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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  October 31, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm... labour launch their election campaign, promising to take on what they call the establishment elite. we are going after the tax dodgers, we are going after the dodgy landlords, we are going after the bad bosses, we are going after the big polluters. because we know whose side we, the labour party, are on. he on the day borisjohnson pledged the uk would leave the eu, the prime minister says it's jeremy corbyn‘s fault that brexit hasn't happened, and focuses on public services. we are investing in infrastructure, in new technology, and that's the future that we want to build, but at the moment we've got this roadblock, this logjam, and we need to get through it. the body of missing british backpacker amelia bambridge is found in cambodia.
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more than 70 passengers are killed as their train catches fire in pakistan. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with olly foster. there is only one story, really. we've got team news out of japan ahead of the rugby world cup final. no surprises at all — england are going with the same 15 that beat the all blacks. england are going with the same 15 thanks, olly. england are going with the same 15 and stav is looking at the weather for us... iam indeed. we'll i am indeed. we'll have a quick look at the halloween forecast for this evening at the end of the week into the weekend, we'll also touch on the california wildfires, which have been ravaging some parts of the states this week. see you later. thanks, stav. also coming up... he's the oldest—ever winner of britain's got talent. i'll be chatting to chelsea pensioner colin thackery as he helps to try to raise £1 million in a single day for the royal british legion during london poppy day.
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hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. on the day the prime minister promised we would leave the eu, the battle lines for the december election are being drawn. the labour leader launched his party's campaign in south london, condemning what he calls "tax dodgers, dodgy landlords, bad bosses and big polluters". on his first day of campaigning, borisjohnson has again blamed mr corbyn for stopping brexit, and promised he'll focus on education, the nhs and crime. here's our political correspondent, iain watson, and a warning — his report contains flash photography. jeremy corbyn launched his election campaign in the london seat of battersea. labour doggedly fought here in 2017, winning narrowly. and, despite the upbeat atmosphere now, it is a reminder that the party will have to defend as well as to gain seats if they are to take power.
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the next prime minister, jeremy corbyn! the labour leader got a warm welcome in the cold weather, speaking on the stump to supporters is what he likes to do best. he set out clear dividing lines for his opponents. this election is a once in a generation chance to transform our country, to take on the vested interests that are holding people back, and ensure that no community in any part of this country is ever left behind again. even if the rivers freeze over, we are going out to bring real change for the many, not the few. he said labour would take on what he called a rigged and corrupt system that worked only for a privileged elite. we are going after the tax dodgers, we are going after the dodgy landlords, we are going after the bad bosses, we are going after the big polluters, because we know whose side we, the labour party, are on. applause. this wasn't exactly
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a pitch for the centre ground byjeremy corbyn. his tone was uncompromising. it was designed in part to appeal to young voters and previous non—voters who need to be convinced that politics can make a difference, but he's searching for a message that can appeal beyond brexit, to voters in both leave and remain areas. you know what day this is, halloween, obviously, but it was also the day that we were supposed to be spirited out of the eu. this is what the prime minister used to say about a brexit extension. i'd rather be dead in a ditch. we are coming out of the eu on october 31st, come what may. borisjohnson is still very much alive but he chose to make a visit to hospital in cambridge. he chose today to fight on labour's traditional territory of investing in public services. he also blamed his opponents for the brexit delay. the only thing we can really do now is go to our people, go to the country and say,
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let's get this thing done. we have an oven—ready deal, put it in the microwave, as soon as we get back after the election on the 12th of december, get it done, and then let's get on with our domestic agenda, and it's fantastically exciting to be here at addenbrooke‘s hospital in cambridge, looking at what we are doing to support the nhs. in westminster, the lib dems unveiled a campaign slogan then quite literally conveyed this message to boris johnson and jeremy corbyn‘s constituencies. jo swinson‘s party are putting brexit at the centre of the campaign. but labour and the conservatives have clashed today on a much wider policy agenda. iain watson, bbc news. in a moment, i'll talk to chris mason, who's at addenbrooke‘s hospital in cambridge, where the prime minister was this morning. first to vicki young, who's in milton keynes, where the labour leader is campaigning today. and he is vowing to transform
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britain,. yes, big, ambitious claims from jeremy corbyn. he will be coming to milton keynes because it has two constituencies, both of them held by conservatives at last election but with pretty small majorities of around 2000 or lower, so majorities of around 2000 or lower, so exactly the kind of seat that labour will have to take if they are to try and get into power. the problem for labour, if you look at the last election, they were a long way behind the conservatives in terms of seats. they'd need more than 60 games, and the question is, where are they going to get them from? that where are they going to get them from 7 that is where are they going to get them from? that is why they will be coming here. but that message is very familiarfrom coming here. but that message is very familiar from the 2017 campaign, and lots of labour supporters really making that comparison and saying, look, labour we re comparison and saying, look, labour were written off last time, they we re were written off last time, they were behind in the polls, everybody said jeremy corbyn was very unpopular as a potential prime
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minister, but he managed to turn it round to some extent doing the campaign. not by winning, but by doing far better than most people we re doing far better than most people were predicting, so the question is, can do that again? what is clear from today as he relishes being out and about, making speeches, coming to places like this and rallying the troops. he looks so much more co mforta ble troops. he looks so much more comfortable than he does in the house of commons and the big question is, can he repeat what he did last time? today would have been a significant day, had he had his way, borisjohnson. a significant day, had he had his way, boris johnson. at a significant day, had he had his way, borisjohnson. at the moment, jeremy corbyn doesn't see that as the way to go as far as the campaign is concerned. no, and in 2017, theresa may calling that election, going around the country and just repeating brexit means brexit. they wa nted repeating brexit means brexit. they wanted it to be all about that. labourdid wanted it to be all about that. labour did something different, with a manifesto talking about their policies, and we've heard them again today, renationalising the railways,
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the royal mail and water companies, plus lots of other voters offers, and they are saying they have been ten yea rs and they are saying they have been ten years of austerity and cuts under conservatives and the coalition, and it's time to change all of that. they don't really want to talk about brexit, and of course they have to, because of the circumstances, but saying, look, labour can get it sorted in six months. they would come into power they would negotiate a new deal with a much closer relationship to the eu and they would hold another referendum with remain as an option. today, jeremy corbyn not saying how he would vote in any second referendum. he is sure to be asked about that again. and, let's go to chris mason at addenbrooke's hospital. borisjohnson, chris mason at addenbrooke's hospital. boris johnson, of chris mason at addenbrooke's hospital. borisjohnson, of course, today should have been, as far as he is concerned, having a big day. it hasn't been, but instead he has focused on public services. that's right. what is striking is that countdown clocks around westminster, and perhaps even a few
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around the country, were due to reach zero at 11pm tonight, the point where we were meant to relieve the eu, and instead they have all been reset with six weeks on the countdown clock, that the number of weeks until polling day from today, so weeks until polling day from today, so borisjohnson weeks until polling day from today, so boris johnson out weeks until polling day from today, so borisjohnson out on the stump today, and i think trying to address what was seen as a weakness of the conservative campaign a couple of yea rs conservative campaign a couple of years ago, where the election was called because of brexit, like now, but the conservatives focus very strongly on the big question of brexit, and labour were seen to steal a march on them, really, talking about day—to—day nitty—gritty issues which matter to millions of voters. so what does borisjohnson millions of voters. so what does boris johnson do? here millions of voters. so what does borisjohnson do? here at addenbrooke's hospital this lunchtime, this is one of the hospitals that was mentioned by the conservatives a couple of weeks ago as far as investment in the nhs was concerned and their plans for the nhs's concerned and their plans for the nhs‘s long—term future. he has gone off toa nhs‘s long—term future. he has gone off to a school elsewhere in the region and he will be at a police
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station later. they are bending at the people'spriorities, and their pitch is, ok, brexit hasn't happened on time, and they blame parliament for that, but to say that, with them, they would get brexit out of them, they would get brexit out of the way, as they see it, although there would be so much to sort out as far as there would be so much to sort out as farasa there would be so much to sort out as far as a trading relationship is concerned, and instead focusing on domestic, nitty—gritty issues, like the health service, schools and crime. chris mason in cambridge. if you want to know about why an election has been called and the issues that voters care about, see our really simple guide to the general election, at bbc.co.uk/news or on the bbc news app. the us house of representatives is voting on the next stage in the process that could lead to the impeachment of donald trump. this afternoon, members will decide how the investigation into the president should be conducted. let's get more from our washington correspondent, gary o'donoghue.
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what we know is that this is not a vote to decide to impeach the president. this isn't a vote warehouse says, we charge the president with these articles of impeachment. —— a vote where the house says. this is setting up the process for the investigation in the next couple of weeks, in a sense taking it out from being behind closed doors, where it has been for the last 38 days or so, and making public hearings, public testimony, publishing depositions, and some rights of representation at some point to the president for him to ask witnesses questions, all that kind of thing. so formalising isn't quite the word, but bring it out into the sunshine, if you like, ahead of potential impeachment vote there are christmas and then what we'd call a trial which takes place in senate after christmas. and some
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legal representation for the president. yes, i am sure he will use that to the full, because one thing the republicans have been saying all along is that the process is illegitimate, a sham, in the words of one of the freedom caucus this morning, the right wing of the republican party. a sham, he said, as this resolution to set out the process is a ribbon on the sham, as he put it. it doesn't quite work for me, but you get his point. we will have a vote in about an hour, and the democrats will win it co mforta bly. the democrats will win it comfortably. a handful, submit four 01’ comfortably. a handful, submit four or five of comfortably. a handful, submit four orfive of their own, comfortably. a handful, submit four or five of their own, will vote against the resolution, and they will be given some licence to do that, i think, will be given some licence to do that, ithink, by will be given some licence to do that, i think, by the leadership, because they are from what we call red leaning districts, in other words, republican districts in american political parlance, and they will be given that as some sort of cover in their own district, but they have a majority, the democrats, but they will use it in this vote in
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about an hour, and then the impeachment process will become a very much more public process, with some of these astonishing witnesses we've already heard from had heard about who have testified behind closed doors, and the bits that have lea ked closed doors, and the bits that have leaked out from them, possibly being called back to repeat that evidence in public, and then the enticing possibility of people likejohn bolton, the man fired as national security adviser... he would say he resigned, but he was fired, coming back to give evidence, potentially, and maybe even rudy giuliani, the man who was running this so—called shadow ukraine foreign policy, someone whojohn bolton reportedly described as a drug deal, effectively, in foreign affairs, will he be called, too? so some big names could be up in public before these committees in the coming weeks. let's talk to lynn sweet, washington bureau chief at the chicago sun—times. she joins us via webcam. in the next hour, what we
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effectively see is possibly the launch of the fireworks. well, i think the fireworks have already been lodged, and the republican complaints have been going on. you are hearing them in one condensed second, so you get a good sense of what has been going on and they have been saying for weeks. the other months have been rehearsals and then todayis months have been rehearsals and then today is the show where you hear the best of the best arguments. but the vote is going to happen. in a sense, it just formalises what vote is going to happen. in a sense, itjust formalises what has been happening anyway, but this is still not to be ignored. and yet, in the long run, the president seems to be ona long run, the president seems to be on a safe course, given the state of the senate. if we jump ahead to this story, yes, it's likely we know how it will end, and that is the house will impeach the senate —— will
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impeach, the senate will have a trial and, because you need a super majority of senators to convince remove from office, no analyst sees that the senate votes are there to do it, but that was true for president clinton, and still you had a very dramatic trial. i was there in 1999 a very dramatic trial. i was there in1999 in the a very dramatic trial. i was there in 1999 in the senate. and it puts some political damage. we could look at this with a president who will be up at this with a president who will be upfor at this with a president who will be up for re—election in 2020. let me put it this way, potential political damage, because trump has a very thick shield around him where the negative stories, the facts that come up against him, don't seem to impact him, and we've known this for yea rs, impact him, and we've known this for years, the way that lesser political figures in our history have been impacted. we are seeing live pictures of nancy pelosi. she is a key player. she is a key player, the
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speaker of the house, because she is the one that had to agree to have this vote. she is the boss of the house, agreeing to have this process. there are some democrats who think you did not need this. this is only the third time in our nation that we have had this impeachment process go this far off an elected president, so it's not like we have rules of the road, but in order to take away any criticism of the white house republicans, she is helping this along. we are talking about republican senators backing their president, but is there the chance that some of the evidence could prove so shocking that they might reconsider that? there is that chance and, the closer it gets to people in the trump in circle, particularly rudy giuliani, thatis circle, particularly rudy giuliani, that is what would cause, and it has to be at that level, and there would have to be a high level of witness certainty of facts, and that will be
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disputed, no matter what, so yes, can something happen to change their minds? certainly. what is historic about how this unfolds is that the nixon and clinton impeachment went on after months and years of investigations, so all the preparations were done before the house got to work on the impeachment enquiry. this story is so new, it's just unfolding. remember that phone call president trump at, which was the subject of the whistle—blower complaint which launched this ukraine phase of investigations, that only happened onjuly the 25th. everybody gets excited in political journalism but, as far as the american public are concerned, do they understand, do they care? well, people have busy lives. i am in
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chicago today, and president trump was in chicago this week, and the day after that former president obama was here. but now, i would guess that, in chicago, there is a big teacher's strike, it's been going on to micro weeks and it be settled today. that is a big thing on peoples minds, real life, impacting on their kids, and also it's halloween today, and we have unusually early snow in the city, so just think, if you are a parent with kids, you've got to deal with the strike, you want to get them out and go trick or treating, so you are probably not glued to watching the impeachment enquiry vote because, if you impeachment enquiry vote because, if y°u pay impeachment enquiry vote because, if you pay attention, you'll notice that the enquiry has been going on a nyway that the enquiry has been going on anyway and this is procedural. i don't think it changes the trajectory of anything going on at the moment, but what will change something is what the people who are testifying say. so is the president infora testifying say. so is the president in for a trick or a treat? perhaps
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both. no, iwould in for a trick or a treat? perhaps both. no, i would think he may not observe today. thank you, lynn sweet. thank you. you're watching afternoon live. these are our headlines — jeremy corbyn launches the labour party's general election campaign pledging to take on a "corrupt system". on the day borisjohnson pledged the uk would leave the eu, the prime minister says it's jeremy corbyn's fault that brexit hasn't happened and focuses on public services. police in cambodia say they've found the body of missing british backpacker amelia bambridge. and in sport — england have named an unchanged 15 for the rugby world cup final. eddie jones has kept faith with the same team that beat the all blacks in the semifinal last weekend. the match against south africa is a repeat of the 2007 final. just the one change for the springboks, wing cheslin kolbe, who missed the semifinal win over wales with an ankle injury,
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will start against england. the draw‘s been made for the league cup quarterfinal. there's a plum tie for league 2 colchester united, a trip to manchester united in the last eight. i'll be back with more on those stores later. a fire has swept through a train in pakistan, killing more than 70 people and injuring dozens of other passengers. the train was travelling from karachi to rawalpindi. it's thought the blaze began when passengers used a gas cylinder to cook their breakfast, and it exploded. our correspondent in islamabad is secunder kermani. a warning — you may find his report distressing. desperate bystanders watch as the flames burn. they engulfed at least three of the busy carriages. many of the passengers were heading for a religious gathering. translation: it was very difficult for us to get out of the train and save our lives. some members of the group managed to pull the emergency chain. it was very chaotic. everyone thought they were going to die.
