson from northern ireland. thank you for joining us. let's go to shanghai now. robin, this is truly tragic, and what do we know if anything of what the authorities there are trying to investigate? the truth is, it is still unclear at this stage exactly where these people have come from and it has been interesting that on two occasions in the last 2a hours, the chinese ambassador in london on social media has reiterated that the nationality is yet to be confirmed. nonetheless, his staff are involved in assisting the police down in essex. there's been a lot of reporting of it here, domestically, which is significant. this country has state—controlled and state—run media. but there has been some censorship over the issue of the mention of chinese nationals, that
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being removed from some coverage. it may be, though, that embassy staff can help essex police quite simply and swiftly identify these people because any adults living in china on the mainland require a chinese national id. for the last seven yea rs, national id. for the last seven years, you have had to submit a fingerprint to get one of those on most occasions so fingerprint to get one of those on most occasions so there is a small chance, maybe, just maybe, some in this group, if they are chinese, may have a fingerprint on the national database have a fingerprint on the national data base and chinese have a fingerprint on the national database and chinese officials can assist in that. thank you for joining us. eight minutes past eight, now. mobile farce could be shed to improve phone singles in rural areas. you have all had their moment to where you don't know if your phone works and you have to borrow each other‘s. phone works and you have to borrow each other's. plans have been revealed this morning by the government and uk's biggest phone company. nina has the details. they have finally sorted this out, we hope. they have made a start, it is annoying when one of your signals
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works and the other does not and you have to swap those. they want to get around this situation because at the moment, only two thirds of areas in the uk where all four of the big uk companies have compressive coverage and the government along with a big four have come up with a £1 billion plan to get it up to 95%. but it involves £500 million of government investment and £530 million from the companies. crucially, there was a caveat in a statement from the digital secretary nicky morgan, who said it is not yet a done deal. she wa nts to said it is not yet a done deal. she wants to see the industry move quickly. we spoke with the chief technology officer of vodafone earlier and he said from their perspective, working with three, 02 and ee, they have agreed how they will pay for this and they are confident they will get moving by next year, the deal will be signed off and by 2025, they will reach the deadline and make sure that in 95% of areas, no matter which network you are with, you get compressive coverage. ok, do we have a timeframe
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yet? the deal between the big four will be early next year and then 2025 i5 will be early next year and then 2025 is the time they think, the resources will be pooled and the new muscle go up and i spoke with the chief technology officer of vodafone earlier and i said that we worry that harris will go up because he has got to foot the bill for this hundreds of millions of pounds but he said it is confident it will make more of them —— all of their more efficient so tariffs won't be affected and we won't pay any more. it is not set in stone yet. it has taken so long for the big four to pool their resources? that's it. seems simple, as ever. quickquid, britain's biggest payday lender is closing — leaving thousands of complaints about its practices unresolved. its american owners said it was exiting the uk market because of what it described as "regulatory uncertainty". the company had received as many as 10,000 compensation claims from customers who claim they were given loans they could not afford to repay. if they are upheld, those affected
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may only receive a fraction of their compensation. it is just it isjust coming up it is just coming up to it isjust coming up to 8:11am. the deaths of 39 people aboard a shipping container has horrified people across the world but for some, it's a sad reminder of past disasters. 15 years ago, 21 cockle pickers, trafficked from china, drowned after being trapped by the tide in lancashire's morecambe bay. we're joined now by mick gradwell, the former detective superintendent who led the investigation, and lisa yam, a lawyer specialising in chinese immigration affairs. good morning. ishould good morning. i should ask you straight mick, your reaction to this awful incident. —— straightaway. there seems to be history of this country of having mass fatality incidents with chinese immigrants and it shows how vulnerable these people are who are trafficked into the country. again, it is just a really tragic and sad event. lisa?
