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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 1, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm carrie gracie. today at 2. the brexit party says it will fight every seat in england, scotland and wales, unless boris johnson drops his deal with the eu. it is 1st november, and yes, we are still members of the european union. yet more broken promises, and indeed, a breakdown of trust and faith, notjust in politics, but actually in our entire democratic system. the chief coroner calls for tough new laws to tackle extremist propoganda, in the wake of the london bridge attack. a second man has appeared in court over the deaths of 39 people in a
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hurry and affects. coming up on afternoon live all the sport, with katie shanahan. the rugby world cup aims and defeats, they have been beaten by a0 points against new zealand to win the bronze medal. that was also the head coach last game in charge of wales. thanks katie, and stav has all the weather thanks, stav. here is a hint of what we are expecting a better week and particularly in southern parts of the country it can be pretty wild and beat i will have all of the details coming up. also coming up, campaigners call for a clamp—down on fireworks being let off in residential areas at all hours. hello everyone, this is afternoon live. nigel farage has said his
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brexit party will contest every seat in england, wales and scotland in next month's election, unless borisjohnson drops his deal with the eu and signs up to a leave alliance. mr farage said the prime minister's withdrawal agreement with the eu is ‘simply not brexit.‘ the brexit party say they have 500 candidates ready to fight the election. the conservatives have responded by saying a vote for nigel farage risks letting jeremy corbyn into downing street by the back door. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake reports. thumbs up for brexit — that's always been his message, but nigel farage launched his party's election campaign this morning with a warning that it hasn't happened yet and, unless things change, it might well not. it is november the ist and, yes, still we are members of the european union. yet more broken promises and indeed a breakdown of trust and faith, notjust in politics but actually in our entire democratic system in this country.
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the party, he said, was ready to take on labour and the tories and make the case for what he calls a clean—break brexit. first, though an appeal — to work with, not against, the other main parties. the only way to solve this is to build a leave alliance across this country. that doesn't mean just conservatives and the brexit party. there are labour figures out there that i have spoken to who would more than happily stand in this election if we could put this coalition together. but if it was done, borisjohnson would win a very big majority. and on that manifesto, we really could get brexit done, in fact, to quote a friend of mine, we'd become an unstoppable force. nigel farage said the brexit party was ready to stand in every seat in england, scotland and wales, if boris johnson didn't ditch his brexit deal and the form a leave alliance.
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the chances of that seem slim. we're not interested in doing any pacts with the brexit party, or indeed with anybody else. we are in this to win it, and we know that only a vote for the conservative party will deliver brexit, only a vote will protect the union so we don't have two referendums next year, causing the end of brexit and potentially the end of the union, and ultimately it is only a vote for borisjohnson that will stop jeremy corbyn walking up downing street on friday the 13th december. the brexit party's top targets would be labour—held constituencies that voted to leave, but labour is focusing on its own offer, with something, it claims, for everyone. to the country as a whole, what we're saying is, whether you're remain or leave, there is a route through for you by voting labour. for the other parties, it's one side or the other, it's very divisive, and one of the things we want to do is try to reunify quite an angry country. i think this is the way forward, but there's much more than brexit on the agenda,
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as you know, in this election, and i'm sure we will begin to move on to some of the other debates about the nhs, jobs, poverty, and all the other problems which the coutry faces. support for the brexit party is easy to find in places like thurrock in essex, which voted overwhelmingly to leave. but the challenge for nigel farage will be turning that into electoral success. ijust think there is something about the man, he says he's going to do something, he generally goes out and does it, do you know what i mean? hopefully, it will do. i mean, we should have been out yesterday and now we're still in. everyone i talk to, near where i live, they are all going to go for the brexit, because they think tory government done wrong by not passing it through and to have another election, why? i don't see any discussion happening now, i see rowing, and i see lots of turbulence, and i see plenty of people in dire straits, and i see some bad times coming for this country at the moment. brexit won't be the only issue on which voters make up their minds, but so far it seems set
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to dominate the campaign. 0ur political correspondent helen catt is in. last night, nigel farage spoke to president trump, how likely is a beer? the conservatives have been pretty consistently declaring talk of some sort of formal pact with the brexit party has been suggested they are just not a market for that. i think as nigel farage makes this offer today he would be where it's very unlikely that the conservatives are going to go for that. particularly as the price is borisjohnson abandoning that deal that he has been already trying to sell to
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militaries did and 50 candidates and thatis militaries did and 50 candidates and that is a tall order for a party that is a tall order for a party thatis that is a tall order for a party that is only a few months old. he says he has got 500 candidates signed up and ready to go and he says on monday of course he will be buoyed by the results that they have got in the european elections earlier this year. of course as he had seen in the past, a good performance does not necessarily translate into success here at westminster. the next question obviously is where does this leave the tories? because being outflanked bya the tories? because being outflanked by a hard—line view of brexit or the right—wing will be tricky for them. it does make thatjob of going out and setting borisjohnson‘s brexit perhaps a bit harder. it does in unconnected ability of the risk that the leave of oats will be spent. the conservatives are very keen to say they dispute this idea that there is is not a brexit. they say they are
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leaving the customs union on their boris johnson's leaving the customs union on their borisjohnson‘s deal which leaving the customs union on their boris johnson's deal which means leaving the customs union on their borisjohnson‘s deal which means you are able to do trade deals but that big risk for them is that there is this split into votes between boris johnson's conservatives and nigel farage's brexit party and that channels other parties to the metre in seats that they expected to be held. . who said the us could not do a free—trade deal with the uk because of ‘certain aspects' of the prime minister's brexit deal. with me to look into this in more detail is our reality check correspondent, chris morris. so chris, a lot of this is about what ‘get brexit done' actually means, isn't it? a lot of this is framed about what brexit actually means in a way, we will hear this phrase that brexit done a lot in the next few weeks and is going to be a lot of debate about what it means. it is worth remembering that we started out more than three years ago, the question on the ballot paper at the
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referendum should the uk remain a member of the eu or should it leave the eu? member of the eu or should it leave the eu 7 that's member of the eu or should it leave the eu? that's the only thing we we re the eu? that's the only thing we were asked. it is. we went and told what leave it looks like that's the battle now, not about how we view but about where we end up and particularly that means that trade. if you are going to diverge or move away from the european economic model and the european economic orbit, the only place you can really go realistically, there are other deals around the world but in terms ofa deals around the world but in terms of a big place to anchor yourself, it's going to be the united states. and i think for donald trump, a melody of brexit it's no accident he made these comments while talking to at fries on radio and a melody of brexit would have the effect of moving the uk more abruptly into the american orbits because it would move in the uk more abruptly away from the european one. and yet obviously there are forces on the other end of the argument to say
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this is already too hard a brexit. and we know this document here came out earlier this year, we know some of the things the united states wa nts of the things the united states wants from a future trade the only united kingdom. they put their specific objectives. 0ne united kingdom. they put their specific objectives. one of the things it says is we want to obtain more open and equitable access for agricultural projects and another thing it says it later on if we want full market access for us products in pharmaceuticals and medical devices. still, they want to move in and break up what they see is a monopoly of the nhs. the government can say no we will protect the nhs but that will be one of the objectives of the united states. i think from mr objectives of the united states. i thinkfrom mrtrump, objectives of the united states. i think from mr trump, the due care in boris johnson's think from mr trump, the due care in borisjohnson‘s dear think from mr trump, the due care in boris johnson's dear i think from mr trump, the due care in borisjohnson‘s dear i suspect is something he had not actually read but it looks to him like something which continues to bind the uk into that european model. even though the language on what are called a level
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playing field provisions, the way you stick close to rules on worker's rights an environment protection that language is being moved in mr johnson's version of the video from the legal binding agreement to the nonbinding political declaration but it is complex. the compromise of a northern ireland makes it even more complex. i think mr trump is wrong when he said he can't do a trade—in in the future because under the johnson beer the whole of the uk including northern ireland would be leaving the eu customs union but the idea that this would be a simple, clea n b rea k idea that this would be a simple, clean break is simply not the case. what do you make of the other thing that mr trump what do you make of the other thing that mrtrump said what do you make of the other thing that mr trump said that the uk can't do much bigger numbers with a free deal barely be less than it is doing in terms of trade that the eu. 0bviously he had in the past that leaving the european union would be like losing an anchor around the ankle but this idea that there are
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bigger numbers, bigger games to be met? no. essentially it's certainly not enough yet —— foreseeable future. the amount of trade we do with the european union cannot be replaced in the short term by free trade deal with the united states. it is at the moment of a lemming many of our largest trading partner. it is true that as a proportion of oui’ it is true that as a proportion of our entire trade has been going down over the last few years. new market, they are becoming more important. the idea that somehow a free—trade deal with the united states. it is at the moment overwhelmingly our largest trading partner. it is true that as a proportion of our entire trade has been going down over the last few years. newmarket, they are becoming more important. the idea that somehow a free—trade unit the united states could replace all that trade we do with our nearest neighbours is not up to scrutiny. the snp leader nicola sturgeon has said she'll make a formal request before christmas for a second independence referendum. 0ur scotland correspondent james shaw has been explaining the significance of the move. it was very clear that she will ask for that formal authorisation, to hold a second independence referendum, before christmas. almost an early christmas
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present for whoever is the next prime minister of the united kingdom. what's the significance of it? well, i suppose it shows that the snp are still determined to go for independence. they want to hold a referendum, if they can, next year. and that is part of their election pitch. it is 2—pronged, really. 0n the one hand, it appeals to the main voters, people who don't want the united kingdom to leave the european union, and it intends to appeal to people in favour of independence as well, to hoover up all those voters in scotland, if the snp possibly can. so, here's a little bit of what nicola sturgeon said, earlier this morning. oh, i've made pretty clear, and i'm sticking to this, that section 30 demand will be delivered to downing street, whoever happens to be in it, before christmas. and that is because it is vital that scotland takes control of our own future. right now, our future is being dictated by borisjohnson, who himself, is enthralled to donald trump.
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that's not the future i think the majority of people in scotland want. we can have a better future, by being independent and that's one of the big issues that's on the line at this election. now, nicola sturgeon also talked to this issue of the post—brexit trade deal between the united states and britain. she said she was concerned about that, whatever donald trump says now, about the nhs not being on the table, she believes it will and she also said she thought there would be a risk to environmental and food standards, and also to workers' rights. those are the kind of issues that the snp will be stressing, through this campaign. it's just under six weeks until the general election and if you're unsure how to register to vote, you can find out how by visiting our website at bbc.co.uk/news or on the bbc news app. whirlpool has been criticised for the time it's taken to deal
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with potentially dangerous tumble dryers that have been linked to a spate of fires. mps on the business select committee say it's disgraceful that some customers who've been the victims of fires have been made to sign non—disclosure agreements to get compensation from the company. our personal finance correspondent simon gompertz reports. i've got some washing for you. caught up in the four—year process so far of whirlpool sorting out its danger dryers, steviejo from west london battled to get hers replaced then found even the replacement was one of the models at risk of catching fire. it's scary to think that they've taken so long to sort this problem out. eventually, after hounding them, i received a free—of—charge replacement. i checked online to make sure that it wasn't on the recall list, after all the hassle that i'd had. lo and behold, it was on the recall list.
