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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  October 30, 2019 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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‘ speaker, speaker, fihank you, ‘speaker, fihank you, and corbyn. mr speaker, thank you, and could i start by thanking the prime minister for the could i start by thanking the prime ministerfor the serious could i start by thanking the prime minister for the serious way in which he has approached this in the speech that he has given today on the findings of the first report on this. can i also thank you, mr speaker, for ensuring that we had a one minute of silence at the start of this debate for those that lost their lives on that terrible, terrible night. i want to start by paying tribute to the survivors of the fire and their family members, who had campaigned with such dignity and such determination for the past two years. and such determination for the past two yea rs. two and such determination for the past two years. two long years. many of them are here today in the gallery oi’ them are here today in the gallery or watching this debate on television. and for them, it's yet another horrible day of remembering another horrible day of remembering a father, mother, brother, sister, nephew, niece that they will never see again and will never come back and these memories will never go
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away and we should have that understanding and that sympathy of oui’ understanding and that sympathy of our responsibility to ensure eve ryo ne our responsibility to ensure everyone is able to live in safety, where ever they are in this country. 72 people lost their lives on that night injune 72 people lost their lives on that night in june 2017. 72 people lost their lives on that night injune 2017. if that situation rocked the community and shocks the whole country. and it brought together help from lots and lots of people, local churches, mosques, synagogues, people from different community organisations, and people rushed to grenfell and as the fire was still blazing, with gifts of food and toys and support and so on. that understanding, that simple human understanding of so many people are something that i think we have to cherish and begin to understand. because there is a natural human instinct to help people and that's what was demonstrated and i cannot forget
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going there straight after the fire and just talking to dazed people who did not really understand what had happened and talking to exhausted firefighters, police officers and many, firefighters, police officers and any firefighters, police officers and many, many others who were trying to comprehend the enormity of the situation. and it was truly horrific and ip absolute tribute to all those volu nteers and ip absolute tribute to all those volunteers and so many others that turned out that day to help, local government officers from all across london who volunteered to try and help because the royal borough of kensington and chelsea seemed to have difficulty in responding to the enormity of the situation and i will say no more than that at the moment. it was a tragedy mr speaker but it was an avoidable tragedy. a tragedy is when there is an earthquake, when there is a tidal wave, a volcano which you cannot understand or predict that this was an avoidable tragedy. all the survivors, all of them, deserve a new home and safety and security in this country, as my
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friend the shadow home secretary demanded at the time. all those responsible for this avoidable tragedy must understand thatjustice must prevail and every necessary measure must be put in place to prevent a fire like grenfell ever happening again. i've participated yes, of course. would my honourable friend agree with me that this is a national fire response issue, it's notjust about london? would he also comments on my request to the prime minister that extra funding be made available so these recommendations be put in place because i haven't actually heard a response to that that was a positive one to say yes, we will pay for that. i thank my friend for that intervention. yes, it is a tragedy that grenfell, in that part of london, it is a potential tragedy everywhere, where there is danger
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cladding on blocks of flats anywhere and my friend, a shadow foreign minister from and my friend, a shadow foreign ministerfrom our party did specifically ask that question about funding which may be the prime minister or whoever is responding for the government will care to a nswer for the government will care to answer that point when we come to it. i've been on a number of the walks for grenfell, over my life i've been on many marches and many demonstrations. but i've never been on anything that's so poignant and so powerful as thousands and thousands and thousands of people, just silently walking. through north kensington and walking past the carcass which is grenfell tower and the power of that, the power of silence, is palpable. but what's also palpable is the way in which the community, as a whole, supports those people. and when the silent march passes the fire station, there
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is genuine love and affection for all those firefighters who risked their lives that night and so, i know nobody is trying to do this today, let's not blame firefighters or their work, they did everything they could and more and well beyond that. and the service that was held in st paul's i thought was absolutely the right thing to do because it was a way again of bringing people together to try to come to terms with the horror of their loss and also events i've been to in the mosque which also brought people together, trying to comprehend the horror of their loss. of course, i'm sorry. i'm grateful to the honourable gentleman forgivingly. i was privileged enough to be the minister for civil society at the time the honourable gentleman for croydon north and i met with many charities supporting the effort there, will he join me in thanking them for all the work that they have done both immediately in the aftermath but also since then as
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well, in terms of supporting victims and their families well, in terms of supporting victims and theirfamilies and well, in terms of supporting victims and their families and the wider community as a consequence of this tragedy? i absolutely do, absolutely andi tragedy? i absolutely do, absolutely and i thank the memberfor tragedy? i absolutely do, absolutely and i thank the member for that intervention, i've neverforgotten meeting so many different groups and charities that day that were already doing their best to meet in the church, there was the community organisation, citizens advice bureau, north kensington law centre and so many others doing their very, very best as well as the collections in the community that went on to try and ensure people at what they needed. so, mr speaker, we welcome the report on the first phase of the inquiry, one second. which obviously, as the prime minister pointed out, not everybody has yet had the chance to study in detail, it's only just had the chance to study in detail, it's onlyjust come out but we do welcome it and we expect the government and other agencies will respond in full and while it's very unlikely that further debate be held in this parliament, it's for the
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next parliament, i hope, to start with an urgent debate and of course i will give way. i wonder if he would like to reflect on the two occasions i think the speaker organised in a speakers hands, where survivors came and i thought it was a very useful occasion for members to be able to speak informally to people who had had this dreadful experience. and it was remarkable how stoical they were and how grateful is you were saying, they we re grateful is you were saying, they were to the fire service and all those who help them. yes, indeed. those were memorable occasions. and the courage and determination was of support for the families and those who were bereaved, but it was also a very strong determination to make sure that grenfell never happens again anywhere else and i think the g re nfell again anywhere else and i think the grenfell survivors are the heroes of all of this. because, when you go through a tragedy, there is a natural human instinct to try and put it behind you, move away, go off
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and do something else if you have that opportunity and choice, they haven't done that, they have stayed there, stayed in the community, kept there, stayed in the community, kept the community together in order that the community together in order that the rest of us might learn the lessons of the pain they went through. the limited scope of the inquiry was agreed by the government, the fact that phase one only looked at what happened on the night of the 14th ofjune is important because many questions inevitably remain unanswered. and the recommendations do not cover the range of issues that need urgent action from ministers. so the prime minister talked, one second, the prime minister talked about the whole truth but sadly, the whole truth is not yet with us, of course i will give way. i thank my right honourable friend for giving way. 0ne honourable friend for giving way. one of the unanswered questions from phase two of the report relates to the types of flammable cladding which are out there, on buildings right now. the government response to date has focused solely on acm —type cladding and there has been a
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failure both to acknowledge fully that there are other types of flammable cladding which may be just as flammable and just as much of a risk and also to commission an adequate range of tests so that building owners and residents can know what is on their buildings and note the response required. will he join me in calling on the government urgently and ahead of the seconds phase report to address that issue comprehensively about the range of flammable cladding still putting residents at risk? i thank my friend for that intervention. i am going to come unto some more details later in my speech but she is absolutely right and as somebody, who like her, represents constituents who live in high—rise blocks, we know the stress and pain they go through and she is absolutely right and everything she has said in that intervention. will my honourable friend give way? of course. i thank him forgivingly and i welcome the prime ministers tone in terms of his presentation. does
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he agree with me is the honourable lady has alluded to, that there is a much bigger picture than phase one? phase one is focusing on the fire brigade response mostly and many in the media have targeted the fire brigade for criticism, some of which isn't unfair but is only targeting them as opposed to waiting for the bigger picture? the inquiry was always going to take a long time, it is incomplete and there are others including ourselves here in this parliament, who have some responsibility for the conditions that led to the grenfell tragedy taking place ? that led to the grenfell tragedy taking place? i thank my friend for that intervention and he knows as a formerfirefighter, the that intervention and he knows as a former firefighter, the stress and strain firefighters go through but also the way in which we now live in an age of such instant media that people have read a bit of half a report or a bit of the report and decide that is the conclusion of all things. this is the first of two macromedia reports and i think we should be cautious in throwing blame
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around much too quickly and too soon on this because these are serious and very, very tragic matters. on this because these are serious and very, very tragic matterslj on this because these are serious and very, very tragic matters. i am very grateful to my right honourable friend and on that point, does he also agree that many of the families are indeed waiting for those criminal prosecutions and the enquiries that are being made by the metropolitan police ? enquiries that are being made by the metropolitan police? a number of people have been interviewed under caution, there are many who believe that what happened in grenfell amounts effectively to corporate manslaughter. and that we should also wait to find out who is going to be prosecuted for what happened? i thank my friend for that and he lost a dearly loved friend in that fire and he has done great work in supporting the grenfell community andi supporting the grenfell community and i thank him for that. but i also asked the government to listen very carefully to remarks he just made.
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remembering people who lost their lives in a wholly preventable fire has to be met with a political response, which is what we are trying to do, it has to be met with a procedural response which is about the fire service and fire training, which i will come to in a moment. and of course building regulations. but it also has to be justice because of those people who knowingly perhaps or perhaps not, but that's what a court must find out, clad buildings with materials that they themselves knew to be dangerous and that's where the corporate manslaughter issues do arise. and i hope that the government and nobody else will put obstructions in the way the justice, the prime minister talks about the whole truth and that clearly isn't with us yet, in the light of the particular focus on actions of london fire brigade in phase one of the report, we urge the recommendations be made of the london fire brigade are given the
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full response they require. but at the same time, i want to pay tribute to the heroic actions of firefighters in our country, every single day. including on the night of the grenfell tower fire. they stand a lot of time in fire stations waiting for something to happen and then they have to go and deal with it, they do not know what they are going to deal with before they get there. our natural instinct never we see a thing of danger is to put ourselves in a place of safety, to run away, to avoid or whatever, firefighters do not do that, they cannot do that, they have to run into a burning building while the residents are trying to escape from that burning building. it's something they know is in theirjob, they know it's their responsibility. and they do it day after day and i just think we should understand the bravery of those that are sacrificed so much that night and despite being
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told, when they came out of the fire, exhausted, dehydrated, that they must not go back in, it was against fire service regulations, they said no, we might manage to save a life so they went back into that fire. that is what they do. and the general secretary of the fire brigades union is a man who has been a firefighter himself and his union is obviously composed of firefighters. he is a strong, strong man who fights for his members. when he spoke that summer at the durham miners event, i have never known 200,000 people in absolute silence as he described what his members, his firefighters, had done in g re nfell his firefighters, had done in grenfell so i think we should pay tribute to all of the firefighters and of course the work done by the fire brigades union which helps to make us all safe. yes, of course. i thank my honourable friend forgivingly. and i thank him also
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the great tribute he has paid to the fire brigade service. but would he agree with me that between 2010 and 2016 the government cut central funding by 20% in real terms, leading to 11,000 fewer firefighters? and the mayor of london, the present prime minister, was at the forefront of cuts to the fire service? cutting 27 fire appliances, 55 firefighters, 324 support workers and the closure of ten fire stations, does he agree with me that the prime minister should apologise for removing aerial appliances from the london fire brigade fire engines when he was mayor of london? i thank my friend for that intervention and she, like other colleagues, represents a constituency in which many residents live in tower blocks and i don't
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suppose too many members of parliament live in high—rise council owned tower blocks but they should understand, we should all understand the stress and strain that people go through with worry about what would happen ina through with worry about what would happen in a fire and i have to say this, mr speaker. the government response to grenfell i think has been much too slow and not strong enough on every front from rehousing survivors to dealing with grenfell style acm cladding on hundreds of blogs across this country. and, just for the last time, yes, of course. blogs across this country. and, just for the last time, yes, of courselj am grateful to the honourable member for giving way, on this issue of government response, there are one in ten of council blocks in england are in birmingham, 213, 10,000 households, in the aftermath of the fire, the west midlands fire service recommended retrofitting of sprinklers in all of those blocks, costing £31 million. at the time of the dreadful time that we lived
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through at grenfell, there was pledges made that local authorities would be helped and supported in making tenants safe. birmingham has not received one single penny, that cannot be right. i thank my friend for that intervention and he's absolutely right, this is a gap in government response, gap, the retrofitting of sprinklers will help to control, possibly stop the spread ofafire, to control, possibly stop the spread of a fire, it won't stop every fire but it will save lives and that's why i think it's so important that that issue be addressed properly. so the prime minister must act now, urgently, on the government for yea rs urgently, on the government for years following grenfell. the failure to learn the lessons from previous high—rise fires, with no proper response to the coroners recommendations of the 2013 fire, and the shirley towers fires in southampton, these were terrible tragedies, lives were lost, in the
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case of shirley towers, firefighters and lack moorhouse, residents that we re and lack moorhouse, residents that were there. and we have to learn lessons, we cannot be, here we are, going on to 2020, still talking about the coroners response to the 2013 fire. the failure to rehouse survivors, some families and this is shocking, still living in hotels and in temporary accommodation, more than two years on. and the failure to reach clad blocks identified with dangerous grenfell style cladding as my friend pointed out, disgracefully, eight in ten residential blocks still yet have to have their acm cladding replaced. there are almost 60,000 people still living in blocks that have this cladding, 18,000 in the social sector, residential, 41,000 in the private sector. there are hundreds,
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nay thousands of blocks of flats across the country that need to be dealt with urgently now. and i say that, i will come to that in a second, i say that for those with acm cladding, my friend pointed out that this isn't the only dangers cladding which must be dealt with. and local authorities must act very, very quickly on this to ensure that every block, every block, be it public or private in their community, is inspected and the dangers cladding removed. i will ta ke dangers cladding removed. i will take some interventions in a moment. in my own constituency, we have some tower blocks, i went to a meeting after there had been a small fire in one flat and the fear that ran through the estate because they could see what had happened at grenfell, another block, dangerous cladding was found and i commend my local authority, islington, for immediately responding when they discovered this was the case. putting fire watchers in within two hours and started removing the
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cladding a week later, that's a local authority totally on it and got onto it straight away and it is with pleasure i see that the scaffolding is about to come down and replacement has already happened. that's when local authorities work efficiently and quickly because they are totally on it. i thank my friend forgivingly, does he agree with me it's an outrage that the government has allowed so much time to be wasted before supporting local authorities to deal with the acm cladding? i have only had three that have had the work done, 39 private blogs where people cannot sleep at night, does he think this government should learn some empathy and perhaps the prime minister should visit some of the residents who are having to live like this and perhaps then, he would learn the importance of urgent action because we don't see urgent action because we don't see urgent action on this government 's watch. my action on this government 's watch. my friend is so right, it's a question of urgent action. it means