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the injured were rushed to hospital, some by helicopter, whilst helpless crowds watched firefighters extinguish the blaze. amongst the wreckage, these gas cylinders — railway officials believe the fire was caused when one exploded whilst passengers used it to cook food. translation: we could smell something burning in the night, i kept on saying that i can smell something burning, but no—one paid attention. so in the morning we saw there was a fire in carriage 12, and from carriage 12 it spread to carriage 13. translation: it was an oversight that they managed to take the cylinders on board, which caused the explosion. at small stations, there are no scanners, only at larger ones. we regret this terrible event has happened. may god grant to the victims a place in paradise. in a tweet, prime minister imran khan expressed his condolences and ordered an inquiry.
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there is anger about the lack of security checks that could have detected the cylinders and also claims that the cause of the fire was actually an electrical fault. for the moment, though, the authorities are still trying to identify all the dead. secunder kermani, bbc news, islamabad. police in cambodia say the body of british backpacker who went missing a week ago has been found in the sea. amelia bambridge, from worthing in west sussex, disappeared on the island of koh rong. our correspondent, nick beake, is there for us. clearly, this was the news amelia's family were dreading. it was the head of the cambodian navy who said that amelia's body was discovered many dozens of miles out to sea. formal identification will take place tomorrow but we have seen in the past half an hour that amelia's brother harry who had been out on the island involved in the search, he has written on facebook saying that he has now seen the body and, yes, it is his little sister.
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devastating for him, his mum and dad, and other relatives. all of whom had come out of the island after hearing that amelia had disappeared a week ago. she was 21 years old. we know she had been working for two years back in the uk to save up to come to asia. but she apparently disappeared in the early hours of last thursday. she was last seen at a beach party. when she didn't come back to her hostel she was reported missing the next day. her possessions were found on rocks very near the shore inside her bag. her mobile phone, her bank cards, her purse, but simply no sign of amelia. her body has now been found, ben, but at this point, we do not know how she died. and for the family, there is the dreadful realisation that they may never know. hong kong has gone into recession for the first time since the global financial crisis. the territory's economy shrank by 3.2%, year on year.
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the downturn is being partly blamed on the continuing anti—government protests and the us—china trade war. hong kong's chief executive, carrie lam, had already warned of a looming recession. british detectives investigating the death of harry dunn have interviewed the woman accused of killing him. the 19—year—old motorcyclist died in northamptonshire in august after a crash with a car driven by anne sacoolas, who left the uk claiming diplomatic immunity. our correspondent, duncan kennedy, is in new york. this was a very short statement saying simply that they have now interviewed what they called the suspect. they don't actually name anne sacoolas. and that the information they've gleaned from her has now been passed, along with other evidence, to the crown prosecution service. she has always been the main suspect in this ever since the accident back in august. and the police say they will now wait for the cps to respond to their information that they have passed on and it will be up to the cps to say whether charges will be brought against anne sacoolas. so far as the family
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reaction to this, well, i've spoken to larna, harry dunn's sister, who's here in new york with me. they're doing a round of media interviews today and yesterday. they're not very happy. in fact, they say they are angry with this police statement because they say it doesn't go far enough, there is no timeline. as usual, they say, with northamptonshire police, they are being kept in the dark with all this and they simply say they want more information because they themselves are at the centre of this tragedy. time for a look at the weather. we are looking at what is happening in the united states but come on the west coast, these horrendous fires in california. yes, it's been a horrendous week. there have been loads of evacuations, power cuts as well across parts of the state, particularly in the south around the los angeles area. these are some stills of the fires which have affected areas near los angeles in
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the last couple of days. you can see both day and night, and sometimes by night the winds seem to pick up and the fires spread. and the winds are causing real problems, aren't they? that's right. i've got a video to show you the noticeable feature of these fires, which is the wind. look at the strength of it, and a very dry, virtually no humidity in these winds, so they will be spreading the fla mes winds, so they will be spreading the fla m es fast winds, so they will be spreading the flames fast tinder dry conditions. it's all scrub, which just goes up like flammable fuel, and there is no rainfall in sight. we were struggling for a word to help you there, but flammable fuel does it! this is the santa ana wind. it gets its name from a suburb of los angeles. these winds come off the desert, they go through the mountains, and they are funnelled through canyons, picking up speed.
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we have seen winds up to 70 miles an hour, and some people call them hurricane force winds fanning the fires. they are blowing in from the desert, exceptionally dry winds, blowing across the los angeles area and out to sea. we have the getty fire, a smallerfire and out to sea. we have the getty fire, a smaller fire to the north—west of los angeles, not far from bel—air. this easy fire is burning in the simi valley area, and this is the biggest one, about 1600 acres at the moment, and it's still burning wildly. a couple of huge fires, and firefighters are struggling to cope, but the only good news is, over the next couple of days, there is high pressure spinning clockwise in the northern hemisphere, so we are getting these winds across the southern flank, but you will notice they are slackening. they were close together this week, with the winds blowing in from the east, and a slackening of the isobars in the next few days means that the winds will drop.
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temperatures might drop a bit, but that should help firefighters contain the huge blazes. we could do with some rain in the area but, as you know, in california, rain is pretty rare. unlike here. yes, it's not going to be very pleasa nt yes, it's not going to be very pleasant tonight. are you trick—or—treating? no, by the time i leave here it will be about eight p. -- hpm. a cheap shot, sorry! it will be dry for many this evening. there is a club symbol there was some rain. northern ireland, part of the south—west could see some light, patchy rain through the halloween evening period, but north, central and east should be mainly dry. quite chilly with a fresh south easterly breeze. 13 in plymouth, the signs of the moulder air dash and milder air. the rain increasing across northern
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ireland, much of england and wales, pushing into central and southern scotland, so pretty murky, damp end to the night. 13 or 1a degrees will be the overnight low in the south—west, but chilly in scotland and north—east england. the next few days look unsettled, pressure firmly in control for friday. a pretty deep feature which will deepen further for the start of the weekend. it will bring this mild air off the atla ntic will bring this mild air off the atlantic on a south—westerly wind, enveloping the whole of the uk. a cloudier day with quite a different feel in northern and eastern areas on friday. one batch of rain moving north through the morning. a bit drier with sunshine in the afternoon, and it will feel exceptionally mild, with 15 or 16 perhaps across the central southern portions of england, but then the next patch of heavy rain starts working in in western areas in the evening. this area of low pressure deepens on saturday, with a real
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squeeze in the isobars in southern britain bringing issues through the day. very strong winds, heavy rain for wales and much of england, which could lead to some surface water flooding in places, and also some preppy “ flooding in places, and also some preppy —— to heavy rain flooding in places, and also some preppy -- to heavy rain and flooding in places, and also some preppy —— to heavy rain and windy conditions for north—east scotland. the winds are a feature across the board, 62 to maybe 70 mph likely across southern britain and south wales, which could cause some issues and may be some damage. temperatures pretty academic. around the seasonal average, but it will not feel like that with the wind and rain. on sunday, it will remain quite breezy, but nowhere near as windy, we think, and not quite as wet. there will be some spells or longer showers of rain tending to clear out to the north sea. we should see increasing sunshine in northern ireland, western scotland, england and wales, with temperatures around the low teens. a very unsettled and to the week, with a spell of stormy weather perhaps on saturday. at the moment,
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it looks like it is southern parts, so stay tuned as the detail could change. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. labour launch their election campaign — promising to take on what they call the establishment elite. we are going after the tax dodgers, we are going after the dodgy landlords, we are going after the bad bosses, we are going after the big polluters. because we know whose side we, the labour party, are on. on the day borisjohnson pledged the uk would leave the eu — the prime minister says it's jeremy corbyn's fault that
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brexit hasn't happened — and focuses on public services. we are investing in infrastructure, in new technology, and that's the future that we want to build, but at the moment we've got this roadblock, this logjam, and we need to get through it. the body of missing british backpacker amelia bambridge is found in cambodia. more than 70 passengers are killed as their train catches fire in pakistan. sport now on afternoon live with olly foster. there live with olly foster. is really only one big story, saturday there is really only one big story, saturday morning, and now we know who will be on the pitch. sometimes it can be a dangerous game to second guess the england head coach eddiejones, to second guess the england head coach eddie jones, but to second guess the england head coach eddiejones, but no surprises with his selection for that world cup final against south africa on saturday morning. it is an unchanged 15. remember eddie jones
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saturday morning. it is an unchanged 15. remember eddiejones who tempered with his midfield for the win over australia in the quarterfinals, when george ford was surprisingly dropped. but the fly half was absolutely brilliant against the all blacks last weekend in the semifinal. as the whole team we re in the semifinal. as the whole team were really. so it is unchanged, they go again. that's the skipper owen farrell who will continue in the centre. the team had a bit of a walkabout after training in tokyo ahead of the springboks coming up on saturday. it has been six weeks since the tournament began so there is much to do fitness —wise. jones says they have been building up to this moment forfour years. says they have been building up to this moment for four years. remember how terrible they were, not with him in charge of the tournament on home soilfour in charge of the tournament on home soil four years in charge of the tournament on home soilfour years ago, they in charge of the tournament on home soil four years ago, they failed to get out of the group, the worst performance by home nation in the history of the tournament. we also heard from the hulkjamie george about the influence of the captain and the emotional team meetings that farrell holds for only the players, no coaches around on the eve of
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matches. first of all, he leads from the front and he is committed in the way he performs in the way he carries himself day in and day out. that's the sort of person that you wa nt to that's the sort of person that you want to follow. i think also he has developed in terms of his messaging to the team and how he builds up to the game on saturday and his messaging throughout the week is brilliant and it makes the team feel so ready on saturday and it builds our confidence up throughout the week. i think a large part of that is down to him. so, simon, will owen farrell become the first england captain since martin johnson, farrell become the first england captain since martinjohnson, you know one, 2003, to lift the webb ellis trophy? we will find out. south africa have also named their side, one change for them, wing cheslin kolbe coming back into the side. now let's look at football, quarter final league cup, liverpool through but not sure they can play. it is their own fault for being so good
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and winning everything. there is a fixture pile—up on the horizon for them. they are into the quarterfinals of the league cup, their game for aston villa scheduled for the same week that liverpool are due to be in qatar taking part in the world club cup as european champions. jurgen klopp says that unless that tie can be moved they will have pull out of the league cup, give aston villa a bye or let arsenal play it instead, that's who they beat, last night on a crazy night at anfield. divock origi's injury time volley levelled the scored at 5—5, they had been 11—2 down. that took the game to penalties. they were perfect from the spot. liverpool academy product curtisjones scored the winner. but when will they face villa? the efl say that they are in discussions with the club to find a suitable date. it might have to be january. the draw for the quarters was held this morning. this was the reaction of the colchester united.
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the league 2 side have been drawn against manchester united at old trafford. league one oxford united host the holders manchester city, everton are at home to leicester. the england one—day captain eoin morgan is going to skipper the side until at least the twenty20 world cup in australia next year. he led the team to the 50—over world cup this summer but he had been considering his role. i'm very comfortable with the decision i made. i'm delighted that i have made it because i feel that is the right one for myself and the team. i still think i have a lot to offer. there were questions over my fitness and how i would come back and play, isuppose. buti fitness and how i would come back and play, i suppose. but i think that was just lingering in and play, i suppose. but i think that wasjust lingering in my and play, i suppose. but i think that was just lingering in my head because i was back playing county cricket two weeks after the world cup final. eoin morgan carrying on as one—day captain. that's your lot for now and i'll be back in the next hour. thanks very much, talk to you later on, olly foster. 2,000 service personnel have joined forces with veterans,
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volunteers and celebrities in an attempt to raise £1 million in a single day for the royal british legion during london poppy day. it's the biggest street cash collection of its kind in europe and it's now in its 14th year. the day will see collectors hitting the train stations, streets and office blocks in london to raise money for the royal british legion's poppy appeal. let's speak now to the britain's got talent winner, and chelsea pensioner, colin thackery — who has been part of london poppy day today. how is it going? seems to be going very well, there were people who are quite generous this morning, i was there this morning and there were so many buckets and stuff, and because a lot of people were going to work, do soon as they saw the uniforms, and also what helped was the band, the para band and later on the gurkha pipe band with air. how many people asked you to sing? loads! it happens all the time, yeah. to be fair, you're not the obvious choice
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to be the winner of britain's got talent. how it sunk in? well, it is sort of sinking in, you know? it's the razzmatazz. i find sort of sinking in, you know? it's the razzmatazz. ifind it very interesting. even just the razzmatazz. ifind it very interesting. evenjust coming the razzmatazz. ifind it very interesting. even just coming to a studio my eyes are all over the place because i'm just interested in how things work. so an eye. i'm not sure they do work all the time! that's the gamble of walking into a studio like this. but for you, a very personal journey, and studio like this. but for you, a very personaljourney, and then suddenly everybody knows all about you. that's right. it's frightening, isn't it? how are you adjusting? using to be all right. i'm fine. my daughter was a bit concerned. i said i liken it to being on the roundabout and it's going round, getting a bit faster and one day it's going to stop and i shall drop off and that'll be the end of it. you know, i'm not looking for a great career, not at 89 years of age. you talk a lot on stage and generally aboutjoe, your age. you talk a lot on stage and generally about joe, your late age. you talk a lot on stage and generally aboutjoe, your late wife. yes. what do you think she'd say
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about this? i think she'd be delighted. she was a singer and she would use one of her phrases, you know, don't let it get too far to your head, old lad. to be fair, that's going to be difficult because you are singing in front of the queen soon. that will be nice. certainly at the royal albert hall. the royal british legion, yes. last yeari the royal british legion, yes. last year i was marching down the steps. this year i'm singing as they march down, the boys of the old brigade and back with 16 of my colleagues behind me that were on when i won bg gt. you served in korea. i did. i'm wondering between the balance in the ceremony and what's going on in here and what memories you must have. we we re and what memories you must have. we were there in 1950 and it was pretty ferocious at the time. there were
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some quite large battles and it was my initiation really into warfare. and because you saw a lot of chaps die, you knew a lot of chaps died who you knew so well, almost like brothers, and they come right to the front of your mind, actually, especially when you see those petals fall. that's extraordinary. every year, we say why it is important to remember. every year you are fewer in number, veterans of campaigns. what is it important that you are out there first thing this morning raising money? well, because we are raising money? well, because we are raising money? well, because we are raising money to help those guys that are a little bit less fortunate than we are. you know? and it's not just people in the service, it's theirfamilies just people in the service, it's their families and people outside. but it's important to raise the money and it's important to keep the remembrance in the front of your mind. the target is to raise £1
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million in one day. how do you think it will do? it is. there are all sorts of funny things happening, out there? certainly if this morning is anything to go by, people were putting tenors and fivers in the bucket, not just coins, putting tenors and fivers in the bucket, notjust coins, so let's hope that continues for the rest of the day. —— £10 notes. hope that continues for the rest of the day. -- £10 notes. when you started on that britain's got talent journey, did you have any idea? no, none whatsoever, because it was a day, you know? was it? yes. we have a curry friday, the last friday of the month, and that is served in our clu b the month, and that is served in our club and there is a little stage and after curry me and another guy used to sing for about an hour. an hour? yes, between us. he would do the country and western and i would do the balance. i said to somebody, he won't admit to it, but i know who it
