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tv   Monday in Parliament  BBC News  October 29, 2019 2:30am-3:00am GMT

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but they haven't said how or where. media reports suggest they were buried at sea. al—baghdadi was killed on saturday in a us special forces operation in northern syria. firefighters in california are battling a wildfire blazing near the wealthy suburbs of los angeles. about 10,000 homes and businesses are under threat inside an evacuation zone. the california utilities authority has said it would investigate cutting power to prevent more fires starting, as has already been done in the north of the state. the british prime minister, borisjohnson, has failed to get the two—thirds majority in parliament that he needed for a snap election on december the 12th. he is now going to resubmit his proposals in a different form on tuesday. 0pposition parties are divided on how to respond.
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it's about 2:30am. now it's time for a look back at the day in parliament. hello again, and welcome to monday in parliament, as borisjohnson tries and fails to force an early general election. the electorate will, i'm afraid, have a sense that we are all like charlie brown, endlessly running up to kick the ball, only to have parliament take it away. the lib dems want an early poll too, but it's not their first choice. if there is not the support for a people's vote in this parliament, then we need to look at the other way to do that. and in john bercow's last week as speaker, an mp finally discovers how to impress him. he
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really is an encyclopaedia of arguably useful information. but first, boris johnson‘s latest attempt to persuade mps to vote for an early general election has failed. 0n the very day the prime minister had to accept a delay to brexit. we are not now leaving on thursday. mrjohnson wants to hold an election on december the 12th, but under the law to thirds of mps, 434 of them, had to vote for it. speaker: the ayes to the right, 239. the noes to the right, 270. the ayes haveit the noes to the right, 270. the ayes have it but the motion does not obtain the majority required under the fixed—term parliaments act, 2011, and because... 0rder, i'm coming to the right honourable gentleman, because the majority required has not been reached, the noes have it.
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so the prime minister won the vote but not by enough to force an election. he's going to try again on tuesday, this time by a different would require only a simple majority. we will not allow this paralysis to continue and one way or another we must proceed straight to an election, so later on this evening, the government will give notice of presentation for a short bill for an election on the 12th of december so that we can finally get brexit done. mr speaker, we don't trust this prime minister, and we don't trust this prime minister for good reason. so the prime minister, if he is going to bring forward a bill, must get an absolute cast iron assurance that up until the passage of that bill and the rising of parliament, there will be no attempt to bring forward the withdrawal agreement. we will obviously look and scrutinised that bill and we look forward to a clear, definitive
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decision that no—deal is absolutely off the table and there's no danger off the table and there's no danger of this prime minister not sticking to his word because he has some form on these matters. earlier, eu leaders agreed in principle to extend breaks and until the 31st of january next year. this means the uk will not leave, as planned, on october the 31st, thursday. the eu council president donald tusk said it was a flexte ntion, donald tusk said it was a flextention, saying the uk could leave before the deadline if approved by parliament but opening the debate on an early election, the prime minister said this parliament had run its course. if this house is to convince the country it is really serious about getting brexit done, there must a fixed term to this debate, a parliamentary terminus, a ha rd debate, a parliamentary terminus, a hard stop, ms, that everyone can believe in. mr speaker, without that
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ha rd stop of believe in. mr speaker, without that hard stop of an election, without that moment of truth, the electorate will, i'm afraid, have a sense that we are all like charlie brown, endlessly running up to kick the ball only to have parliament take it away, whisk that ball away yet again, only to find that parliament is willing to go on delaying and delaying until january, until the end of january, until delaying until january, until the end ofjanuary, until february and beyond. and the frustration will go on, mr speaker, the anxiety will go on, mr speaker, the anxiety will go on, and the angst and uncertainty thatis on, and the angst and uncertainty that is felt by millions of people and businesses across the country will be unnecessarily and unfairly prolonged and exacerbated. that's the reality of what the opposition‘s course condemns this country to. jeremy corbyn said the prime minister could not be trusted. having illegally prorogued parliament for five weeks for his queen's speech, he now abandons that queen's speech, he now abandons that queen's speech. he got his deal