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yes, it was a big shock when i heard about the incident and so many chinese losing their lives. with your experience, mick, from the investigation, of course, this is under way right now in the early stages of what is a huge murder investigation. from your experiences of dealing with the chinese authorities and trying to get information, we were hearing from ourshanghai information, we were hearing from our shanghai correspondent earlier about how it might work and what the avenues are, give us a sense about how it might work and what the avenues are, give us a sense of how it worked in practice for you. there are several aspects to the investigation and one of the important things is to identify the deceased. my feeling is, that if these people have been trafficked by snake head gangsta. just explained that. they are criminal travel agents, really, you go to a snake head to say you want to be trafficked to an economic opportunity and usually, you will borrow quite a significant amount of money, to pay them to get you trafficked. that money will get passed on to the family. the people there, the relatives, are still in
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contact with the people being trafficked as they are going. they will be ringing. we have found in morecambe bay that very quickly, these people came forward and said, "we believe that our loved ones have died". so there is a chance, as well as the fingerprint from the id documents, the chances are they have also got phones and possibly smartphones on them which will have digital footprints as well as other contact details. that might move on a lot quicker than you would anticipate for the identification. but then as far as the investigation goes, you but then as far as the investigation goes, you are looking at how far it goes. you have got snake head gangs in china, and the various low hanging fruit throughout the organisation, who have been involved in the trafficking, and the potential accommodation. it is all very organised criminal gangs involved at different stages and in different countries. lisa, i imagine there's a huge event of fear among those who have been traffic —— make
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that element of it among those who have been trafficked in terms of safety for themselves and their loved ones. now this has happened, what is happening in the chinese community in this country and also in china, to try to identify these people and make sure something like this does not happen again or at least flag it to show that people are so least flag it to show that people are so desperate that they will get in lorries like this to get here? yes, we find this is very shocking, obviously, because these days, china is more opened and getting richer so we find it is quite difficult to believe why people still —— why so many chinese still come to this country. they are coming from rural areas, and they? even so, but if you imagine in the last 20 years, china's economic growth has been so vast that even in some rural areas, they are not really that poor. they can make theirliving. they are not really that poor. they can make their living. we don't really understand it. there must be a reason for them to come here, to risk their lives. yeah. there's a
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propaganda, so to speak, from the chinese government to say life is great and it is obviously economically booming but some people are not benefiting. i understand that it could be because of, you know, the immigration is quite tight and in the country and if they want to come here, normally you are well educated and quite rich, if you have enough money to invest, and otherwise, for the poor people, then it is quite difficult, if you are uneducated, to emigrate to other countries, especially the uk. it might be because of that that they choose the alternative way. and as the chinese community, we are the largest chinese community in the north—west and at the moment we don't know very much information. it is very difficult for us to offer any help. but if we know or if they ask, then the community will definitely help them if they ask. mick, during the course of your
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investigations, did you come face—to—face with the gang masters themselves or the traffickers? did you have direct engagement? what did you have direct engagement? what did you learn about that mindset, which so you learn about that mindset, which so many people... i mean, it is so horrific, what happened in this case and in previous incidents as well. we found a massive amount of information. the gag master who was operating the people who died that night was actually convicted of 21 manslaughter hall, 23 people died on the night and there is still one body missing out there. we got a lot of intelligence about how all the organisation worked. the money—laundering to get the profits back to china. but to add to yourself, we found that the survivors had not been told properly what this country was like. they had an idea it was like the darling buds of may, you can pick up gold of the streets so there is false information to people in provinces like fujian that the streets are paved with gold here and you can make easy money so they are not
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fully informed, especially when you end up in the middle of a bay in morecambe, or some of the places they were living, it isn't true. the sentence for the gang master, who left those 23 chinese cockle pickers to die, was 1a years. left those 23 chinese cockle pickers to die, was 14 years. released after seven. he served half of it, what message is it sending? um... it's very sad, i mean, whenever i've talked about this that you look at all the work that went in, and of course, the tragedy of this huge loss of life, that is what the sentencing guidelines are, 1a years, served seven and he never admitted anything. it was a full six month trial. he never showed any remorse, anything at all. it is saddening and appalling. there is a distinct sense that these gangs, that you tried to convicted, they act with impunity. they think, by and large, they are not going to be caught. they do and