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this has been the fear — a spate of fires like one in london's shepherd's bush, blamed on faulty dryers. the brands affected include hotpoint, indesit and swan. the company revealed to mps in the summer that up to 800,000 could still be in use. so i apologise to you... in their evidence, whirlpool said sorry to one customer they'd made sign a nondisclosure agreement, attempting to silence her in exchange for getting compensation. when it came to adding up the cost of everything, i felt like a criminal, like i were being questioned. gemma had had to get her baby and toddler out of the house when her dryer caught light. as i opened the door and saw the flames, i had to grab him and get out, and i had to get my son to help me grab my daughter out. i think it is absolutely appalling that whirlpool not only was responsible for fires in people's homes but then tried
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to stop them from speaking about it, because we all know that the most powerful thing in terms of getting those machines out of homes is others speaking about their experience, that is what encourages people to check their own machine. whirlpool told us, "we have resolved this potential safety issue which concerns tumble dryers produced by the previous owner of the company for more than 1.75 million people." their factory near bristol is producing a new dryer every ten seconds to provide the safer replacements it's now obliged to offer. that's under the terms of the full product recall which the government imposed three months ago. simon gompertz, bbc news. you are watching afternoon nights, here are you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: here are hese are our headlines: the brexit party says it will fight every seat in england, scotland and wales — unless boris johnson drops his deal with the eu the chief coroner calls for tough new laws to tackle extremist propoganda, in the wake of the london bridge attack. detectives have spoken by phone
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to one of the suspects wanted over the deaths of 39 people in a lorry in essex. and in sport: disappointment for wales, as they lose their bronze medal match, at the rugby world cup. they were beaten by a0 points to 17, against new zealand, in head coach warren gatland's last game in charge. 0nto tomorrow's final, between england and south africa. world cup winner, jonny wilkinson, tells the bbc england need to make sure they put that victory over new zealand, last weekend out of their minds. and, granit xhaka has been left out of the arsenal squad, for tomorrow's match with wolves. the captain swore at fans, after being booed off, when he was substituted last weekend. and i'll be back with more on those stores after half past. mps and peers say mental health legislation must be changed, to stop what they call the ‘horrific‘ and inappropriate detention of young people with autism or learning disabilites. thejoint committee of human rights says conditions in mental health
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hospitals across england inflict ‘terrible suffering‘ on those who are detained, and cause anguish to their families. 0ur education & family correspondent frankie mccamley reports. the only physical contact jeremy and his daughter bethany had was through a hatch in one treatment unit. she has autism and was placed in isolation 2a hours a day, seven days a week. she was made to stand at the other side of her room when her meals were being served. she has to sit on the floor, three members of staff come into the corridor outside, almost as if they‘re expecting beth to explode out of the door like a wild animal. at that point, the door is opened, the food is laid inside, and they shut the door again. bethany, who we can‘t fully identify, was doing well inside an adolescent unit. when she turned 18, though, she had to move to a treatment centre for adults, where
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things turned from bad to worse. it‘s a unit that has no autism provision whatsoever, and once again my daughter is locked up in a cell that does not even have a hatch, i cannot hold her hand. it‘s horrific. she is falling apart in there. the lack of human contact is damaging her already fragile state. she asked me if i could find her dolls that smelt like real babies, that looks like real babies, because she‘s lonely. that broke my heart. completely broke my heart. today a report from the joint committee on human rights says that seclusion and restraint is the horrific reality for too many young people with disabilities and autism who too often face inappropriate detention in brutal circumstances which inflict terrible suffering. the breaches that we heard about,
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whether from parents or from young people themselves who have been subject to detention, were appalling. the committee was really traumatised by the evidence that it heard. the inquiry is calling for urgent change to the system and an ovehaul of the care quality commission‘s inspection regime. the cqc says it‘s been implementing changes but admits there is much more to be done. frankie mccamley, bbc news. a man has appeared in court in dublin in connection with the deaths of 39 people in lorry in essex last month. two men have also been arrested in vietnam and charged with organising illegal emigration. it comes as police call on two brothers — wanted over the deaths — to hand themselves in. 0ur correspondent mark lowen is here. let‘s speak now to our correspondent mark lowen, who has been following developments... a start off with the man who appeared in high court in ireland, 23 years old from county down he is
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charged with multiple counts of manslaughter, conspiracy to commit human trafficking and conspiracy to assist unlawful immigration and he‘s now facing extradition back to the uk. it is alleged that he delivered the trailer to the belgian part before it continued itsjourney the trailer to the belgian part before it continued its journey and he was arrested in dublin after this european arrest warrant. separately as it is sorry to say vietnam have confronted the bbc that two people have been arrested there on suspicion of people smuggling, their identities have not been revealed. and then this morning you had essex police making a direct appealfor two brothers, a0—year—old running hughes and his aa—year—old brother christopher to turn themselves in. they are wanted on suspicion of manslaughter and human trafficking as well and the company that owned the trailer of the larry said that ronan he was assigned at the paper is to rent the container. you now have the driver who is in custody, robbing sin, he is facing 39 counts, you have the man who rented the
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container who i wanted by police and you have the man who delivered the trailer is facing extradition to the uk. do you know more in terms of the identities of the victims? only in terms of families from vietnam who are making contact with police to state that they have lost contact with their sons and daughters and know they were en route to britain. we have not had a confirmation of the names and we had not a confirmation if they were all the although the majority is thought to be the enemies. and that he is also in vietnam continued to take care of samples and dna samples from their families who are coming to the police to say they have lost touch with the police to say they have lost touch with their children often last hearing from them in really tragic facebook messages and text m essa 9 es tragic facebook messages and text messages saying they were going to reestablish contact when they landed in the uk and that contact was never re—established so the s —— assumption is be aware among the 39. now you have police here and 6000 miles away in vietnam while cooperating to try and unearth all the moving parts of this complex
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international murder investigation. meanwhile looking at the wider context, more focus on modern—day slavery, more focus on people trafficking. absolutely. these international rings based in vietnam. we heard that could take some three months to travel back by road, the poorest ones who travel by road, the poorest ones who travel by road, they were coming to eastern europe, the wealthier ones are the ones that my money would pay for a flight ones that my money would pay for a flight ticket into china and bend westwards and from the families also you are hearing the sums of money arejust you are hearing the sums of money are just astronomical. families who are just astronomical. families who are using all their life savings to check to help the children get to western europe, they did not make it. so the double tragedy is losing their children and losing such huge sums of money. thank you very much for the update. warren gatland‘s 12—year reign in charge of wales‘s rugby team ended with a defeat against new zealand today. the all blacks ran out winners by a0 points to 17 in the world cup third
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place play—off in tokyo. but english fans dream of victory in tomorrow‘s final. bars and pubs are preparing to open early for the 9 am kick off and stocking up on extra supplies of beer, bacon and sausages for a world cup breakfast. danny savage is in leeds to see the preparations there. in pops up and down england, pumps are being primed, if england win the world cup it will be a super saturday. the time difference between here and japan means this will be a breakfast experience. somebody will surely come up with a numberfor somebody will surely come up with a number for how many bacon sandwiches will be concealed. landlords expect he was at the door. somebody will surely come up with a number for how many bacon sandwiches will be consumed. landlords expect queues at the door from 8:00am. busy, it‘s going to be
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busy, a lot of interest, a lot of phone calls, a lot of people interested, so we‘re opening at 8am, busy, busy for breakfast and, you know, we have a big rugby union community, we sponsor leeds university, we sponsor trinity, we‘ve got big links with the rhinos and the rugby league with the rhinos and carnegie, so there‘s a lot of interest. for england rugby fans, there‘s only one thing to be doing tomorrow — watch, hope and be inspired. i think it's massive for the whole country, for rugby, sort of going from grassroots level, right up until the top, really. i think a lot of, like, local clubs are really getting behind the national team, as well, and it'sjust really exciting to watch us do well. and for some fans of the union code, it will be their first sight of england in a world cup final. it‘s amazing, because it tells you what you could be, when you‘re older, what position you could be, how good you are, and you get to watch all the other good players, you might meet up with them in the future and see them, yeah. do you think they‘ll win? yeah, they‘ll probably win. it's really special, because i've never watched a rugby final before, with england in it, and i think it's going to be really exciting to see how they play and how they cope
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with the intensity of it. a number of the england players attended st george‘s school in harpenden — rugby is in the blood here. you bet they‘ll be glued to the tv in the morning. everyone is inspired by them, and it's great we've got that connection with four world cup finalists, so everyone is really aware of what they've achieved. every one of the england players started offjust like this. tomorrow, a sport with discipline and respect at its heart will be showcased. 80 minutes of play will decide if it‘s going to be disappointment or elation. danny savage, bbc news, leeds. time for a look at the weather. we have got some severe weather in the forecast as we head into the weekend. pretty deep area of low pressure it will bring gusts up to
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60, 70 pressure it will bring gusts up to 60,70 mph and maybe pressure it will bring gusts up to 60, 70 mph and maybe even pressure it will bring gusts up to 60,70 mph and maybe even higher than this in southwest england. so, yellow warnings and forest for the met office, nothing higher at the moment. so i have to keep watching that. this is the low pressure system you can see it moving in, this is their saturday morning, be able to squeeze in the isobars across southern england and south wales as well, but notice that feature as well. let‘s have a look again, it‘sa feature as well. let‘s have a look again, it‘s a saturday morning, deals across the southern flank moving across southern england, heavy rain as well. this area of the pressure pushing and that will bring severe details and heavy rain into western france. afterwards... these big rains will take the last leaves off the trees? exactly, we‘re pretty concerned. wind gusts around 1780 mph will bring down trees, we could be looking at the 80 mph gusts in the southwest of england coast—to—coast, and along southern coast—to—coast, and along southern coast around the isle of wight. this is the peak of the wins will be
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through saturday morning up to midday, 50 to 60 mph potentially in the london area and into east anglia. there could be some damage and disruption from this keeping a watchful eye on it because it could be upgraded we just have to wait and see. for the region, that stormy starts, very mild and then as the head on into sunday, things should tend to ease down a bit, their wings are easing down, they will still be shy was around, it is mild for the time of year, the next 2a hours even the next few days you‘ll notice that and we end the day with very mild conditions across england and wales, quite murky and cloudy misty outbreaks of rain across scotland and heavy rain pushing to the southwest as he had to the evening. at that that 15 or 16 degrees in the south, is a chilly field across scotla nd south, is a chilly field across scotland and reached out to see the rain seeping up on the southwest, gail is developing in southwestern england and south wales by the night and heavy rain pushing him and there
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will be further rain across the north and those temperatures ranging from nine to ii north and those temperatures ranging from nine to 11 degrees that night, pretty mild. then there is our area of low pressure squeezing isobars across the south, city or gales through the morning. a wild morning, windows will be rattling i think there the early hours and it is saturday —— saturday morning, heavy rain seeping across causing issues as the ground a saturated could be some surface water flooding. northern scotland is very left and randy, besides that central, southern scotland and northern england could see quite a bit of sunshine as they dry, very big difference top and tail of the country. then, as he moved into the evening period, it will still be mild and windy, it is going to be pretty wet. temperatures came through 13 celsius. let‘s move on into sunday. it is looking less wild, the winds will be quite a
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strong, still breezy, some sunshine around one or two showers and lumbar spells of rain but because of the winds will be sunshine it would be i3 winds will be sunshine it would be 13 or ia celsius. very wild weekend to come, except any saturday morning across the forecast. this is bbc news, our latest headlines. the brexit party says it will fight every seat in england, scotland and wales, unless boris johnson drops his deal with the eu. it is ist november, and yes,
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we are still members of the european union. yet more broken promises, and indeed, a breakdown of trust and faith, notjust in politics, but actually in our entire democratic system. the chief coroner calls for tough new laws, to tackle extremist propoganda, in the wake of the london bridge attack. detectives have spoken by phone to one of the suspects in the deaths of 39 people in essex. sport now, on afternoon live with katie sha na han. we‘ll talk about england and the world cup final in a moment, but there was disappontment for wales, this morning? wales have finished fourth at the rugby world cup, after losing their bronze medal match against new zealand. the match in tokyo this morning was for the two teams that lost in the semi—finals. the all blacks were always on top, running in 6 tries, to claim the victory by a0 points to 17.