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is. i said to him, as i get older... have you forgotten his name or are you just not going to give it? he won't admit it so i mustn't give his name. but i said to him, as i've got older i've always sung and i love to sing. i always worry that, you know, singing isa sing. i always worry that, you know, singing is a funny thing. if you don't use it, you lose it, no doubt at all. and he said, was this true? and i said, of course this is true. and i said, of course this is true. and he said, something, something, go and... do something about it. go and do something about it. and i said, what you mean? and he said britain's got talent are advertising for the next series of shows. and i said, what do you want me to do about it? why would they want an old what's it like me to come and sing? he said on then. he said, i dare you to do it. i said, ok. never dare
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colin thackery! never dare. how has it changed things for you?m colin thackery! never dare. how has it changed things for you? it is incredible, the recognition is extraordinary. when dressed with the hat and scarlet its instant recognition front and back. it's a little less when there is no scarlet but we are still wearing the hat. what is even more surprising is when one is in civilian clothes. you know people are looking. you might get somebody, or you are sitting in a restau ra nt, somebody, or you are sitting in a restaurant, my daughter or my son, or one of my granddaughters will be with me, and they will say, they are talking about you, granddad. and they are, they are looking over, is it really him? i find they are, they are looking over, is it really him? ifind it they are, they are looking over, is it really him? i find it very flattering, very flattering. and because i never refuse to talk to people ever, i like talking to people, and of course, they inevitably photograph you. everybody
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has a phone these days with the camera, so it's literally thousands of photographs. what's the next album? i've got to get this one out first! you must be planning on the next. oh, well, i don't know. i have some ideas, yes. tell me about the current one. is it a stocking filler? well, i hope so. it's an eclectic mix of songs, some sentimental, some old, some new, a couple of war songs. we'll meet again, white cliffs. the challenge, well, it's hardly a challenge, but the suggestion that people wouldn't expect somebody of my age to sing a modern song, and they gave me this lovely ed sheeran song called supermarket flowers. when i heard it, i thought, supermarket flowers. when i heard it, ithought, what supermarket flowers. when i heard it, i thought, what a lovely little song that was. it worked for me
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because it was about his grandmother and clearing up after her death, you know, which i'd done after my wife died. ifolded things know, which i'd done after my wife died. i folded things and know, which i'd done after my wife died. ifolded things and put know, which i'd done after my wife died. i folded things and put them in suitcases and took things off the windowsill, that sort of thing. it's very poignant really. ant and dec said there wasn't a dry eye in the house. i keep on getting accused of that. i was seeking its function yesterday and was exactly the same thing happened. just a final thought, because we are looking at the launch of the poppy appeal. if someone is watching you now, and they may have seen you on britain's got talent, and they may be under 20 yea rs got talent, and they may be under 20 years old, what do you say to them about why it's important to remember? well, it's important to remember? well, it's important to remember because i think most people of my age don't want their children and grandchildren to be involved in any form of conflict, and therefore it's important to bring it to the front all the time. i fought in
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korea, as you know, and the korean people are marvellous. right the way down to the youngest at school remember we were fighting out there in the 50s. it's a campaign many people in this country don't talk about. yes, and i was asked about that only this morning, and my theory about it is that in 1950 it was a bit soon after the war. i think people were sick of talking about wartime, so it got sort of forgotten. but, you know, not with the korean people, obviously, because we created something that they've carried on with. but going back to people of our own, my grandchildren, i hope my grandchildren, i hope my grandchildren and their children will never ever see any form of conflict because it's a filthy business and i don't want them to suffer in any way, shape or form. what do you think of the country at the moment? we are living, we are
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managing. andi the moment? we are living, we are managing. and i have no qualms that it will all sort itself out. we have got a few problems but they do inevitably. i think ijust trust the people that is in charge, really. it's a great pleasure to meet you andi it's a great pleasure to meet you and i wish you well with the album and i wish you well with the album and your concert for the queen. you have a busy time. colin thackery, thank you. thank you very much indeed. you're watching afternoon live from the bbc news. the labour mp, keith vaz,has been suspended from service to the house of commons for six months. mp's have just voted on amotion after the commons standards body said it found compelling evidence that he offered to pay for a class a drug and had paid—for sex in august 2016. we will bring you more on that later. the commons had earlier said there was compelling evidence and they recommended he be suspended for they recommended he be suspended for the six months after he was evasive
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and unhelpful during their investigation. he hasn't commented on his future. he says he is receiving treatment for a serious mental health condition. a statement issued by his office earlier said he had cooperated at all stages of the inquiry and had been admitted to hospital. the standards committee found the mp had caused significant damage to the reputation of the house after he expressed a willingness to purchase cocaine for others during an encounter with male prostitutes. we will have more reaction to that. keith vaz is facing calls to stand down as a labour candidate after that scathing comments report. more on that later on. up until a few days ago, businesses across the country had been preparing for the uk to leave the european union at 11 o'clock tonight. now — instead — they're having to get ready for yet another brexit deadline. our business editor simon jack explained how frustrated businesses are as another deadline passes. i've been visiting businesses all over the country. they stockpiled and got ready in march. they were then told,
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this time it's for real, make sure your business is ready on 31st october, you'll remember all those adverts, and that massive campaign, only for that date to also slip. and stockpiling, you think, so what, you had to get a few bits and bobs, more than you would normally. there's a big cash flow impact. some businesses have to dig into their cash reserves to buy that excess stock at the same time as many of them saw their revenue and their sales fall because of the brexit uncertainty for some of their clients. so they're getting a double whammy, and many feel very frustrated indeed. now, of course, throw into the mix now this general election and the brexit outcome is very dependent on how that election goes. so, once again, uncertainty. and it's very tempting to think that a lot of businesses must be saying, "do you know what, let's get it all over with, no deal is better than this lingering uncertainty." but i think it would be a mistake to say that. most of them still think, not all, but most still think any kind of deal is better than no deal and they will be praying wearily that this general election will give some certainty as to which direction this ends up getting resolved in because resolution
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is what really matters to them. that was simon jack. that was simonjack. this is victoria fritz who has all the business news in a moment but first the headlines on afternoon live. jeremy corbyn launches the labour party's general election campaign, pledging to take on a "corrupt system". on the day borisjohnson pledged the uk would leave the eu, the prime minister says it's jeremy corbyn's fault that brexit hasn't happened, and focuses on public services. police in cambodia say they've found the body of missing british backpacker amelia bambridge. hello. here are your business headlines on afternoon live. a tie—up to create the world's fourth biggest car—maker. fiat chrysler and peugeot try to seal a mega—deal. vauxhall, which a psa brand, employs 3,000 people in the uk. car production in britain slowed again last month as demand for new models sunk 16% so far in 2019. more on that in a moment.
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profits at lloyds are wiped out by setting aside another 1.8 billion to cover ppi complaints. the august deadline for claims had a substantial impact on all of the major banks. you have brought your own coffee, lovely. what do you want? i'll get you one next time. i was watching colin thackery, who was such a lovely guy that i just wandered on with my coffee. we will put that out on twitter. he seemed wonderful. a big hit for lloyds today, as you we re a big hit for lloyds today, as you were saying. it's pretty much completely wiped out, down 97%. the reason, last minute ppi claims. the kotov has passed. exactly, so this is it, so lots of people were putting on their claims last minute —— the cut off. there was a rash of them at the end of august and it has substantially impacted all the banks with this big surge. lloyds put aside an extra
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£1.8 billion in order to cover those claims. lloyds has been the big baddie in all of this. the banks have between them put up something like £50 billion now as a result of this and lloyds really accounts for more than 20 billion of that, they we re more than 20 billion of that, they were the biggest one because lots of people have lloyds bank accounts, so that's part of the reason. so it has been a massive scandal. but hopefully we are drawing a line under it, or at least that's what the banks are hoping. we have another story. this possible merger which would create the fourth biggest car manufacturer in the world ? biggest car manufacturer in the world? very good, you've been listening to me, simon! that's absolutely right. peugeot and fiat chrysler. you don't have to be quite so surprised! it is a big day, loads of news, so nice to know business is still on the agenda. it would create the fourth biggest car—maker. for your bonus points do you want to guess what one, two and three might
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be? oh, gosh. ford, volkswagen. volkswagen is one of them. chrysler? renault nissan, remember them, they tied up, and toyota. toyota, i was going to mention them. if these two combined they would have vehicle sales of something like 8.7 million ca rs sales of something like 8.7 million cars worldwide and something like 400,000 people on payrolljust directly from these companies alone, let alone their massive supply chains, soa let alone their massive supply chains, so a huge deal. but as you say, and is hopefully we will hear from samira hussain in new york, it's not necessarily a done deal. lets speak to samira hussain in the nyse. it's an interesting one, isn't it? lots of people have been talking about megamergers on the cars in this industry, do you think it will happen? —— on the cards. this industry, do you think it will happen? -- on the cards. first, from the company's perspective, fiat chrysler has been looking for someone to team up with. remember way back when, we saw they were
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trying to team up with renault and that actually fell apart at the last minute because of demands by the french government. so, fast forward some five months and now we see that fiat chrysler is going to team up with peugeot. why is it good for both of these companies? well, looks, the direction of the way the auto sector is going is in electric vehicles, especially as we consider that countries are putting more and more restrictions in terms of emissions from cars, you need to have a real strong standing in the electric car market. neither of these companies really have it and it is really pricey to do. so, combined, they feel they will be in a much better position to actually become competitive in that market. but as you rightly pointed out, there are of course challenges about whether or not this will actually come to fruition. you have the italians, you have the french, and then of course, you also have the american somewhere in there too. exactly, you've got these big families with big stakes in these businesses. you also have national governments as well come they no
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small matter of the fact this is a heavily regulated industry and, you know, highly politicised as well. i bet donald trump will have one or two things to say about this. most certainly, he may certainly have something to say about this, there is also the question of us regulators, whether they are going to have something to say about this. on the plus side, we have already heard the french government is pleased with this merger. they are liking what they are seeing but the italians are saying, look, if we are going to see anyjob losses, we are not interested. it is certainly not a done deal. but certainly from the company's perspective, it would allow them to be really quite competitive in this new auto market. if you look at the way autos is going in europe and in the united states, car sales are falling so really these companies need to find a way to stay competitive. absolutely right. thank you. hang on, you are canadian and you say peugeot? sorry, i was
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on, you are canadian and you say peugeot? sorry, iwas going on, you are canadian and you say peugeot? sorry, i was going to let that go, i'm sorry! look, i'm really frazzled this morning, simon. cut me some slack, you didn't know the top two companies! that's right, she has halloween to prepare for this evening and has young kids, lots to prepare for. sorry to interrupt you! 0h, prepare for. sorry to interrupt you! oh, dear. let's have a look at the markets. the ftse 100 oh, dear. let's have a look at the markets. the ftse100 is lagging behind the rest of its european cou nterpa rts behind the rest of its european counterparts today, in part because of the likes of shell and lloyds, their shares have been falling today. lloyds you can see is down 1.496 today. lloyds you can see is down 1.4% at the moment. quite interesting news coming out from crest nicholson, a house—building. there is an end building. that isn't a typo. i tell you what it is, the graphics, you end up in the arrow. it's not my fault! graphics, it is not theirfault it's not my fault! graphics, it is not their fault either. graphic! crest nicholson, shares down 6%, they are winning about the break
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brexit and certainty, people not wanting to invest, not wanting to buy homes and not building homes. apple, good results from them, up 196. thank you. tea or coffee? now for the weather with stav danaos. thank you, simon, the weather will change over the weekend, we could look at a stormy spell southern areas, and turning wetter, cloudier and windier into tonight. for the halloween evening it should be dry for most central and eastern areas, quite a chilly south easterly breeze but through the night we will start to season rain pushing into northern ireland, wales and the south—west of england, there could be a few spots of drizzle ahead of it but by the end of the night it will be wetter and cloudierfor end of the night it will be wetter and cloudier for most, end of the night it will be wetter and cloudierfor most, the breeze blowing up from the south will introduce a mother air to wales and the south—west, 12—14d but still
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chilly under mainly clear skies for the north and east of scotland. low pressure is with us on friday. bringing lots of cloud and outbreaks of rain and also milder airfrom the south—west. you can see the orange colour is pretty much enveloping the whole of the uk by the time friday is out. there will be lots of cloud around to start the day, outbreaks of rain pushing northwards and eastwards followed by some raya. you can see a bit of brightness across england and wales in the afternoon but very limited. further west, the next batch of rain moves in which could be heavy. temperatures at the low teens in the north but 14—16d in england and wales so that will be noticeable. this is the low to new and to deepen as it moves on to our shores for saturday. a real squeeze in the isobars across southern areas. pretty uncertain as to its position, could be further north or further south but at the moment it looks very wet and windy for england and wales, could see some surface water flooding from this rain, sweeping through, particularly for wales and west in england. the wind
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gusts, 60, 70 wales and west in england. the wind gusts, 60,70 mph wales and west in england. the wind gusts, 60, 70 mph across southern counties, which could cause disruption. very wet across the north and east of scotland. temperatures of the low teens celsius, pretty academic when you factor in the wind and rain it won't feel like that. the area of low pressure starts to weaken as we head into sunday. it will still be with us into sunday. it will still be with us bringing further showers along with spells of rain but the winds will not be a strong, so i think a better day part two of the weekend, increasing amount of sunshine for england and wales in particular. brighter with more sunshine and a good feel better with temperatures around 12—13dc. that's your latest weather.
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labour launch their election campaign, promising to take on what they call the establishment elite. we are going after the tax dodgers, we are going after the dodgy landlords, we are going after the bad bosses, we are going after the big polluters. because we know whose side we, the labour party, are on. on the day borisjohnson pledged the uk would leave the eu, the prime minister says it's jeremy corbyn's fault that brexit hasn't happened, and focuses on public services. we are investing in infrastructure, in new technology, and that's the future that we want to build, but at the moment we've got this roadblock, this logjam, and we need to get through it. the body of missing british backpacker amelia bambridge is found in cambodia. more than 70 passengers are killed as their train
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catches fire in pakistan. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with olly foster. countdown on, ollie foster. it's as you were for england — the same 15 that started against the all blacks will face south africa in saturday's rugby world cup final. thanks, olly, and stav has all the weather. yes, we'll be discussing the halloween forecast and the weather as we head into the weekend, which looks a very unsettled, and we'll start with a discussion about the california wildfires, which have been ravaging parts of the state through this week. thanks, stav. also coming up... he's the oldest—ever winner of britain's got talent. i've been speaking to chelsea pensioner colin thackery, as he helps to try to raise £1 million in a single day for the royal british legion during london poppy day.
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hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. on the day the prime minister promised we would leave the eu, the battle lines for the december election are being drawn. the labour leader launched his party's campaign in south london, condemning what he calls "tax dodgers, dodgy landlords, bad bosses and big polluters". on his first day of campaigning, borisjohnson has again blamed mr corbyn for stopping brexit and promised he'll focus on education, the nhs and crime. here's our political correspondent, iain watson, and a warning — his report contains flash photography. jeremy corbyn launched his election campaign in the london seat of battersea. labour doggedly fought here in 2017, winning narrowly. and, despite the upbeat atmosphere now, it is a reminder that the party will have to defend as well as to gain seats if they are to take power. the next prime minister, jeremy corbyn! the labour leader got a warm welcome
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in the cold weather. speaking on the stump to supporters is what he likes to do best. he set out clear dividing lines for his opponents. this election is a once in a generation chance to transform our country, to take on the vested interests that are holding people back, and ensure that no community in any part of this country is ever left behind again. even if the rivers freeze over, we are going out to bring real change for the many, not the few. he said labour would take on what he called a rigged and corrupt system that worked only for a privileged elite. we are going after the tax dodgers, we are going after the dodgy landlords, we are going after the bad bosses, we are going after the big polluters, because we know whose side we, the labour party, are on. applause. this wasn't exactly a pitch for the centre ground byjeremy corbyn.