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recognising that local authorities are underfunded and very stressed and strained by it and they know full well that unless they get the money refunded from government, and that has not always happened, then its other services that are affected because they are trying to bring about safety for their own community. grenfell tower would not have happened mr speaker, to wealthy londoners. it happened to poor and mainly migrant londoners. i've met with grenfell survivors on many occasions since that dreadful night. and they've all told me about this wonderful community that existed in and around grenfell tower. this multiethnic, multiracial community that was there around grenfell tower, supporting each other and supporting each other that night. those that tried to wake others who we re those that tried to wake others who were frightened of the fire, those that were asleep and didn't realise the building was on fire, those people did all that and whilst this report does make a criticism of the london fire brigade, we should remember this, it was not
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firefighters that deregulated building safety standards. it wasn't firefighters who ignored the concerns of tenants. it wasn't firefighters who ignored the coroners report and failed to put sprinklers and high—rise blocks. and it wasn't firefighters who put flammable cladding on grenfell tower. likewise mr speaker, it's disgraceful that two years on, there are still hasn't been a major review or assessment of the state put policy, i echo the prime minister ‘s words when he said it's an article of faith in dealing with high—rise block fires, well, it might be an article of faith but clearly, there has to be a serious review and examination of that policy. the fire brigades union has raised this with government ministers on numerous occasions. concerns about the state put policy were raised with the government years before grenfell by the fbu and others. so, i ask the prime minister, will the government
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today stopped dragging its feet and act? yes, of course, for the last time. with regard to the state put policy arise this time of his questions on monday and did not get a satisfactory answer so i'm pleased you've raised that, thank you. a satisfactory answer so i'm pleased you've raised that, thank youlj thank you've raised that, thank you.” thank my friend for that intervention. and the past nine yea rs of intervention. and the past nine years of history, mr speaker, have seen cuts degrade our fire and rescue services, the reality and the truth is we have fewer firefighters, your fire appliances and as a result, slower response times. and i'm not being critical of individual firefighters or the response that was made by all of them to try and deal with grenfell but the reality is, if we cut fire services, we live ina more is, if we cut fire services, we live in a more dangerous place because of it. so while firefighters selflessly risk their lives to protect others, the government has not provided them with the resources they need, between 2010 and 16 the government cut central funding by 28% in between 2010 and 16 the government cut centralfunding by 28% in real terms, followed by a further cut of
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1596 terms, followed by a further cut of 15% by 2020, these cuts have lost 11,000 fewer firefighters positioned, 20% of all firefighters. and the prime minister will know as mayor of london, that he was at the forefront of the cuts to the fire service. in eight years he was mayor of london, the london fire brigade was required to make gross savings of £100 million. that led to the cutting of 27 fire appliances, 552 firefighters, 324 support staff, two fire and rescue units, three training appliances and closed ten london fire stations. mr speaker, grenfell, we all agree, must never happen again. and it happened i think because of the way in which building regulations have either not been adhered to or are inadequate. inspection regimes that are either nonexistent or inadequate. and a response that was insufficient, yes
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one response that was insufficient, yes ...oneof response that was insufficient, yes one ofthe response that was insufficient, yes one of the real problems is the way responsibility was taken away from building control officers and local authorities who acted independently so developers can appoint their own friends now, very often, to sign up the buildings. isn't this something dame judith identified as a real problem that needs addressing needs urgent action on now rather than waiting for legislation in two years?” on now rather than waiting for legislation in two years? i thank my friend for that. as chair of the select committee is done excellent work in highlighting all of this and i thank work in highlighting all of this and ithank him work in highlighting all of this and i thank him for that. that is parliament at its best, examining what happened. i was going to make exactly the same point. that's a first, mr speaker! he gets up to intervene and doesn't do it, thank you, i thank my friend for that and i note that he represents again a community which has mixed housing and therefore has these issues to deal with and so, i do think there are serious questions to be asked, about what the government has done, what's been happening with funding
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of the london fire service and of course, the performance of the royal borough of kensington and chelsea. the night of the 14th ofjune will never, the night of the 14th ofjune will never, ever the night of the 14th ofjune will never, ever be forgotten. i've never forgotten that evening, talking to my friend, a member for forgotten that evening, talking to my friend, a memberfor kensington who i think has been a wonderful representative, is a wonderful representative, is a wonderful representative of the people there, talking to her in my office about what it was like being an mp, she'd only been an mp or a few days and i said it's great but it's hard work and you need to get into it slowly. she went home and had the greatest test of her life two hours later. and i think the way she has spoken for her community is something that we should all be very proud of, what she's done. the shameful fact is, feet have been drowned, the exact same cladding is on similar high blocks, sprinklers have not been fitted, thousands of people will go to bed tonight and tomorrow night not feeling safe in this country. in paying tribute to the firefighters,
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most of all, i pay tribute to the dignity and the solemnity of the survivors and the bereaved who continue to campaign forjustice so that no one else has to suffer like them. i welcome the report by sir martin, i look forward to the second pa rt martin, i look forward to the second part of the inquiry but i willjust say this. i want us to have a properly funded fire service in all parts of the country. i thank g re nfell parts of the country. i thank grenfell united and of the survivors for everything they have done to try and bring people together and keep communities together. and whilst i welcome the fact that the prime minister has said there's going to be an appropriate memorial constructed near or on the grenfell site, the real memorial will be a properly funded fire service, the real memorial will be safety for people in every tower block across this country. 60 , 000 people in every tower block across this country. 60,000 at the moment are unsure of their own safety and many, are unsure of their own safety and any are unsure of their own safety and many, many more with other kinds of composite materials that are just as
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dangerous. we need tough, very tough regulation to ensure all of our people can sleep safely and soundly in their beds at night rather than having the image of that burning monstrosity of a fire which took the lives of so many wonderful, wholly innocent people. thank you. mrs theresa may. mr speaker, thank you andi theresa may. mr speaker, thank you and i can i thank the government for tabling this debate today, enabling us to get the very earliest opportunity to debate in this house the recommendations from the report so martin has given us, the first pa rt so martin has given us, the first part of the public inquiry into what happened at grenfell tower. can i also thank the prime minister with a commitment that he has given for further debate to be held in this issue when honourable members across this house have had an opportunity to look more fully at the report and the recommendations that it makes.
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today ‘s debate gives us an opportunity as my right honourable friend and leader of the opposition did, to recognise the appalling nature of the tragedy that took place at grenfell tower injune 2017. i would like to thank my right honourable friend the prime minister for the tone that he took in his speech and the understanding that he showed. this was a horrific loss of life and of course, it was a tragedy that should never have happened. and i would like to pay tribute to the survivors and to the families and friends of those who died. for the dignity and fortitude that they have shown in circumstances which none of us would want to have to face. not just dignity and fortitude. but the
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commitment and dedication they have shown fought struggling for the justice that they want to see for all those who lost their lives and also those who lost everything they possessed. and the home that they had built up. i want to pay tribute to the survivors who gave evidence to the survivors who gave evidence to the survivors who gave evidence to the public enquiry, reliving those horrific times cannot have been easy, but without the evidence, it would not have been possible for sirmartin it would not have been possible for sir martin moore—bick to produce the report that he has produced and i would like to thank him also for the thoroughness and considerate and thoughtful way in which she has produced this report. it is detailed, but it is also in aspects
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of this report shocking. the public enquiry was set up to get to the truth of what happened on that night, but crucially also why it happened, and as has already been mentioned, there are many questions that are yet unanswered, because they lie in part two of the report, sorry, but two of the enquiry. there is, crucially, are issues around building regulations, around the cladding, around the enforcement of regulations, around why cladding that was noncompliant with the regulations was able to put up and was agreed to be put up on this building. ithink was agreed to be put up on this building. i think it is significant that sir martin moore—bick found himself able clearly to say that the cladding was noncompliant. i think
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that was an important aspect and finding of part one of the enquiry, although greater detail in relation to those matters will be gone into in part two of the enquiry. i will give way. i think the right honourable member for giving way. does she not accept that while part two will need to deal with these more difficult issues, there are hundreds and hundreds of families still living in conditions which are com pletely still living in conditions which are completely unacceptable, because actions have not been taken, actions which could be taken prior to part two coming forward, and for instance in my own constituency, people living in a building which is quite frankly no longer fit for habitation because the cladding has been removed and there are now gaps around all the windows?” removed and there are now gaps around all the windows? i say to the honourable gentleman that of course the government has put in place both support for local authorities to ta ke support for local authorities to take action in relation to cladding and support for the private sector
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in relation to cladding, and also, and a question was asked earlier not just about acm cladding but other cladding, the department has also been ensuring that tests are undertaken on other cladding on these buildings. we also of course initiated dame judith these buildings. we also of course initiated damejudith hackitt‘s report and are clear that the recommendations of that report had been accepted by the government. i said that, in terms of part two, the issues around the cladding, the building regulations and so forth, will need to be addressed, as also will need to be addressed, as also will the question of the role of government and the role of the royal borough of kensington and chelsea. but today, i will give way one more time. would the honourable lady agree with me too that itjust can't be right that survivors and bereaved of g re nfell be right that survivors and bereaved of grenfell are not properly, permanently rehoused ? of grenfell are not properly, permanently rehoused? well, i say to the honourable lady that i recognise over the time since this terrible tragedy took place, significant
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effo rts tragedy took place, significant efforts have been made to ensure that the survivors, that those who lost so much, have been able, have been provided with accommodation thatis been provided with accommodation that is suitable for their needs. that work i know in the early stages, many people felt did not go as quickly as it should have done. i was just as quickly as it should have done. i wasjust going on as quickly as it should have done. i was just going on to remark that i recognise that in the struggle that the survivors have been facing to ensure that justice the survivors have been facing to ensure thatjustice can be done and that the truth, that we find out the truth of what happened, and crucially the responsibilities for what happened, that they have felt that the response of government at national and local level has not a lwa ys national and local level has not always been as swift or as fulsome as they wished it to be. every effort will be made, as my right underfrom the effort will be made, as my right under from the prime effort will be made, as my right underfrom the prime minister said, in continuing the work to support the families who had this terrible
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experience in this appalling tragedy, and we will continue to provide that support. there are other aspects of support that need to be provided in the long—term as well, not least the question of providing mental health support for people who have been affected by this tragedy. but of course today we can only look at part one of the enquiry, because that is the report thatis enquiry, because that is the report that is before us, and one of the things that i think comes through from part one of the enquiry, and will be clear to anybody who has had any discussions with, who has met any discussions with, who has met any members of the grenfell community is the care that they felt for each other, not just community is the care that they felt for each other, notjust care within families, but care for friends and neighbours too, and indeed for the whole community, and i would say that the grenfell community has a lot to teach all of us about the true meaning of community. it was that care for each other that led to
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them raising concerns, over some time, about their fears for the safety of the building in which they we re safety of the building in which they were living. those concerns were brought him to be at a very early stage when i first met survivors from grenfell tower, that they had, over time, been raising issues about their fears over time, been raising issues about theirfears for over time, been raising issues about their fears for the safety of their building and yet those issues, their voices, those concerns had gone unheeded and had been ignored. and i wa nt to unheeded and had been ignored. and i want to say, i want to go on to reference some of the shocking aspect of this report, but i think one of the most shocking features that has come out from the consideration of what happened at g re nfell tower consideration of what happened at grenfell tower is this issue of the way in which those people had been genuinely raising matters about safety, and felt that those matters, and in some cases they were just com pletely and in some cases they were just completely ignored. that is what led
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to the work to look across at social housing across the country, and i'm grateful a number of housing minister undertook that, i see my right honourable friend the member for reading west, who was the first housing minister who started that work in his place on the treasury bench. that work was due to lead to a social housing green paper. my right honourable friend the prime minister referenced a social housing white paper. i am pleased to hear that reference. we are now of course about to go into an election, but i would urge the government as soon as possible after government is reconvened to publish that white paper because change is needed to ensure that those who are living in social housing are able to have their voices heard so that they can have the confidence that when they raise issues they will be acted on, and if they are not, that they have redress to which they can go in order to make sure that their
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concerns are being out heard. there are other shocking aspect of this report that i just want to touch on briefly, and some of those do relate to conclusions on the london fire brigade. our emergency services do an amazingjob, brigade. our emergency services do an amazing job, day in and day out, and there is absolutely no doubt that on that fateful night individual firefighters gave totally of themselves. they bravely went into a of themselves. they bravely went intoa building, of themselves. they bravely went into a building, having spoken to some of them afterwards, they said it was a fire like they had never seen before, yet they bravely put themselves in danger to try to rescue others. but it is also clear from sir martin moore—bick‘s report that he does raise questions of the command structure, training and communications in london fire brigade, which all need to be
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addressed. i think we are used to seeing, indeed we expect that when there is an emergency, our emergency services will work seamlessly, both in teams within an individual service but also in services working together. but, sadly, what we saw on that fateful night was that this was not the case. now these were the most challenging of circumstances, and none of us should take that away, the fact that people were dealing with something they had not seen the likes of before, and having to respond with instant decisions and split—second decisions about what to do, but there is absolutely no doubt from sir martin moore—bick‘s report that lack of communication and lack of the passing on of information, crucial information, had an impact on the response that was given, and there isa response that was given, and there is a particular quote in the report
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that i wanted to refer to, where he says the chaotic nature of the communication links meant that neither the control room nor the command units nor the incident commander could know whether rescue attem pts commander could know whether rescue attempts had been made in response to calls, or if they had, what had been the outcomes. that seamless working together is important within teams, but also across the services. it is so important that when our emergency services attend an emergency, they are able to work together in the best possible way in dealing with that. when i was home secretary, i oversaw the jessop dealing with that. when i was home secretary, i oversaw thejessop work of the work on the joint emergency services protocol project. the whole purpose of this was to ensure that there was a way of working together between our emergency services that enable them to provide the services wa nted enable them to provide the services wanted them to provide, and yet on this night we saw for example that a
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major incident was declared i think by each of the services at different times, but they did not communicate it to each other, and again sir martin moore—bick makes this point, when he says one of the consequences of the declaration of a major incident by emergency services is that there should be conversation between the control room leads. it was a requirement of the procedure manual, the evidence that such a conversation took place is at best unclear. this need to communicate is very important, and it is an issue thatis very important, and it is an issue that is absolutely right that sir martin moore—bick has raised is something that needs to be addressed in his recommendations. i then want to just in his recommendations. i then want tojust comment in his recommendations. i then want to just comment on what i think must be in many ways the most heartbreaking aspect of the report for the survivors, and that is the
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use of the doctrine to stay put. i can quite understand why there was a doctrine of staying put. the experience was that normally in fires in tower blocks, in a flat in a tower block, that fire would remain in that flat and be able to be dealt with in that flat, the compartmentalisation that people talk about, the containment within a flat. but of course this did not happen in this circumstance. something else happened, because of the cladding being on the outside of the cladding being on the outside of the building. so that doctrine of stay put had been developed for good reasons, because that was the normal experience the firefighters had. the problem was not that that was that doctrine in those circumstances, the