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the reigning champions — who were beaten by england last weekend — got off to a great start, showing their class and scoring two early tries. but then, a boost for wales, as they fought back with this try. but new zealand pushed on and went from strength to strength as more tries followed. that means that warren gatland‘s last game as head coach of wales ends in defeat, as he‘s stepping down after 12 years in charge. i really hope that what we have achieved in the last ten or 12 years that we have earned respect and put respect back into wales as an international team, that they continue, the new coaches come in and continue to build on that, because i think what we‘ve done and what we‘ve achieved,
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it would break my heart if wales went back into the doldrums, i think. so carrie, disppointment today for wales but a real sense of achievement — three grand slams and two world cup semi—finals over the last 12 years with warren gatland as coach and as for england, they‘ve been benefitting from the experience of a man who knows how to win a world cup? yes they certainly are, with none other than jonny wilksinson who scored that dramatic drop goal to win the world cup back in 2003. here he is, giving some kicking tips to skipper, 0wen farrell, at england training session this morning. as england will be hoping they can write their own piece of history tomorrow, against south africa in the final. a match, which is actually a repeat of the 2007 final, that the springboks went on to win. jonny wilkinson played in that match. but england will be out in force force to try and secure rugby union‘s biggest prize.
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physically there structure is great and their video knowledge will help them recover physically, mentally and emotionally to accept that it was a phenomenal game, whatever, but it is done now. and you almost start again. when you have nothing to compare it to, there is no such thing as complacent. you literally just prepare for this one game and i think the strength to do that well, is there. to football now, as granit xhaka has tried to explain his behaviour, while he was playing for arsenal, last weekend. he‘s says that after repeated threats to his wife and daughter had pushed him to "boiling point". he swore at fans, after being sustituted during the gunner‘s 2—2 draw with crystal palace in the premier league. he says he reacted disrespectfully. but he had been "hurt deeply" by comments on social media and at matches. liverpool managerjurgen klopp has attacked the fixture schedule which leaves his players facing 17 matches in the next nine weeks.
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liverpool reached the quarterfinals of the league cup, but are not sure when they are going to play it. it is obvious, it is obvious it is too much. absolutely obvious. everyone involved in the game would tell you that and you know it as well. premier league, what a competition, sensational, but then canada cup, nice, wonderful game we had stuff like this. but there in the end of january, had stuff like this. but there in the end ofjanuary, after a had stuff like this. but there in the end of january, after a very busy schedule in december, two semifinals. and maybe then the football league, that is something else but they have to sit on the table and really discuss and think about the players and not about their wallet. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. more now, on the general election. the brexit party has delivered a ultimatum to the conservatives, to form a ‘leave alliance‘ and reject borisjohnson‘s deal, or the party will stand candidates
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in every seat in england, wales and scotland. nigel farage said that leave—supporting labour mps were welcome tojoin, saying it‘s the only way to deliver a true brexit. i believe the only way to solve this is to build a leave alliance, across this country. and that doesn‘t mean just conservatives and the brexit party. there are labour figures out there, that i‘ve spoken to who, would more than happily stand in this election, if we could put this coalition together. but, if it was done, borisjohnson would win a very big majority. and, on that manifesto, we really could get brexit done. in fact, to quote a friend of mine, we‘d become an unstoppable force. i hope and pray that, after 25 years of endeavour on my part, that this works.
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but if it doesn‘t, well, then the brexit party will be the only party, standing in these elections, that actually represents brexit. and if that‘s the situation, there are two things that we will do. the first is to make sure that every house in this land is informed, as to what is in the treaty and what is in the political declaration, what the costs of this are, what the time implications are, to make people truly understand the extent to which this is a sell out. and the second thing, in those circumstances, that we will do is we will contest every single seat, in england, scotland and wales. indeed, if it hadn‘t been forjimmy goldsmith, the conservatives would never have made the pledge to have a referendum, before joining the euro.
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if it hadn‘t been for ukip, there would have been no referendum on eu membership. and without the brexit party, we will never get a meaningful brexit done. we are determined to deliver brexit. we are equally determined, as you heard earlier on this morning, that politics cannotjust go back to the way that it was before. this country is crying out for genuine political reform and we will campaign on that, during this general election, too, because we really do want to change politics for good. and i know, inevitably, you will ask me about funding. well, i can tell you we have enough money, right now, for a fully funded election campaign, and by the look of the way money is coming in, on our website, we will have more than enough to fight this campaign. and to fight it well. now, of course, i‘m open and flexible to local exceptions. and already, we are in communication with a number of mps, who are prepared to renounce the withdrawal agreement, to renounce the deal,
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and they themselves to stand on a ticket of a genuine free trade agreement, or leave on wto terms. and, of course, in those cases where mps say this, we will view them as our friends and not as our enemies. and, more interestingly, already we‘re being approached to put together informal arrangements on the ground — constituencies in which they may have a better chance of winning and we won‘t bother to campaign, but equally, constituencies in which we have got a better chance of winning and they won‘t campaign. that is already beginning to come together. the chief coroner is calling on the government to consider new laws, banning the possession of extremist propaganda. his comments come in a report, after the inquests into the deaths of those killed, in the london bridge attacks. our home affairs correspondent, dominic casciani, says there are 18 recommendations in the coroner‘s report, aimed at preventing future deaths.
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so it goes to the home secretary, head of the metropolitan police, the head of mi5, a number of other agencies. let‘s go through three of the key ones. the first one is he questions the criteria, for protecting public spaces, saying the criteria are weak. what he means by that is there is a secret test, behind—the—scenes, of what makes a crowd and space vulnerable to a terrorism attack, there had been concerns that london bridge could be a target, but nothing was done to protect it before the attack. if you remember, the three attackers came down the bridge, in a van, killing two pedestrians and hitting others, before stabbing people, in borough market. the second key concern of his, he thinks there should be a new crime of possession of terrorist material, this may come as a surprise to people. you can be prosecuted for passing on terrorist material, for a specific purpose, or possessing document, such as a bomb—making manual, but pure possession of it is not a crime. in the case of the ringleader, he had an enormous volume
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of material on his phone. mi5 knew this and there was very little they could do, in the circumstances, because they could not prove intent. the third really interesting area, he talks about a possible plan for instant reporting of vehicle rentals to security services, because the attackers rented a vehicle. he wonders whether the uk could come up with a system, between government and industry, to instantly flag a rental the security services get to know about that and they can tap into the database to see if this is a terrorism suspect. wider questions for mi5 and also the manner in which the emergency services responded, on the night, but all the agencies involved have until mid—january to respond to the coroner, about what they will do to prevent further deaths. the first funerals have been held in pakistan for victims of yesterday‘s train fire, in which more than 70 people died. many of the victims were pilgrims, from the same area in sindh province, travelling to a religious festival. secunder kermani
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sent us this report. tears for the dead — mourners pay their respects to one of the more than 70 victims, of this horrific tragedy. they‘re laying to rest a young father, who leaves behind five children. translation: i went into one room, there were two dead bodies. then i went into another room, and there were 15 or 20 bodies there. they showed me one — it wasn‘t my cousin. then i looked at another one, and i recognised him. this town has been particularly ha rd—hit. a large group was travelling from here to a religious gathering, on the train. a number of other funerals are taking place, pretty much at the same time, nearby. it‘s thought that many more of the victims were from this area, but the authorities are still trying to identify their bodies. it‘s now known more than 70 people lost their lives, in the fire on the train that was travelling, yesterday, from karachi to rawalpindi. officials say the fire began
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when a gas cylinder, some passengers were using to cook food, exploded. 0thers refuse to accept that, blaming an electrical fault. either way, many hold the government ultimately responsible. translation: what will they do, suspend the driver, arrest him? what's the driver's fault? who is in management? it is the railway minister. they should get rid of him, he should resign. there have already been half a dozen funerals in this town, today, and more are expected. the prime minister has ordered an inquiry. people here want answers, but they aren‘t sure they‘ll get them. secunder kermani, bbc news, mirpur khas. in a moment, susannah is going to bring us the latest business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the brexit party says it will fight every seat in england,
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scotland and wales — unless boris johnson drops his deal with the eu the chief coroner calls for tough new laws, to tackle extremist propoganda, in the wake of the london bridge attack. detectives have spoken, by phone, to one of the suspects wanted over the deaths of 39 people in a lorry, in essex. here‘s your business headlines, on afternoon live. whirlpool used "chilling" non—disclosure agreements, "to silence customers", while fire—prone tumble dryers remained in uk homes, according to mp5. the house of commons business committee said the manufacturer deflected concerns and was too slow to fix the fire danger, which first emerged four years ago. the dangerous dryers were sold in the uk for 11 years, from 200a. a rush to stockpile goods, ahead of yesterday‘s aborted brexit deadline, helped manufacturers, last month. new data shows that orders didn‘t fall by as much as some had feared.