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through, a second reading, then abandoned it. he promised us a budget on the sixth of november, and then he abandoned that too. he said that he would never ask for an extension, and he said he would rather die in a ditch. another broken promise. the 12th of december election is less than a fortnight before christmas, nine days before... nine days before the shortest day of the year... i'll come to you in one second. the house must consider that in parts of this country, it will be before 4pm. many students will have just finished theirterm and students will have just finished their term and gone home for christmas... well, actually, people having the right to vote is what an election is all about! if we take him at his word, that this is the most untrustworthy government and prime minister,
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wedded to do the most evil and disastrous things to this country, can he explain to me his reticence for a general election where he has the chance to sweep us out of office? we have said all along we want no—deal off the table, and since there is so little trust in this prime minister, we will agree to nothing until it's clear and concrete exactly what is being proposed. the snp and the liberal democrats both support an even earlier election, on december the ninth, in an attempt to stop the prime minister's brexit deal getting through parliament. it's in the hands of the labour party tojoin us it's in the hands of the labour party to join us and the liberal democrats, to have coverage, to stand up against a prime minister, but what are we going to find? we
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find that the labour party want to sit on their hands, set on their hands, mr speaker, and wait for this government to deliver a brexit. i say to the labour party, "don't be the handmaidens of the prime minister's brexit. " let's put this back to the people by coming together. we haven't seen the path forward and if it's not going to be for a people's vote, if there is not the support for a people's vote in this parliament, then we need to look at the other way to do that, and right now, that is through having a general election. the dup said its mps would not support an election because of the impact of the prime minister's brexit deal on northern ireland ‘s. we don't want to have accelerated passage. we don't want to have 24 hours scrutiny. we want to make sure that there is nothing that happens in this house which enables the prime minister to deliver on a deal
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which he promised he would never, ever do. sammy wilson. and there will be lots more on calls for an election on tuesday in parliament. a driver accused of the manslaughter of 39 people found dead in a lorry was part of a global ring of people smugglers, prosecutors have alleged. morris robertson from craig aaron was remanded in custody at chelmsford magistrate's court. on monday morning the prime minister laid flowers in tribute to the 31 men and eight women who died in the refrigerated lorry. writing in the book of condolence, borisjohnson said the world had been shocked by this tragedy. initially police said the victims were chinese but a number of the emmys families say they fear their loved ones were among the dead. the home secretary told the commons their nationalities had not been confirmed. the families of the victims at this incredibly difficult time are in all oui’ incredibly difficult time are in all our thoughts, my thoughts and have
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my full our thoughts, my thoughts and have ll sympathy. our thoughts, my thoughts and have my full sympathy. nothing can ever undo the loss they have suffered. we own it to them to identify those responsible and ensure that they face the full force of the law. i wa nt to face the full force of the law. i want to work with those families to ensure that they can bring forward any evidence that they might have to help solve this appalling crime. with their help, we can bring the perpetrators to justice, and with their help, we can bring the perpetrators tojustice, and i'd also like to remind colleagues that this is going to be a long and meticulous investigation. i've heard from essex police today and i heard last week as well, this will involve working with partners overseas, with foreign law—enforcement agencies and unravelling the threat of criminality that could stretch halfway across the world. the opposition parties had questions about future cooperation with european crime agencies. can the home secretary further explain how this cooperation can
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continue in future under either a no—deal brexit all the prime minister's deal? because as it stands, we will lose the current level of cooperation, we will not have the current access to eu agency databases have the current access to eu agency data bases and we have the current access to eu agency databases and we will lose access to a host of criminal databases and we will lose access to the european arrest warrant. and the house would like to know what plans the home secretary has going forward to maintain, and if anything strengthen, that level of cooperation. i would like to just say to the house, mr speaker, that of course, the way can absolutely ensure we have the strongest possible level of cooperation is by having a deal, which is exactly the government's position, and we'd also like the honourable lady and her party to support that, but when it comes to future cooperation and security tools, there are no boundaries when it comes to our cooperation. the united kingdom will remain one of