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problem was that there was no flexibility, faced with different circumstances, to know how to deal with those and how to respond, and although, as we see in the report, ata although, as we see in the report, at a point in time, and although, as we see in the report, ata point in time, and my although, as we see in the report, at a point in time, and my right honourable friend referenced that point, there was a decision taken to evacuate, rather than to continue to operate stay put, even at that time, the messages that were getting through were not clear, and the m essa g es through were not clear, and the messages being given by the control room were not as clear as they should have been. and one of the issues here is ensuring that the training is there to make sure that those who are on the ground making decisions know that they have that flexibility to make a different decision, but also know when and how to exercise that flexibility. and this had an impact. if i mayjust give this, because it had an impact. on the friday after the fire, when i
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was visiting survivors in hospital, i met one family, and the father said that he and his wife and child had been told to stay put in their flat. others had been brought into their flat as a place of safety. there came a point when this father took the decision that they could no longer stay in the flat, took himself and his wife and his child, said what he was doing, took his health has his wife and his child out of their flat. they survived. the others did not. so this had an impact that night. now the worst thing that would happen now would be to lurch to a situation where people would say we can't have stay put at all, because there will be circumstances where stay put is still the right advice to give, but what is important is that that flexibility is provided, i'm sorry, ifi flexibility is provided, i'm sorry, if ijust finished the sentence i will give way to the honourable
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gentleman, that training is provided, so that individuals know when and how they can exercise that flexibility and change that.“ there is to be this change, a flexibility in which they may be a full evacuation from time to time, which she agreed that sprinkler systems, at least in communal areas, that having more than one means of escape, and having a central alarm system would all be essential, and g re nfell tower would system would all be essential, and grenfell tower would have benefited from those measures? would she support those being introduced in new buildings and retrofitted?” think first of all, i have been asked on the issue of sprinklers on asked on the issue of sprinklers on a number of occasions. of course it was not the response that sprinklers should be fitted in all high tower blocks, but that the landlord should look at that issue. sir martin moore—bick is going to address the sprinkler issue in part two. he
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references that. makes the point i have just made about the house fire. on the issue of the means of escape, i think there is a question, because there was that central stairway in g re nfell tower, there was that central stairway in grenfell tower, and i think there was a question, which was raised, has been raised by the firefighters, about that question of the means of escape. but this, i think, about that question of the means of escape. but this, ithink, is another issue that part two of the enquiry will be likely to look at, as it is looking at the requirements and the regulations that are necessary for the future. so, mr speaker, there are issues, saddam, madame deputy speaker, there are issues about the cladding and responsibility for why this fire was enabled to happen by the circumstances of the building. i set up circumstances of the building. i set up the enquiry to get to the truth. i think that sir martin moore—bick
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has shown that he is capable and determined to get to the truth. his report so far has been clear and uncompromising, and i have every expectation that his report on part two of the enquiry will be clear and uncompromising, whoever or whatever it needs to address. and i would expect that to happen. i welcome the government has a commitment set out by my right honourable friend to accept the recommendations, but change requires a willingness to change, and! change requires a willingness to change, and i do refer to paragraph 28.55 of the report, of volume four of the report, where sir martin moore—bick references the london fire brigade in response to the commission's evidence and says that he feels that only serves to demonstrate the lfb is an institution at risk of not learning the lessons of the grenfell tower fire. for the families and friends
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of those who lost their lives, the pain of that loss will never go away. but for their sake, and in memory of all who lost their lives, the lessons must be learned. theresa may, of course, prime minister at the time of the grenfell tower tragedy in june 2017, the time of the grenfell tower tragedy injune 2017, taking part in the debate into the release of the first part of the enquiry, an air of respect and solemnity in the house of commons, as many of the survivors and relatives of those who died monitor events from the public gallery above. boris johnson after monitor events from the public gallery above. borisjohnson after a minute's silence was held in honour of those 72 who died, borisjohnson telling mps that the survivors and the briefed had been —— the grieved had been overlooked before the fire and shamefully failed afterwards. the second phase of the enquiry will focus on why the circumstance of the fire including the design of the building, but several issues were
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addressed in the first part of the debate, with the labour leader jeremy corbyn saying the government's response to the fire had been too slow and too weak on every front, from rehousing the survivors to dealing with grenfell style acm cladding on hundreds of other tower blocks across the country, and saying that there were thousands of people living in homes with the same type of cladding still on their external walls. this of course following report by sir martin moore—bick, the first phase of the enquiry, looking into what happened. there was critical of the london fire brigade's response and also said the tower did not meet building regulation is was not response over building regulation is was not response over from building regulation is was not response over from the london fire brigade say they were disappointed by some of the criticism of individuals. the survivors group on the whole has welcomed the report on the whole has welcomed the report on the fire, calling for the government to treat its respond as a national emergency. we will keep an eye on
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that debate, it looked to be closing as theresa may took to her seat but any advance on that we will bring it to you. you are watching afternoon live, iam to you. you are watching afternoon live, i am simon mccoy, in a moment alice baxter will be telling us what is happening in the world business but first a look at the headlines. party leaders clashed in what is likely to be the last prime minister is question before the general election. the london fire brigade chief dany cotton and says she won't resign over the grenfell tower fire and says she is committed to take every action to improve public safety. the helicopter crashed into the clutha pub in glasgow was caused to pilot error according to an enquiry. 10 people died because the pilot didn't follow emergency procedures. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. facebook has agreed to pay a £500,000 fine imposed by the uk's data protection watchdog for its role in the cambridge analytica scandal. it had originally appealed the penalty. but as part of the agreement,
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facebook has made no admission of liability. us lawmakers have accused boeing of building "flying coffins" and engaging in a "pattern of deliberate concealment". the plane—makers' boss dennis muilenburg was quizzed by the senate commerce committee where its been accused of putting profits before safety in seeking approval for its 737 max 8 plane to fly — following the two deadly crashed that killed a total of 346 people. high street retailer next has blamed the hot weather for poor sales in august and september. a bellwether for the high street, next said sales had improved in october as the temperature fell. a boost in online sales, lead to an overall rise in the three months to october. more clues as to the health of the us economy, hours ahead of the latest interest rate decision by the us central bank, the federal reserve. the us economy grew at a 1.9% rate
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in the three months to september, slowing by less than expected. so what impact will that have on the fed's deliberations? it's widely expected to cut rates for the third time in a row in a few hours' time. vivienne nunis is outside the federal reserve in washington dc. so, vivian, why is another interest rate cut looking likely? an interest rate cut looking likely? an interest rate cut looking likely? an interest rate cut is certainly what markets are expecting. a rate cut of 25 basis points, it would bring the federal funds rate down to 1.5 and 1.75%. the reason the federal reserve is thinking about rate cuts and has been cutting rates so far twice sincejuly is because it is trying to shore up the economy and avert fears there could be a recession on the horizon. we have heard growing concerns that the us could be entering a slowdown, so the
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federal reserve is trying to boost the economy anywhere you can by cutting interest rates. that is why markets think another rate cut should be on the cards today. the fresh data showed the us economy is slowing slightly. it grew at a slower rate than it had done. so bets on for a third rate cut coming out of the us in a few hours' time. markets will be watching jerome paola's comments for what happens next. absolutely. once we get a clear decision on whether interest rates will be cut or put on hold, all attention will turn to that press co nfe re nce all attention will turn to that press conference of the chair of the federal reserve, jerome powell, gives afterwards during that press conference, investors will be watching for any clues that the federal reserve might be taking because that is really what they are concerned about. we know when the federal reserve has entered a period of rate cuts, it did in the 90s for
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instance, at that stage it did cut rates three times in a row and then put them on hold. investors will be waiting to see if that is the same plan this time or if there is another plan. all attention will be on the federal reserve later this afternoon. interestingly, some a nalysts a re afternoon. interestingly, some analysts are suggesting due to signs economic weakness has broadened since the fed began cutting rates backin since the fed began cutting rates back in this could make officials uneasy about providing too much guidance about their plans. any thoughts on that? certainly there has been various parts of the us economy that have been worrying the federal reserve. factory output in the us has actually been at its lowest in a decade over the past few months. we have also seen pretty lacklustre business investment, as businesses have really held off making those bigger purchases, investments, because they are worried about the uncertainty that comes with the us china trade will add a global slowdown as well. on the other side, there is some good news for the economy, we have seen
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consumer spending, and strong employment figures as well. all of that will be weighed up by the federal reserve when it comes to make its decision later this afternoon. all eyes will be on that. thank you. that is all the business news, back to you, simon, outside the houses of parliament. now for a look at the weather, first across to nick miller with the latest. a bright, chilly day out there at the moment across much of the uk, but not everywhere. there are quite big contrast out there, south—west england seeing some rain. just tell that story with some of our weather watcher jazz. i will take that story with some of our weather watcherjazz. i will take you to cumbria, well broken clouds, some sunny spells coming through, south—west england and the channel islands. fairly brisk winds as well. low pressure looking towards the south—west of the uk, whereas
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elsewhere high pressure is in control, still the odd shower running into north—east england and eastern scotland out of that cloud, as there will be through the rest of today and into tonight, but away from south—west england, the far south of wales, and in fact more of southern england overnight, it is going to be drive. and a range of temperatures as well, with cloud into cornwall and devon, 11 celsius, below freezing in the coldest parts of scotla nd below freezing in the coldest parts of scotland and into northern england, with a frost to start the day tomorrow and if you mist and fog patches around. we will keep those contrasts for another day tomorrow. however, the weather fronts are just weakening to the south—west. there may be a bit of earlier rain, especially for halloween towards the south coast of england gradually clearing, and is looking like a cloudy but still dry day across much of south—west england compared with today full stop we keep the cloud here, elsewhere good sunny spells, still perhaps a shower towards north—east scotland and a fairly chilly breeze. we are not expecting it to be as windy as it has been in south—west england with the rain that we have been having. and
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temperatures are pretty much out or a little bit below where we might expect them to be this time of year but there are weather changes in the way. low pressure looking to the south—west finally advances across the uk friday and saturday. the weather fronts have been waiting to come in and it means the claudia wet weather becomes more widespread across the uk, but we are changing the source of air coming our way so it is going to be feeling milder. friday, you just notice how different it is, so much cloud around, outbreaks of rain, some heavier bursts to southern areas to start the day, it is not going to be raining all day long and there will still be a few brighter moments here and there but a big change in temperatures particularly across england and wales but also into northern ireland, may be as high as 17 celsius in southern england. it is turning milder but the price to pay will be widespread rain across the uk, a selection of locations going into the weekend, wet at times, not all the time, could turn very windy with gales in places too so we will keep you updated. still
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something to play for in the detail for the weekend with but keep checking where you are, with many more locations available online and through the hour.
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hello. you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy, live at westminster. today at 3pm: the london fire brigade chief dany cotton insists she won't resign over the grenfell tower fire and says she is commited to taking every action to improve public safety. we will never forget the tragedy of that night. the 72 lives lost were just the worst thing ever. london fire brigade are truly sorry we couldn't save everybody that night. party leaders clash in what's likely to be the last prime minister's questions session before the general election. leadership means standing up for the people of this country, standing up for our police, standing up for our nhs, making sure it gets the funding that it needs. the choice at this election could
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not be clearer. people have a chance to vote for real change after years of conservative and lib dem cuts. the helicopter crash into the clutha pub in glasgow was caused by pilot error, rules an inquiry. 10 people died because the pilot didn't follow emergency procedures. we speak to a man who says he made exactly the same crossing as the 39 people found dead in a lorry in essex, and tells us he knew 12 of the group. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with holly hamilton. hello. we will be discussing sam burgess, the rugby league legend who has called time on his career due to a chronic shoulder injury. he describes it as the hardest decision of his life. more on that in half an hour. and nick miller has all the weather. it isa it is a dry day for much of the uk, but try telling that to the people
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of south west england. i will have the details of the weather changes to come. thanks, nick. also coming up, if you're sick of the long wait to board a plane, a new trial scheme could have the answer. hello, everyone. i'm simon mccoy. the head of the london fire brigade, dany cotton, has rejected calls for her resignation from survivors of the grenfell tower fire, following the release of a highly critical report into the disaster. the public inquiry found systemic failures in the way the brigade responded to the blaze, which killed 72 people injune 2017. meanwhile, borisjohnson has told mps that the bereaved and survivors were too often overlooked and ignored" in the months and ignored in the months
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and years before the tragedy. labour leaderjeremy corbybn described it as an avoidable tragedy. our home affairs correspondent sarah corker reports. operationalfailures by the london fire brigade. a tower block that didn't comply with building regulations. and 72 lives lost. the 1,000—page report concludes more people would have survived if the building had been evacuated sooner. and this morning, grenfell families held a minute's silence. they want you to please listen to their testimonies... they broadly welcomed the report's findings but, for many, it was heartbreaking to read. these are my family! why, why? i don't sleep, always crying. we don't want to see
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and want anybody else to go through what we have had to go through. and what we're still going through. the report confirmed the fire started due to an electrical fault in a fridge freezer, and the flames engulfed the tower block because it was covered in flammable cladding. yeah, hello, hi. there's a fire in grenfell tower. this was the first 999 call of the night. there were hundreds more. quick, quick, quick! they are on their way. and for nearly two hours, residents were told to stay put. and while firefighters were commended for their extraordinary courage, the report concludes the brigade's planning for a fire like grenfell was gravely inadequate. today, the head of the fire service, dany cotton, personally apologised. we will never, ever forget the tragedy of that night. the 72 lives lost were just the worst thing ever
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and london fire brigade are truly sorry we could not have saved everyone's life that night. the commissioner was criticised for her evidence in the inquiry when she said she would not have done anything differently that night. the report now, in black and white, shows what went wrong. so it's time the commissioner of the london fire brigade takes ownership of that, of those failings. the report says important steps must be taken to improve fire safety without delay. and it calls on the government to develop new guidelines for evacuating high—rise residential buildings. the government will be accepting all of the recommendations of the judge, sir martin moore—bick, in this first phase in the inquiry and we want lessons to be learnt urgently. families hope today's recommendations will help to bring in changes that could save lives. and this inquiry has some way to go yet.
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next year, it will consider questions on the cladding, building regulations and the role of the council. and there is some frustration that criticism has focused on the fire service and not those who managed and refurbished this building. but that will come in the inquiry next year. in the house of commons this afternoon, the prime minister played tribute to the victims of the fire. there exceptional tenacity in seeking justice has not always been matched by their faith seeking justice has not always been matched by theirfaith in seeking justice has not always been matched by their faith in the system's ability to deliver. this is no surprise. after all, they have been let down many times before. too often overlooked and ignored in the months and years before the tragedy and shamefully filled by the institutions that were supposed to serve institutions that were supposed to serve them in the days and weeks after it.