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the purchasing managers‘ index, produced by ihs markit cips, rose to a9.6 last month, up from a8.3 in september. a figure below 50 indicates the sector is contracting, but it is still the highest level recorded, since april. banks should consider refunding more customers, who fall victim to certain kinds of payment fraud, according to mp5. a new report warns fraud is the second most common kind of crime in england and wales, and described economic crime as a "serious and growing problem." susannah, you‘ve also been following a big development in the fitness app industry. yes — the device maker fitbit is being bought by google for £1.6 billion. the move allows google to expand into the market for fitness trackers and smart watches. it comes at a time when loss—making fitbit has been looking to expand into other areas.
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the bid values fitbit at $7.35 a share, a premium of about 19% to the stock‘s closing price on thursday. fitbit was founded 12 years ago byjames park. it has sold more than 100 million devices, but has struggled with waning demand for its products, as other companies enter the market. so it‘s obviously a good day for mr park and even though 1.6 billion is a hefty price tag — it‘s small change for google, when considered against the bigger picture of gaining a huge amount of health data. yes — won‘t that concern fitbit fans — aboutjust how their data will be used? yes, by next year, the health data fitbit has on its users today will become google‘s data — some consumers may be uneasy about that — but the company is stressing that its "health and wellness" data would not be used
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for google adverts and pledged to maintain strong privacy let‘s find out more about this with samira hussain who is at the new york stock exchange — this is a premium offer isn‘t it given the market value of the company a day or so ago? that‘s right. this is a really great dealfor fitbit as that‘s right. this is a really great deal for fitbit as you already mentioned, they were really struggling to try and get more users and to try and expand a little bit. there was a lot more competition in this space and of course one of the big competitors that has entered into a 1a is apple, with the apple watch which would offer a lot of the things fitbit does. certainly a lot of competition so it is good to have the heft of google behind it. that said, the privacy issue is one that will certainly be on the forefront of the minds of those people who are
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going to purchase the fitbit. yes, you may hear the assurances from google but don‘t forget this is coming ata google but don‘t forget this is coming at a time in which the us department ofjustice is investigating a lot of these internet companies, tech companies, further competitive behaviour and anti—trust behaviour so this could give people a little bit of pause in terms of wanting to go and purchase this product now it is owned by them. for the month of october we saw an hundred and 28,000 jobs added to the us economy. normally, no one would really batten eyelid. in fact, people would say that is actually not very good. that said, we were coming into thisjobs report expecting something a lot lower. that is because of a strike at
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general motors. for six weeks, that is because of a strike at general motors. forsix weeks, more than 50,000 employees were out on the streets, on the picket lines and we re the streets, on the picket lines and were not working. they were calculated as part of the unemployed. if you think about the knock—on effect that had on the rest of the economy, you have truckers not working, auto supplies not providing materials so they were off the payroll and a lot of economists expected to see a significant hit to this month was notjob report. we have not seen that so it is an indication that the labour market is resilient. that said, it is clear there is a slowdown happening. and it is consumer spending that has been the bright spot for the us economy. many thanks for that update onjobs and economy. many thanks for that update on jobs and that deal with fitbit. lets check in with the financial markets now and the blue chip ftse 100 has been trading slightly higher
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today — recouping some of the losses of the 1 % drop yesterday. but still a lot of caution remains, not least with the election looming here in the uk and also those dowjones opening up. the pound against the dollar have ring underneath that $1.30 as you can see. uncertainty about the outcome of the uk general election is playing on investor‘s mines. campaigners in bradford are calling for action to stop fireworks being let off in the city, late at night. it‘s claimed the problem is making people‘s lives a misery and its not just confined to bonfire night, or religious festivals. the police are warning people caught setting off fireworks that they could face a curfew. bbc look north‘s corinne wheatley sent us this report. this is not bonfire night or new
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year‘s eve. this is midnight on monday in bradford and it is this kind of behaviour, fireworks late at night in heavily residential areas, that has got lots of people feeling frustrated. it is claimed this is happening far too often, three or four times a week in some areas. for emma and her family, four times a week in some areas. for emma and herfamily, the disturbances became too much to cope with. the sound is horrendous around terraced houses, it just with. the sound is horrendous around terraced houses, itjust resonates all the way through and it is what i would think, i know it sounds extreme, but a war zone. because it is that loud. she moved out of her home of 30 years and moved to another part of the city to escape the fireworks, usually connected to weddings or anti—social behaviour. the fireworks, usually connected to weddings or anti—social behaviourlj wasn‘t weddings or anti—social behaviour.” wasn‘t getting enough sleep, i was trying to work, i was having to get up trying to work, i was having to get up by trying to work, i was having to get up by 30 in the morning, it was when fireworks had just finished and the dogs had just come down enough for me to take out but it was day to day living, the stress levels were
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immense and he did not dare go out of your house, dusk because people we re of your house, dusk because people were running around throwing fireworks at each other. and pressure is mounting for action on theissue, pressure is mounting for action on the issue, including west bowling, where some residents claim it has increased over the last few years. nowadays when we have a wedding, they are competing against each other, going off in a big way so it is getting silly and out of hand. it is getting silly and out of hand. it isa is getting silly and out of hand. it is a nuisance overall, it is a pollution. the community is fed up with it. it is illegal to let off fireworks after 11pm except on key dates. 0ne campaign group says a stricter enforcement is needed but they are also appealing for people to be better neighbours. we are asking people to be respectful and consider your neighbourhood and don‘t explode them at an hour when it is going to be an inconvenience for others, especially when children and elderly people are trying to
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sleep. bradford council says it will review the issue over the next six months. campaigners hope they will see this site less often on the streets. the government wants to close a legal loophole, that‘s enabled some drivers to escape prosecution for holding a mobile phone, while driving. the existing laws are mainly designed to stop people making calls and texting behind the wheel. but the transport secretary, grant shapps, wants to tighten the rules, to stop drivers filming, taking photos, or browsing the internet. he‘s ordered an urgent review and says any changes could be in place by spring, next year. the wreckage of a second world war british submarine has been found, 77 years after it disappeared. hms urge vanished in 19a2 with more than a0 people on board. it was discovered at the bottom of the mediterranean sea, off malta, on thursday. a ceremony is planned for next
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year to declare the site an official war grave. before the weather, the duchess of sussex has been rolling up her sleeves in the kitchen. in footage posted on instagram, the duchess donned an apron, as she helped celebrate the opening of new premises for a bakery for vulnerable women, in north london. the luminary bakery featured in vogue, when the duchess was made a guest editor of the magazine‘s september edition. good afternoon. very wild weather on the way. as we head into the weekend, particularly southern parts of britain, the met office has issued a yellow warning for winds, severe gales with gusts in excess of 70 miles an hour across some southern and coasts. us the next 2a hours, hurtling off the atlantic, the isobars, there will also be heavy rain wrapped into the system
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too. one thing you will notice over the next few days it will be pretty mild for the time of year, certainly a mild end to today. plenty of cloud around the temperatures of 12—1a, outbreaks of rain due to affected northern scotland, pipping up across wales, south england, pushing northwards by further heavy rain in the south—west and here we will start to see the wind picking up by the end of the night. gill force winds into south—west england and south wales. temperatures not below nine or 11 degrees so a fairly mild night to come. he is the area of low pressure, saturday morning will have the strongest winds from the early hours up to around 3—a pm into the afternoon. starting in the south—west and spreading southern counties of england, it eventually reaches east anglia and the south—east. winter gusts, 70—80 mph, particularly along the south coast
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towards the isle of wight. even edmund, 50—60 miles for, including the london area and east anglia. we could be looking at some trees uprooted from this. because the leaves are still on. rain is mounting up in northern scotland but could be a dry spell for central and southern scotland into the far north of england with further heavy rain across the south which could lead to localised flooding. all happening on saturday with strong winds, heavy rain and the risk of flooding too. heading into sunday, the area of low pressure begins to weaken so a quieter day. still quite blustery but not as windy as what we will see on saturday. the areas of rain around, cloudy skies too but also sunshine breaking out as we head on into the afternoon. temperatures again ranging from 11—13 in the south, stay tuned to the weather forecast, head online to look at the latest weather warnings for strong
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winds and heavy rain on saturday.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live, i‘m carrie gracie. today at 3: the brexit party says it will fight every seat in england, scotland and wales, unless boris johnson scraps his deal with the eu. boris tells that it is a great new deal, it is not it is a bad tree pee and simply it is not brexit. a man faces extradition from ireland, as part of the investigation into the deaths of 39 migrants in a lorry in essex. and the chief coroner calls for tough new laws to tackle extremist propoganda, in the wake of the london bridge attack. coming up on afternoon live
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all the sport — katie: the rugby world cup aims and defeats, they have been beaten by a0 points against new zealand to win the bronze medal. that was also the head coach last game in charge of wales. thanks, and stav has all the weather — stav? it is looking pretty wild as he head into the weekend. wet and windy across southern britain where we could be looking at some damage and gusts of wind. i will have all the details later on. thanks. also coming up: the town where police are threatening to impose a curfew on anyone caught setting off fireworks late at night.
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hello everyone. this is afternoon live. nigel farage has said his brexit party will contest every seat in england, wales and scotland in next month‘s election, unless borisjohnson drops his deal with the eu and signs up to a leave alliance. mr farage said the prime minister‘s withdrawal agreement with the eu is ‘simply not brexit.‘ the brexit party say they have 500 candidates ready to fight the election. the conservatives have responded by saying a vote for nigel farage risks letting jeremy corbyn into downing street by the back door. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake reports. thumbs up for brexit — that‘s always been his message, but nigel farage launched his party‘s election campaign this morning with a warning that it hasn‘t happened yet and, unless things change, it might well not. it is november the 1st and, yes, still we are members of the european union.
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yet more broken promises and indeed a breakdown of trust and faith, notjust in politics but actually in our entire democratic system in this country. the party, he said, was ready to take on labour and the tories and make the case for what he calls a clean—break brexit. first, though an appeal — to work with, not against, the other main parties. the only way to solve this is to build a leave alliance across this country. that doesn‘t mean just conservatives and the brexit party. there are labour figures out there that i have spoken to who would more than happily stand in this election if we could put this coalition together. but if it was done, borisjohnson would win a very big majority. and on that manifesto, we really could get brexit done, in fact, to quote a friend of mine, we‘d become an unstoppable force.