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the safest countries in the world but also, mr speaker, a global leader on security. i know the home secretary is keen for us to support the deal for leaving the european union, but that deal does not adequately address what plans the government has two work with these vital eu institutions in the future, and it simply will not do to say america has a relationship with europol, because, mr speaker, america is not in europe, we are. we continue to be one of the safest countries in the world and will be a global leader in security. she asked about europol, we can continue to work with europol when we leave the european union. it is possible for third countries doing that and there are very good advanced, examples of third countries, like the us, doing so. third countries, like the us, doing so. several mps were concerned about security at smaller ports. there's been lots of concern about security is at our east coast ports but does she agree with me that it matters nothing how much security they put
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in there when these people are being trafficked through numerous countries before coming here and being trafficked through continental ports. shouldn't we all step up and deal with this? small ports and airports have long been known to be airports have long been known to be a problem and security weakness, and in fact the former prime minister urged a patrol force to deal with them. can! urged a patrol force to deal with them. can i urge more investment in them. can i urge more investment in the border force, the nca, internationally working with our parties to combat this evil trade. ironically it is some of those victims who have already arrived in this country who know most about these criminals and their methods. if we can get them to turn over evidence... without fear of retribution and being deported and that will assist us usually, should the home secretary look at mechanisms where this might happen without them being too fearful for them to come forward and help us?|j thank the gentleman for his points but he has just raised. i
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thank the gentleman for his points but he hasjust raised. i give thank the gentleman for his points but he has just raised. i give the house his assurance, mr speaker, that he is absolutely right and on that he is absolutely right and on that basis for this particular investigation, that's exactly how we will be working. home secretary priti patel. you're watching monday in parliament with me, david cora. don't forget, if you miss our daily round—up, thanks to the wonders of technology, you can find it all on the bbc iplayer. the culture secretary has promised all mobile phone coverage will be eliminated in 95% of the uk by 2025 —— poor coverage. bringing 4g to not spots, area where there is weak or no reception. in a statement that was music to the years of mps with real constituencies, labour complaint it left many parts of the country still without any coverage. this is a world first deal that means consumers will be able to rely on their own providers' network to
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use their mobile phones wherever they are. it will make patchy coverage a thing of the past and more people from rural areas can benefit from the speed and efficiency of coverage on the go. this is really half of a half measure, and what was needed was a bold, ten year, national switchover plan to deliver ubiquitous gigabit per second access to every corner of the country. now, we welcome the commitment to 95% 46 coverage, because it is better than the 91% that we have today. but mr speaker, i'm afraid this still leaves an area, 4681 square miles of the country, where coverage will be non—existent or not good enough stop and as members know, that is an area twice the size of norfolk, and much bigger than our largest county, the size of north yorkshire. when the previous prime minister rang too far removed from my position as telecommunications minister, she couldn't get through because they
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didn't have a signal on my mobile phone. so this announcement to me is very close to my heart. the mouth of the secretary of state to update the house on any changes to planning regulations, which are often the barrier to erecting much—needed mobile phone towers in rural areas? in august we announced a consultation are goes on november four, in relation to planning regulations and looking at how we can simplify the planning process in relation to telephone masts. there isa relation to telephone masts. there is a balance in having labour party across the country, but of course having local communities to have their say. we are waiting for those consultations. people hearing this announcement today could be forgiven for having a sense of deja vu. the 2017 manifesto from the conservatives promised to and rural not—spots, by 2022, a target we know will not be mad. now we're being told 2025. can you tell me, can she
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give mea told 2025. can you tell me, can she give me a cast iron guarantee that guarantee will be met, and if not, without really have that if she is suggesting? i think the honourable lady very much indeed for her reply, she was a little more enthusiastic than we had from the opposition front dance. not difficult, actually given the low bar they said. can i say the current coverage in scotland, of all four operators is 4196, scotland, of all four operators is 41%, and under these proposals, it would get to 85% of scotland. labourmp would get to 85% of scotland. labour mp hoping to be the next max becker was supportive of the plans. i work becker was supportive of the plans. iwork in becker was supportive of the plans. i work in what she said today. —— welcome. the people i get, however that i get very fed up with, other mobile phone companies. because actually, quite often they will say you have 100% coverage in a village and actually, nobody in hannah street can get a signal whatsoever.