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the thing is, it is light, the day after the trial, key people were taken out, bank accounts were closed down, properties were seized, the whole money—laundering operation was closed down, a8—hour was later, people in the chain are replaced as are the bank accounts. it is a huge moneymaking and organisation that has a network throughout the world —— makea has a network throughout the world —— make a moneymaking organisation. iimagine —— make a moneymaking organisation. i imagine they will be hitting certain levels in this investigation but the mr bigs who make the big money i would say are virtually untouchable unless there is a massive international operation to ta ke massive international operation to take these people out. there must be real fears that this has happened now, it has happened before and it may happen again. yes, i think it is possible, which is why that i think is the chinese community, and we have relatives and friends in china, i think every single opportunity should be to bring the message to them and tell them that, if they wa nt them and tell them that, if they want to come to the uk, then they
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choose a proper way. if they come here illegally, they won't be able to find anyjob. so if they are caught, they will definitely be sent home and deported back to china and then they won't be able to come here at least for ten years. it is not just risking their lives and also jeopardising their whole future. i think this is the message that we should definitely deliver to china, especially some not very opened areas, to make sure that they know that. thank you forjoining us. a special helpline has been set up for people who may be concerned about relatives who could be involved in the incident.
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it is 8:19am. plans for the weekend, wanting the weather to be good, matt? we will get there, sunshine by sunday but a lot of rain for some to come to get there as i will show you. good morning. nota bad come to get there as i will show you. good morning. not a bad start this morning, frosty friday, this is just outside aberdeen a short while ago, a cracking start to the day but chili with frost across scotland and northern ireland. for many, particularly across england and wales, sunshine replaced by looming rain clouds and if you are in the welsh hills, pennines, south west moors, there is a realflood risk in the next 36 hours, as i will show you. this area of cloud is responsible for it, stretching all the way to the mid—atlantic, snaking its way and it will sit like a river pushing across england and wales through the next 36 hours, and a lot of cloud on the satellite imagery is just high cloud so that is turning
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the sunshine hazy. rain falling, not quite reaching the ground across some in wales and the south—west but it will do. what is is that showers across the northern half of scotland, turning to snow over even modest heals in the far north and strong winds blowing about all day long. but a bit of sunshine, clouding over in scotland and northern ireland but england and wales, grey skies into the afternoon and outbreaks of rain persistent across north and west wales, northern england and the north midlands especially. in the far south—east, you will see some rain in the middle part of the day but any brightness this afternoon, 17 or 18 degrees, humid with it, compared to seven or eight across some parts of central and northern scotland. then the raid to content with, still into the evening rush—hour, south—west england, wales and northern england especially could see over 100 millimetres in some of the hills. that will lead to the risk of flooding and some travel disruption into the start of the weekend. still the dividing line between what will be a humid start in the south—east, 15 degrees tonight compared to a frosty start across scotland and northern ireland. sunshine and a few showers here to get your weekend under way.
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a big contrast to start the weekend. you will still need your rain jackets across northern and western parts of england and wales initially but it will turn drier and brighter through saturday. rainey threw a good part of the day the midlands before easing off, but turning wetter and wetter and also when the earth across east anglia and the south—east and the channel islands, could see gale force winds developing today due tomorrow. warmest of all in the far south—east, kent, sussex and the channel islands, 17, but more of us feeling the chill as we finish saturday. through saturday night into sunday, we eventually clear away the weather front from the south—east corner, it may take a bit longerfor the channel south—east corner, it may take a bit longer for the channel islands. but we have on the floodgates to cold airfor we have on the floodgates to cold air for all, we have on the floodgates to cold airforall, a we have on the floodgates to cold airfor all, a lovely, crisp start to sunday, with plenty of sunshine around. there will be some showers across northern scotland, one or two could just drift down through the north channel and the irish sea towards the likes of liverpool bay but for most, a sunny sunday with temperatures of 9—11 for the vast majority so feeling much colder in the south than it well in the next few days. but of course, you have the extra hour in bed, the clocks go
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back into sunday. over the next few nights, you might be lucky to see some of these, the pictures of aurora, spotted last night in the far north of scotland. another chance to see them tonight if the skies stay clear. lucky them, lucky anyone who gets to see that. none of us have seen them. no, one day. trip! but charlie is driving and we can be in the back like the naughty kids. i'm not sure on that. talking about lovely places to go, how about this one? in a field near bristol the closest thing to an ocean has been created. but it is inland. the aim? to bring the joys of the sea to a whole new wave of people — and make surfing accessible to all. that is your plan of the day, is it? — your that is your plan of the day, is it? —— your pun. we'll be live there in just a moment, but first let's find out a little bit more about what's this amazing project.