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labour mp david lammy — who has worked closely with the victims — told the house that he feared for those across the country who still live in building with the same type as cladding as the one that encased grenfell tower. it is still the case that there are men, women and children up and down the country sleeping tonight in buildings with that cladding. and so many years after the tragedy, does he not think in this sixth richest democracy in the world, we could not have done more to get rid of people sleeping in infernos across our country. well, earlier our correspondent daniela relp spoke to local democracy reporterjulia gregory about how today's report had been received by the victims of the fire. (sot) it seems to be quite hard hitting.
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there are some strong recommendations in terms of improving fire safety in buildings, there should be plans of high—rises available to the fire service. there should be regular checks on fire doors. there are recommendations for high and low rise and recommendations for the law is to be changed. what about the feelings of the families? did they have high hopes that this report could deliver? my sense in what i have heard of people were sceptical at the beginning and were not necessarily very —— very happy about who was cheering it. people i have spoken to today, and it's only a few people who have lost families, they have welcomed the remarks. they welcome the fact that it is even said the cladding was a major cause of the fire spreading so quickly and it should be removed from buildings as soon as possible. i think there
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is some concern. this doesn't bring families back. i think there is a real hunger that it isn't lost, like the previous house report. there is a general election coming up. people wa nt safer a general election coming up. people want safer homes for people to come out of this. how tough today the community here? i think it's very difficult. it's been long awaited. anywhere in this area, you can see the tower. people are badly affected. i spoke to a member of the community yesterday and he had a family member who escaped the fire. he is concerned about the trauma this will bring over the coming weeks and months. we have had many conversations over weeks and months. we have had many conversations over the past 18 months about mental health and suicide. people in the community
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have been lost since the fire. people are concerned about community members. the council and emergency services and health service need to support them. do you think people are feeling more optimistic about the second phase? well, there's been some criticism about the delays in getting the list of names from the te na nt getting the list of names from the tenant management organisation, the delay in the plans. there was an out of date evacuation policy. and i think people feel it might be setting up for what might happen next. it will be looking at why this building was so unsafe and why it caused such a devastating effect. we will return to that story throughout the afternoon.
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if there's one word to sum up the mood here this afternoon it's this, volatile. at what was probably the last prime minister's questions before a general election, the party leaders clashed over a number of issues including the nhs and, of course, brexit. after months of deadlock mps voted overwhelmingly last night to hold a general election on 12 december. backing in the house of lords appears a formality. the future of brexit and the country. labour leaderjeremy corbyn is promising to launch what he calls the most ambitious and radical campaign for change ever seen in the uk. our political correspondent iain watson reports. is this election a gamble, prime minister? well, he got the early christmas present he wanted, a general election. but sometimes, the gifts we look forward to the most turn out to be disappointing and winning a vote in parliament for an election isn't the same as winning an election. questions to the prime minister! the speaker will soon be standing down, john bercow was presiding
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for the last time over prime minister's questions and this elicited a rare tribute from boris johnson. although we may disagree about some of the legislative innovations you have favoured, there is no doubt in my mind that you have been a great servant to this parliament and this house of commons. but the party leaders have no intention of paying tribute to each other, they are fighting for their jobs and they gave us a taste of the forthcoming election campaign. the biggest ever investment in the nhs, 40 new hospitals that we are building as a result of the decisions that we are taking. note an emphasis on public services. the election will notjust be about brexit and jeremy corbyn seemed content to fight in this territory. as for these fabled 40 hospitals, that figure dropped to 20 and finally dropped to six. he claims the nhs is safe in his hands. why, then, has nhs privatisation doubled under this government? but it was also clear that personalities, as well as policies, would feature in this campaign.
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leadership means standing up for the people of this country, standing up for our police, standing up for our nhs, making sure that it gets the funding that it needs. the choice at this election couldn't be clearer. people have a chance to vote for real change, after years of conservative and lib dem cuts. but for the snp, who called for an early election, brexit will be front and centre of the campaign. we can talk about the impact of the brexit and they howl and complain because they know the reality, that it will damage people's life. isn't the truth that the prime minister is willing to throw scotland under his big red bus to deliver his brexit? more than 50 mps have announced they are standing down at this election and in the last 24 hours, the ex—conservative cabinet minister amber rudd, the former tory chairman sir patrick mclauchlan and the labour leadership challenger
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owen smith joined their ranks. it is clear we are effectively at the start of the general election campaign and polls suggest the conservatives appear to be comfortably ahead. but the 2017 election showed that the campaign itself can influence the outcome. and what is not yet clear is just how far people's views on brexit will be more important than their traditional party loyalties in determining the result. we have got a really volatile electorate at the moment. numbers of voters have changed their minds over the last four or five years since we have had so many elections. so that could play out in a number of different ways on the constituency level. the hope is that the election can cut through the brexit deadlock. but that didn't work in 2017 and it is not guaranteed before christmas either. our chief political correspondent vicki young is in parliament.
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simon, that was the longest prime minister's questions ever, an hour and 11 minutes. the ones before a general election tend to go on longer. also, it is a time for farewells from the dozens of members preparing to say goodbye. kenneth clarke standing down after 49 years as an mp. that election set to get under way in full flow in the next couple of days. let's speak to sammy wilson from the dup who is with me now. your party has obviously enjoyed a lot of influence in this hung parliament with the conservatives. i mean, they problem for you, or the risk i suppose, is that if the conservatives come back with a majority that they will not need you any more? i hope that during the time we were here, we tried to get things for northern ireland and northern ireland has
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benefited economically as a result of the confidence and supply arrangement we had. we also use our influence to stop things happening that would be detrimental to northern ireland. i don't know what the next election is going to produce, a hung parliament or a clear majority for one party or another. what we are doing, and a message to voters in northern ireland will be, return as many democratic unionist party members as possible because in the eventuality there is a hung parliament, the stronger the unionist block, the more power we will have. do you think the campaign in northern ireland will be dominated by the issue of brexit? particularly as what boris johnson issue of brexit? particularly as what borisjohnson is proposing is one you are opposed to? our supporters see this deal as being a grave matter for the union. and also for —— for our economy. putting a border down the irish sea, the fact
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we will be paying more on vat on energy bills. we will have to ally ourselves to the vat rate in the republic. this is the part of the uk where fuel poverty is at its highest. businesses will see cash flow problems because we are part of the eu customs code and that will impact our trade with our biggest market here in gb. there will be an economic focus to peoples anger, as well as a constitutional one. the prime minister has said it doesn't matter and we are going to leave one pa rt of matter and we are going to leave one part of the united kingdom in the european union whilst the rest leaves. you have been very critical ofjeremy corbyn over brexit. you would have more in common with him over the stand boris johnson.” don't think we would have very much
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in common with jeremy corbyn given his past support for terrorism in northern ireland and his current stands where he is clearly in support of a united ireland and would be in support of the republican view in northern ireland. on brexit, he will not put a border down the irish sea. we are not too sure what his position on brexit is, that's one of the problems. it's a difficulty the electorate will have. does he support or oppose brexit? hard or soft brexit? a second referendum? it's not clear where he stands on all of this. for a whole host of reasons, i don't think we will be rallying to the labour party. sammy wilson, thank you very much indeed. parliament is due to dissolve and pack out by wednesday morning. there are rumours that they will soon run out of business and they could finish a bit sooner and eve ryo ne they could finish a bit sooner and everyone can they could finish a bit sooner and everyone can get on to the election
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trail. a quick word about the house of lords. there needs to be a vote they are to allow a general election to ta ke they are to allow a general election to take place? that's right, they have to consider the general election bill. most people feel they will not oppose it. if the commons has said it is ok, it would be quite difficult for an unelected chamber to block it. with the conservatives and labour behind it, we expect that to go through without too much of a glitch later today. ok, we will talk to you later. thank you. you're watching afternoon live. these are our headlines. the london fire brigade chief dany cotton insists she won't resign over the grenfell tower fire and says she is commited to taking every action to improve public safety. party leaders clash in what's likely to be the last prime minister's questions session
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before the general election. the helicopter crash into the clutha pub in glasgow was caused by pilot error, rules an inquiry. 10 people died because the pilot didn't follow emergency procedures. in sport, sam burgess retired from by in sport, sam burgess retired from rugby league because of a shoulder injury. he says it is the hardest decision of his life. and the england women's side have their first female coach. mark robinson left following the heavy defeat in the ashes this summer. and the first player has secured their place in the last four of the wta tour finals. i will be back with more on all the stories at 3:30pm. the first phase of the enquiry into the grenfell tower fire has
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concluded. our correspondent daniela relph is near grenfell tower in west london for us. today has been —— an important moment for survivors and relatives. iamjoined by moment for survivors and relatives. i am joined by a representative from the organisation justice for grenfell. how do you feel, looking at the report today? it has been quite difficult, but at the same timel quite difficult, but at the same time i hope it has provided some answers for the bereaved survivors and relatives. this enquiry has been about them. i think some of the concerns they have raised have been answered in this report. but i am concerned, and i think a answered in this report. but i am concerned, and i thinka number of us in the community are concerned, at the enormous focus that has been put on the lfp. —— on the london fire brigade. that could be
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considered as a criticism of the firefighters who went in on the night. i think that has raised some anxiety within the community. at the same time, i think the report has been quite thorough. and hopefully has provided some answers to the bereaved survivors and relatives. there is a bit of a conflict, isn't there? we have spoken to some of the survivors today about the criticism for the london fire brigade. so many of them or their lives to the firefighters from that night. and yet criticism of the lfb have been wide—ranging today. yet criticism of the lfb have been wide-ranging today. the main cause of the spread of the fire was the cladding. and it wasn't the firefighters who put the cladding on the building. the firefighters went into a the building. the firefighters went intoa building the building. the firefighters went into a building that was a death trap, that was recognised as having failure is from a fire safety
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expert. having that kind of focus actually takes away some of where the finger should be pointing, really, which is actually why that building field. ahead of this enquiry, a lot of those who have been so deeply affected by the fire, they were sceptical of what the enquiry could achieve. is your sense that the report is more hard—hitting than they were expecting? probably. but at the same time, i think we are very mindful that enquiries produce recommendations. and there is no obligation on the statute books for governments to actually implement those recommendations. so it might be hard—hitting for many people, however, we still need reassurance that actually those recommendations are being funded. if you are going to make criticism of the london fire brigade, you need to fund them so
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that actually they can be a modern service in the 21st century with modern equipment. so actually the implementation of recommendations is key, especially the funding. and putting stuff on the statute books so that actually becomes real and people can have accountability for decisions that they make. there are some confusion about the first phase and the second phase and whether they are the right way round and in they are the right way round and in the right order. do you feel more hopeful about what might come out of the second phase in terms of the detail of the cladding, building recommendation —— building regulations? i'm afraid it doesn't. it's been a long time. by the time the second phase begins, you know, the second phase begins, you know, the key issue is what about the recommendations. what about stuff that needs to be done? sol recommendations. what about stuff that needs to be done? so i think that needs to be done? so i think that actually by the time the report
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comes out, the second phase will ta ke comes out, the second phase will take a yearand comes out, the second phase will take a year and a half in the report will come out probably some time at the end of 2021, at that point, there is a strong feeling from many others, that actually those responsible for putting the cladding on the building and for selling the cladding will be in the bahamas or the panama have disappeared. the organisations will have collapsed. that is the real concern, along with the numberof that is the real concern, along with the number of government ministers who did not act on recommendations. so, this is a long wait, but we know it is really significant for the country to understand the context in which grenfell happened, the context of cuts, privatisation, outsourcing, not listening to social housing tenants, and that's what led to
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grenfell, the deregulation. thank you. just to see that that crucial second phase of the grenfell tower enquiry begins early next year. thank you. the inquiry into the fatal crash of a helicopter in glasgow in 2013 has found that the accident was caused by pilot error. the report says the pilot failed to react correctly when the helicopter showed a low fuel warning. 10 people died in the crash on the clutha pub. here's our scotland correspondent lorna gordon. it was 22 minutes past ten on a friday night in november when the police helicopter fell out of the sky and crashed into the roof of the clutha bar. are you ok? the pub in the centre of glasgow had been packed with people listening to music.
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robert went to the bar to get us a drink. and that is when the helicopter came down. so i was able to get out fairly quickly once the door was opened. i have been through six years, almost six years now, of wanting to know what happened that night. and i still feel i don't know, there are still so many unanswered questions. the pilot of the helicopter, two police officers on board the aircraft and seven people who had been inside the pub, died that night. more than 30 others were injured. there was no mayday, the helicopter had no black box recorder. but the reason it crashed has never been in doubt. its engines flamed out because they had been starved of fuel. the pumps which supplied that fuel from the main tanks to the engines had been switched off. the fatal accident inquiry had one
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key question at its heart, why did this happen, why did the helicopter crash onto the roof of the clutha that night? the sheriff found that the pilot david traill had ignored low fuel warnings and said if the captain had followed procedures the accident would not have happened. captain traill, he said, took a chance that the low fuel warnings he received were erroneous and that was a conscious decision on his part, it was a decision that had fatal consequences for ten people. the report stated that the circumstances of the accident were so unusual that it is improbable they will ever be repeated. it also praised the dignity of the friends and relatives of those who died and those who had been left injured in this tragedy that shocked a city and changed many lives. time for a look at the weather.
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high pressure and control over much of the uk at the moment, so much of the uk is dry. you might be seeing some sunshine. not the case everywhere. let's look at the picture in cumbria from earlier. the sunshine is getting through. overcast with poor visibility. wet over the channel islands. and also for much of south—west england. the cloud is here and the rain has advanced, just fringing into south—west wales. low pressure in control. big contrast across the uk. southern coastal counties will be affected overnight. the odd shower for eastern scotland overnight. a clear and chilly night to come away from the mild ear in the south. some mist and fog patches to start the day. looking at the big picture
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going into tomorrow, weatherfronts are flirting with western parts of the uk. some rain close to southern coastal england to start halloween. gradually creeping southwards. cloud increasing over northern ireland. elsewhere, sunny spells again, a few showers for north—east scotland, but are largely dry story for thursday. temperature is pretty much where they have been for the past few days. something more mild lurking over the south—west. on friday, weather fronts are coming our way which will come in, along with low pressure over which will come in, along with low pressure over much which will come in, along with low pressure over much of the uk. there will be some mild air putting in for more of us, particularly for england, wales and northern ireland on friday. we will show you the picture on friday. it looks very different. more cloud across the uk. the blue indicating where there will
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be some outbreaks of rain. not raining all day long, increasingly blustery, temperatures as high as 17 celsius in southern england. still on the chilly side for scotland. temperatures will ease off again into the weekend. we will keep low pressure, so it will be cloudy, wet at times, wind it for some of us with deals in places as well. —— windy for some others. we will take a closer look at the weekend later. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the london fire chief dany cotton insists she won't resign over the grenfell tower fire despite criticism of her brigade's response to the incident. we will never, ever forget the tragedy of than night. the 72 lives lost were just the worst thing ever, and london fire brigade are truly sorry we couldn't have saved everyone's lives that night.