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and recently there was an arson attack on the mast which covered several different companies, ee didn't even bother to tell its customers it was out for four weeks, they refused to give compensation. the mobile phone companies must simply do better. i thank the honourable member. you would think he was standing for election next week, how much he welcomed this announcement. well, that is very true, mr speaker. nikki morgan. northern ireland has been without a functioning assembly for more than 1000 days. in the lords, a conservatives bear wanted to know if there had been any progress on restarting the power sharing administration. the eu withdrawal agreement has made political progress in northern ireland even harder to achieve. do not all unionist parties, not just
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harder to achieve. do not all unionist parties, notjust the dup, have grounds for concern about the actions of the government, this conservative and unionist government? will the prime minister who has given himself the title minister of the union at the forefront of the continuing efforts to secure political progress and to strengthen our union in the interests of all our fellow countrymen and women in northern ireland? my right honourable friend, the prime minister, has declared he would be the minister for the union. the union is composed of four nations, northern ireland is an integral part of that union. we must deliver for the people of northern ireland but so must the politicians who have an obligation to reform that executive. the parameters that will give careful consideration as to whether it would speed up the restoration of devolved government in northern ireland, if we were to stop paying them until they sat
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ain? — stop paying them until they sat again? —— with the prime minister? yes. laughter. my lords, how many more times with the government was a failed attempt to bring the northern ireland assembly and executive back into being before it finds the kind of initiative that might break the deadlock and give the people of northern ireland what they need, which is local politicians capable and willing to deliver so many things which are hanging undone, underfunded, on finance and undelivered? the noble lord is correct. last week there was an attempt for the assembly to set. but it was unable to do so because it could not be done on a cross community basis. we must ensure each element of the treaties which we are obliged to me, not in these the belfast agreement, i met in full. but in reality, the parties in northern ireland had a response ability and they must answer to the people sooner, rather than later. lord duncan. now, is the growth of short—term letting website such as
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abiby making it harderfor short—term letting website such as abiby making it harder for people to find affordable homes to rent? —— airbnb? on the subject of possible registration, witty welcome airbnb was my plan is to have a discussion on this matter. we are engaging with them and other similar stakeholders on their proposals. can i say local authorities already have powers to ta ke authorities already have powers to take actions against issues such noise, antisocial behaviour or accumulation of rubbish as my noble friend has pointed out? that may arise in short—term properties. and i would take it to anyone who complains of the local authority. we wa nt to complains of the local authority. we want to encourage responsible short—term letting where hosts haven accordance with the law and with respect for both their guests' safety a nd respect for both their guests' safety and the neighbours we was peaceful stop is the noble viscount saying to the because he doesn't accept there is a problem here that he is dealing with? no, i'm not
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saying there isn't a problem, i'm saying there isn't a problem, i'm saying we should take the view that we welcome a voluntary approach to this. what we are doing is encouraging the short—term accommodation association, the staa to drive up standards, so there self—regulatory measures today include partnerships with quality and tourism, westminster city council to develop and promote the considerable short—term letting charger, and there voluntary imposition ofjacks charger, and there voluntary imposition of jacks in charger, and there voluntary imposition ofjacks in london only. —— checks. imposition ofjacks in london only. -- checks. it's taking houses out of the housing market in london. would you not that agree that would have an effect on the price of renting and would have an effect on homelessness? what i said in my initial answer that actually the increase in airbnb is not having an effect on houses to rent. canal sustains owns about rental prices does not can i also say, they only