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his tone was uncompromising. it was designed in part to appeal to young voters and previous non—voters who need to be convinced that politics can make a difference, but he's searching for a message that can appeal beyond brexit, to voters in both leave and remain areas. you know what day this is — halloween, obviously — but it was also the day that we were supposed to be spirited out of the eu. this is what the prime minister used to say about a brexit extension. i'd rather be dead in a ditch. we are coming out of the eu on october 31st, come what may. borisjohnson is still very much alive but he chose to make a visit to a hospital in cambridge. he chose today to fight on labour's traditional territory of investing in public services. he also blamed his opponents for the brexit delay. the only thing we can really do now is go to our people, go to the country and say, let's get this thing done. we have an oven—ready deal, put it in the microwave,
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as soon as we get back after the election on the 12th of december, get it done, and then let's get on with our domestic agenda, and it's fantastically exciting to be here at addenbrooke's hospital in cambridge, looking at what we are doing to support the nhs. in westminster, the lib dems unveiled a campaign slogan then quite literally conveyed this message to borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn's constituencies. jo swinson's party are putting brexit at the centre of the campaign. but labour and the conservatives have clashed today on a much wider policy agenda. iain watson, bbc news. vicki young is in milton keynes, where the labour leader has been campaigning today. he is on his feet right now as we speak. what can we learn at this very early stage about what sort of campaign we are looking at?|j very early stage about what sort of campaign we are looking at? i think it's clear from labour and from
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interviews we did on the day the election was called that labour do wa nt to election was called that labour do want to talk about other things. they don't just want to talk about brexit. of course, they know it's a big issue for lots of people and has dominated the political landscape of the last few years, and jeremy corbyn is saying, look, it's pretty simple, he would get another deal from the eu, he would hold a referendum, dealagainst from the eu, he would hold a referendum, deal against remain is what would be on the ballot paper, and he says he could get that sorted in six months. some are saying that's a tight schedule, and the interesting point put to him earlier is how he would vote in such a referendum, and i think that is still one of the key problems for labour, are they a party in favour of remaining or are they a party in favour of leaving the eu ? of remaining or are they a party in favour of leaving the eu? and that, over all these months, has never really been resolved, and it's caused huge battles in the party. you can see whyjeremy corbyn doesn't really want to dwell on
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that, he wants to talk about other things, and just like 2017 they will come out with a manifesto which is putting forward lots of other policies for people, and i've been talking to people in the audience, and they are all labour party members, some are concerned, i recognise there is a massive hill for labour to climb because, if you look back at the last election, they need to win more than 60 more seats and the tories only need to win another eight. today, we sought jeremy corbyn in battersea, a labour held seat. he has to be able to hold onto that and move on to places like milton keynes, with two marginal seats held by the conservatives. they need to take these kind of seats plus a lot of others, and i think they feel is a strategy that they have to get people talking about other things jeremy they have to get people talking about other thingsjeremy corbyn is talking about years of austerity under the conservative government and the coalition government and saying it's time all of that was reversed. thank you. let's talk more on this now with the director
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of deltapoll, joe twyman. let's pick up on the point vicki young was making. forjeremy corbyn, theissue young was making. forjeremy corbyn, the issue of brexit is one he is at the issue of brexit is one he is at the momentjust the issue of brexit is one he is at the moment just letting the issue of brexit is one he is at the momentjust letting lie and he is concentrating on core values, if you like. at the moment. if you ask people what the most important issue is facing the country, brexit comes topped by some distance, but if you ask people what is most important to them and their families, ask people what is most important to them and theirfamilies, things like health and the economy become more important than brexit, and what jeremy corbyn is hoping is that he can appeal to those people, talking about the kind of policies which, in fairness to the labour party, proved very popular at the last election in terms of their manifesto. the difficulty they have is that, among labour remain voters, brexit is still the top priority, and so there is only so far you can go down this route of strategic ambiguity on the subject before people start asking
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questions. at the last election, he defied the pollsters, catching people by surprise that he came out of it as popular as he did. he didn't win but, forjeremy corbyn, it was a good election. yes, at the start of the campaign, the conservatives had a big lead, like at the moment, and then the gap closed. jeremy corbyn performed extremely well. on the other side of things, theresa may at the conservatives performed very badly. that was a different situation. back in 2017, neitherjeremy corbyn nor theresa may were particularly well—known to ordinary members of the public. that situation is different now. jeremy corbyn himself has been through an election at borisjohnson, has been through an election at boris johnson, although he has been through an election at borisjohnson, although he isn't well known as prime minister, is extremely well known as a public figure and a politician. so, to pull off the same trick might be difficult for labour and, of course, they have to rely on the fact that they have to rely on the fact that the conservatives have a bad campaign, which! the conservatives have a bad campaign, which i think is unlikely.
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talking about people versus parliament, jeremy corbyn was pitching this as people versus the establishment. yes, we heard a lot of mentions at the lodge about the fa ct of mentions at the lodge about the fact he was there to represent the people, that he was against the elite. these are terms he has mentioned a lot previously, but they are also, of course, what boris johnson is trying to jump are also, of course, what boris johnson is trying tojump on are also, of course, what boris johnson is trying to jump on as a bandwagon. he sees the brexit discussion as one of people versus parliament, but he can slave as part of that anti—people group, as he would see it. —— but he counts labour as part of that anti—people group. so we have a battle between the leaders about whose people they are trying to appeal to. jeremy corbyn quick out of the box, launching his campaign today. not messing about, the campaign lodge and then presumably following that with the manifesto launch, excellent opportunities for parties to have their moment in the spotlight, and it was after the manifesto launch
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for labour last time that the gap in the polls really started to close, and it was after the conservative ma nifesto and it was after the conservative manifesto launch that their ratings really started to decline, so the sort of set pieces to have the potential to have an impact. sort of set pieces to have the potentialto have an impact. it's a lwa ys potentialto have an impact. it's always nice to see you. thank you. if you want to know about why an election has been called and the issues that voters care about, see our really simple guide to the general election, at bbc.co.uk/news or on the bbc news app. the us house of representatives is voting on the next stage in the process that could lead to the impeachment of donald trump. this afternoon, members decide how the investigation into the president should be conducted. let's get more from our washington correspondent, gary o'donoghue. we've seen one vote but it isn't the
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vote just yet, is we've seen one vote but it isn't the votejust yet, is it? this we've seen one vote but it isn't the vote just yet, is it? this feels like deja vu, one vote after another! this vote was a procedural one, it doesn't matter very much. it isa one, it doesn't matter very much. it is a vote on whether to have a vote. that will go through pretty clearly. in the next few minutes, they will start voting on the resolution itself. that would take 15 to 20 minutes and then we will get a result, and like in many cases in the british parliament, the result is to clear. in this case, the democrats will get their resolution through. they will have a handful of their own voting against it, and there are justifiable political reasons for those people doing that because of the districts they are m, because of the districts they are in, but it will comfortably go through, setting the stage for the next few weeks of the impeachment enquiry, which is going public. lot of people watching are going to think, hang on, we've been talking about impeachment for ages, but this is significant, isn't it? it's only
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been 38 days, to be fair. that was on the democrats announced it, the 23rd of september. there was a lot of talk about potential impeachment around the mullah report, and that came to nothing, and democrats resisted that, but there was a change with this particular example, with the democrats believing there isa with the democrats believing there is a simplicity in the narrative of what they are accusing the president of, accusing his office, the oval office, to put pressure on a foreign power to take action against one of his domestic political opponents. that is why they are pushing on this pretty ha rd, that is why they are pushing on this pretty hard, and they've got most of their caucus on side do that. we will see in the coming weeks is more public hearings, and there has been some pretty explosive evidence already from some of the people that has leaked out. some of them will come back, there might even be some really big names brought onto the stage, likejohn really big names brought onto the stage, like john bolton, really big names brought onto the stage, likejohn bolton, former national security adviser, who was
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sacked, if you ask the president, resigned, if you askjohn bolton, and he'll describe apparently this whole business with ukraine and the president's strategy on it as a drug deal so we'll see if he is prepared to repeat language like that in front of a congressional committee. it could be wrapped up by christmas in terms of the house process. they would vote on articles of impeachment, in other words, the charges. if that happens, in the new year you'd see a trial in the senate, overseen by the chief justice of the supreme court and, to convict the president and get him removed from office, you need a two thirds vote there, which would entail about 20 republicans changing side, and that isn't going to happen. you say that, but if the level of shop is so great presumably there are those who might reconsider and defect. —— level of shock.|j honestly don't think that is going to happen unless some really
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extraordinary extra evidence comes out. they're in mind, let's take a step back from this and go back to bill clinton in 1998, the impeachment process then beginning with questions over a land deal and ending up with whether or not he had had sexual relations with and in turn, so these things can take extraordinary turns at times and go in different directions. in terms of what is known, quite a lot of what he is accused of is known, and the white house has released this transcript of the now famous july the 25th corps, the president has tried to normalise it. he came out on the south lawn and said, definitely and, by the way, china should do the same as well, so it's not like there are a lot of facts not like there are a lot of facts not already known to come out. so i cannot see, unless there is an absolute sea change, a kind of earthquake in the republican party and in their strategy, their thinking, i can't see at this stage 20 republican senators changing
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sides. when they do it, you can come back to me and give me my p45, how about that? this is recorded, and there is always a risk in not sitting down on the fence, gary! enjoy your christmas but i suspect we will talk before then. police in cambodia say the body of british backpacker who went missing a week ago has been found in the sea. amelia bambridge, from worthing in west sussex, disappeared on the island of koh rong. our correspondent, nick beake, is there for us. clearly, this was the news amelia's family were dreading. it was the head of the cambodian navy who said that amelia's body was discovered many dozens of miles out to sea. formal identification will take place tomorrow but we have seen in the past half an hour that amelia's brother harry who had been out on the island involved in the search, he has written on facebook saying that he has now seen the body and, yes, it is his little sister.
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devastating for him, his mum and dad, and other relatives. all of whom had come out of the island after hearing that amelia had disappeared a week ago. she was 21 years old. we know she had been working for two years back in the uk to save up to come to asia. but she apparently disappeared in the early hours of last thursday. she was last seen at a beach party. when she didn't come back to her hostel she was reported missing the next day. her possessions were found on rocks very near the shore inside her bag. her mobile phone, her bank cards, her purse, but simply no sign of amelia. her body has now been found, ben, but at this point, we do not know how she died. and for the family, there is the dreadful realisation that they may never know. you're watching afternoon live. these are our headlines... jeremy corbyn launches the labour party's general election campaign, pledging to take on a "corrupt system". on the day borisjohnson pledged
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the uk would leave the eu, the prime minister says it's jeremy corbyn's fault that brexit hasn't happened, and focuses on public services. police in cambodia say they've found the body of missing british backpacker amelia bambridge. and in sport... england are unchanged for saturday's rugby world cup final injapan. eddie jones has kept faith with the same team that beat the all blacks in the semi—final last weekend. the match against south africa is a repeat of the 2007 final. just the one change for the springboks — wing cheslin kolbe has recovered from the ankle problem that saw him miss their semi—final win over wales. the draw‘s been made for the league cup quarterfinal. there's a plum tie for league 2 colchester united — they're away at manchester united in the last eight. i'll be back with more on those stories later. a fire has swept through a train in pakistan, killing more than 70 people and injuring dozens of other passengers.
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the train was travelling from karachi to rawalpindi. it's thought the blaze began when passengers used a gas cylinder to cook their breakfast and it exploded. our correspondent in islamabad is secunder kermani. a warning — you may find his report distressing. desperate bystanders watch as the flames burn. they engulfed at least three of the busy carriages. many of the passengers were heading for a religious gathering. translation: it was very difficult for us to get out of the train and save our lives. some members of the group managed to pull the emergency chain. it was very chaotic. everyone thought they were going to die. the injured were rushed to hospital, some by helicopter, whilst helpless crowds watched firefighters extinguish the blaze. amongst the wreckage, these gas cylinders — railway officials believe the fire was caused when one exploded whilst passengers used it to cook food. translation: we could smell
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something burning in the night, i kept on saying that i can smell something burning, but no—one paid attention. so in the morning we saw there was a fire in carriage 12, and from carriage 12 it spread to carriage 13. translation: it was an oversight that they managed to take the cylinders on board, which caused the explosion. at small stations, there are no scanners, only at larger ones. we regret this terrible event has happened. may god grant to the victims a place in paradise. in a tweet, prime minister imran khan expressed his condolences and ordered an inquiry. there is anger about the lack of security checks that could have detected the cylinders and also claims that the cause of the fire was actually an electrical fault. for the moment, though, the authorities are still trying to identify all the dead. secunder kermani,
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bbc news, islamabad. british detectives investigating the death of harry dunn have interviewed the woman accused of killing him. the 19—year—old motorcyclist died in northamptonshire in august after a crash with a car driven by anne sacoolas, who left the uk claiming diplomatic immunity. our correspondent, duncan kennedy, is in new york. this was a very short statement saying simply that they have now interviewed what they called the suspect. they don't actually name anne sacoolas. and that the information they've gleaned from her has now been passed, along with other evidence, to the crown prosecution service. she has always been the main suspect in this ever since the accident back in august. and the police say they will now wait for the cps to respond to their information that they have passed on and it will be up to the cps to say whether charges will be brought against anne sacoolas. so far as the family reaction to this, well, i've spoken to larna, harry dunn's sister, who's here in new york with me. they're doing a round of media interviews today and yesterday. they're not very happy.
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in fact, they say they are angry with this police statement because they say it doesn't go far enough, there is no timeline. as usual, they say, with northamptonshire police, they are being kept in the dark with all this and they simply say they want more information because they themselves are at the centre of this tragedy. firefighters tackling wildfires in california say extremely strong winds have been hampering their operations. a new blaze near los angeles tripled in size in just two hours, at one point threatening the ronald reagan presidential library, but the building and its priceless collection has been saved. sophie long has sent this report. the fires that forecasters feared broke out in several locations around southern california. as wildflies raged across ranchland, people fled from the flames and bewildered horses tried to make their own way to safety.