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party leaders clash in what's likely to be the last prime minister's questions session before the general election. the helicopter crash into the clutha pub in glasgow was caused by pilot error, rules an inquiry. ten people died because the pilot didn't follow emergency procedures. sport now on afternoon live with holly hamilton — with news on a retirement for one of england's best rugby league players. yes, that's right, this is someone often described as one of the greatest players of his generation, but sam burgess has been forced to call time on his rugby league career at the age ofjust 30. he's failed to recover from a chronic shoulder injury, and says his time has come to an end because he couldn't be himself on the field any more. he had three years left on his contract with australian nrl side the south sydney rabbitohs. burgess has been england captain, and had a brief spell in rugby union leading up to the world cup in 2015 which didn't go so well. announcing his retirement, he said it was one of the hardest
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decisions he's had to make in his life. his england teammatejohn batemen says it's a huge loss for the sport. it is pretty gut wrenching, i spoke to him the other week and he told me his shoulder was in a bad way, to be fair, and he mentioned little bits and bobs about retirement but i didn't really think it would come to that point. he was away is probably the player i wanted to look up to and always emulate, and he was one. i always followed and looked at what he did! i always followed and looked at what he did ijust wanted to follow his footsteps and obviously to see him having to retire, probably not the way he wanted to, it is pretty disappointed for him, i am gutted, you know what i mean? rugby union. wales have made 9 changes for their bronze medal match against new zealand on friday. the match will be warren gatland's last as coach after 12 years in the job. he's picked rhys patchell to start at fly half with dan biggar being dropped to the bench,
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while wing owen lane will make his wrold cup debut. it has been, you know, some experience, i have said on a number of occasions that i never thought i would have been in wales for 12 yea rs. would have been in wales for 12 years. i was lucky enough to have a couple of sabbaticals with the lions, and that was really good for me, mentally. obviously we are disappointed not to be in the final, but playing the all blacks, you have got to be pretty excited about that, so it really is a second home for me, being in wales and i will miss being there. but you have got to look forward and be excited about the opportunities going forward, so one more game and then start thinking about the next challenge. former australia international lisa kiteley will be the first full time female head coach of the england women's side. she will replace world cup winning coach mark robinson who left following the heavy defeat in the ashes this summer.
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keightley had previously been announced as the coach of the london spirit in the hundred next summer but will now be stepping down from that role. scotland have qualified for the t20 world cup in australia next year. they've beaten the uae in their playoff in dubai by 90 runs, having posted 198—6 in their 20 overs. the uae struggled in the chase eventually finishing on 108. scotland are the fifth of six teams to go through via the qualifying tournament. elina svitolina has become the first player to book her spot in the semi finals of the season ending wta tourfinals. she beat wimbledon champion simona halep in straight sets for her second win in the round robin phase. the defending champion won 7—5, 6—3 to make it seven straight wins in the tournament — stretching back to last year. halep's last group game will be against karolina pliskova — the winnerjoining svitolina in the last four. the czech beat us open champion bianca andreescu — after the canadian retired through injury after the first set. the tournament has already seen naomi osaka withdraw. meanwhile, at the paris masters, fabio fognini wasn't in the best of moods. he lost to canada's denis shapovalov
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and his racquet bore the brunt of his angst. handle and head snapped clean apart. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. somebody who can always keep his cool somebody who can always keep his cool, it is simon back at westminster. very funny. back to you later on. more on what is going on here at westminster, mps gearing up to fight a general election this winter, voters will head to the polls on december 12, a vote borisjohnson says will give the public a choice over the future brexit and the country. let's discuss this more, i'm joined by dawn foster,
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guardian columnist — and dan hodges, from the mail on sunday. dawn, high risk for all parties, there is an air of uncertainty i have not seen for a long time on an election. in living memory, i have not seen an election like it. normally you go into an election and even normally you go into an election and evenif normally you go into an election and even if it is close there is a clear message one party will win and the other party might run them close. but this time everything is up in the air. nobody knows what's going to happen, even the mps i speak to say that anything could happen. lots of them are quite scared but lots of them are also quite excited, and i think they are excited about the fa ct think they are excited about the fact that in many cases it is a 4—way split. and i think the public and the mps just want something to happen. they want the public to say we wa nt happen. they want the public to say we want this party or that party or even we want this party or that party or even just to stay the same. they wa nt even just to stay the same. they want some finality. dan, is it that or is it that actually this is another referendum as far as people are concerned on brexit? that brexit overrules everything?”
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are concerned on brexit? that brexit overrules everything? i think you have put the finger on what is going to determine the result of the election. i think the irony is that having set himself so stridently against a second brexit referendum, thatis against a second brexit referendum, that is effectively what boris johnson has called and what he needs. he needs this to be a brexit referendum, he needs a brexit general election. it was very interesting watching pmqs this afternoon, obviouslyjeremy corbyn was laser focused on the nhs. and, frankly, if jeremy corbyn was laser focused on the nhs. and, frankly, ifjeremy corbyn is successful on turning this into, if you like, an nhs election, then i thinkjeremy corbyn is going to do very well. if boris johnson thinkjeremy corbyn is going to do very well. if borisjohnson is turning into a brexit election i think it will do very well. there is a gamble over borisjohnson because there is a brexit party snapping at his heels. it is probably the biggest political gamble we have seen taken by a british prime minister. absolutely, theresa may called the election but frankly that
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at the time seem to be a no—brainer, she was so far ahead in the polls. but because obviously the backdrop to this was boris had just secured a deal. he had secured a deal, which had passed second reading by the not insignificant margin of 30 votes. so to actually call the general election against that backdrop is why it is even more of a gamble, if you like. dawn, we are surrounded by a british public who may be getting fed up with politics, i'm talking out there in the country. is that mirrored by the fact so many mps are actually standing down this time as well? i think so, actually standing down this time as well? ithink so, in actually standing down this time as well? i think so, in some respects. i think it has been over egged exactly how the public feel about the election. a lot of members of the election. a lot of members of the public really do want to have a safer stop a lot has changed since 2017, more since 2016, and i think some mps have just had 2017, more since 2016, and i think some mps havejust had enough and they want to move on. and i think also there is a huge amount of
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toxicity in politics at the moment because of how much brexit has divided everybody. we live in a very divided everybody. we live in a very divided society because brexit has overshadowed all of these things, and so! overshadowed all of these things, and so i think the conservatives will have to say we can actually do this, if you believe in us, and labour will turn around and say, how was the last decade of your life under austerity, do you want something different? do you think this election can detoxify this?” think there is a slim possibility, i think there is a slim possibility, i think if a party get a slim majority or manage to form a coalition be able to say, look, either the conservatives pulled through and brexit goes forward, or labour and a coalition comes through and you look ata coalition comes through and you look at a second referendum and possibly not leaving. but you need some form of finality, and i think until we have resolved brexit, then british politics will still continue to be very toxic. dan, a question i ask at every election, we have been through a few, all of us, will it be policies or personalities here?” think actually in this election it
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will be policies to an extent, because obviously brexit will be the backdrop, if not come to the fore of the election campaign. obviously with boris you have somebody who is virtually a political brand in his own right, and i think that is what the tories are banking on, they are banking on him having a much stronger campaign, and being able to engage with the electorate in a way theresa may could not come and with jeremy corbyn, a big question for labour is are we going to see a repeat of corbyn mania? are we going to see those huge crowds in the old jeremy corbyn chance ? to see those huge crowds in the old jeremy corbyn chance? we haven't talked about jo jeremy corbyn chance? we haven't talked aboutjo swinson and it is very clear what her policy will be and there are a lot of remainers out there. i think a big part of this is going to be the extent to which the lib dems and the labour votes whether they align or split, the extent to which that remain a vote coalescence. if there is significant tactical voting in constituencies,
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particularly with the remainers aligning behind whichever is the best place remain candidate, then boris is in a lot of trouble. if they remain vote splits, then i think boris is onto a winner and obviously another part of the backdrop is we have seen obviously the civil war that hasjust broken out in the people's vote campaign, which i think has delighted some in downing street, shall we say. and dawn, just looking ahead to what happens next, is this an election for someone to lose? the campaign itself is going to be much more important perhaps than previous ones have been. yes, absolutely. ithink if borisjohnson loses, he will have to stand down immediately and people will view him as the prime minister that finished off the tory party. every tory mp i have spoken to is very, very worried that if they lose, then the conservatives will be out of power for generations, and they have been weakened and weakened and weakened by that, but then with labour as well, i think if labour
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perform very poorly, jeremy corbyn and john mcdonnell have said they will stand down, at which point you have to look at what happens to labour? will it go back towards blairism, or if labour win will it change the party yet again? but financially they seem well prepared this time. yes, they have had the ma nifesto this time. yes, they have had the manifesto ready for a long time, lots of things are in place, and the labour party have managed to fund raise £200,000 in under 24 hours. momentum wanted to raise £50,000 in two days and managed to raise 100,012 hours, so there is a huge amount of money pouring in from very small donors, which is quite similar to what we have seen with bernie sanders. a lot of young people are very enthused and very excited and desperate to get out and campaign. the tories will be trying to get as much money from bigger donors and is possible, but they are very worried they still don't have a functioning youth wing who can go out and
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campaignfor youth wing who can go out and campaign for them. dan, much has been made of the timing of this, the winter, the pre—christmas cut of a cold, the dark, will that play a factor in this? it was certainly play a factor for those of us out there covering the election!” play a factor for those of us out there covering the election! i am aware of that! we don't know. another key element is to what extent is the electorate going to be mobilised and motivated to go out and vote. it is a key part of number ten's strategy, it has literally been framed as the people versus parliament election. again, if boris has a strategy right, dom cummings has a strategy right, dom cummings has his strategy right then the dark, cold won't deter people but if it does deter people, it is going to be boris's voters probably who will stay—at—home and then the gamble won't have paid off. dan, dawn, we are going to be talking about this again, i suspect. are going to be talking about this again, isuspect. good are going to be talking about this again, i suspect. good to see you. ina in a moment, alice baxter will be telling us what is happening in the
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business news. first the headlines. the london fire chief dany cotton insists she won't resign over the grenfell tower fire despite criticism of her brigade's response to the incident. party leaders clash in what's likely to be the last prime minister's questions session before the general election. the helicopter crash into the clutha pub in glasgow was caused by pilot error, rules an inquiry. ten people died because the pilot didn't follow emergency procedures. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. facebook has agreed to pay a £500,000 fine imposed by the uk's data protection watchdog for its role in the cambridge analytica scandal. it had originally appealed the penalty. but as part of the agreement, facebook has made no admission of liability. us lawmakers have accused boeing of building "flying coffins" and engaging in a "pattern of deliberate concealment". the plane makers boss dennis muilenburg was quizzed by the senate commerce committee where its been accused of putting
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profits before safety in seeking approval for its 737 max 8 plane to fly — following the two deadly crashed that killed a total of 346 people. high street retailer next has blamed the hot weather for poor sales in august and september. a bellwether for the high street, next said sales had improved in october as the temperature fell. a boost in online sales, lead to an overall rise in the three months to october. in the last decade, many organisations have made big strides in supporting lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender employees. but many lgbt people still choose not to disclose their sexuality at work, with many more senior executives feeling under pressure not to come out in the office. so the 2019 outstanding role model list celebrates the work being done by lgbt leaders across the globe to encourage wider inclusivity and understanding at work.