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rose 13% in the 12 months to september 2019, which is rate unchanged since may, 2019 —— only rose 13%. — — unchanged since may, 2019 —— only rose 13%. —— 1.3%. unchanged since may, 2019 —— only rose 13%. -- 1.396. airbnb unchanged since may, 2019 —— only rose 1396. -- 1.396. airbnb has become very profitable, and could the minister agree that there has been a decrease in properties despite the percentages he said in his answer? the vast increase in short—lets are not how to build communities. well, ican not how to build communities. well, i can only quote because i've given you which is the increase is there, but it isn't having an impact on private rental property. and as i say, we want to continue to follow the application for self—regulation, and also to support local authorities. in 2018, the short—term accommodation association considered this charter with westminster
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council, and with the findings they have, i have the details, it seems to be working. we are determined to follow the voluntary approach at present. a few months ago i asked ministers what they were doing about the situation where leaseholders and tenants of social housing were subletting to airbnb and the minister indicated that was no problem, it was a local authorities problem. i now ask an issue which is clearly central government was my problem, how many of the 80,000 premises which are let to airbnb in london are registered for business rates, for profit tax, or for vat? because i think there is this form of tourism, it's actually detrimental to a loss of areas in central london where people live and where housing is in very short supply. as i said earlier, we do think it is right that local authorities remain responsible for this area. and if i can cite
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westminster council again, they have investigated or are in the process of investigating over 1500 properties for unlawful short—term letting. and in one case earlier this year, a fine of over £100,000 was imposed. can i also say that the noble lord is absolutely right that those who do let out their properties for airbnb must pay taxes and that is something which local authorities should look out. of course, when they register, when they register, they can find out who they register, they can find out who the hosts are and whether the taxes have been paid or not. lord younger. before we go, a reminder it is i was with paying attention during question time stops you never know when you might learn something. we did geta when you might learn something. we did get a 2.3% settlement which in the great scheme of things was good. for the fire service. but there is i was more investment can be looked at was more investment can be looked at was in one of the key areas of investment but i talk to about the passover is about is technology, what more can we invest in to make a more efficient, their ability to fight fires better, and make sure
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that the forces art — mr speaker, did you know there is a chemical that adds to water to make it wetter? and therefore more effective in putting out fires? what an extraordinarily helpful nugget of information the honourable gentleman has vouchsafed to me and other members of the house. he really is an encyclopaedia of arguably useful information. educating the speaker during john bercow‘s last week in the chapel is that i get the feeling he will miss this place. thank you for watching monday in parliament, alysia mccarthy will be here for the rest of the week. but for me, david korn, by for now. —— from me, david korn, by for now. —— from me, david korn, by for now. good evening. today's weather a repeat performance of yesterday in some ways.
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it will be a chilly start on a frosty start for some. but there will be some sunshine around as well. and largely dry. now, the exception to that will be this area of low pressure just brushing with the south—west. but elsewhere, under the influence of high pressure, we are going to start off chilly. and, in fact, temperatures again falling just below freezing. so a frost is likely. the winds swinging around to a north—easterly. there could be some showers along the east coast. maybe along the thames later on. we will see are breaks of showery rain across the channel isles, the isles of scilly, and into cornwall as well. elsewhere, lovely, sparkling sunshine expected for much of the day. highs of 9—12 celsius. now, as we move out of tuesday into wednesday we're going to start to see the signs of change as we gradually by thursday bring in milder but wetter weather from the west. take care.
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technology, you can find it all on the bbc iplayer.
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this is bbc news. welcome if you're watching here in the uk, on pbs in america or around the globe. i'm mike embley. our top stories: the remains of the is leader abu bakr al—baghdadi have been disposed of, but us officials won't say where. wildfires in california move closer to los angeles. thousands of homes and businesses are evacuated. britain's parliament rejects prime minister borisjohnson's bid to break the brexit stalemate with a snap election. families in vietnam wait anxiously for news about loved ones who might be one of the 39 who died in a lorry in the uk. and challenging our ideas about time and space. a new super—telescope may give us more clues about dark energy.

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