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in the simi valley, about 30 miles north of los angeles, more than 25,000 people were told to evacuate as flames quickly engulfed whole hillsides and the valley filled with thick, dark smoke. the fire, fuelled by winds gusting up to 70mph, surrounded the ronald reagan presidential library and threatened 7,000 other buildings nearby. it's being called the easy fire. but putting it out is proving to be anything but. we're just at the entrance of the ronald reagan presidential library, and you can see how strongly the wind is blowing the flames in directions all around. they're fighting the fires here, but it's the wind that is the greatest enemy. while this fire trebled in size to consume more than 1,300 acres injust two hours, others continued to burn in the celebrity—studded hills of los angeles. there are pleas for the public to be vigilant as new fires are sparked every hour, but optimism that the strongest
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santa ana winds for more than a decade could soon start to abate. now we're going to see we're on the back end of that wind, we're going to see the activity start to reduce, and we do have sufficient resources to jump on new fires and continue to fight the fires that we also have in place. in northern california, authorities say the kincaid fire, which has consumed more than 120 square miles around santa rosa, is now 30% contained, and they're hopeful that further progress can now be made as the wind has dropped. sophie long, bbc news, los angeles. time for a look at the weather. these winds are the real problem, as she was saying. yes, some dramatic pictures. these are the mountains that run along the eastern side of
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los angeles. on the other side is the desert, the great basin, and here we have the ocean. higher pressure towards the great basin and the desert, lower pressure out to sea, we have a contrast, with the air flying sea, we have a contrast, with the airflying from a higher sea, we have a contrast, with the air flying from a higher pressure to the lower pressure. so these winds flowing over the mountains, it looks like the fern effect, if you've ever heard us mention that, weather winds come from the west of moisture and they hit the pennines, for example, they hit the pennines, for example, they dry out and warm up, and then it drops the other side of the mountains, where it is drier and warmer. oh, the fern effect! this is quite a warmer. oh, the fern effect! this is quitea similar warmer. oh, the fern effect! this is quite a similar story, so the air heats up even further and dries out, so there is virtually no moisture by the time it reaches this side of the mountains, fuelling the wildfires, and they can be extremely strong blowing through canyons in the
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mountains, where they funnel and speed up. so these strong winds are fanning the getty fire and the easy fire, which is burning up here. and those santa ana winds, it comes after a na mesa ke those santa ana winds, it comes after a namesake of los angeles, the southern part of los angeles, but it usually means the whole of central southern california. further north into the sacramento area, they are known as the diabolo winds, but it's a similar setup. and in our forecast, the wind is dropping?m stays dry and sunny, because it's california, but the temperatures will be coming down, which will help firefighters contain the flames. they could do with some rainfall, which is certainly what we've got! trick or treating could be pretty dampfor trick or treating could be pretty damp for some areas, particularly across the west of the uk. for many, it will be dry. to be positive about
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it. but they will be a bit of rain this evening affecting parts northern ireland, wales and the south—west. the odd spot of drivel further east, but most of central and eastern england should be dry, but chilly with a brisk south—easterly wind. single figure temperatures in the east, the temperatures in the east, the temperature is coming up, and it's to be damp but milder in the south—west for halloween. through the night, as the rain pushes north and east, it's going to turn wetter and east, it's going to turn wetter and become quite damp for many. temperature is very mild in the 13 or 14, but still a chilly night to come across the north and east. the next few days looking very wet with outbreaks of rain. it will turn windy, thanks to low pressure, and that will be deepening as it moves towards our shores, so potentially a stormy spell for the start of the weekend. dragging much milderairto our shores, as you can see on friday, and it will be quite noticeable for and wales, despite
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the fact it will be a wet morning with a lot of cloud and some hill fog. we could see some brightness in central southern england in the afternoon, very limited, and the next batch of heavy rain stops to push into the west. temperatures 13 to 16 in the south and east, just about double figures in the north. on saturday, this area of low pressure deepens, with quite a squeeze on the isobars on the southern flank, which could affect southern flank, which could affect southern britain. further north, it could be, so stay tuned, but at this stage it is looking like severe and —— gales and severe gales in england and wales, with some surface water flooding. those wind gusts up to 60 or 70 flooding. those wind gusts up to 60 or70 mph, flooding. those wind gusts up to 60 or 70 mph, disruptive flooding. those wind gusts up to 60 or70 mph, disruptive wind flooding. those wind gusts up to 60 or 70 mph, disruptive wind speeds, and potentially damaging. temperature wise, around the low teens celsius, but it won't feel like that because of the wind and rain. that is saturday. it looks a bit quieterfor sunday, rain. that is saturday. it looks a bit quieter for sunday, and the area
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of low begins to weaken a bit, as the isobars slacken a bit, so it's beginning to be easy but not as windy. they will be showers and longer spells of rain. but a decent amount of sunny spells, so it should bea amount of sunny spells, so it should be a better day, and temperatures of 12 to 14. stay tuned to the forecast for that risk of a stormy spell for the start of the weekend. thank you for that. i am going to take you to washington, because the vote on the impeachment process is being taken to this is nancy pelosi. resolution is adopted without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid upon the table. so the vote on the impeachment resolution is carried, with a majority, a huge surprise, but this is to establish the format for open hearings by the house intelligence committee as part of the ongoing impeachment enquiry.
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this move coming out of the committee has had testimony behind closed doors which is reportedly damning to present trump in relation to that phone call between him and the president of ukraine. republicans have been highly critical of the hearings, demanding a more public forum. indeed, before this vote as special assistant to the president timothy morrison, senior director for russia and europe, at the national security council, testifying before the committee behind closed doors, announcing that one of them was leaving his post at the white house, this is morrison. step for those wanting to pursue impeachment of the present. there is the vote, 232, 194 to —— present. there is the vote, 232, 194 to -- 196 present. there is the vote, 232, 194
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to —— 196 against. in the senate it is thought donald trump will be fairly safe, but what will happen now is more revelations perhaps, more shocking revelations is what the president's critics are promising about his conduct while talking to the president of ukraine and claims that there was pressure on the president of ukraine to help in an inquiry into donald trump's oppositionjoe biden in an inquiry into donald trump's opposition joe biden and in an inquiry into donald trump's oppositionjoe biden and the affairs of his son there. that's the resolution. no surprise it has been carried but it does mean present trump will now need a legal team to publicly refute claims that are going to be made in public as part of that impeachment inquiry. a long way to go but step one as far as the present‘s critics are concerned. a significant step has just been taken in the house. now it is time for the
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sport on afternoon live with olly foster. less tha n foster. less than 48,000 till the rugby world cup final in yokohama, england against south africa, it's going to be absolutely huge. we know that eddiejones has be absolutely huge. we know that eddie jones has never be absolutely huge. we know that eddiejones has never been scared of changing a winning formula. he tinkered with the midfield for their win over australia in the quarterfinals when george ford was dropped very surprisingly. but the fly— half dropped very surprisingly. but the fly—half was absolutely brilliant against the all blacks last weekend in their semifinal. the whole england team was. and eddiejones isn't changing a thing. he's going with the same 15. here is the skipper having a walkabout this morning, owen farrell after training in tokyo. they will make the short hop to yokohama for saturday. that final against the springboks. we are six weeks into this tournament now so there is not much more, you would have thought, that they need to do fitness —wise, just a lot of team
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talks. we heard from eddiejones today. he says that they have been building up to this moment for four yea rs building up to this moment for four years since he took over three or four years ago after that terrible world cup on home soil. we also heard from the hookerjamie george about the influence of the captain owen farrell and these team meetings that he holds only for the players on the eve of matches. first of all, he leads from the front and he is incredibly committed the way he performs on the way he carries himself day in a day out. that's the sort of person that you want to follow. i think also he has developed in terms of his messaging to the team and how he builds up to the game on saturday and his messaging throughout the week is brilliant and it makes the team feel so ready on saturday and it builds our confidence up throughout the week. i think a large part of that is down to him. martinjohnson was the last english
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captain to lift that webb ellis trophy in 2003, the only man to lift that trophy. south africa will be taking their inspiration from 2007 when they beat england in the paris final at that tournament. they have made one change. wing cheslin kolbe coming back into the side. come on, england! i'm not allowed to express come on, england! i'm not allowed to ex press a come on, england! i'm not allowed to express a view so i won't. but let's talk about football. when has that ever stopped you? how much trouble can one person get into? liverpool are through to the quarterfinals of the league cup and yet it seems they may not be able to play. this is the league cup, we had all the last 16 ties over the last couple of nights, a real fixture pile—up for liverpool because they are still in everything. into the quarterfinals of the league cup, that game is against aston villa scheduled for the same week that liverpool are due to be in qatar taking part in the club world cup as european champions. jurgen klopp
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says, he has threatened, you could read it like this, that that has to be moved now or they willjust pull out of the competition, the league cup, and give aston villa a bye into the semifinals, or let arsenal play the semifinals, or let arsenal play the game, the team they beat last night. the efl say that they are in discussions with the club to find a suitable date. looking at the calendar, that might have to be injanuary. the draw for the quarters was held this morning. this was the reaction of the colchester united. who have they got? manchester united at old trafford. league one oxford united host the holders manchester city, everton are at home to leicester. those are the four ties. all of the reaction on the bbc sport website should you want it. fifa have written to all national associations calling on them to take a zero—tolerance approach to discriminatory behaviour in domestic matches.
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the world's governing body wants the three—point protocol that we saw implemented when england players were racially abused in bulgaria to be introduced in club matches. some cricket news. the england one—day captain eoin morgan is going to skipper the side until at least the twenty20 world cup in australia next year. he led the team to the 50—over world cup this summer but had been considering his role. i'm very comfortable with the decision i made. i'm delighted that i have made it because i feel that is the right one for myself and the team. i still think i have a lot to offer. there were questions over my fitness and how i would come back and play, i suppose. but i think that was just lingering in my head because i was back in playing county cricket two weeks after the world cup final. he is knocking on a bit and considered his role for a number of months but he still has plenty to offer. simon mccoy.
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others would disagree but thank you for that vote of confidence, olly foster. you're watching afternoon live. as we've been hearing, campaigning has begun for the next general election — on the day the uk should have left the european union. this morning, the labour leaderjeremy corbyn launched his party's campaign. in his speech in battersea, he vowed to bring real change and transform britain. this election is a once—in—a—generation chance to transform our country, to take on the vested interests that are holding people back and ensure that no community in any part of this country is ever left behind again. applause some people believed that real change isn't possible. they say we're asking too much. really? a health service that people can be proud of,
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where tens of thousands of cancer patients aren't waiting months for treatments and prescriptions are free throughout the country. is that asking too much? applause is it asking too much to have a social care system that doesn't leave our older people isolated and afraid, but instead gives them dignity with free personal care? applause is that asking too much? how about a decent pay rise? a real living wage of at least £10 an hour right away including for young workers from the age of 16. applause
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is that asking too much? asking too much to secure homes that families can afford, rents that don't break the bank and an end to the disgrace and indignity of rough sleeping in every city of this country. applause mr corbyn also outlined his party's policy on brexit. after three long years of brexit division and failure from the tories, we have to get this issue sorted now as marsha pointed out. we need to take it out of the hands of politicians and trust the people to have the final say. labour will get brexit sorted within six months. we'll let the people decide whether to leave on a sensible deal or remain. it really isn't that complicated. applause
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and we, a labour government, will carry out whatever the people decide so we can then get on with delivering the real change that britain needs after years of conservative cuts to vital services and tax hand—outs to the richest. applause with a general election looming, the decision by the founder of twitter to ban all political advertising will have an immediate impact here in the uk. jack dorsey said the move was intended to combat the spread of unchecked misleading information. the boss of facebook, mark zuckerberg, has rejected calls to follow suit. he said it wasn't right for private companies to "censor politicians or the news". we can speak now to mark scott, who's chief technology correspondent at politico.
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this does follow increasing concern about what social media is doing in the run—up to elections. about what social media is doing in the run-up to elections. it certainly does and what twitter has done is taking a very principled approach about trying to clamp down on the worst offences, particularly when it comes to political speech. the problem is, twitter isn't really a big player when it comes to political ads in the uk, particularly head of the december election, so what twitter has done is what sounds good but won't really have much of an effect. so, twitter deciding to do this now, what is behind it, though?|j deciding to do this now, what is behind it, though? i mean, you could say that twitter is taking a proactive approach and trying to get ahead of the issue. the cynic in me thinks this is trying to differentiate themselves from facebook and mark zuckerberg, which as you say, are willing to have political ads running on their networks. talk me through the finances because this is fascinating, the amount of money thatis
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fascinating, the amount of money that is spent by political groups on social media. taking the 2017 uk election as a reference. i crunched the numbers this morning and overall the numbers this morning and overall the conservatives, labour and other political parties spent about £3 million collectively on facebook political ads but when it came to twitter combined they spent £55,000, so you can see how much of a difference there is between the political ad buying going on twitter and what is happening on facebook. facebook, mark zuckerberg, huge pressure on him and at the moment no sign that he is going to bend. exactly, mark zuckerberg was on capitol hill in washington last week trying to defend his practices and those of his company. it's becoming more difficult for facebook to justify not at least fact checking the political ads by traditional, legitimate political parties and now mark zuckerberg and other executives are saying they aren't willing to do
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that. what is the answer here? is it more transparency? or perhaps legislation? frankly, it is a bit of both. the companies need to be more willing and open to show how political groups are spending money on their networks. but frankly, this isn't something i would really like a private company to oversee. here in the uk, in europe, or in the us ahead of the 2020 election we do need new rules. but frankly because of what's going on in brexit here at the moment and the impeachment process in the us, no rule—making is being done. so frankly, i think nothing will happen with regulation before december and probably before the 2020 election. anybody watching now says we are entering an election campaign, this doesn't affect me, they will not target me. how do we know who is targeting who? so, within the last, say, three or four months, all the uk political parties have been running facebook political
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ads asking voters to sign up for newsletters and handing over their personal information. the reason why they have done that is to gain as much information about you, me and other people here in the uk so that they can go onto facebook and other social media platforms, including twitter until this announcement, to target them. the problem is, we don't know exactly who are in those groups and how the targeting is being done because facebook safe thatis being done because facebook safe that is proprietary and political campaigns are not willing to share that information. so right now it is a bit ofa that information. so right now it is a bit of a black box. there are third—party efforts to make it more transparent but at the moment it is really about putting in a fishing line every day to see what political ads are popping up. mark, it is really good to talk to you, mark scott, chief technology correspondent at politico, thank you for your time. we havejust been hearing reaction to that vote in the house, which would suggest the first stage of impeachment against the
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president donald trump is going ahead. we have just president donald trump is going ahead. we havejust had a president donald trump is going ahead. we have just had a statement from the press secretary to the president, and i will read this, because it's not too long. it says, "the president has done nothing wrong and the democrats know it. nancy pelosi and the democrats' unhinged obsession with this illegitimate impeachment proceeding does not hurt present trump, it hurts the american people, instead of focusing on pressing issues that impact real family like reducing of focusing on pressing issues that impact realfamily like reducing gun violence, improving health care, lowering prescription drug costs, securing our southern border and modernising our ageing infrastructure. the democrats are choosing every day to waste time on a sham impeachment are blatantly partisan attempt to destroy the president." it goes on, today's vote, from speaker pelosi and democrats, nothing more than an due process being brought into house rules. then it goes on. present trump has tweeted about this. he's gone rather closer to the nub of this, continuing to call it the
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greatest witchhunt in american history. he earlier said the impeachment hoax is hurting our stock market, the do nothing democrats, he says, just don't care. but reading between the lines, if you can of a one line tweet, it is suggesting perhaps that there has been a development is the move towards impeachment has taken a not insignificant step. but as we were saying earlier, very unlikely to go all the way through given the strength of trump support in the senate. but there we are, that's what is happening in washington right now, president donald trump. this is miss victoria fritz who has the business news and the coffee as well. ido! she will bring is the business news ina she will bring is the business news in a moment at first the headlines on afternoon live. jeremy corbyn launches the labour party's general election campaign, pledging to take on a "corrupt system". on the day borisjohnson pledged the uk would leave the eu, the prime minister says it's jeremy corbyn's fault that brexit hasn't happened,
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and focuses on public services. police in cambodia say they've found the body of missing british backpacker amelia bambridge. here are your business headlines on afternoon live. a tie—up to create the world's fourth biggest car—maker. fiat—chrysler and peugeot try to seal a mega—deal. vauxhall, a psa brand, employs 3,000 people in the uk. car production in britain slowed again last month as demand for new models falls 16% in nine months. profits at lloyds are almost wiped out — by setting aside another 1.8 billion to cover ppi complaints. the august deadline for claims has had a substantial impact on all of the major banks' profits this year. you have nicked my headline here. is pork for the chop? it's a good question, isn't it? we are talking about african swine flu.