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and the outstanding list is the work of involve and suki sandhu is the company's founder and chief executive. just walk me through the breadth of business leaders who have made it onto your top role model list. because they are a pretty eclectic bunch. they certainly are, and very proudly so. we have pedro pina, the number one lgbt proudly so. we have pedro pina, the number one lg bt executive. proudly so. we have pedro pina, the number one lgbt executive. an exec at google who has been driving their programme for lgbt conclusion. then you have an limb who leads the chair of the scouts, public sector. —— ann limb. and then having someone who is trans, bobby picard, at bp, is one
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of their senior managers who is driving their trans—agenda of their senior managers who is driving their tra ns—agenda setting up driving their tra ns—agenda setting up the first transit city network with 55 partners across the uk. so all really worthy of being number one, as well as celebrating the straight allies who are also doing great things for our community, like joe is a boring year atjp morgan, who is their ceo for brazil. given the political climate there where every 19 hours and lgbt person is murdered, it is great to see someone like jose standing up murdered, it is great to see someone likejose standing up for our community and that climate. as you say, a very mixed bunch of people, spreading across industry. you mentioned pedro pina, you also have representatives from standard chartered bank, from goldman's, aviva, dow. what it is that all of these executives are doing in order to earn that place on your list? visit them alone or is it also the culture of the business in which they were? yes, so we have some very strict criteria as part of the
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judging process. they have to demonstrate what they are doing both inside the workplace for lgbt inclusion but also outside the workplace, and then we have a great panel ofjudges, including workplace, and then we have a great panel of judges, including laura brown, former ceo of bp, harriet green, the chairman of asia for ibm who help us to decide where these individuals are placed on the list. and they vary from doing things like setting up employee resource groups for the lgbt community, acting as executive sponsors to amplify their voice. there are a multitude of interventions the individuals do and the more they do the higher they claim in the list, hence the number once we have in those posts. 50 the criteria is clear, it is also clear lots of businesses are getting it right, hence your list, but a lot still aren't. some recent analysis from your own company has shown 35% of ftse 100 from your own company has shown 35% of ftse100 companies don't even mention lgbt and diversity in their annual reports were stopped there was a similarly damning bit of research out from glass door recently. what is it that other
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companies and sectors, what do they need to still do to improve the situation in their own environments? the research indicates and the reason we did this is because when you think of pride month, there are lots of brands for incidents that are changing their logo to be covered in the rainbow and to celebrate the lgbt community, and what we found with the ones that we re what we found with the ones that were celebrating it, it didn't translate in their definition of diversity of lgbt in their annual report. so i think what it means to us as we need more leaders and ceo and chairman to stand up and speak up. and ensure they are including lg bt up. and ensure they are including lgbt in their definition of diversity because the tone for inclusion starts from the top. that is who everyone is looking to in their organisation for how they should behave in our community. fascinating stuff. thank you. that is all of the business for this hour, i would that is all of the business for this hour, iwould be that is all of the business for this hour, i would be back in the next for a look at how the markets have fared over the course of the date was not back to simon now outside
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the houses of parliament for us. the family of a 21 year old british backpacker who's missing in cambodia have joined a search of the area. amelia bambridge has not been seen since last thursday. her brother and father took part in a search from a speedboat, following an unconfirmed sighting of a body floating in the water off the island of koh rong. our correspondent nick beake was on the island: another full day of searching has come to a close and no sign of amelia. more than 100 soldiers, sailors, divers involved in the operation and today as you say, amelia's family, people who have flown out to the family joined amelia's family, people who have flown out to the familyjoined in the search, and the focus today was probably 25 miles out to sea, and thatis probably 25 miles out to sea, and that is because that is where a local fisherman thought that he saw a body at the weekend. that is just one sighting, and today, when lots of boats were looking, they found nothing, so this agonising wait for the family continues, and really there has been no development since last thursday. that is when amelia's
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bag was found near the waterfront. in her bag was her purse, her bank cards, her phone, but there has been no sign of the 21—year—old, and her family say this disappearance is com pletely family say this disappearance is completely out of character. she has been described as somebody who is a meticulous planner. we know she had been saving up for two years working ina bank been saving up for two years working in a bank so she could follow her dreams, come out to asia and travel around here. she had been here a month, though, when she disappeared. the last sighting was in the early hours of last thursday morning. she was at a beach party. but since then there has been nothing. now, there is some speculation among locals here that she could have drowned. herfather here that she could have drowned. her father has here that she could have drowned. herfather has said here that she could have drowned. her father has said he thinks may be something sinister has happened, but really, for now, there are no a nswe rs , really, for now, there are no answers, but tomorrow morning the search will continue once again. returning to the election. december 12. the city of liverpool — world —famous for its
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music and football — was named european capital of culture in 2008. it's outward looking, and home to more than 37,000 businesses and several universities. a majority of its residents voted remain in the eu referendum, and in the last election its five seats were all won by labour. as the uk looks ahead to polling day, alison freeman has been finding out how the city might vote this time around. three years of brexit uncertainty has hung over liz's business, an international events company in the heart of liverpool. she voted remain and thinks an election is the last thing we need. i don't think this is going to be a general election as we know them, in the past. i think it literally is going to be an election to see who you vote for, in terms of, do we go out of europe or do we stay in europe? so you don't think we should have a general election? what do you think should happen next? whatever the deal is, and however the deal is, let's just try and get out now. the baltic triangle where liz's business is based is a hub for tech and creative small and medium—sized businesses. liverpool has received more than £1 billion of eu funding
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for projects, including development and the baltic is no exception. even the streets here in the baltic triangle, say, are funded by the european union. a clear message of how that is going to be managed post—exit must be answered by any party that is going to be credible to sme votes. all five of liverpool's mps are labour, but things have been turbulent here. the party is going to have to field three new candidates at the next general election, two of those vacancies have come about because mps left the party over their concerns about anti—semitism. for some students at the university, it is not about the individuals. personally, it doesn't really matter who the candidate is, it is more like what the party stands for. i want to be voting on the other stuff, but for me this is about brexit and stuff so i want to figure out
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who can do that best. you don't know what will happen until it has happened so it is a bit of a gamble but it's better than being in the state we are now. is social media going to help you to decide? you don't want to take it as it is and i think now people are more aware that what you see online isn't100% true, hopefully, because of that awareness, it should make people think about what they are reading. turnout in liverpool was high at the last general election, between 60% and 70% in all five constituencies, but there are concerns the date will cause problems for student voters. i personally will be, but it is the last day of semester, so a lot of people won't be here. the people we spoke to don't want this to be a single issue election, but hope as many people as possible turn out to vote. alison freeman, bbc news, liverpool. time for a look at the weather now with nick miller. some fine autumn day across much of the uk with occasional sunshine, so we will start with a weather watcher pick from north yorkshire. not
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everybody has seen the sunshine. far from it across a large part of south—west england. the cloud, rain, windy, close to weather fronts here, so low pressure close to the south—west of the uk, whereas further north and east, across the bulk of the uk, it is exerting its influence, so it is settled. that contrast continues as we go through this evening and into tonight. some rain, south—west england, south wales, running along more of softening and as well as the night goes on with brisk wind, eastern scotland, most places, a breakfrom the rain and mild weather in the south—west, will be drier, clear and chilly with a frost across much of scotland, and if you missed and fog patches as we start the day tomorrow. still with that contrast, high—pressure easing the way eastwards. still weather fronts close to the south—west at least initially tomorrow, outbreaks of rain across southern parts of england slowly clearing away. although cloudy, looking like a drier day in south—western when, not as windy, the odd shower into
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aberdeenshire, cloud increasing in northern ireland but many places getting to see some sunshine. still a chilly east or south easterly breeze out there and temperatures pretty similar to where they have been. a largely fine end to the day, going into the evening for halloween trick or treaters, but things change as we go into the friday we can period and it is more of a trick than a treat. low pressure moving in. whether france have been queueing up. they finally make their way into the uk. what does that make? although it is turning milder as the wind pushes round to south and south—westerly again, we get cloud, outbreaks of rain, and not just in south—west england but across the uk on friday there will be some rain at times, initially some heavier bursts running across southern areas, it will be a blustery day as well. but temperatures are coming up and certainly the further south you are, it will feel really quite mild if you get to see any brightness. and then low pressure moves right across then low pressure moves right across the uk into the weekend. if you take
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from this there will be rain at times, not all the time, it will be windy, perhaps gales in places, you won't go far wrong, but keep checking the latest.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy, live at westminster. today at four... the london fire chief dany cotton insists she won't resign over the grenfell tower fire despite criticism of her brigade's response to the incident. we will never, ever forget the tragedy of that night. the 72 lives lost were just the worst thing ever and london fire brigade are truly sorry we couldn't have saved everyone's life that night. party leaders clash in what's likely to be the last prime minister's questions session before the general election. leadership means standing up for the people of this country, standing up for our police, standing up for our nhs, making sure that it gets the funding that it needs. the choice at this election couldn't be clearer. shouts of agreement.
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people have a chance to vote for real change after years of conservative and lib dem cuts. an inquiry rules a helicopter crash into the clutha pub in glasgow was caused by pilot error. 10 people died because emergency procedures were not followed. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with holly hamilton. we will be hearing from the new england women's cricket coach and we will be having react to sam burgess av will be having react to sam burgess a's announcement that he is calling time on his rugby league career. that is at 4.30. thanks, holly, and we'll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past. nick miller has all the weather. it's a chilly day across much of the uk, but that is reining in the south—west. there is change on the way for all of us is that rain spreads everywhere by the end of the week. thanks, nick.
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also coming up, if you're sick of the long wait to board a plane, a new trial scheme could have the answer. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. the head of the london fire brigade, dany cotton, has rejected calls for her resignation from survivors of the grenfell tower fire following the release of a highly critical report into the disaster. the public inquiry found "systemic failures" in the way the brigade responded to the blaze, which killed 72 people injune 2017. meanwhile, borisjohnson has told mps that the bereaved and survivors were "too often overlooked and ignored" in the months and years before the tragedy. and labour leaderjeremy corbyn described it as an "avoidable tragedy". our correspondent, daniela relph is near grenfell tower
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in west london for us. simon, for the bereaved families and the survivors, this is a really important moment. they had hoped that the inquiry would help bring justice for the 72 people who died. and today they got some answers. operationalfailures by the london fire brigade. a tower block that didn't comply with building regulations. and 72 lives lost. the 1,000—page report concludes more people would have survived if the building had been evacuated sooner. and this morning, grenfell families held a minute's silence. they want you to please listen to their testimonies... they broadly welcomed the report's findings, but for many, it was heartbreaking to read.
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these are my family! why, why? i don't sleep, always crying. we don't want to see and want anybody else to go through what we have had to go through, and what we're still going through. the report confirmed that the fire started due to an electrical fault in a fridge freezer, and the flames engulfed the tower block because it was covered in flammable cladding. yeah, hello, hi. there's a fire in grenfell tower. this was the first 999 call of the night. there were hundreds more. quick, quick, quick! and for nearly two hours, residents were told to stay put. and while firefighters were commended for their extraordinary courage, the report concludes the brigade's planning for a fire like grenfell was gravely inadequate. today, the head of the fire service,
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dany cotton, personally apologised. we will never, ever forget the tragedy of that night. the 72 lives lost, were just the worst thing ever and london fire brigade are truly sorry we could not have saved everyone's life that night. the commissioner was criticised for her evidence in the inquiry when she said she would not have done anything differently that night. the report now, in black and white, shows what went wrong. so it's time the commissioner of the london fire brigade takes ownership of that, of those failings. the report says important steps must be taken to improve fire safety without delay. and it calls on the government to develop new guidelines for evacuating high—rise residential buildings. the government will be accepting all of the recommendations of the judge, sir martin moore—bick, in this first phase in the inquiry
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and we want lessons to be learnt urgently. families hope today's recommendations will help to bring in changes that could save lives. and this inquiry has some way to go yet. next year, it will consider questions on the cladding, building regulations and the role of the council. and there is some frustration that criticism has focused on the fire service and not those who managed and refurbished this building. but that will come in the inquiry next year. in the house of commons this afternoon, mps honoured the victims of the fire with a minute ‘s silence and then the prime minister paid tribute to those who died. yet their exceptional tenacity in seeking justice has not always been matched by theirfaith in the system's ability to deliver. this is no surprise. after all, they have been let down many times before, too often overlooked and ignored
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in the months and years before the tragedy, and, shamefully, failed by the institutions that were supposed to serve them in the days and weeks after it. jeremy corbyn took the opportunity to ask the government to ensure that all victims were rehoused, and demanded cladding be removed from blocks across the uk covered in the same cladding as grenfell. the failure to rehouse the survivors with some families, mr speaker, and this is shocking, still living in hotels and in temporary accommodation more than two years on, and the failure to reclad blocks identified with dangerous gre nfell—style cladding. there are hundreds, nay thousands of blocks of flats all over
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the country that need to be dealt with urgently now. the findings of the first phase of the inquiry has been well received. people still have questions, but they are satisfied and some are a little surprised at how hard hitting that first report is. but all eyes are now on next year, when the phase two of the inquiry begins. that is when the issues around cladding, building regulations and the refurbishment of grenfell tower will be looked at thoroughly. thank you. now back to the election and if there's one word to sum up the mood here this afternoon, it's this: volatile. at what was probably the last prime minister's questions before a general election, the party leaders clashed over a number of issues including the nhs and, of course, brexit. after months of deadlock, mps voted overwhelmingly last night to hold a general election on december 12th. backing in the house of lords appears a formality. borisjohnson says the public must be given a choice over
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the future of brexit — and the country. labour leader, jeremy corbyn, is promising to launch what he calls the most ambitious and radical campaign for change ever seen in the uk. our political correspondent iain watson reports. is this election a gamble, prime minister? well, he got the early christmas present he wanted, a general election. but sometimes, the gifts we look forward to the most turn out to be disappointing, and winning a vote in parliament for an election isn't the same as winning an election. questions to the prime minister! the speaker will soon be standing down. john bercow was presiding for the last time over prime minister's questions and this elicited a rare tribute from boris johnson. although we may disagree about some of the legislative innovations you have favoured, there is no doubt in my mind that you have been a great servant to this parliament and this house of commons. but the party leaders have no intention of paying tribute to each other. they are fighting for theirjobs,
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and they gave us a taste of the forthcoming election campaign. the biggest ever investment in the nhs, 40 new hospitals that we are building as a result of the decisions that we are taking. note an emphasis on public services. the election won'tjust be about brexit and jeremy corbyn seemed content to fight in this territory. as for these fabled 40 hospitals, that figure dropped to 20 and finally dropped to six. he claims the nhs is safe in his hands. why, then, has nhs privatisation doubled under this government? but it was also clear that personalities, as well as policies, would feature in this campaign. leadership means standing up for the people of this country, standing up for our police, standing up for our nhs, making sure that it gets the funding that it needs. the choice at this election couldn't be clearer.
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people have a chance to vote for real change, after years of conservative and lib dem cuts. but for the snp, who called for an early election, brexit will be front and centre of the campaign. we can talk about the impact of brexit and they howl and complain because they know the reality that it will damage people's life. isn't the truth that the prime minister is willing to throw scotland under his big red bus to deliver his brexit? more than 50 mps have announced they are standing down at this election and in the last 24 hours, the ex—conservative cabinet minister amber rudd, the former tory chairman sir patrick mclauchlan and the labour leadership challenger owen smith joined their ranks. it is clear we are effectively at the start of the general election campaign and polls suggest the conservatives appear to be comfortably ahead. but the 2017 election showed that the campaign itself can influence the outcome.