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nigel farage said the brexit party was ready to stand in every seat in england, scotland and wales, if boris johnson didn‘t ditch his brexit deal and the form a leave alliance. the chances of that seem slim. we're not interested in doing any pacts with the brexit party, or indeed with anybody else. we are in this to win it, and we know that only a vote for the conservative party will deliver brexit, only a vote will protect the union so we don't have two referendums next year, causing the end of brexit and potentially the end of the union, and ultimately it is only a vote for boris johnson that will stop jeremy corbyn walking up downing street on friday the 13th december. the brexit party‘s top targets would be labour—held constituencies that voted to leave, but labour is focusing on its own offer, with something, it claims, for everyone. to the country as a whole, what we‘re saying is, whether you‘re remain or leave, there is a route through for you by voting labour. for the other parties, it‘s one side or the other, it‘s very divisive, and one
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of the things we want to do is try to reunify quite an angry country. i think this is the way forward, but there‘s much more than brexit on the agenda, as you know, in this election, and i‘m sure we will begin to move on to some of the other debates about the nhs, jobs, poverty, and all the other problems which the coutry faces. support for the brexit party is easy to find in places like thurrock in essex, which voted overwhelmingly to leave. but the challenge for nigel farage will be turning that into electoral success. ijust think there is something about the man, he says he's going to do something, he generally goes out and does it, do you know what i mean? hopefully, it will do. i mean, we should have been out yesterday and now we're still in. everyone i talk to, near where i live, they are all going to go for the brexit, because they think tory government done wrong by not passing it through and to have another election, why? i don't see any discussion happening now, i see rowing, and i see lots of turbulence, and i see plenty of people in dire straits, and i see some bad times
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coming for this country at the moment. and even alliance looks like wishful thinking for nigel farage, voters will again have to decide. both sides talking tough. both sides talking tough. 0ur political correspondent helen catt is in westminster. we heard from nigel farage and on the other hand, the tories are saying we are not interested in a packed. is this alliance just simply not going to happen? it doesn't it pretty unlikely. the conservatives have consistently said that they do not want to have any sort of electoral packed like they split the brexit party and the fact that nigel farage has attached is a very high price to eight of the teaching that the borisjohnson has been pitching to voters as something he said is ready in the way of getting brexit over the line at least the first
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stage anyway but it seems even more increasingly unlikely that he would now do that and go for this sort of pa ct now do that and go for this sort of pact with nigel farage, lead us to seek the brexit party? if you going to follow through on that page to stand candidates in every seat in england, wales, and scotland that means that brexit party will have somewhere in a number of candidates and nigel said he already has 500 signed up but it‘s a tall orderfor a party that is very new and has only been in existence for around six months. we hurt him at that referencing his interview with the american president how well is not likely to pay for him if he keeps on talking about his good friend?” suppose the key thing that donald trump said in his interview yesterday was his idea that undated deal that borisjohnson yesterday was his idea that undated deal that boris johnson has negotiated and he does not believe you could get a trade there would the us under that of course downing street and the conservatives dispute
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that nbc that means you can go and make trade deals with countries around the world. but of course it does play into exactly nigel farage‘s argument which he says for him this is not brexit which is also how he responded to people saying if you stand against conservatives rightly just you stand against conservatives rightlyjust going to split the votes ? rightlyjust going to split the votes? as far as he‘s concerned what the conservatives are offering is brexit. thank you. the snp leader nicola sturgeon has said she‘ll make a formal request before christmas for a second independence referendum. she said the upcoming general election will not make a difference to her timetable. 0ur scotland correspondent james shaw has been explaining the significance of the move. it was very clear that she will ask for that formal authorisation, to hold a second independence referendum, before christmas. almost an early christmas present for whoever is the next prime minister of the united kingdom. what‘s the significance of it? well, i suppose it shows that the snp are still determined
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to go for independence. they want to hold a referendum, if they can, next year. and that is part of their election pitch. it is 2—pronged, really. 0n the one hand, it appeals to the main voters, people who don‘t want the united kingdom to leave the european union, and it intends to appeal to people in favour of independence as well, to hoover up all those voters in scotland, if the snp possibly can. so, here‘s a little bit of what nicola sturgeon said, earlier this morning. oh, i‘ve made pretty clear, and i‘m sticking to this, that section 30 demand will be delivered to downing street, whoever happens to be in it, before christmas. and that is because it is vital that scotland takes control of our own future. right now, our future is being dictated by borisjohnson, who himself, is enthralled
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to donald trump. that‘s not the future i think the majority of people in scotland want. we can have a better future, by being independent and that‘s one of the big issues that‘s on the line at this election. now, nicola sturgeon also talked to this issue of the post—brexit trade deal between the united states and britain. she said she was concerned about that, whatever donald trump says now, about the nhs not being on the table, she believes it will and she also said she thought there would be a risk to environmental and food standards, and also to workers‘ rights. those are the kind of issues that the snp will be stressing, through this campaign. it‘s just under six weeks until the general election and if you‘re unsure how to register to vote, you can find out how by visiting our website at bbc.co.uk/news or on the bbc news app. a man has appeared in court in dublin in connection with the deaths of 39 people in lorry in essex last month. two men have also been arrested in vietnam and charged
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with organising illegal emigration. it comes as police call on two brothers — wanted over the deaths — to hand themselves in. 0ur correspondent mark lowen is here. he appeared at the high court today and he is charged with multiple cou nts and he is charged with multiple counts of manslaughter and conspiracy to commit human trafficking and conspiracy to assist unlawful immigration. it is alleged that he delivered the trailer to the belgian part before it made its journey to essex. now, he will be facing extradition requests coming to britain, we are not sure exactly how long that is going to take. he is the second man who is now being charged with manslaughter. morris rob and send a man alleged to have driven the truck last week was arrested and he is facing 39 counts
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including man and money trafficking and human smuggling. let us go to vietnam where two arrests have happened. two people we are not being told their identities, such as confronting to the bbc may have been arrested and there arrested on suspicion on people smuggling so you really have the sense now that at least here and of course 6000 miles away in vietnam, that cooperating closely with all of these moving parts. you mention also the call for that to buy this to find themselves m, that to buy this to find themselves in, they are calling on a0—year—old ronan he was and 3a—year—old christopher hughes to hang themselves name. ronan hughes has spoken to the police one, possibly two times after the arrest of morris robinson. but now they have not spoken since. there also wanted on suspicion of manslaughter and human trafficking. the company that owns the trailer says that ronan hughes signed the papers to rent the
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container and they have links to couege container and they have links to college and shipping industries in the irish republic and northern ireland. a lori believed to be connected to the brothers were seized last thursday. in terms of police piecing together what happened when and who the victims are, our police saying about that? they are not confirming the identities of the victims, so far they are going on the families in vietnam coming forward saying they have lost contact with the children knowing they were en route to the uk and of course we saw some of those tragic messages —— messages from facebook and sms messages from children saying they would contact once they arrived in the uk and that never happened. so two and two are being put together to suggest that they were some of 39. leave in vietnam are going to collect dna samples of blood and hair samples from the family to try to piece together and work on the identities of the setting on people. and obviously it created a lot of concern about people smuggling,
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modern—day slavery, is anything developing of the kind of policy level at this point? we are getting snippets of more information about how these smuggling rings work. so, a lot of them are focused on france and there seems to be a network of vietnamese smuggling rings that are centred in france with vietnamese crime bosses who are managing the stages of the transport from vietnam and we are told that the wealthiest are being able to fly to china and then travelled by road if 50 western europe. the least wealthy are coming by road. so it‘s ready now that the job of the police to try to crack the smuggling rings in france, belgium and germany and of course also we are hearing the amount of money that the vietnamese families are having to part with to get their children to western europe. some people say they have used their entire life savings to try to get the children over here to the uk. there sad stories, thank you.
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the chief coroner is calling on the government to consider new laws banning the possession of extremist propaganda. his comments come in a report after the inquests into the deaths of those killed in the london bridge attacks. our home affairs correspondent dominic casciani says there are 18 recommendations in the coroner‘s report — aimed at preventing future deaths. it goes to the home secretary, head of the metropolitan police, the head of m15, a number of other agencies. three of the key ones: number one, he questions the criteria for protecting public spaces, saying the criteria are weak. what he means by that is there is a secret test behind—the—scenes of what makes a crowd and space vulnerable to a terrorism attack, there have been concerned that london bridge could be a target but nothing was done to protect it before the attack. if you remember, the three attackers came down the bridge in a van, killing two pedestrians and hitting others before stabbing people in borough market. number two, he thinks there should
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be a new crime of possession of terrorist material, this may come as a surprise to people. you can be prosecuted for passing on terrorist material, for the specific purpose or possessing document such as a bomb—making manual, but pure possession of it is not a crime. in the case of the ringleader, he had an enormous volume of material on his phone, m15 knew this and there was very little they could do in the circumstances because they could not prove intent. the third interesting area, talks about a possible plan for instant reporting of vehicle rentals to security services, because the attackers rented a vehicle. he wonders whether the uk could come up with a system between government and industry to instantly flag a rental with the security services, they know about that and they can tap into the database to see if this is a terrorism suspect. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: the brexit party says it will fight every seat in england,
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scotland and wales, unless boris johnson scraps his deal with the eu. detectives have spoken by phone to one of the suspects wanted over the deaths of 39 people in a lorry in essex. the chief coroner calls for tough new laws to tackle extremist propoganda, in the wake of the london bridge attack. this appointment for wales after losing that bronze medal match at the rugby world cup, they were beaten by a0 points against new zealand and the head coach was his last game in charge. 0n the eve of the final between england and south africa, world cup winnerjohnny wilkinson has been sharing his experience with eddiejones team at training. and he has been left out of the arsenal squad for tomorrow‘s match among the captains were at fa ns after match among the captains were at fans after being booted off when he was substituted last weekend. i‘ll be back on more of the stories. mps and peers say mental health
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legislation must be changed, to stop what they call the ‘horrific‘ and inappropriate detention of young people with autism or learning disabilites. thejoint committee of human rights says conditions in mental health hospitals across england inflict ‘terrible suffering‘ on those who are detained — and cause anguish to their families. 0ur education & family correspondent frankie mccamley reports. the only physical contactjeremy and his daughter bethany had was through a hatch in one treatment unit. she has autism and was placed in isolation 2a hours a day, seven days a week. she was made to stand at the other side of her room when her meals were being served. she has to sit on the floor, three members of staff come into the corridor outside, almost as if they‘re expecting beth to explode out of the door like a wild animal. at that point, the door is opened, the food is laid inside, and they shut the door again. bethany, who we can‘t fully identify, was doing well inside an adolescent unit.
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when she turned 18, though, she had to move to a treatment centre for adults, where things turned from bad to worse. it‘s a unit that has no autism provision whatsoever, and once again my daughter is locked up in a cell that does not even have a hatch, i cannot hold her hand. it‘s horrific. she is falling apart in there. the lack of human contact is damaging her already fragile state. she asked me if i could find her dolls that smelt like real babies, that looks like real babies, because she‘s lonely. that broke my heart. completely broke my heart. today a report from the joint committee on human rights says that seclusion and restraint is the horrific reality for too many young people with disabilities and autism who too often face inappropriate detention in brutal circumstances which inflict terrible suffering.