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this is something lots of people may not have heard about but this virus has swept across the whole of china. a quarter of the pig population in the world. it is expected to die from it, exactly. so, pork production in china has gone down 45% in one year alone. this disease is spreading, it is going to cambodia, mongolia, vietnam and elsewhere and is having a huge impact right across the world. experts are warning that we haven't seen a global meat shortage like this for 30, 40, 50 years. so this is a huge deal and if you know your economics, which i know you do, simon, if you have rising demand, as we do for meat, and supply falls, all things being equal and in a competitive market prices go up and this is exactly what we have seen. china is saying we need more meat. exactly china is saying we need more meat. exa ctly a nd china is saying we need more meat. exactly and at the moment prices for
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pork have gone up 170%. but it's not just that because if you can't get your pork people are eating chicken, beef, other sources of protein, so chicken prices are up 14%, beef prices up 20%. so it is only going to bea prices up 20%. so it is only going to be a matter of time until we see these price changes come through and trickle down into the shops, not just in the uk but across europe and the us. he looks happy, though. he won't be. don't do that! let's move on, shall we? honestly, children may be watch them and we don't want to upset them. we are talking about halloween. yes, we are, while you are still here. pork to pumpkins. there we go, one that we made earlier. in fact, we didn't make this, a bloke called brent in the us made this, apparently, specifically for the bbc. really? you wouldn't know that! all our budget went on this so don't knock it. that sort of
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funny... i know! it's not really, is it, the joke's funny... i know! it's not really, is it, thejoke's on funny... i know! it's not really, is it, the joke's on us. funny... i know! it's not really, is it, thejoke's on us. the problem is that this is a massive source of food waste at this time of year and is happening across the world. pumpkins are one of those things where they check everything out of the seeds and everything. squirrels, don't they like pumpkins? people like them too, simon. yeah, you can have pumpkin soup, pumpkin pie, you can have pumpkin soup, pumpkin pie, you ca n toast have pumpkin soup, pumpkin pie, you can toast the seeds, you can do what you like. but let's speak to sarah, i don't know if she is divall, or divall, but is this a big problem? it is a massive problem, the average family weighs £30 a month on food and we waste a third of the food we buy, pumpkins are one small part of that. is it something like 18,000 tonnes created in terms of pumpkin waste? what kind
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of impact could be all have if we all changed our behaviour at home a little bit? can we make real changes or is it all going to end up in landfill? it is huge, at the moment two thirds of us by a pumpkin at halloween and only 15% are putting it in the bin afterwards, so rather than composting or eating it, people are buying it, chucking it in the bin, and it goes to landfill and thenit bin, and it goes to landfill and then it doesn't get used, so all of then it doesn't get used, so all of the energy, the water and all of the environmental impacts that have been made by creating that pumpkin are wasted. ok, so tell me, what are you going to do with your pumpkin after this? i have already carved it, i've taken the innards and turned it into a soup, i toasted the seeds and afterwards i will cook the flesh as well. that's very thrifty, isn't it! thanks very much, sarah. well. that's very thrifty, isn't it! thanks very much, sarahlj well. that's very thrifty, isn't it! thanks very much, sarah. i ask you the same question. don't you want to say thank you ? the same question. don't you want to say thank you? i already thanked her. this is the one evening of the year that i don't get to watch television because i sit in a
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darkened room with all of the curtains shut and make sure nobody rings on the door. what a grinch! i'm sure you are out there dressed asa pumpkin i'm sure you are out there dressed as a pumpkin handing out sweets. are you not? that's what i imagine simon o koye you not? that's what i imagine simon okoye does at halloween. you not? that's what i imagine simon okoye does at halloweenm you not? that's what i imagine simon okoye does at halloween. if that is your image i will not dispel it but that's not what goes on. do you want some markets? they are not there but i promise we will do them in an hour's time with an expert. i need to tell him what we are doing first. he is an expert. victoria, thank you. i've got to follow that somehow but i'll give it a go. his quirky phrases and distinctive shouts have made john bercow a well known figure not only at westminster — but around the world. apparently. well, today, after ten years in the chair, it's his last day as commons speaker. his sucessor will be elected on monday. here's mark lowen. order! bellowing. .. behave yourself! colourful... i couldn't give a flying
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flamingo what your view is! unforgettable. leave the chamber, get out, we'll manage without you! as john bercow leaves the speaker's chair after a decade, the tributes are piling up. if i may say, it's been my particular privilege to address the chair when you are in it. i find it very hard to imagine this chamber without you. the highest duty of the speaker of the house of commons is to be the champion of our house and its members, and to defend our right to freedom of speech, in defence of our constituents, and, mr speaker, you have done that. even at 18, john bercow had the rhetorical flourish — and the crowd—pleasing lines. i would suggest to mrs castle that the reason she sought tojoin the european parliament was precisely the same... an mp from 1997, he's reformed the speakership, ditching the traditional court dress, empowering backbenchers. he overcame allegations of bullying,
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questions about his expenses, and a sticker in a car he drove reading, "bullocks to brexit." that sticker on the subject of brexit happens to be affixed to or in the windscreen of my wife's car. yes. and i'm sure the honourable gentleman wouldn't suggest for one moment... laughter ..that a wife is somehow the property or chattel of her husband! it was his interventions on brexit that catapulted him to fame. stopping a third meaningful vote on theresa may's deal, allowing the the benn "no—deal" bill to be debated. feted by remainers, hated by leavers. it is becoming remarkable how often you please one lot and not the other. from junior tennis champion... to speaker and unlikely celebrity. order!
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john bercow is bowing out. division! remembered long after he will be given his marching orders. mark lowen, bbc news. we could all do with some of that soothing medicament. photographs apparently showing elusive street artist banksy at work have been published. the behind—the—scenes images apparently capture banksy in action, creating several famous works of art at various locations, although none of them show his face. they were taken by his former agent and photographer, steve lazarides, who worked with him for more than a decade. the graffiti artist's identity has never been publicly revealed. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello there. after our colder, quieter spell with plenty of sunshine around, it's all change to end the week and into the weekend as low pressure takes over, it looks like it will become very unsettled, much cloudier, wetter and windier with potential stormy spell on saturday particularly for england and wales.
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for halloween evening it looks like it will be a largely dry evening for most, quite chilly, quite a breeze blowing in from the south—east. but there will be some rain at times affecting parts of northern ireland, wales and the south—west of england. and this rain will tend to pep up and move northwards and eastwards as we head through the course of tonight. so, turning damp and pretty murky for many parts of england and wales and northern ireland. still a cold night to come across the north and east of scotland in particular with some clear spells. but on friday, low pressure firmly in control. it is a much cloudier day for most, with outbreaks of rain. one thing you will notice is it will be much milder, winds coming in from the south—west. so, a grey day, outbreaks of rain spreading northwards and eastwards across the country through the morning. perhaps a drier slot following on behind but it will stay quite misty with some hill fog and murk around and then the next batch of rain moves into western areas and this could be quite heavy. note those temperatures,
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13—16d maybe across the south. this is the area of low pressure i was talking about which is going to bring the stormy spell through saturday, we think, real squeeze in the isobars across southern britain. that could bring some disruption. along with that, some very heavy and persistent rain affecting parts of wales and england as we head through the course of the day. also, some very wet weather across northern and eastern scotland but it's the winds we are more concerned about across the south, gusts of 60, 70 mph may be which could lead to disruption and the potential of some damage in places. temperature wise around the seasonal average but you really won't notice it with the strength of the wind and all the heavy rain which could also cause surface water flooding. our area of low pressure starts to fill as we head on into sunday so it should be a little bit better day than saturday. still a breezy day but the wind is much lighter, there will be showers and longer spells of rain mainly across northern and eastern areas. we could see sunshine a bit more widespread into the afternoon
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across southern areas, and those temperatures again, highs of 11—13d in the south.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 4... labour launch their election campaign, promising to take on what they call the establishment elite. we are going after the tax dodgers, we are going after the dodgy landlords, we are going after the bad bosses, we are going after the big polluters. because we know whose side we, the labour party, are on. on the day borisjohnson pledged the uk would leave the eu, the prime minister says it's jeremy corbyn's fault that brexit hasn't happened and focuses on public services. we are investing in infrastructure, in new technology, and that's the future that we want to build, but at the moment we've got this roadblock, this logjam, and we need to get through it. the body of missing british backpacker amelia bambridge is found in cambodia.
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more than 70 passengers are killed as their train catches fire in pakistan. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport, with olly foster. we are looking at the rugby? we are, and england will be starting the same side which played the all blacks last weekend. thanks, olly, and we'll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past. stav has all the weather. thanks, stav. the weather is turning much more u nsettled the weather is turning much more unsettled to end the week and into the weekend, we look could be looking at a spell of stormy weather. i will have the details coming up. and coming up on news nationwide, a look ahead to a bbc local radio special tonight which will be answering your questions on brexit.
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hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. on the day the prime minister promised we would leave the eu, the battle lines for the december election are being drawn. the labour leader launched his party's campaign in south london, condemning what he calls "tax dodgers, dodgy landlords, bad bosses and big polluters". on his first day of campaigning, borisjohnson has again blamed mr corbyn for stopping brexit and promised he'll focus on education, the nhs and crime. here's our political correspondent iain watson, and a warning, his report contains flash photography. jeremy corbyn launched his election campaign in the london seat of battersea. labour doggedly fought here in 2017, winning narrowly. and despite the upbeat atmosphere now, it is a reminder that the party will have to work hard to defend as well as to gain seats if they are to take power.
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the next prime minister, jeremy corbyn! the labour leader got a warm welcome in the cold weather. speaking on the stump to supporters is what he likes to do best. he set out clear dividing lines for his opponents. lines with his opponents. this election is a once in a generation chance to transform our country, to take on the vested interests that are holding people back, and ensure that no community in any part of this country is ever left behind again. even if the rivers freeze over, we are going out to bring real change for the many, not the few. and he said labour would take on what he called a rigged and corrupt system that worked only for a privileged elite. we are going after the tax dodgers, we're going after the dodgy landlords, we're going after the bad bosses, we're going after the big polluters, because we know whose side we, the labour party, are on. applause. this wasn't exactly
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a pitch for the centre ground byjeremy corbyn. his tone was uncompromising. it was designed in part to appeal to young voters and previous non—voters who need to be convinced that politics can make a difference, but he's also searching for a message that can appeal beyond brexit, to voters in both leave and remain areas. you know what day this is — halloween, obviously — but it was also the day that we were supposed to be spirited out of the eu. this is what the prime minister used to say about a brexit extension. i'd rather be dead in a ditch. we are coming out of the eu on october 31st, come what may. borisjohnson is still very much alive but he chose to make a visit to a hospital in cambridge. he chose today to fight on labour's traditional territory of investing in public services. he also blamed his opponents for the brexit delay. the only thing we can really do now is go to our people, go to the country and say, let's get this thing done.
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we have an oven—ready deal, put it in the microwave, as soon as we get back after the election on the 12th of december, get it done, and then let's get on with our domestic agenda, and it's fantastically exciting to be here at addenbrooke's hospital in cambridge, looking at what we are doing to support the nhs. at westminster, the lib dems unveiled a campaign slogan then quite literally conveyed this message to borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn's constituencies. jo swinson's party are putting brexit at the centre of the campaign. the centre of their campaign. but both labour and the conservatives have clashed today on a much wider policy agenda. iain watson, bbc news. and iain watson is at westminster. and that is interesting because perhaps not the concentration on brexit that we might have expected? absolutely right, that is certainly what i drew from the first proper
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day in anger on the election trail, parliament is still sitting, the campaign does not formally get underway until next week that labour very keen to get the retaliation in first, if you like, against boris johnson, this whole idea that perhaps it was parliament versus the people, and brexit, they say they are battling the elite themselves. borisjohnson, of course, as i suggested, occupying, or trying borisjohnson, of course, as i suggested, occupying, ortrying to occupy, labour's traditional territory, visiting a hospital and the police, talking about investment in public services. for the two main parties, they do have, to coin a phrase, a vested interest in not making this purely a brexit election. from labour's point of you, jeremy corbyn wants to try to appeal to voters in leave areas who might be put off by his party she has pledged to have another referendum, and he is trying to find policies which might appeal to some voters who might vote labour if they concentrate on issues other than brexit. that's why he was going i think quite so strongly on those dividing lines with the
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conservatives, the whole range of issues including for example taking the water industry back into public ownership, nationalising the railways, and we are told there will be an even more radical manifesto on its way in the next few weeks. from boris johnson's its way in the next few weeks. from borisjohnson's point of view, if he is looking at the concerns of voters who might have been persuaded to back labour in 2017 in leave areas, he knows they want to see better public services, they are far more interested in investment rather than tax cuts so he was trying to get away from the more traditional conservative message and talk about more policing, more hospitals, even though the exact number is disputed between him and labour. it was really the liberal democrats who didn't really have a big launch today, they simply unveiled a poster, but it was the liberal democrats who were putting brexit front and centre of the campaign, theircampaign front and centre of the campaign, their campaign slogan is, stop brexit, and also, to sound a bit more positive, they are also talking about building a better future. as for the other two parties, very
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interesting that they were campaigning predominately on other issues. labour quick out of the blocks and it would appear the target would be maybe younger voters and those who haven't voted before? that's right. i think they're trying to get into tapping a potential reservoir of support. certainly the thinking within the labour ranks is, lots of people simply believe that politics doesn't work or doesn't make a difference to them, so one reason they think they should go for a more radical message is that younger people might be attracted to their banner about being interested in voting for the first time, and also the left—wing group within their own ranks, momentum, doing lots of work trying to move their activists to where they are most needed around the country, and the more radical message is likely to fire them up. that said, there are labour mps who speak to me privately about this issue and they say pocket quite a lot of these partly moderate conservatives, who voted to remain in the referendum, now leaving frontline politics, nicky morgan,
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justin greening, patrick mcloughlin... justin greening, patrick mcloughlin. .. labour are missing justin greening, patrick mcloughlin... labour are missing a trick by not tacking to the centre, they say, and trying to move in that direction. and it is very, very clear, the striking thing from everything jeremy corbyn was saying today, denouncing his rogues' gallery of billions and bad bosses, dodgy landlords, tax dodgers, that he is not appealing to the centre ground, he is very much trying to fire people up who might otherwise not come into the political system at all. iain watson, thank you very much. if you want to know about why an election has been called, and the issues that voters care about, see our really simple guide to the general election, at bbc.co.uk/news or on the bbc news app. in the past hour, the house of representatives has passed a resolution that approves rules for the impeachment inquiry into president trump. the vote was not about whether or not to impeach donald trump, but rather how the inquiry should proceed. the resolution sets out plans
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for part of the investigation to be opened up to the public. until now, evidence has only been given behind closed doors. it is only the fourth time in us history that a president has been the subject of a formal house impeachment investigation. let's get more from our washington correspondent gary o'donoghue. it isa it is a small but significant step? it is a small but significant step? it is. it shows that the democrats think they are onto something here, that they have had enough evidence behind closed doors, to want to show this to the american people in televised public hearings. and i think this was also a way of calling the bluff of the republicans, who have been criticising the process all along as a sham, as illegitimate, is not in tune with the rules of naturaljustice, and here we have the house overwhelmingly voting to approve the way forward. just two democrats voted against their party, they are from very tight republican districts, i think their party will
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give them a pass on that one. and one independent voted with them as well. he was a former republican who is now pretty disillusioned, three republicans didn't bother to vote at all but they certainly didn't invoke in favour of the resolution. the reaction, president trump has taken to twitter, but an interesting statement from the white house? yes, they talk about the democrats having an unhinged obsession with president trump. he has also talked about it being the biggest witchhunt in history, and i presume that is since the last biggest witchhunt in history, which was the inquiry ta blet history, which was the inquiry tablet they are focusing very much on process, tackling the process, not really engaging in the facts of it, and they believe that is the best way to undermine the legitimacy of the whole idea. gary o'donoghue, thank you very much. police in cambodia say the body of a british backpacker who went missing a week ago has been found in the sea. amelia bambridge, from worthing in west sussex, disappeared
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on the island of koh rong. our correspondent nick beake is there for us. clearly, this was the news amelia's family were dreading. it was the head of the cambodian navy who said that amelia's body was discovered many dozens of miles out to sea. formal identification will take place tomorrow but we have seen in the past half an hour that amelia's brother harry who had been out on the island involved in the search, he has written on facebook saying that he has now seen the body and, yes, it is his little sister. devastating for him, his mum and dad, and other relatives. all of whom had come out to the island after hearing that amelia had disappeared a week ago. she was 21 years old. we know she had been working for two years back in the uk to save up to come to asia. but she apparently disappeared in the early hours of last thursday. she was last seen at a beach party. when she didn't come back to her hostel she was reported missing the next day. her possessions were found on rocks
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very near the shore inside her bag. her mobile phone, her bank cards, her purse, but simply no sign of amelia. her body has now been found, ben, but at this point, we do not know how she died. and for the family, there is the dreadful realisation that they may never know. the labour mp keith vaz has been suspended from service to the house of commons for six months after being found to have the labour mp keith vaz has been suspended from service to the house of commons for six months after being found to have expressed willingness to buy cocaine for sex workers. the house of commons standards body said there was "compelling evidence" that the veteran mp offered the class a drug and that he had paid—for sex in august 2016. he's now facing calls not to stand in the election. a fire has swept through a train in pakistan, killing more than 70 people and injuring dozens of other passengers. the train was travelling from karachi to rawalpindi. it is thought the blaze began when passengers used a gas cylinder to cook their breakfast and it exploded. our correspondent in islamabad
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is secunder kermani — a warning, you may find his report distressing. desperate bystanders watch as the flames burn. they engulfed at least three of the busy carriages. many of the passengers were heading for a religious gathering. translation: it was very difficult for us to get out of the train and save our lives. some members of the group managed to pull the emergency chain. it was very chaotic. everyone thought they were going to die. the injured were rushed to hospital, some by helicopter, whilst helpless crowds watched firefighters extinguish the blaze. amongst the wreckage, these gas cylinders — railway officials believe the fire was caused when one exploded whilst this passengers used it to cook food. translation: we could smell something burning in the night, i kept on saying that i can smell something burning, but no—one paid attention.