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and what is not yet clear is just how far people's views on brexit will be more important than their traditional party loyalties in determining the result. we have got a really volatile electorate at the moment. numbers of voters have changed their minds over the last four or five years since we have had so many elections. so that could play out in a number of different ways on the constituency level. the hope is that the election can cut through the brexit deadlock. but that didn't work in 2017 and it is not guaranteed before christmas either. iain watson, bbc news, westminster. with me now is the conservative mp siralan duncan. you have just had your last pmqs. yes, indeed. ithought you have just had your last pmqs. yes, indeed. i thought i you have just had your last pmqs. yes, indeed. ithought i might you have just had your last pmqs. yes, indeed. i thought i might say something and then i thought not, because i was beginning to find it quite emotional. after 27 years and god knows how many prime ministers,
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i thought, this is the last one. you are not regretting your decision? no. it's difficult. you have to be very self—aware in this business and i thought that after 27 years, i can sit there being in on events, but being so wise and all this kind of stuff, no one would really listen. politics has changed. in the days when people of deep experience would stay in politics because their political career could be ministerial, they could earn some money, but stay in the pull of politics, have gone. you can't earn money and stay in politics these days. it has become a much more full—time professional occupation. i think it's full—time professional occupation. i think its basis of knowledge of the outside world has got shallower. but i thought this was the moment. i have done my 27 years in parliament. the basson has passed and the next generation, and i am just about young enough to go and do some more fulfilling things. this afternoon,
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we had the final pmqs before the general election and the knock—about stuff that we have all got used to. then we had the grenfell inquiry report debate and suddenly, you saw a glimpse of what parliament should perhaps really be about. funnily enough, i think both the prime minister's questions before it and the grenfell debate were good exa m ples of the grenfell debate were good examples of what parliament should be because there was a sort of end of parliament feeling because the election has been called. so prime minister's questions lasted an hour. there were a lot of courteous references to people service in the house and some tributes to the speaker. but you are right, once it got to the grenfell tower debate, andi got to the grenfell tower debate, and i thought the prime minister and jeremy corbyn and theresa may set a very sombre, analytical, thoroughly researched tone in the debate, and
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it was a credit to parliament. looking back on your career, what would be the highlight?” looking back on your career, what would be the highlight? i have done lots of different things. i ran the william hague leadership contest. which he won. i have had seven shadow cabinet positions, seven yea rs shadow cabinet positions, seven years as shadow cabinet positions, seven yea rs as a shadow cabinet positions, seven years as a minister in development and foreign affairs, been on the intelligence committee, the first openly gay conservative. i wouldn't pick any one of those as the highlight, but the combination of what i hope has been a contribution, i would like to think amounted to something. i never hit the great heights of cabinet office, because the business is 90% luck. and different characteristics count in this age and i don't regret that. i am not upset by it for a second. i am not upset by it for a second. i
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am gratefulfor am not upset by it for a second. i am grateful for having spent the best pa rt am grateful for having spent the best part of three decades being in the midst of this great country's politics. which is going through a huge change at the moment. is it going to be an election on policies? we saw at pmqs, jeremy corbyn picking on the nhs. or is it going to be absolutely dominated by the one issue that is dominating politics, which of course is brexit? i think brexit will be the main issue and a polarising issue. it is also going to be a complicating factor because it will become entangled as a single issue amidst what is a general election. so we are going to see notjust a contest between two polar opposites, the blue corner and the red corner, which is what has happened in elections before. you're going to see 650 different contests in each individual constituency where a lot of them will be four cornered fights
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where the liberal democrats are rising as the singular "we are going to stay" party, the conservative dominant, with boris johnson to stay" party, the conservative dominant, with borisjohnson clearly being the most dominant political character in the country, labour really suffering and brexit being there. but however play out in each individual contest? but i think we are ahead in the polls, although the results will not reflect that scale of lead because it doesn't mean our votes are of lead because it doesn't mean our votes a re in of lead because it doesn't mean our votes are in the right place. but if i had to put money on it today, i think borisjohnson will be returned with a working majority. your tory colleagues, who at the moment have very thin majorities, are you concerned that they don't have the control they would have in previous elections because of that issue of brexit and tactical voting may play a part this time? i think there will
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be tactical voting, but in a lot of those marginal seats, we won with a slim majority over labour. but we are seeing that labour are pretty weak. as the major opposition party, they are a long way behind us. but in the four cornered fights that you might have, the lib dems might pick up might have, the lib dems might pick up and labour have not risen at all. they could increase those marginal majorities in a number of seats. so iam majorities in a number of seats. so i am relatively optimistic. let's be personalfor a moment. if you were talking to the young alan duncan 20 yea rs talking to the young alan duncan 20 years ago here, what advice would you have given him that you might give someone now considering going into politics? that is a sort of "would you do it again" question. it is far less dignified. it has become coarser and ruder. since i came in
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30 years ago, you have seen the rise of 24 hour news and social media, and social media is deeply abusive, caustic, nasty, vile, anti—social media, i would call it. because of 24 hour news, we see a lot of government by press release rather than government by deeply researched decisions and policies. i think it has become a less pleasant, less effective process. i don't agree that speaker burqa has enhanced parliament. he has allowed a lot of mps to ask the same questions again and again —— speaker bercow. but we are down useless at legislating, and thatis are down useless at legislating, and that is ourjob is that we are the legislature. so all the backbenchers wa nt to legislature. so all the backbenchers want to become a minister and they pay no attention to making our law. so they stand there bleating,
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saying, i don't like this, but what do they do to make the difference? you have got to change the law. and i don't think we do that well enough. good to see you. enjoy not being here for a while.” enough. good to see you. enjoy not being here for a while. i will try! it will be quieter. we are expecting the debate in the house of lords to effectively rubber—stamp, although it is unlikely they would do anything otherwise, the decision taken here anything otherwise, the decision ta ken here last anything otherwise, the decision taken here last night for a general election to take place on december the 12th. let's pick up on tactics. with me now is the former labour advisorjohn mcternan. you are nodding to a lot of what sir alan was saying. do you agree that politics has taken a downward step? i thought he was right about the tone coarsening, but i thought he was profound when he said legislation is the purpose of the
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house of commons. they haven't focused on legislation for the last three years. we have got a general election because the prime minister doesn't want the scrutiny of the house of commons on the withdrawal agreement bill. so the core function, passing the right laws, not bad laws, that is what the workplace is about. some of the public scrutiny is good for the commons but some of it focuses on their public person and not the day job, which is legislation. but the reason we are having a general election is because borisjohnson wa nts a election is because borisjohnson wants a majority. do you think the issue at this election will be the policies thatjeremy corbyn was highlighting in premises questions, or is it going to be brexit? is it effectively going to be another referendum? theresa may called an election when she had a majority in the house of commons because she wa nted the house of commons because she wanted a bigger majority. she ended up wanted a bigger majority. she ended up with a minority government
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supported by the dup. as karl marx said, history repeats itself. the first time a tragedy, the second time as farce. we could be facing a similar thing here. if boris johnson, with the majority he question of —40, goes out to look for a majority. but as sirjohn curtice, the great psephologists from strathclyde university, says, where other seats going to come from? he is going to lose to the liberals in england. he will lose to the snp in scotland. he could win 50 labour seats? name me ten or 15 seats that labour could lose. i wonder if this election will be one week about brexit and three weeks about what we can see going up and down behind us, buses, the day—to—day things. austerity has meant bus route cuts and higher fa res meant bus route cuts and higher fares on rail. it is the housing crisis. on those issues, jeremy corbyn had a strong song the last time round. have the tories got more
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than one message? if it is only brexit, attention wanders. voters' mines go on to, what about my life? that was in evidence in premises questions, withjeremy corbyn pushing on the nhs. is that how labour are going to play this? labour are going to play this? labour are going to play this? labour are going to work on two things. one is, don't trust that man. and then they will go straight to bed in butter, housing, nhs and link that back to trust, going, are you negotiating secret deals with the americans to sell chlorinated chicken to us? this is not going to bea chicken to us? this is not going to be a nice election. there are character issues on both sides. boris and corbyn have character issues. he is not trusted by northern working—class voters. he doesn't believe in defending our country. he trusted the russians over salisbury rather than the british secret services. so there is
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a big area of doubt over corbyn. so the question is, can corbyn mobilise the question is, can corbyn mobilise the distrust of boris over brexit, or can boris mobilise the distrust about corbyn over all the issues about corbyn over all the issues about his politics, his extreme left politics and policies, which would be damaging to the economy if labour we re be damaging to the economy if labour were in government and bring them in? you describe this as a two-party race, but it's not. we haven't mentioned the brexit party and the liberal democrats and the green party. and plaid cymru. it is all to play for. alan duncan touched on this. it is not one election, it is 615 specific elections. you will see some collaboration between the greens and plaid cymru. the lib dems learned a lesson from brecon and radnorshire. you can make a difference by an alliance. i think we will see tactical voting on the remain side and the leave side, but you're right. borisjohnson's gamble is that by going for an election, he
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can pull together all the leave votes. the brexit party votes and conservative votes put together would be an overwhelming majority. the problem for him is that the brexit party stormed through in the european elections immediately after theresa may failed to leave the european union. boris is now calling an election after he has failed to leave the european union. not a fighter only has one thing to say. he can say, that man could have had a clean break brexit. he didn't do it, he kept us in the european union. vote for the brexit party if you want to leave. that is enough to run interference on boris and causing real problems. as a campaign, this is a blank sheet of paper, isn't it? we don't know where it will go. that is right. number ten and boris johnson it will go. that is right. number ten and borisjohnson are very strong on "the public want to get this done". i have no doubt that the public are bored of brexit. the possibility is that the public board
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of politics. so if somebody can come storming through with a new way of talking about things, or a new conversation, or the concerns about the public have been focused on brexit. what if you find a new way of gathering people up and saying, you are worried about your kids' future, the cost of living, housing prices, jobs, transport. that person could scoop up a lot of votes and run away with them. we are in very u nsta ble run away with them. we are in very unstable politics. four or five parties are fighting in some seats. it is going to be full employment for commentators and full implement for commentators and full implement for psephologists and pollsters. we all need to fasten our seat belts. great see you. —— great to see you. let's take a look inside the house of lords....
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asi as i say, we are not expecting anything to prevent the election going ahead on december the 12th, but the debate is under way. you're watching afternoon live from bbc news. as you've been hearing, the inquiry into the fatal crash of a helicopter in glasgow in 2013 has found that the accident was caused by pilot error. the report says the pilot failed to react correctly when the helicopter showed a low fuel warning. 10 people died in the crash on the clutha pub. here's our scotland correspondent lorna gordon. it was 22 minutes past ten on a friday night in november when the police helicopter fell out of the sky and crashed into the roof of the clutha bar. are you ok? the pub in the centre of glasgow had been packed with people listening to music. it has been close to a six—year wait for relatives to get some answers. they are disappointed. robert went to the bar
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to get us a drink. and that is when the helicopter came down. so i was able to get out fairly quickly once the door was opened. i have been through six years, almost six years now, of wanting to know what happened that night. and i still feel i don't know, there are still so many unanswered questions. the pilot of the helicopter, two police officers on board the aircraft and seven people who had been inside the pub, died that night. more than 30 others were injured. there was no mayday, the helicopter had no black box recorder. but the reason it crashed has never been in doubt. its engines flamed out because they had been starved of fuel. the pumps which supplied that fuel from the main tanks to the engines had been switched off. the fatal accident enquiry had one key
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question at its heart — why did this happen, why did the helicopter crash onto the roof of the clutha that night? the sheriff found that the pilot, david traill, had ignored low fuel warnings and said if the captain had followed procedures, the accident would not have happened. captain traill, he said, took a chance that the low fuel warnings he received were erroneous and that was a conscious decision on his part. it was a decision that had fatal consequences for ten people. the report stated that the circumstances of the accident were so unusual that it is improbable they will ever be repeated. it also praised the dignity of the friends and relatives of those who died and those who had been left injured in this tragedy that shocked a city and changed many lives. lorna gordon, bbc news. you're watching afternoon live from westminster. i'm just going to show you what is happening literally over
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there are st stephen ‘s gate in westminster. that is where liberal democrat mps are gathering for what looks like a news conference. no sign yet ofjo swinson, but tom brake, vince cable, chuka umunna, ed davey, tim farron in the background, the former leader, they are all getting ready for a news conference announcing the start of their campaign. they are laying out what they see as the issues that will be debated in the coming weeks before that election on december the 12th. vicki young will be there and we will find out more from them later. now look at the weather with nick miller. anotherfine, drier day out there across much of the uk. not all of us, though. again in south—west england, some rain, nudge toward
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south wales, ran this evening and overnight across more of southern england as well, especially southern coastal counties. now elsewhere bar the odd shower in north—east england, it will be dry overnight, clear skies turning chile and in fa ct a clear skies turning chile and in fact a frost across parts of scotla nd fact a frost across parts of scotland and northern england, just as we saw this morning, if you missed and fog patches around as well, but with some sunshine once those clear in the morning. some early rain affecting southern parts of england, slowly clearing away southwards, for many of us a dry day with sunny spells, the odd shower running into aberdeenshire. crowd —— cloud increasing in northern ireland more than today and as for those wines, still a breezy, chilly easterly coming but not as windy as it has been in south—west england, temperatures are fairly similar to when i have been, as we look to the rest of the week and weekend, my milder but claudia, wetter, windier.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the london fire chief dany cotton insists she won't resign over the grenfell tower fire despite criticism of her brigade's response to the incident. we will never, ever forget the tragedy of that night, the 70 lives lost were just the worst thing ever, and london fire brigade are truly sorry we couldn't have saved eve ryo ne sorry we couldn't have saved everyone has make life that night. party leaders clash in what's likely to be the last prime minister's questions session before the general election. leadership means standing up for the people of this country, standing up for our police, standing up for our nhs, making sure that it gets the funding that it needs. the choice of this election couldn't be clearer. people have a chance to vote for real change after years of conservative and lib democrats.
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an inquiry into a helicopter crash in glasgow in 2013 has found that it could have been prevented if the pilot had followed emergency procedures. sport now on afternoon live with holly hamilton where injury has forced one of england's best rugby league players to call it a day.... he's been described as one of the greatest players of his generation. but sam burgess has been forced to retire from rugby league at the age ofjust 30. he's failed to recover from a chronic shoulder injury and says his time has come to an end because he couldn't be himself on the field any more. he had three years left on his contract with australian nrl side the south sydney rabbitohs. burgess has been england captain and had a brief spell in rugby union leading up to the world cup in 2015 which didn't go so well. announcing his retirement, he said it was one of the hardest decisions he's had to make in his life. his england teammatejohn batemen says it's a huge loss for the sport.
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it is pretty gut wrenching, i spoke to him the other week and he told me his shoulder was in a bad way, to be fair, and he mentioned little bits and bobs about retirement but i didn't really think it would come to that point. he was away is probably the player i wanted to look up to and always emulate, and he was one. i always followed and looked at what he did ijust wanted to follow his footsteps and obviously to see him having to retire, probably not the way he wanted to, it is pretty disappointed for him, i am gutted, you know what i mean? rugby union. wales have made 9 changes for their bronze medal match against new zealand on friday. the match will be warren gatland's last as coach after 12 years in the job. he's picked rhys patchell to start at fly half with dan biggar being dropped to the bench, while wing owen lane
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will make his world cup debut. it has been, you know, some experience, i have said on a number of occasions that i never thought i would have been in wales for 12 years. i was lucky enough to have a couple of sabbaticals with the lions, and that was really good for me, mentally. obviously we are disappointed not to be in the final, but playing the all blacks, you have got to be pretty excited about that, so it really is a second home for me, being in wales and i will miss being there. but you have got to look forward and be excited about the opportunities going forward, so one more game and then start thinking about the next challenge. former australia international lisa keightley will be the first full time female head coach of the england women's side. she replaces world cup winning coach mark robinson — who left after their humbling ashes defeat this summer. keightley says she can't wait to get started. it is really exciting. i feel ready
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to go and wanting to get into it, to be honest. at the same time get tested to get better. not only the plays, tested, so are the star. i am a real big believer that you have to grow, and that is part of the reason why i am really interested in this job. scotland have qualified for the t20 world cup in australia next year. they've beaten the uae in their playoff in dubai by 90 runs... having posted 198 for 6 in their 20 overs... the uae struggled in the chase eventually finishing on 108. scotland are the fifth of six teams to go through via the qualifying tournament. elina svitolina has become the first player to book her spot in the semi finals of the season ending wta tourfinals. she beat wimbledon champion simona halep in straight sets for her second win in the round robin phase. the defending champion won 7—5, 6—3 to make it seven straight wins in the tournament —
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stretching back to last year that's all the sport for now. hugh ferris will have more after 5pm. but for now it's back to simon at westminster. back to the forthcoming general election. borisjohnson boris johnson and jeremy corbyn borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn have clashed over the nhs, brexit and leadership at the last prime minister's questions today. voters will go to the polls on 12 december. he is everything you need to know about making sure are registered to vote. sorry, could you repeat the question. i have no idea. idon't know how the actual process goes. not another one!
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so now you know. the city of liverpool — world —famous for its music and football — was named european capital of culture in 2008. it's outward looking, and home to more than 37,000 businesses and several universities. a majority of its residents voted remain in the eu referendum, and in the last election its five seats were all won by labour. as the uk looks ahead to polling day, alison freeman has been finding out how the city might vote this time around. three years of brexit uncertainty has hung over liz's business, an international events company in the heart of liverpool. she voted remain and thinks an election is the last thing we need. i don't think this is going to be a general election as we know them, in the past.