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the breaches that we heard about, whether from parents or from young people themselves who have been subject to detention, were appalling. the committee was really traumatised by the evidence that it heard. the inquiry is calling for urgent change to the system and an ovehaul of the care quality commission‘s inspection regime. the cqc says it‘s been implementing changes but admits there is much more to be done. frankie mccamley, bbc news. head of policy at the learning disabilities charity mencap, dan scorer joins us. thank you for coming in, it‘s quite a daunting emotional he reported that the mps themselves were traumatised by what they heard. what should be done in your view?” traumatised by what they heard. what should be done in your view? i think the committee have come up with very important recommendations which is they want to see leadership from the top of government we‘ve now had it top of government we‘ve now had it to failed strategies to try and get
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children and adults out of these units and back into the community. they want to see duties on local areas to put the right support in place in the community which is absolutely vital if we are going to get people out of these units. currently he isn‘t just get people out of these units. currently he isn‘tjust an aspiration rather than a legal requirement? this is notjust about health, this is about social care as well and people are going to come out and be supported in the community we need local counsel to be building the right kind of support to have the skilled staff and the right housing available for people to come out. at the moment that‘s not happening across the country so the health and social ca re country so the health and social care services to work together and has the report said we need to see com plete has the report said we need to see complete change in the way that care quality commission looks at these high—risk services and it‘s been known for a long time since the bbc panorama programme exposed this back in 2011. these are very high risk places where people are facing seclusion and being locked away and
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being physically restrained and also being physically restrained and also being given large amounts of medication. these issues have been known about for a long time. we had government strategies to address them and they haven‘t worked and we need leadership to drive this forward. one of the striking thing about it is that people were saying this is going to be very expensive. i was interested to read that one of the points is that what we are doing at the moment which is failing a very expensive. that's right. we are spending half £1 billion a year on what no one would call care, how jeremyjust what no one would call care, how jeremy just described what no one would call care, how jeremyjust described treatment of his daughter is absolutely appalling. local areas in many cases are being £10,000 a week or more for this treatment so that money is there in the system but it needs to be unlocked and it needs to be put into making sure that we have had the right support in the local areas for people so we don‘t have to go away and in many cases hundreds of miles from home away from their families, away from their friends and their communities where they
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become stuck. the average length people are staying in these units is over five years. these are hospitals, they are not homes.” suppose the more seclusion and more restraint and more isolation, they deeper the problem. people have come deeply traumatised and institutionalized and so when they do finally come out it can be incredibly difficult for them to being back in the community and they need special use skilled staff to support them to do that. but ultimately these are abusive practices. these are violations of peoples human rights that should never be taken place. warren gatland‘s12—year reign in charge of wales‘s rugby team ended with a defeat against new zealand today. the all blacks ran out winners by a0 points to 17 in the world cup third place play—off in tokyo. but english fans dream of victory in tomorrow‘s final. bars and pubs are preparing to open early for the 9 am kick off and stocking up on extra supplies of beer, bacon and sausages for a world cup breakfast. danny savage is in leeds to see
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the preparations there. in pubs up and down england, the beer pumps are being primed. if england win the rugby union world cup, it will be a super saturday. the time difference, between here and japan, means this will be a breakfast experience. somebody will surely come up with a number for how many bacon sandwiches will be consumed. landlords expect queues at the door from 8:00am. busy, it‘s going to be busy, a lot of interest, a lot of phone calls, a lot of people interested, so we‘re opening at 8am, busy, busy for breakfast and, you know, we have a big rugby union community, we sponsor leeds university, we sponsor trinity, we‘ve got big links with the rhinos and the rugby league with the rhinos and carnegie, so there‘s a lot of interest. for england rugby fans, there‘s only one thing to be doing tomorrow — watch, hope and be inspired. i think it‘s massive for the whole country, for rugby,
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sort of going from grassroots level, right up until the top, really. i think a lot of, like, local clubs are really getting behind the national team, as well, and it‘s just really exciting to watch us do well. and for some fans of the union code, it will be their first sight of england in a world cup final. it‘s amazing, because it tells you what you could be, when you‘re older, what position you could be, how good you are, and you get to watch all the other good players, you might meet up with them in the future and see them, yeah. do you think they‘ll win? yeah, they‘ll probably win. it's really special, because i've never watched a rugby final before, with england in it, and i think it's going to be really exciting to see how they play and how they cope with the intensity of it. a number of the england players attended st george‘s school in harpenden — rugby is in the blood here.
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you bet they‘ll be glued to the tv in the morning. everyone is inspired by them, and it‘s great we‘ve got that connection with four world cup finalists, so everyone is really aware of what they've achieved. every one of the england players started offjust like this. tomorrow, a sport with discipline and respect at its heart will be showcased. 80 minutes of play will decide if it‘s going to be disappointment or elation. danny savage, bbc news, leeds. it's it‘s a good job we‘ve got something to watch on the tv because the weather is not going to be that great is it? yes, particularly across the south of the country. these could be the strongest winds we have had so far, 60, 70 these could be the strongest winds we have had so far, 60,70 mph gusts, maybe even more than that across some coastal areas. if because of an area of low pressure. we always talk about the squeezing isobars to close at the art to get at the stronger their wings this is
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certainly the case on the system. you can see this is actually moving into sunday we are expecting but it‘s a saturday morning, we will squeeze across southern england into south wales that he transfers towards the east towards east anglia in the southeast. there is also a isobars for northern scotland so it will be windy there too. and central areas getting away with it. i want to show you all that we have this system through that —— saturday, late into sunday and at the secondary level pushes him to to france as well, let coast of france with severity of as well. we have still got a lot of leaves hanging on the tree so they will come down? exactly. that‘s my next point on wind gusts, leaves still on the tree bearing in mind that, 70 to 80 mph yes, 80 mph probably close to the coast, 60, 70 here initially. maybe even more along the south coast up the isle of wight. 5360 maybe london
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in the southeast, for a while around the middle parts of the day. so yes, this could bring trees down, there will be some transport disruption as well. if you have got any plans you have to check the weather forecast, this might be updated and remember there will be some bonfires and firework events going on saturday so even though their wings should ease down late in the day it will still be quite blustery. i‘m not sure that‘s a bad thing for your bonfire you don‘t want it to get out of hand. that‘s how it‘s looking over the weekend. stormy starts but then we will start to see sunshine and showers for sunday in this area of low pressure eases down. 0ne showers for sunday in this area of low pressure eases down. one thing you will notice of the next 2a hours it will be much milder than it‘s been lately. very mild and to the day across england and wales. 13 to 16 degrees there are across the southeast. just about double figures across the northwest but a rather cloudy, murky picture out there. 0utbreaks cloudy, murky picture out there. outbreaks of rain moving north, further patches of rain, longer
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spells of rain moving for tonight some of these will be quite happy and strong winds that arise across the southwest very early on saturday. temperature wise nine to 11 degrees. there is our area of low pressure as i showed you earlier with that pinch in the isobars across the south, some heavy rain wrapped into this system with the grounds saturated in places particularly across the southwest it is the problem with minor flood and surface water. strong winds spreading their way across southern england and into the east anglia as we had to reset today you can see gusts also very windy and wet that i pointed out across northern scotland, the rainfall was really piling up here but it‘s in between these areas of rain where we could see dry weather. it could stay dry altogether with some sunshine. it should not be too bad at all. temperature is ten to 13 degrees but with the wind and cloud and rain it might not feel so mild. 0ur area of
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low pressure feels in a man becomes wea ker low pressure feels in a man becomes weaker on sunday. i think parts of the weekend writer wings for most of us, still quite blustery but sunshine and showers merging together producing on spells of rain. it will stay dry altogether as temperatures into the low teens and celsius, quite a wild week and for some of us particularly the first task —— first half of apes, head online to see the latest weather warnings for your area. goodbye for now. this is bbc news, our latest headlines. the brexit party says it will fight
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every seat in england, scotland and wales, unless boris johnson ditches his deal with the eu. boris tells us it is a great new deal. it is not. it is a bad old treaty and, simply, it is not brexit. the chief coroner calls for tough new laws to tackle extremist propaganda, in the wake of the london bridge attack. a man faces extradition from ireland, as part of the investigation into the deaths of 39 migrants in a lorry, in essex. sport now on afternoon live with katie sha na han. we‘ll talk about england and the world cup final in a moment, but there was disappontment for wales this morning? good afternoon. yes it‘s the end of the road for wales as they‘ve have finished fourth at the rugby world cup, after losing their bronze medal match, against new zealand. the all blacks showed their class, as the reigning champions ran in six tries, to win by a0 points to 17. 0ur correspondent,
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andy swiss, was watching. it wasn‘t the finale they had hoped for but wales‘s fans did not seem to mind. high spirits and high hopes that they could end of the tournament in style. also end and either, their coach warren gatland‘s final game in charge. for all the passion, there was a problem. wales had not beaten new zealand in 66 yea rs had not beaten new zealand in 66 years and that record soon seemed in little danger. early tries, the all blacks reminding everyone that for one more day at least, they are still the world champions. wales can battle the best in the business, they came. scything through to give theirfans they came. scything through to give their fans fresh hope. they came. scything through to give theirfans fresh hope. but they came. scything through to give their fans fresh hope. but it proved short lived as ben smith handed them a rather uncomfortable lesson. the
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all blacks led 26—10 at half—time, surely there was no catching them. 0na night surely there was no catching them. on a night of farewells, it was soon the wales prop captain. an ovation and surely his last world cup game. a team try to cling on. josh adams with his seventh try of the tournament, one short of the all—time record. new zealand were simply too powerful and they rounded off an emphatic victory. bronze medalfor them and off an emphatic victory. bronze medal for them and for wales‘s coach, an understated exit. warren gatland‘s 12 year reign ending with a fourth place finish. congratulations to the all blacks, kept trying to play some good rugby in the second half, so pleased with that, but disappointed. probably a game too far for us. wales head home
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with their heads held high. for them and their coach, a night where there was to be no fairy tale ending. so carrie, disppointment today for wales, but at the same time, a real sense of achievement. three grand slams and two world cup semi—finals over the last 12 years with warren gatland as coach. and as for england, they‘ve been benefitting from the experience of a man who knows how to win a world cup? yes they certainly are, with someone who knows what it‘s like to lift the webb ellis trophy — jonny wilksinson — who scored that dramatic drop goal, to win the world cup back in 2003. here he is, giving some kicking tips to skipper 0wen farrell at england training session this morning. as england will be hoping they can write their own piece of history tomorrow, against south africa in the final. a match which is actually a repeat of the 2007 final that the springboks went on to win. jonny wilkinson played in that match. but england will be out in force force to try and secure rugby union‘s biggest prize.