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so, in the morning we saw there was a fire in carriage 12, and from carriage 12 it spread to carriage 13. translation: it was an oversight that they managed to take the cylinders on board, which caused the explosion. at small stations, there are no scanners, only at larger ones. we regret this terrible event has happened. may god grant to the victims a place in paradise. in a tweet, prime minister imran khan expressed his condolences and ordered an inquiry. there is anger about the lack of security checks that could have detected the cylinders and also claims that the cause of the fire was actually an electrical fault. for the moment, though, the authorities are still trying to identify all the dead. secunder kermani, bbc news, islamabad. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines... jeremy corbyn launches the labour party's general election campaign pledging to take
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on a "corrupt system". on the day borisjohnson pledged the uk would leave the eu, the prime minister says it's jeremy corbyn's fault that brexit hasn't happened and focuses on public services. the body of missing british backpacker amelia bambridge is found in cambodia. in sport, england will be unchanged for saturday's rugby world cup final injapan. for saturday's rugby world cup final in japan. edge jones has for saturday's rugby world cup final injapan. edgejones has kept faith with the same starting xv who beat the all blacks. just the one change for the springboks, their winger has recovered from his ankle problem which saw him miss the semifinal with wales. and kyle edmund has been knocked out of the paris masters, beaten in straight sets by the world number one novak djokovic in the third round. iwill number one novak djokovic in the third round. i will be back with all the sport in the next 15 minutes. the culture secretary, nicky morgan, has been explaining why she's leaving politics.
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she says that she wants to spend more time with her family, but admitted that the abuse she'd received in recent times had been a factor. hugely difficult. i love being loughborough‘s member of parliament and the constituency work has always been something i have really enjoyed andi been something i have really enjoyed and i loved being secretary of state, but there comes a time when you have got to work out the balance of your life, and i have said that in my letter, which is actually the sacrifice and the impact on family, is outweighed, or in this case, has become the bigger thing for me to be concerned about, because i am so frustrated with how parliament has behaved over the last couple of yea rs. behaved over the last couple of years. has the abuse played a part, because that is the headline, if you like, after your decision to quit? it has certainly been a factor, i wouldn't say it has been the tipping point. i think over the last couple of years we have had a number of people prosecuted for death threats and that kind of thing and i had an e—mail in my office which a couple of years ago i think we would have
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reported to the police, and we just said, that is not as offensive as others we get. but it has become something definitely, everyday there is more abusive e—mails, this is not what it used to be in 2010. there was a tweet today from a labour mp saying she had seen an mp from another party today who was in floods of tears because she was quitting, because she felt she was too soft to be here. i mean, you are a great campaigner for getting women into politics and here you are going — what is going wrong?|j into politics and here you are going - what is going wrong? i am very conscious that part of the difficulty in making the decision was actually, what signal does it send out if some of our fiona lamdin is decided is not for them? i think there is always going to be a churn in parliament and people coming and going. we need that. there needs to bea going. we need that. there needs to be a new speaker, i think there needs to be a wholesale culture change in the house of commons and an understanding that actually we are expected to live in two places and if you are trying to balance family life and responsibilities,
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other people do it, too. but i think this over expectation of the role of the mp and the high profile person that you become, that as i say makes the balance of life quite difficult to achieve. but we do need more women and i hope that this doesn't put people off but we have got to tackle this culture of abuse, in particular. because it does seem there is a disproportionate number of high—profile women who are stepping down, and as you say, it sends out the wrong signal, doesn't it? look, it is a difficult signal but i do think for a lot of that is has very much been that valance between... being an mp is a wonderfuljob and it gives you the opportunity to work with lots of people from different backgrounds to really help people to solve their problems and women are great at doing it. but we all have to balance the other impact on other parts of our lives and when you start, for me, it was about being part of an institution which has struggled to fulfil what we needed to do, on the
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biggest issue of our time, and actually once i could see that wasn't working, then i began to think, the other bits of my life which have been heavily impacted, why am which have been heavily impacted, whyami which have been heavily impacted, why am i putting them through this? the so—called islamic state group has confirmed the death of its leader abu bakr al—baghdadi following the us raid in syria on the weekend. the group also named abu ibrahim al—hashimi al-qurashi as the successor. with me now is our security correspondent frank gardner. so, how significant that they have confirmed this? it is significant. there are a number of points to make. first of all, isis leadership spent some time over the last four days telling people to be wary of fa ke days telling people to be wary of fake news, i think they didn't necessarily want to accept the unpleasant truth for them that their leader has gone. he has been on the run for more than ten years, and this is quite a big blow to them, so they said, beware of fake accounts, et cetera. i think they didn't want to believe it, certainly the followers. now they have confirmed it and they have also confirmed the death of the chief spokesman as well. he was killed in a separate
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incident, with the help of syrian kurds. at the same time, same day? pretty much, with 24 hours —— within 24 hours i think it happened, the kurdish—led sdf announced that. very significantly, they have announced his successor, they have named him as somebody, just as we said, none of us will have heard of, somebody called karin abu ibrahim al—hashimi al-qurashi. and this is what is known as in arabic, an adopted name, it won't be the real name which would have been on his birth certificate or passport if he had one. what is important about it is the fact that he is claiming direct descendant see from the prophet muhammad's tribe. the worry about this is, does the announcement of the death of their leader inspire those, and particularly those who have just been released from prison in syria as a result of what has happened? almost certainly. one of the last acts, if not the last act,
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that abuba kar the last acts, if not the last act, that abubakar al—baghdadi did, was to call for everybody in the region to call for everybody in the region to try and spring isis prisoners, including the women, from prisons. some of these were absolutely fanatic isis supporters, they had taken over effectively parts of the camps in northern syria, so, freeing them is very much a part of their ideology and campaign, and can be i mean at the risk of what my parents used to call bringing it back to yourself, i wrote a piece for bbc news online, saying, what to expect next from isis and i said, first of all, they're going to name their successor pretty quickly. secondly, revenge attacks, expect them, they will be most likely in syria and iraq. they would do them here in europe if they could but it takes a lot more planning and it is riskier and less easy for them to access weapons and explosives, but there will be vengeance attacks. on that
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grim no, you can but go back to brexit now. were you always accused of bringing it back to yourself? frequently! always good to see you. british detectives investigating the death of harry dunn have interviewed the woman accused of killing him. the 19—year—old motorcyclist died in northamptonshire in august after a crash with a car driven by anne sacoolas, who left the uk claiming diplomatic immunity. our correspondent duncan kennedy is in new york. this was a very short statement saying simply that they have now interviewed what they called the suspect. they don't actually name anne sacoolas. and that the information they've gleaned from her has now been passed, along with other evidence, to the crown prosecution service. she has always been the main suspect in this ever since the accident back in august. and the police say they will now wait for the cps to respond to their information that they have passed on and it will be up to the cps to say whether charges will be brought against anne sacoolas. so far as the family
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reaction to this, well, i've spoken to larna, harry dunn's sister, who's here in new york with me. they're doing a round of media interviews today and yesterday. they're not very happy. in fact, they say they are angry with this police statement because they say it doesn't go far enough, there is no timeline. as usual, they say, with northamptonshire police, they are being kept in the dark with all this and they simply say they want more information because they themselves are at the centre of this tragedy. firefighters tackling wildfires in california say extremely strong winds have been hampering their operations. a new blaze near los angeles tripled in size in just two hours, at one point threatening the ronald reagan presidential library, but the building and its priceless collection has been saved. sophie long has sent this report. the fires that forecasters feared broke out in several locations around southern california.
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as wildfires raged across ranchland, people fled from the flames around people fled from the flames and bewildered horses tried to make their own way to safety. in the simi valley, about 30 miles north of los angeles, in the simi valley, about 20 miles north of los angeles, more than 25,000 people were told to evacuate as flames quickly engulfed whole hillsides and the valley filled engulfed whole with thick, dark smoke. the fire, fuelled by winds gusting up to 70mph, the fire, fuelled by winds gusting up to 70mph, surrounded the ronald reagan presidential library surrounded the ronald reagan it's being called the easy fire. but putting it out is proving to be anything but. we're just at the entrance of the ronald reagan we're just at the entrance of the ronald reagan presidential library, and you can see how strongly the wind is blowing the flames in directions all around. they're fighting the fires here, but it's the wind that
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is the greatest enemy. while this fire trebled in size to consume more than 1,300 acres injust two hours, others continued to burn in just two hours, others continued to burn in the celebrity—studded hills of los angeles. there are pleas for the public to be vigilant there are pleas for the public to be vigilant as new fires are sparked every hour, but optimism that the strongest santa ana winds for more than a decade could soon start to abate. in northern california, the authorities say the fire around sa nta authorities say the fire around santa rosa is now 30% contained. and they are hopeful that further progress can now be made as the wind has dropped. sophie long, bbc news, los angeles. now it's time for a look at the weather, with stav danaos. hello there, after a quiet, chilly start to the week, things are turning a lot more unsettled to end the week, turning wetter and windier,
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thanks to a low pressure. we could be looking at a spell of stormy weather across southern britain as we head into saturday. but for halloween evening, it should be largely dry and chilly for most central and eastern areas, more cloud with some patchy rain further west. this rain will tend to become more widespread, pushing northwards and eastwards as we head through the night. it will introduce milder air into many southern and western areas, still quite a chilly night to come across scotland and the far north—east of england. the low pressure is firmly in control as we enter in control as we end the week or so, for friday, largely cloudy skies, quite breezy, too. the wind coming in from the south—west so it will feel noticeably milder, especially for england and wales. one batch of rain pushing northwards and eastwards through the morning, followed by something a little bit drier and brighter for england and wales, where it will be noticeably milder, but then the next batch of heavy rain pushes into the west later on.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines: labour launch their election campaign — promising to take on what they call the establishment elite we are going after the tax dodgers. we're going after the dodgy landlords and the bad bosses. we're going after the big polluters. because we know whose side we, the labour party, are on. on the day borisjohnson pledged the uk would leave the eu, the prime minister says it's jeremy corbyn's fault that brexit hasn't happened and focuses on public services. we're investing in infrastructure, in new technology. that is the future that we want to build. but at the moment we have got this road block, this logjam and we need to get through it. the body of missing british backpacker amelia bambridge is found in cambodia. more than 70 passengers are killed as their train catches fire in pakistan
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sport now on afternoon live with olly foster. who for the first time is going to get up on a saturday morning! everyone in the office has been talking about their breakfast plans for saturday. england against south africa, a 9 o'clock start. i will be watching it at home. i'm on a late shift here, so no pub for me on a saturday for a change. eddie jones has gone with the same 15 that beat the all blacks. no surprises in the 15 eddiejones tinkered with the midfield for their win over australia in the qaurterfinals, that was when george ford was dropped but the flyhalf was brilliant against the all blacks for their semi—final alst week,
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as the whole england team were, so it's unchanged. there's the skipper, owen farrell who will continue at centre. this is the team walk—about after training in tokyo ahead of saturdays final against south africa, we're six weeks into the tournament now so there's not much more that they need to do fitness wise. we heard from the england head coach eddiejones today, he says that they have been building up to this moment for four years, we also heard from hooker jamie george about the influence of the captain, and the emotional team meetings he holds, for only the players on the eve of matches. first of all, he leads from the front. he is incredibly committed, the way that he performs, the way he carries himself day in, day out, that's the sort of person you want to follow. also he's developed in terms of his messaging to the team and how he builds that up towards the game on saturday and he makes you know... his messaging throughout
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the week is brilliant and it makes the week is brilliant and it makes the team feel so ready on saturday and he builds our confidence up throughout the week and i think a large part of that is down to him. this will be a repeat of 2007 final, which south africa won. they will be at full strength as well. just one change for them. colby coming back into the side. it won't be a com plete into the side. it won't be a complete repeat, because south africa won't win. ok. tennis. kyle edmund, what is going on? he had a few rough games and now he is back. more than a few rough games. he lost eight ina row in a row on tour. back—to—back wins. but it was tough against novak
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djokovic. he pushed the serb in the first set and saved numerous set points. but djokovic took that. he has been suffering a bit of flu as he ended the season as world no 1. he stepped up a gear in the second. jurgen klopp has threatened to pull out of league cup, unless a suitable date can found for their match with aston villa. jurgen klopp says villa should be give an bye or arsenal could take their place. the efl said they're in discussion with the club to find a suitable date. but that
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might have to be injanuary, that would impact on the fa cup third round as well. the draw for the quarter finals was held this morning, this was the reaction of the colchester united squad, when they found out they'd drawn manchester united at old trafford. league one oxford united host the holders manchester city, everton are at home to leicester. everton are at home to leicester. the england one—day captain eoin morgan is going to skipper the side until at least the twenty20 world cup in australia next year. he led the team to the 50 over world cup this summer but had been considering his role. i'm comfortian with the de—— comfortable with the decision i made, i'm dilighted i have made it, because i feel that is the right one for myself and the team, i still feel i have a lot to offer. there we re feel i have a lot to offer. there were questions about my fitness and how i would come back and play, i suppose, but i think that was just lingering in my head, because i was
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backin lingering in my head, because i was back in playing county cricket two weeks after the world cup final. one quick bit of breaking news, the hearts manager, craig levein has been sacked. he will leaving his role, he won't go back to his role as director of football. more on the bbc sport web—site and we are back in the next hour as well. now on afternoon live, let's go nationwide and see what's happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. today it's a special nationwide and we're joined by adrian goldberg in salford who will be on your local radio station tonight, wherever you are, with an interactive programme on brexit and what comes next. what are you hoping to do tonight? yes it is the night we thought that brexit would be seen, but that is not going to be the case on october 3ist. not going to be the case on october 31st. so what happens next? there
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will be people who are unhappy that we haven't quit the eu and people who are delighted and think it may give us a prospecting of remaining in the eu. there are all sorts of dimensions to the story, in scotland, northern ireland, in wales, tonight we want to hear from england and england alone across local radio. we are going to be speaking to political correspondents north, south and east and west and people involved in tourism, manufacturing and most of all we wa nt to manufacturing and most of all we want to hear from listeners about what they make of the fact that today isn't going to be the day we leave the eu. hasn't brexit been overshadowed by the general election? you might think that, but for many people, brexit will be one of the defining features of their vote in the election. for some people i think it will be the single most important feature of the election, so they can listen in and