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i think it literally is going to be an election to see who you vote for, in terms of, do we go out of europe or do we stay in europe? so you don't think we should have a general election? what do you think should happen next? whatever the deal is, and however the deal is, let's just try and get out now. the baltic triangle where liz's business is based is a hub for tech and creative small and medium—sized businesses. liverpool has received more than £1 billion of eu funding for projects, including development, and the baltic is no exception. even the streets here in the baltic triangle, say, are funded by the european union. a clear message of how that is going to be managed post—exit must be answered by any party that is going to be credible to sme votes. all five of liverpool's mps are labour, but things have been turbulent here. the party is going to have to field
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three new candidates at the next general election, two of those vacancies have come about because mps left the party over their concerns about anti—semitism. for some students at the university, it is not about the individuals. personally, it doesn't really matter who the candidate is, it is more like what the party stands for. i want to be voting on the other stuff, but for me this is about brexit and stuff so i want to figure out who can do that best. you don't know what will happen until it has happened so it is a bit of a gamble but it's better than being in the state we are now. is social media going to help you to decide? you don't want to take it as it is and i think now people are more aware that what you see online isn't always 100% true, hopefully, because of that awareness, it should make people think about what they are reading. turnout in liverpool was high at the last general election, between 60% and 70% in all five constituencies, but there are concerns the date will cause problems for student voters. i personally will be, but it is the last day of semester, so a lot of people won't be here. the people we spoke to don't want this to be a single issue election, but hope as many people as possible turn out to vote. alison freeman, bbc news, liverpool.
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iam going i am going to take you over to saint stephen's green. forgive me because i was about to interview another mp. jo swinson is talking, lib dems, let's hear from her. is at sta ke, let's hear from her. is at stake, and make no mistake, i stand here ready to take on borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn as candidate to be prime minister. the liberal democrats are on the up. we beat both labour and the conservatives in the european elections. we have more members than ever before, we have raised more money for this election than ever before and we have been joined by mps joining than ever before and we have been joined by mstoining us than ever before and we have been joined by mps joining us from than ever before and we have been joined by mstoining us from both labour and the conservatives, and this is a superb team to take to the
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country. we have a bold vision to stop brexit and build a better, brighter future stop brexit and build a better, brighterfuture for our stop brexit and build a better, brighter future for our country and we look forward to doing just that. applause jo swinson. let's pull away from there. joining me now is the conservative mp for st ives, derek thomas. you will have been looking at that because you have a very slim majority, 312, and it is the liberal democrats who at the moment are chasing you. what is the strategy going to be? i have been there four and half years, i took the seat from the liberal democrats after quite a good, positive campaign and i continue to be positive in the way i can approach the constituency. i have worked extremely hard to make sure west cornwall and the other city is well represented. so my positive campaign will be all about how we can have a healthier and greener environment both in west cornwall, and also on silly. i will
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make it positive so people understand the opportunities available if we can get on with the job. you haven't even mentioned brexit. i haven't because people wa nt brexit. i haven't because people want that done so they can move onto this. boris and pmqs made that very clear, let's get brexit done because it helps us to concentrate on how we ca re it helps us to concentrate on how we care for the environment, how we make sure that actually we create really skilled jobs in response to the climate crisis, so in construction, renewable energy, in responding to all the challenges we face, there is a real opportunity for areas where low wages are the norm to actually bring up those wages and make life much better for people in a healthier, greener place. you seem to be agreeing more with jeremy corbyn, place. you seem to be agreeing more withjeremy corbyn, who in prime minister's questions were saying policies will be fought on this election, it is not about brexit. but isn't there a risk that brexit overs ha d ows but isn't there a risk that brexit overshadows everything here? that is possible and the only reason we are here is because jeremy corbyn and
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others blocked. the lib dems want us to cancel everything without going to cancel everything without going to the people for a vote so i am here saying get the agreement through and then we work to a future agreement, but i want to be really clear that boris from the minute he got into numberten clear that boris from the minute he got into number ten has focused most of his time when he is talking to the public about the domestic policy about the extra police, the extra funding for schools, extra money in cornwall for health and social care and hospitals and that is what people want to hear. they want to know we can get on with this domestic agenda. if your constituents are so concerned about brexit and moving on, the liberal democrat approach of concentrating obviously on having another referendum, they don't want a brexit as such, is that going to be just a straight fight in reality?” as such, is that going to be just a straight fight in reality? i think it is likely to be backjo swinson is saying she wants to be prime minister to not even have a people's vote and that really upsets my
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constituents. some of them who voted for remain recognise now that we just get on with it, we get through this process of leaving, which is all we are talking about, then move onto the transition and how we have a future of trade and cooperation and what i have heard over and over again as people have voted tojoin this organisation, people who want a relationship with the european union now want it on cooperation and trade and allow us to get on with everything else that the uk does so well and can do so well as a global leader. interesting talking to sir alan duncan who will not be standing, other senior alan duncan who will not be standing, otherseniortories, alan duncan who will not be standing, other senior tories, amber rudd, kenneth clarke making his last appearance at prime minister's questions, is that going to be damaging for the conservatives to lose people of that sort of quality? i don't know, they have been here a long time and it is actually good. i have benefited from being able to bring blood into modern day
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politics. i come from a building ground, i politics. i come from a building ground, lam politics. i come from a building ground, i am cornish in my skill and trade and have been able to use that to improve buildings to respond to climate change for example. people who come from ordinary life, real life. there are a number of people, as you know, who are not standing again. there is life after politics, despite what many people believe and i think there is a real opportunity to get on with this. i believe boris can form a majority and really work on the things people care about and ican on the things people care about and i can assure you that in my constituency they want brexit, they wa nt constituency they want brexit, they want it done but they care about lots of other things much more. tell me what it is like to be an mp entering an election campaign like this. you've cleared the diary, how are you going to play this? the best bit about the job i know is has been, and! bit about the job i know is has been, and i stood as a candidate for nearly ten years before i got elected, it'sjust a go nearly ten years before i got elected, it's just a go and nearly ten years before i got elected, it'sjust a go and talk nearly ten years before i got elected, it's just a go and talk to people. i love it, it is how you can narrow their priorities down to the
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environment, schools, health and social care. i love that part of the job. i spend my evenings, dark evenings, in local pubs. i have held my in pubs and they work really well. whoever is there, they tend to be much more willing to talk and communicate. after a couple of points. may be, of coke. so it is a really good place to chat people and talk at their level because let's face it, i am working class, missionary parents committed a building job before i got elected so i still understand what it is like for ordinary families who are not owning a great deal of money. coke being a shortened term of coca—cola. they're absolutely being a shortened term of coca—cola. they‘ re absolutely right. being a shortened term of coca—cola. they're absolutely right. i don't know what you're talking about. nice to see you. here at westminster, the final prime minister's questions before to simmer 12 general election being rated on in the house of lords but we are not expecting any real hurdles there. coming up, alice is
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here with other business news. that is to come injust moment here with other business news. that is to come in just moment prefers the headlines. the london fire chief dany cotton insists she won't resign over the grenfell tower fire despite criticism of her brigade's response to the incident. party leaders clash in what's likely to be the last prime minister's questions session before the general election. the helicopter crash into the clutha pub in glasgow was caused by pilot error, rules an inquiry. ten people died because the pilot didn't follow emergency procedures. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. facebook has agreed to pay a £500,000 fine imposed by the uk's data protection watchdog for its role in the cambridge analytica scandal. it had originally appealed the penalty. but as part of the agreement, facebook has made no admission of liability. us lawmakers have accused boeing of building "flying coffins" and engaging in a "pattern of deliberate concealment". the plane makers boss dennis muilenburg was quizzed by the senate commerce committee where its been accused of putting profits before safety in seeking approval for its 737 max 8 plane to fly — following the two deadly crashed that killed a total of 346 people.
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high street retailer next has blamed the hot weather for poor sales in august and september. a bellwether for the high street, next said sales had improved in october as the temperature fell. a boost in online sales, lead to an overall rise in the three months to october. a study by an independent forecaster has suggested that the prime minister's brexit deal would leave the uk 70 billion pounds worse off in a decade — than if it remained in the eu. the study concluded that growth would be three—and—a—half % lower in ten years' time. our economics editor faisal islam was at the treasury today.
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you will remember that certainly whilst the government was trying to get the prime minister's newly negotiated deal through the commons, they wanted to compare it to the prospect of no deal, and the chancellor wrote to mps saying it was self—evidently in our economic interest. now this piece of evidence from an independent forecaster does can occur with that glass half—full approach, that the economy would be after a decade to between bigger under after a decade to between bigger undeer after a decade to between bigger under mrjohnson has made the author no deal, but it also calculates the glass half empty. 3.5%, smaller than would otherwise be the case in a decade's time. to be clear, that doesn't mean we would shrink by 3.5% from where we are now, just that there would be 3.5% last growth. that equates to about £70 billion off the economy, the equivalent per person of over £1000. they also compared it to theresa may's deal and said it would result in an economy slightly smaller. what is
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driving this? it is extra trade barriers and regulations on our trade with our biggest trade partner with europe. things like checks on the origin of car parts, there is a route to avoiding those in theresa may's deal, that was taken out of the draft political declaration for borisjohnson. the treasury the draft political declaration for boris johnson. the treasury say this institute has not got it quite right, in terms of the shape of the free trade deal the government is searching for with the european union, but they do have the option to calculate their own version of these numbers, a pair of computers and the treasury. they have chosen not to do so. now, despite all eyes being on the houses of parliament today, its also been a busy session in the world of business. to talk through the day's major stories and what's moved the markets...
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let's talk live now to randeep somel is director of global equities for m&g investments psa/chrysler is interesting. what car industries are having to face up to other massive costs associated with electric vehicles. psa, peugeot citroen getting together with fiat would create the fourth largest car company in the world, but it still pales in comparison to volkswagen, number one, 90 billion market cap. over the next five years volkswagen have said they need to spend 44 billion euros a year on they need to spend 44 billion euros a yearon ev they need to spend 44 billion euros a year on ev in orderjust to compete in this smaller camp companies need to get together to pool resources, to have scale, to make sure they can get through this, to the other side, when we are all driving around in electric vehicles and this is the first step to that. they expect to see more. when you say ev, you're talking about electric vehicles, the amount the
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motor industry is putting into research and develop meant is huge, right across the industry, is it? absolutely, gone are the engines, motors, drivetrains, the batteries that have to come into this. these car companies are finding the cost of these will be huge compare to what they are used to in the past. and another big story today, boeing and their rush to get the 747, it hasn't crashed —— incurred the wrath of us lawmakers, accusing the plane—maker of building flying coffins was damning words indeed. how dangerous is this for the brand, for the company? boeing are not going through a good spot now obviously. the ceo is having on his second day of testifying before congress. it is a very old aircraft, compared to a bus, whose a320, a replica aircraft, built in the 19805. replica aircraft, built in the 1980s. when you come to make changes to these aircraft it is much easier
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for airbus to do, whereas boeing are now going by a structure that was developed in the 1960s, which may or may not be fit to purpose. u nfortu nately may not be fit to purpose. unfortunately they have had an issue with something called mcas, a pitch augmentation system on the aircraft, which hasn't been put through the right rigours and unfortunately has caused two accidents, both lion air and ethiopian air. we have seen boeing now have suffered from this. they have not had many sales of the 737 max as airbus notched up the biggest order yesterday to 300 aircraft from an airline indigo. boeing are now going to have to show the world this aircraft has gone through the right rigorous safety checks and it is carefree to fly in. staying in the states, the us economy is doing well. it surprised many economy is doing well. it surprised ma ny a nalysts economy is doing well. it surprised many analysts with a better growth, annualised growth, 1.9%, than was expected, that is despite business investment in the country falling. what is your analysis? the expectation for around about 1.6%,
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coming at1.9. expectation for around about 1.6%, coming at 1.9. there is a vast difference. the us consumer, the engine of the world, it still holding up the us economy and probably the global economy. us consumers still feel good. the unemployment rate is low, wages are buying goods, building houses, all very positive. on the other side, while the consumer was good, business consuming was not. —— business consuming was not. —— business investment. that remains a worry, particularly because of political uncertainty, trade tariffs, they still linger in the air, holding back business investment. thank you very much. let's look at the markets now. having a look at equities, whitbread, the uk's largest hospitality company, it owns premier in as well as beefeater, barren block, that was one of the biggest fall is on the ftse100, knocking next of that perch. looking at stirling as well, the currency edged
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higher on wednesday following the decision of the december 12 election pledge. markets assessing the risks associated with that election. that is the way markets are looking. now a weather update with nick miller. another fine autumn day across much of the uk, with occasional sunshine. we will start with a weather watcher picture from north yorkshire so far, beautiful image of clouds reflected on the water here. not everyone here has seen the sunshine, far from it, across large parts of south—west england, cloud, rain, windy, close to weather france here. further north and east and across the bulk of the uk it is exerting its influence. so it is settled and that contrast continues as we go through this evening and into tonight. brains are thrusting in and wales, running along more of southern england as a few showers for north—east england, especially eastern scotland but most places a
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breakfrom eastern scotland but most places a break from the rain. eastern scotland but most places a breakfrom the rain. chile eastern scotland but most places a break from the rain. chile with a frost across much of scotland, parts of northern england and a few mist and fog patches tomorrow. still that contrast, high—pressure easing a way eastwards, still weather fronts close to the south—west at least initially tomorrow. outbreaks of rain across england. it is looking like a drier day in south—west england, not as windy. the odd shower into aberdeenshire, cloud increasing in northern ireland. still a chilly east or south easterly breeze out there and temperatures pretty similar to where they have been. it does mean a largely fine end to the day going into the evening for halloween trick or treaters, but things do change as we go into the friday weekend period, and it is more of a trick than a treat. low pressure moving in, whether france have been queueing up and they finally make their way into the uk. although it is turning milder, we get cloud,
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outbreaks of rain, notjust in south—west england but across the uk on friday they will be some rain at times, initially are some heavier bursts, it will be a blustery day as well but temperatures are coming up, and certainly the further south you are it will feel really quite mild if you get to see any brightness. low pressure moves right across the uk into the weekend. so if you take from this there will be rain at times, not all the time, it will be windy, perhaps gail in places, you won't go far wrong but keep checking back for the latest updated detail.
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today at five — we're live at westminster — where mps observed a minute's silence — as they debated a report on the fire at grenfell tower. the fire, injune 2017, claimed the lives of 72 people, an offical report is critical of the london fire brigade, and says the tower did not meet building regulations. there have been calls for the head of the london fire brigade to resign, the victims' families and survivors say it would be the right response. the report shows what intro and it is time the london fire brigade strip of those feelings. —— shows what went wrong.

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