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physically i think they can recover no problem. theirfitness is great and the structure they have in place with the physios and knowledge and everything will help them recover physically. mentally and emotionally, just to accept that was a phenomenal game, whatever. but it is done now and it is almost new start again and start, when you have nothing to competitor there is no such thing as complacency, you literally just prepare for this such thing as complacency, you literallyjust prepare for this one game and the strength to do this as they are. to football now, as granit xhaka has been left out of the arsenal squad for tomorrow‘s match with wolves. this news comes after he swore at fans while he was being sustituted in their 2—all draw with crystal palace in the premier league. he has tried to explain his behaviour, while he was playing for arsenal last weekend. he says, in a statement, that after repeated threats
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to his wife and daughter, it had pushed him to "boiling point". adding that he did react, disrespectfully. but he had been "hurt deeply", by comments on social media and at matches. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. more now, on the general election. the brexit party has delivered a ultimatum to the conservatives — to form an ‘leave alliance‘ and reject borisjohnson‘s deal, or the party will stand candidates in every seat in england, wales and scotland. nigel farage said that leave—supporting labour mps were welcome tojoin, saying it‘s the only way to deliver a true brexit. i believe the only way to solve this is to build a leave alliance, across this country. and that doesn‘t mean just conservatives and the brexit party. there are labour figures out there, that i‘ve spoken to who, would more than happily stand in this election, if we could put this coalition together.
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but, if it was done, borisjohnson would win a very big majority. and, on that manifesto, we really could get brexit done. in fact, to quote a friend of mine, we‘d become an unstoppable force. i hope and pray that, after 25 years of endeavour on my part, that this works. but if it doesn‘t, well, then the brexit party will be the only party, standing in these elections, that actually represents brexit. and if that‘s the situation, there are two things that we will do. the first is to make sure that every house in this land is informed, as to what is in the treaty and what is in the political declaration, what the costs of this are, what the time implications are,
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to make people truly understand the extent to which this is a sell out. and the second thing, in those circumstances, that we will do is we will contest every single seat, in england, scotland and wales. indeed, if it hadn‘t been forjimmy goldsmith, let‘s talk now to sirjohn curtice, professor of politics at the university of strathclyde. drop this, drop that, does it make sense. it does and it doesn't, it doesn‘t in the sense that one of the things nigel farage claimed in his speech was that when you kept it well in 2015 under his leadership, he was arguing it did more damage to labour and the conservatives. you tense argue now we as a party can win over labour voters and labour seats in the conservatives could never touch. if that is his perspective, it is rather odd that
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he thinks that, by threatening to stand everywhere, he is good to persuade the conservatives to change their minds. presumably he only thinks the threat of standing everywhere is going to have any pact on the conservative stance on brexit. if the conservatives are afraid of the fact he is going to stand, i either think they will lose out. a bit of a disjunction therebetween some of the claims nigel farage made. the threat he has made is frankly only a threat if ndt is going to do damage to boris johnson and make it look like he will win the election. you say he will win the election. you say he will only do damage if she concentrates his fire? at the end of the day he says he‘s going to fight the day he says he‘s going to fight the election and on a stance which the election and on a stance which the brexit party has been very clear on for awhile, which is a, we should leave without a and b, the current deal the prime minister has got is
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brexit in name only. the interesting question therefore is how successful he will be impressed persuading the voters of his argument. what has been going on so far and the reason borisjohnson has the lead is the conservative party has gradually squeeze the brexit party vote, leave voters have moved from the deck supported to the conservatives. —— from the brexit party to the conservatives. 0ne from the brexit party to the conservatives. one reason it looks unlikely he will succeed is that, relatively few leave voters seem to blame boris johnson for the fact relatively few leave voters seem to blame borisjohnson for the fact he failed to meet yesterday‘s deadline. you might think they are enraged and they will vote for nigel farage. 0n they will vote for nigel farage. 0n the other hand it is clear there is a substantial voter body of new voters who would prefer to leave without a deal rather than supporting boris johnson‘s deal, without a deal rather than supporting borisjohnson‘s deal, it might be more popular than theresa may but it is not exactly the bee‘s knees amongst leave voters and therefore you can see how maybe
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nigel farage will be of the pusher some people back in his direction but it is that apparently that argument that is going to go on but in particular part of the uk but across the uk as a whole but particularly what impact that might have on the 50 or so labour held seats many of which are in strongly leave areas, that borisjohnson basically has i‘d up as his pathway to victory. it is what happens there that will matter. there is no reason to believe borisjohnson is going to suffer less jeremy corbyn. of course we heard nigel farage quoting donald trump from that lbc interview yesterday saying together he and borisjohnson would yesterday saying together he and boris johnson would make yesterday saying together he and borisjohnson would make an unstoppable force. looking at the electoral arithmetic, is that a fair comment? i think one of the reasons there was still much interest in the announcement today was the feeling, i think, that if nigel farage was announcing he was not going to stand
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and maybe only concentrate in very safe labour seats, this would be a boost to boris johnson, safe labour seats, this would be a boost to borisjohnson, where was the 20-25% boost to borisjohnson, where was the 20—25% leave vote saying it would still vote for the brexit party? where was it going to go? it is not obvious, maybe some would go back to the labour party but not many of them because not many have come from there in the first place. i don‘t think they will vote forjo swinson who just wants to cancel the whole process. the only game left in time would be the conservatives so i think the reason for the interest was if nigel farage did stand it would be unstoppable force, in the shape of boris johnson. would be unstoppable force, in the shape of borisjohnson. 0f would be unstoppable force, in the shape of borisjohnson. of course, thatis shape of borisjohnson. of course, that is in a sense what nigel farage is trying to point out, that if indeed he does stand against mr johnson, it is going to make life more difficult for him and that is why perhaps you might want to think about being ready to part nigel farage‘s terms. about being ready to part nigel farage's terms. six weeks more of this. thank you.
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we are having camera problems and... here comes my camera. campaigners in bradford are calling for action to stop fireworks being let off in the city late at night. it‘s claimed the problem is making people‘s lives a misery and its not just confined to bonfire night or religious festivals. the police are warning people caught setting off fireworks that they could face a curfew. bbc look north‘s corinne wheatley sent us this report. this is not bonfire night, eid, or new year‘s eve. this was about midnight on a monday in bradford and it is this kind of behaviour — fireworks late at night in heavily residential areas — that has got lots of people feeling frustrated. it is claimed this is happening far too often, even three orfour times a week, in some areas. for emma, and herfamily, the disturbances became just too much to cope with. the sound is absolutely horrendous
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around terraced houses, itjust resonates all the way through and it is what i would think, i know this sounds extreme, but a war zone. because it is that loud. she moved out home she‘d lived in for 30 years moved to another part of the city to escape the fireworks, usually connected to weddings or anti—social behaviour. i wasn‘t getting enough sleep, i was trying to work, i was having to get up at 5.30am in the morning, to take the dogs out, it was when fireworks had just finished and the dogs had just calmed down enough for me to take out but it was day to day living, the stress levels were immense and you did not dare go out of your house come dusk because people were running around throwing fireworks at each other. and pressure is mounting for action on the issue, including in west bowling, where some residents claim it has increased over the last few years. it used to a be a one off thing on 5th november. nowadays when we have a wedding, they are competing against each
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other, going off in a big way so it is getting silly. getting out of hand. it is a nuisance overall, it is a pollution. all the community is fed up with it. it is against the law to let off fireworks after 11pm, except on key dates. 0ne campaign group says stricter enforcement is needed, but they are also appealing for people to be better neighbours. what we are saying is respect and consider your neighbourhood and don‘t explode them at an hour when it is going to be an inconvenience for others, especially young children who are trying to sleep and elderly people are trying to sleep. bradford council says it will review the issue over the next six months. campaigners hope they will see this sight less often on the streets. in a moment, the latest business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the brexit party says it will fight every seat in england,
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scotland and wales, unless boris johnson scraps his deal with the eu. a man faces extradition from ireland, as part of the investigation into the deaths of 39 migrants in a lorry, in essex. the chief coroner calls for tough new laws to tackle extremist propoganda, in the wake of the london bridge attack. here‘s your business headlines, on afternoon live whirlpool used "chilling" non—disclosure agreements remained in uk homes according to mp5. the house of commons business committee said the manufacturer deflected concerns and was too slow to fix the fire danger, which first emerged four years ago. the dangerous dryers were sold in the uk for 11 years from 200a. a rush to stockpile goods ahead of yesterday‘s aborted brexit deadline helped manufacturers last month. new data shows that orders did‘t fall by as much as some had feared.
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the purchasing managers‘ index produced by ihs markit cips rose to a9.6 last month, up from a8.3 in september. a figure below 50 indicates the sector is contracting but it is still the highest level recorded, since april. banks should consider refunding more customers, who fall victim to certain kinds of payment fraud, according to mp5. a new report warns fraud is the second most common kind of crime in england and wales, and described economic crime as a "serious and growing problem." as well as those stories — you‘ve been following the latest development with thomas cook. the thomas cook brand name, along with hotel brands casa cook and cook‘s club, has been bought by chinese conglomerate fosun for £11 million, the business has announced. fosun had attempted to save thomas cook from collapse, leading a refinancing arrangement. but the dealfailed, when banks said the travel company needed to find more money. this announcement has added
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to speculation that the firm could be back, as an online only travel agent. where does that leave overseas hotels? fosun also said it does not plan to buy overseas assets or businesses related to thomas cook.this news comes after hays travel bought thomas cook‘s network of high street travel agencies out of liquidation — in mid october. they offered nearly 2,000 of the company‘s former staff a job and reopened 186 of its shops. we will see what this means in practice. and susannah there‘s a a really big match going on tomorrow — i assume the hospitality industry is already winning given how much is predicted to be spent in pubs and bars. yes — more than 10 million rugby fans are expected to watch england‘s world cup final match in yokohama on tv tomorrow. despite the 9am kick—off, an estimated 5,000
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pubs will be opening early, according to sports bar app matchpint. and the british beer and pub association forecast that an extra 1 million pints could be sold if england win. the sports travel & hospitality group based in richmond, in surrey, also won exclusive rights to design, market, sell and operate the travel and hospitality programmes for the tournament this year across all 12 host stadiums. let‘s find out more about what impact the world cup is having on the hospitality industry now. an awful lot of points predicted to be sold. tell me how much of an impact this is having across the hospitality sector? for fancy can't
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get out of japan, hospitality sector? for fancy can't get out ofjapan, the hospitality sector? for fancy can't get out of japan, the next best thing for an atmosphere of a live matches to go to their local pub, bar, restaurant or cafe and watch it live with a group of fans. and it is not there should be, but millions of extra ba co n not there should be, but millions of extra bacon sandwiches, coffees and teas, it will be at huge boon. interesting to hear about how the hospitality firms are doing deals with these major events, such as the richmond —based firm. that was a key deal, wasn‘t it? are you seeing much more of these tie ends with uk hospitality firms? and yes, we are. people don‘t often realise that uk hospitality is a huge exporter both in terms of corporate hospitality taking fans out to those international tournaments but also demonstrating the best of uk hospitality at home when we are showing the sport and making sure people have a good time celebrating with their teams. you‘re in competition with the supermarkets.