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join in and get a sense of temperature around brexit. so as we know, with the forthcoming election, brexit is not going to go away. what time is it on? 8 o'clock on every local radio station. do join us. yes, you can have your say on that special programme. two thousand service personnel have joined forces with veterans, volunteers and celebrities in an attempt to raise one million pounds in a single day for the royal british legion during london poppy day. it's the biggest street cash collection of its kind in europe and its now in its 14th year. the day will see collectors hitting the train stations, streets and office blocks in london to raise money for the poppy appeal. earlier i spoke to the britain's got talent winner, and chelsea pensioner, colin thackery — who has been part of london poppy day today. i started by asking him
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how the day was going? people are very generous this morning. i was there quite early this morning and there was so many buckets and stuff and of course a lot of people were going to work and as soon as they saw the uniforms, what helped as well was the band and later gurkha rifles pipe band was there. how many people asked you to sing? loads! it happens all the time. to be fair, you're not the only choice to be the winner of britain's got talent. has it sunk in? it's sort of sinking in. it's the razzmatazz and ifind it very interesting. even just the razzmatazz and ifind it very interesting. evenjust coming the razzmatazz and ifind it very interesting. even just coming to the studio, my eyes are all over the place, because i'm interested in how things work. so am i, i am not sure they do work. for you, a very
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personal journey and then they do work. for you, a very personaljourney and then everybody knows all about you. that's right. it is frightening, isn't it. how are you adjusting, you seem to be all right? i'm fine, my daughter was a bit concerned, i likened it to being ona bit concerned, i likened it to being on a round about and it is going around and getting a bit faster and one day it shall stop and i shall drop off and that will be the end. i'm not looking for a great career. not at 89. you talk on stage about jo, not at 89. you talk on stage about jo, your late wife, what do you think she would say?|j jo, your late wife, what do you think she would say? i think she would be delighted. she was a singer. and she would... to use one of her phrases, don't let it go too far to your head, old lad, just watch what you're doing. that will be difficult, because you're singing in front of queen soon. that will be nice. certainly at the royal albert
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hall and last year i was marching down the steps, this year i'm singing as they march down, boys of the old brigade and back with the 16 of my colleagues behind me that were on when i won the composition. you served in korea ? on when i won the composition. you served in korea? yes. i'm wondering about the balance between the ceremony and what is going on in here, what memories you have. we we re here, what memories you have. we were there in 1950 and it was ferocious and there was some large battles a nd ferocious and there was some large battles and it was my initiation into warfare. you saw a lot of chaps die and they were almost like brothers and they come right to the front of your mind, especially when you see the petals fall. that is
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extraordinary. every year we say why it's important to remember, every year you're fewer in number, the vetera ns, year you're fewer in number, the veterans, why is it port that you're out there first thing this morning raising money? because well, we are raising money? because well, we are raising money? because well, we are raising money to help those guys that are a little less fortunate than we are and it is notjust people in the service, it is their families and people outside. but it is important to raise the money and important to keep that, the remembrances in the front of your mind. the target is to raise a million in one day. how do you think it will do? i don't know, there are all sorts of funnier things. and people were putting tenners and fivers in the bucket, notjust coins. let's hope that continues for the rest of the day. when you started on that britain's got talent journey, did you have any idea? no.
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none whatsoever. because it was a dare you know. was it? yes i had been singing, well, we have a curry friday, which is last friday of the month, and that's served in our club. and there is a little stage. after a curry, me and another guy used to sing for about an hour. an hour? yes, well between us. he'd done the country and western and i'd done the country and western and i'd do the ballards. i said to somebody, he won't admit to it, i know who it is, isaid he won't admit to it, i know who it is, i said to him, i get older. have you forgotten his name? no, he won't admit. isaid you forgotten his name? no, he won't admit. i said as i get older, i have a lwa ys admit. i said as i get older, i have always sung and i love to sing. excuse me. i was worried that you
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know, if you... singing is a funny thing, if you don't use it, you lose it. he said was this true. i said of course it was true. he said, well, something, something, go and... do something, something, go and... do something about it? yes. so i said, what do you mean? he said, well britain's got talent are advertising for the next series of shows. i said, well what do you expect me to do. why would they want an old what's it like me to come a and sing. he said, i dare you to do it. isaid, ok. sing. he said, i dare you to do it. i said, ok. and never dare you? no, thatis i said, ok. and never dare you? no, that is a silly thing to do. how has it changed things for you?m that is a silly thing to do. how has it changed things for you? it is incredible. the recognition is extraordinary. when dressed with the hat and the scarlet it is instant. it is less when you're in shirt
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sleeve order, when there is no scarlet and you're wearing the hat and in civilian clothes, you know people are looking, you get somebody, or you sit in a restau ra nt, somebody, or you sit in a restaurant, my daughter or my son will be with me or one of my granddaughters and they say, they're talk about you. they're looking over, is it really him? ifind it very flattering. very flattering. and of course i never refuse to talk to people ever. i like talking to people. and of course there are photographs. everyone has got a phone these days with a camera. it is literally thousands of photographs. what is the next album? i've got to get this one out first. you must be planning on the next!” don't know. i have some ideas. tell me about the current one, because is ita me about the current one, because is it a stocking filler? i hope so. it
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isa mix it a stocking filler? i hope so. it is a mix of songs. some sentimental. some old, some new. a couple of war songs. we'll meet again and white cliffs. and the challenge that, well it is hard lay challenge, but it was a suggestion that people wouldn't expect somebody of my age to sing a modern song and they gave me this lovely ed sheeran song called supermarket flowers. i thought what a lovely song. it worked for me, because it was about his grandmother and clearing up after her death. and which i had done after my wife died. i folded thing and put them in suitcases and took things off the windowsill. that sort of thing. so, it is very poignant really. it was said ant and dec said there wasn't a dry eye in the house. that is right,
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i get accused of that. i was singing ata i get accused of that. i was singing at a function yesterday and the same thing happens. just a final thought, because we are looking at the launch of the poppy appeal, if someone's watching you know and they may have seen you on britain's got talent and they may be under 20 years old, what do you say about why it is important to remember? well it is important to remember because i think most people of my age don't want their children and grandchildren to be involved in any form of conflict. and therefore it is important to bring it to the front all the time. i fought in korea as you know, and the korean people are marvellous. they right the way down to the youngest at school remember... we were fighting out there in the 50s. it is a campaign that many people in this country don't talk about.” campaign that many people in this country don't talk about. i was asked about that this morning, my theory is it was in 1950 it was a
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bit soon after the war. i think people were sick of talking about wartime. so you've got sort of forgotten. but, you know not with the korean people, you know we created something that they have carried on with and that. but going back to people of our own, my grand children, i hope my grandchildren and their children will never ever see any form of conflict. because it isa see any form of conflict. because it is a filthy business. and i don't wa nt is a filthy business. and i don't want them to suffer in any way, shape orform. want them to suffer in any way, shape or form. what do you think. what do you think of the country at the moment? we are living, we are managing and! the moment? we are living, we are managing and i have no... no qualms that it will all sort itself out, we have got a few problems, but they do. i think ijust trust the people that's in charge really. one of the privileges of thisjob that's in charge really. one of the privileges of this job is meeting people like colin. some breaking new
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legislation for the general election has received royal assent. now victoria has the business news ina now victoria has the business news in a moment. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. jeremy corbyn launches the labour party's general election campaign pledging to take on a ‘corrupt system'. on the day borisjohnson pledged the uk would leave the eu, the prime minister says it's jeremy corbyn's fault that brexit hasn't happened and focuses on public services. the body of missing british backpacker amelia bambridge is found in cambodia. here's your business headlines on afternoon live.
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a tie—up to create the world's fourth biggest carmaker. fiat chrysler & peugeot try to seal a mega deal. vauxhall, a psa brand, employs 3,000 people in the uk. car production in britain slowed again last month as demand for new models falls 16% in nine months. profits at lloyds are wiped out by setting aside another 1.8 billion to cover ppi complaints. the august deadline for claims has had a substantial impact on all of the major banks profits this year. we promised viewers the markets, how are they faring? the challenge is to avoid using the word uncertainty. challenge accepted. global stock markets have slid from 20—month highs today —
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we're not going to be talking about brexit. we are talk about the us—china trade deal. will they won't they? i'm not mentioning the u word. it is there in your script. however it isa it is there in your script. however it is a real source of contention and a lot of money has been lost in terms of tariffs and a lot of companies are feeling the burn when it comes to trade spats between the two biggest countries in the world. corporate news in the uk is not great as well. lloyds bank, we will be speaking about that and what is going on at their bank, they're trying to draw a line under ppi. and quest nicholson, the house builder,
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some down beat assessments of the uk economy and investment stalling and people wanting to buy a hold and deciding to hold off, because they're not sure what is going on and generally house builders are not sure what price they will be commanding. the pound is picking up. the pound is on the course for the best month in a decade. i don't mean in terms of value terms, but in terms of a percentage gain. but it well below the level ofjune 16. that is how things are faring. let's speak to laurence gosling, editorial director, what investment. first lloyds bank, what is going on, they want to draw a line under pii, they want to draw a line under pii, they have made some senior management changes, what kind of shape is the bank in?” management changes, what kind of
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shape is the bank in? i think it is in reasonable shape and what lloyds is trying to tell the market is it feels it has some certainty about ppi, even if the liability ig big. it will have cost lloyds about £22 billion. compared to 11 billion for ba rclays. billion. compared to 11 billion for barclays. the deadline in august caught them on the hop, i don't think they expected the volume of complaints. but it is there now and we know the number and it is the sort of worst case number for lloyds and the shareholders, it has rejigged some of its senior management, trying to look to the future. let's talk about fiat chrysler and what is going on there. they want to do a big merger and make it the fourth biggest car makers in the world, do you think it isa makers in the world, do you think it is a good idea for the business and do you think it will happen?” is a good idea for the business and do you think it will happen? i think it will happen. fiat chrysler has
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tried to merge before and the fact that we have this announcement suggests it is some way down the line. there is too much capacity in the car market, if you look at the traditional engine. there is too much ca pas pi. this creates only the fourth largest car company in the fourth largest car company in the world. in the short—term it might be good news for the business. they have pledged there will be no job losses in the uk. that is good news. but you know if you look three orfour news. but you know if you look three or four years news. but you know if you look three orfour years down news. but you know if you look three or four years down the line, i news. but you know if you look three orfour years down the line, i think we will see cost cutting. that could be when the uncertainty for the uk workers come. you're a hard man to please if you're not happy with 8 million sales. bombardier have sold their northern ireland operations for about a billion pounds to a us company. is that good news for people of belfast? it probably is.
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it gives them some certainty, but the outlook for the business was looking unsteady. now the fact it has been bought by a us business gives them a better opportunity to get back into the sort of us business without falling foul of the trade sanctions that have been kicking around. thank you. that is it in terms of your business news. thank you very much. some breaking news to do with the friend ofjennifer arcuri and the prime minister having to deny that there was any conflict of interest in his business dealings with her while he was mayor of london. we are hearing the results of an internal review to do with one aspect of is, a £100,000 grant tojennifer arcuri's company hacker house. the
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dms decided the award was appropriate. it has been looking into the background and said hacker house had not met one part of deal and criminal background checks were not carried out, but they had been waved. they concluded assessment of grant was appropriate. this is accompanied by a letter to the chair of the committee. nicky morgan pointed out the grant decision did not involve minister and was made at a time when borisjohnson was a backbench mp and they decided there was no impropriety. hit the follows borisjohnson was no impropriety. hit the follows boris johnson saying was no impropriety. hit the follows borisjohnson saying that he has done nothing wrong, jennifer arcuri herself saying that in relation to
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that £100,000 award, there were no favours in exchange for that grant. a report clearing jennifer arcuri's company of inappropriately being awarded that £100,000 government grant. more on that later. the house of representatives has passed a resolution that approves rules for the impeachment inquiry into president trump. the vote was not about whether or not to impeach donald trump — but rather how the inquiry should proceed. the resolution sets out plans for part of the investigation to be opened up to the public. until now, evidence has only been given behind closed doors. it is only the fourth time in us history that a president has been the subject of a formal house impeachment investigation. ? the chairman of committee gave his reaction. we recognise the seriousness of this undertaking. we
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recognise that we have been compelled by the circumstances to move forward. when a president abuses his or her office, when a president sacrifices the national interest, when a president refuses to defend the constitution, and does so for the purpose of advancing a personal or political agenda, the founders provided the remedy. i make no prejudgment as to whether that remedy will be warranted when we finish these hearings. i will wait until all the facts are put forward. we will undertake this duty with the seriousness it deserves and to the best of our ability. that's all from afternoon live. next it's the bbc news at five with huw edwards. now it's time for a look
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at the weather with stav danaos. things are turning more unsettled to end the week. we could be looking at some stormy weather in southern britain on saturday. for hallowe'en, largely dry and chilly. central and eastern areas more cloud. the rain will become more widespread as we head through the night. still a chilly night in scotland and the far north—east of england. low pressure in control as we end the week. for friday, largely cloudy, breezy too. the wind from the south—west, it will feel milder. we will have one batch of rain pushing north and east through the morning. followed by something drier and bright. the next rain pushes into the west later. temperatures 14 to 16 degrees.
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today at five — labour launch their election campaign — promising to take on what they call the establishment elite. jeremy corbyn promised to rebuild public services — as he branded the poll a "once—in—a—generation chance" to transform the country. we are going after the tax dodgers, we are going after the dodgy landlords, we are going after the bad bosses, we are going after the big polluters. because we know whose side we, the labour party, are on. on the day borisjohnson pledged the uk would leave the eu come what may — the prime minister says instead it's jeremy corbyn's fault that brexit hasn't happened — and focusses on public services. we are investing in infrastructure, in new technology, and that's

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