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you never know with these kind of projects, what ends up happening. the result is just pristine, perfect blue water and lovely waves. win—win. fantastic images, in the sun. our environment and rural affairs correspondent claire marshall is live in bristol for us this morning. the first thing i notice is that there are no waves right now. well, you are right, because, would you believe, just a year ago, this was
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just a field and now, live on brea kfast, just a field and now, live on breakfast, nothing can go wrong, it's live tv, i'm going to give the signalfor the waves it's live tv, i'm going to give the signal for the waves to start and it will take about 15 seconds to work apparently. in the meantime, i will introduce you to some very special people who are going to sit for the first time. marshall, you are here from the seaside but you have never been able to serve before, how are you going to feel getting in in about an hour? it will be good. getting in for the first ever time, yeah. are you excited? very excited. why when you nominated for this? luke... idon't why when you nominated for this? luke... i don't actually know. ok, uk young champion, server of the year, and nick over here, this was all your idea, let'sjust year, and nick over here, this was all your idea, let's just watch the waves breaking for the first time on national tv. there we go.
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it is so blue, isn't it? yeah, in bristol. there we go, isn't that an amazing sight to see in a field is 12 miles north of bristol, how do you feel, marshall, exciting? yeah, it's very exciting, it looks blue and tropical! it does, yeah, and you are going to get some coaching?” hope so. do you think you will inspire others to get in?” hope so. do you think you will inspire others to get in? i hope so, just people like... anything is possible, really. is that what you think? so what you are going to do, seeing what you can do, anyone can do it? yeah. brilliant, lucas, you nominated your friend. yeah. excited to get in and why did you nominate him? i nominated it because it is such a great opportunity for disabled people to have a go, one of the first public waves, serving for
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the first public waves, serving for the first public waves, serving for the first time. excited to get in? really excited, yes. nick, last word, how does it feel? pretty emotional, actually, amazing waves and amazing people, today is going to bea and amazing people, today is going to be a great day and a fitting start to what is going to be the next chapter of a massive journey we have been on. we will leave you from here, we will leave you with a view from on high, the first waves in bristol. their nominated first riders are going to start surfing within the next hour. and i'm quite looking forward to getting at some point. very much, i'm sure you will enjoy it. so that is the wave, the state of facility, inland, revolutionising the sport. it is a magnificent sight. we will leave you with those images for a moment. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning.
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it's going to be a fine start to the day for many of us. there will be a bit of sunshine out there, but it's not going to last because we have got some heavy rain moving in, courtesy of this area of low pressure which is way out towards the atlantic, but these weather fronts are wiggling around across the uk. northern parts will feel quite chilly. they will be heavier for south—west england, wales and the midlands into scotland. further north across scotland, but gales here. but with the rain persisting right through the night and into tomorrow, some really high rainfall totals are expected into saturday morning is that rain spreads into the south—east of england. but throughout today and into tomorrow, because of the heavy rain, the welsh hills, the pennines and the south—west moors means there is a risk of disruption.
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this is worklife from bbc news, with victoria fritz and david eades. brexit deadline: britain awaits the eu's decision on delaying its departure from the european union. live from london, that's our top story on friday the 25th of october. how safe are you at work — or even at home? we'll meet the woman whose work life is dedicated to making sure we don't fall prey to needless accidents.

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