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0ne competition with the supermarkets. one step i saw, as predicted to sell an one step i saw, as predicted to sell a n excess one step i saw, as predicted to sell an excess of 2000 sausages because of the game. —— as stuff. a lot of people will stay at home, what they? yes, they well because of the time of day but we know over the course of day but we know over the course of this tournament, we sold literally millions of bacon and sausage sandwiches and millions of cups of coffee and tm pubs are the biggest coffee sellers in the uk, bigger than all the other chains put together so whatever happens we have a great time watching it and the nation will come together to celebrate another great sporting triumph hopefully. fingers crossed. thank you very much. will you be down the pub for a pint first thing? now, in pyjamas i think. lets check in with the financial markets now and the blue chip ftse 100 has been trading slightly higher today — recouping some of the losses of the 1 per cent drop yesterday. but still a lot of caution remains,
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not least with the election looming here in the uk and also those concerns about global trade continue with worries about whether washington and beijing will settle their differences. the us economy holding up pretty well despite fears of a downturn. the pound against the dollar hovering under 1.30. the government wants to close a legal loophole that‘s enabled some drivers to escape prosecution for holding a mobile phone while driving. the existing laws are mainly designed to stop people making calls and texting behind the wheel. but the transport secretary grant shapps wants to tighten the rules to stop drivers filming, taking photos or browsing the internet. he‘s ordered an urgent review and says any changes could be in place by spring next year. well—wishers have donated more than £75,000 to a chinese student who ended up
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in hospital after living on just 2 yuan a day — thats about twenty pence a day — for five years. 2a—year—old wu huayan became seriously malnourished, while struggling to study and support her sick brother, who she had raised from a young age, after the pair were orphaned. ms wu survived mainly on rice and chillies and weighed only 20 kilograms, when she was admitted to hospital in the city of guiyang, in october. her case has sparked outrage on chinese social media, about the level of poverty in the country. the wreckage of a british submarine, that vanished during the second world war, has been found in the sea off malta. hms urge disappeared, after setting sail in april 19a2. there were more than a0 people on board and its fate had remained unknown, until now. tim allman has the story. deep beneath the waves of the mediterranean, a mystery, nearly 80 years old, is finally solved. schools of fish move
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through the rusting, corroded wreck of what‘s believed to be hms urge. still on deck, its giant gun, silent for so many years, standing guard, over a metal grave. the wreck is in absolutely fantastic condition. it‘s sitting upright on the sea bed, very proud, in the direction that it was ordered to take, on its way to alexandria. archive: a british submarine makes her way in to her depot ship — coming home to mother, as they call it. malta was a strategically important base, for british submarines, targeting german and italian shipping, in the mediterranean. hms urge was part of the tenth submarine flotilla, known as the fighting tenth, a vital part of the allied war effort. on 27 april 19a2, it left malta, ordered to set sail for the egyptian port of alexandria. but, just after leaving valletta, it is believed
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to have struck a mine. the submarine and its crew went down. all lives were lost. a ceremony is expected to take place next year, where this will be declared an official war grave. the heroes of hms urge honoured, at last. tim allman, bbc news. before the weather, the duchess of sussex has been rolling up her sleeves in the kitchen. in footage posted on instagram, the duchess donned an apron as she helped celebrate the opening of new premises for a bakery for vulnerable women, in north london. the luminary bakery featured in vogue, when the duchess was made a guest editor of the magazine‘s september edition. now, it‘s time for a look at the weather with stav danaos. hello there. just in time for the weekend, we‘re expecting some extremely wild weather in places, it‘s southern britain which looks to be bearing the brunt
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of some very strong winds, through saturday morning. gusts of 60—70 mph, maybe even more in exposure across the south coast. here it is, hurtling in over the next 2a hours, into our shores, squeezing the isobars across southern part of the country, it will bring a lot of rain with it too. one thing you will notice, in the next 2a hours, and even next couple of days, is that it is going to be fairly mild for the time of year. and it‘s a very mild end to today with temperatures across england and wales around 12—1a celsius. closer to 9—10, further north. plenty of clowd across the countries, nest and market conditions outbreaks of reins spreading north. more rain spreading in northern ireland and into the south—west as we head through the course of the night along with gales developing here as well. by the end of the night, temperatures ranging from 9—11d, turning very windy in the south—west, with the arrival of this area of low pressure, like i mentioned. a real squeeze in the isobars, affecting southern parts of england and wales, certainly through saturday morning.
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very windy start, with potentially damaging gusts across the south—west, this rain and wind spreads eastwards through the course of the morning. the focus of the strongest winds will be across the south, like i mentioned. gust—wise, 70, perhaps even 80 mph possible across the south—west and along the south coast around the isle of wight. further inland, gusts of 50 or even 60 mph, so that is a strong enough to cause some damage and lead to some disruption so stay tuned to the forecast. elsewhere, further north, heavy rain and strong wind affecting northern scotland but southern scotland and northern england could stay dry with plenty of sunshine. further south, it will be wild, very windy with areas of heavy rain. temperatures ranging from around 10—13 degrees, might not feel like that with the strength of the wind in places. as we head into sunday, the area of low pressure still with us but it will be filling, it will be weakening, so i think sunday is looking like being a better day of the weekend. fairly breezy conditions but nowhere near as windy,
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areas of cloud and outbreaks of rain but equally some sunny spells around too. wind a little bit lighter, it might feel a bit more pleasant. top temperatures around 13, maybe 1a degrees in the south.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live, i‘m carrie gracie. today at a. nigel farage says his brexit party will fight every seat in england, scotland and wales, unless boris johnson ditches his deal with the eu. boris tells that it is a great new deal, it is not it is a bad tree and simply it is not brexit. a man faces extradition from ireland, as part of the investigation into the deaths of 39 migrants in a lorry in essex. and the chief coroner calls for tough new laws to tackle extremist propoganda, in the wake of the london bridge attack. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. wales last game that they rugby
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world cup has ended with a heavy defeat. the reigning champion in their bronze medal match, focus tends to anger and‘s match against south africa and the world cup final tomorrow. thanks, and we‘ll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past. it's it‘s looking pretty wild as we head into the weekend. particularly across the southern bets where we could be looking at damaging gusts of wind and i will have the details later on. also coming up. the town where police are threatening to impose a curfew on anyone caught setting off fireworks late at night. hello everyone, this is afternoon live. nigel farage has said his brexit party will contest
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every seat in england, wales and scotland in next month‘s election, unless borisjohnson drops his deal with the eu and signs up to a leave alliance. mr farage said the prime minister‘s withdrawal agreement with the eu is ‘simply not brexit.‘ the brexit party say they have 500 candidates ready to fight the election. the conservatives have responded by saying a vote for nigel farage risks letting jeremy corbyn into downing street by the back door. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake reports. thumbs up for brexit — that‘s always been his message, but nigel farage launched his party‘s election campaign this morning with a warning that it hasn‘t happened yet and, unless things change, it might well not. it is november the 1st and, yes, still we are members of the european union. yet more broken promises and indeed a breakdown of trust and faith, notjust in politics but actually in our entire democratic system in this country.
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the party, he said, was ready to take on labour and the tories and make the case for what he calls a clean—break brexit. first, though an appeal — to work with, not against, the other main parties. the only way to solve this is to build a leave alliance across this country. that doesn‘t mean just conservatives and the brexit party. there are labour figures out there that i have spoken to who would more than happily stand in this election if we could put this coalition together. but if it was done, borisjohnson would win a very big majority. and on that manifesto, we really could get brexit done, in fact, to quote a friend of mine, we‘d become an unstoppable force. nigel farage said the brexit party was ready to stand in every seat in england, scotland and wales, if boris johnson didn‘t ditch his brexit deal and the form a leave alliance. the chances of that seem slim.
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we're not interested in doing any pacts with the brexit party, or indeed with anybody else. we are in this to win it, and we know that only a vote for the conservative party will deliver brexit, only a vote will protect the union so we don't have two referendums next year, causing the end of brexit and potentially the end of the union, and ultimately it is only a vote for boris johnson that will stop jeremy corbyn walking up downing street on friday the 13th december. the brexit party‘s top targets would be labour—held constituencies that voted to leave, but labour is focusing on its own offer, with something, it claims, for everyone. to the country as a whole, what we‘re saying is, whether you're remain or leave, there is a route through for you by voting labour. for the other parties, it's one side or the other, it's very divisive, and one of the things we want to do is try to reunify quite an angry country. i think this is the way forward, but there's much more than brexit on the agenda, as you know, in this election, and i'm sure we will begin to move
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on to some of the other debates about the nhs, jobs, poverty, and all the other problems which the coutry faces. support for the brexit party is easy to find in places like thurrock in essex, which voted overwhelmingly to leave. but the challenge for nigel farage will be turning that into electoral success. i just think there is something about the man, he says he‘s going to do something, he generally goes out and does it, do you know what i mean? hopefully, it will do. i mean, we should have been out yesterday and now we‘re still in. everyone i talk to, near where i live, they are all going to go for the brexit, because they think tory government done wrong by not passing it through and to have another election, why? i don't see any discussion happening now, i see rowing, and i see lots of turbulence, and i see plenty of people in dire straits, and i see some bad times coming for this country at the moment. and even alliance looks like wishful thinking for nigel farage, voters will again have to decide.
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0ur political correspondent helen catt is in westminster. it does look like it‘s a small chance that the conservatives will ta ke chance that the conservatives will take up national front‘s offer because it comes at such a high price. dropping his deal. someone who has worked with both boris johnson and nigel farage is douglas, he‘s a conservative mp for nine yea rs before he‘s a conservative mp for nine years before becoming a ukip and p and an independent co—founder of vote leave. why he risks pricking their vote, why do you think they would risk it, why not do some sort of deal with the brexit party? i think if anyone votes for anyone other than paris that risks brexit. as someone who voted for them this summer, the precursor to the brexit party i just summer, the precursor to the brexit party ijust don‘t summer, the precursor to the brexit party i just don‘t see the summer, the precursor to the brexit party ijust don‘t see the point in voting for the brexit party. we are so close, we are 90 days away from
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leaving. if we vote for boris and give him a majority, we break the brexit deadlock in the building behind me, we give him a mandate to get this done, we are out in 90 days. get the data brexit party says it was their policy to keep us in for another six months. i think we need to get this done and we need to back boris. last night the president of the united states said he could not do a free trade deal based on this deal that boris johnson not do a free trade deal based on this deal that borisjohnson is negotiating. is he wrong? with great respect to the president of the united states, i‘m a big fan of the american republic, to —— with great respect i think it‘s for boris johnson and the future prime minister if they decide the terms of those deals, it‘s not for mr trump or those deals, it‘s not for mr trump oertrump ona those deals, it‘s not for mr trump or mr trump on a phoning programme to decide that. he would now, he is the president of the united states, he‘s a businessman and he would look at that and think if i don‘t think i could do a trade deal on that basis, that‘s important isn‘t it? could do a trade deal on that basis, that's important isn't it?” could do a trade deal on that basis, that's important isn't it? i think a very well followed 3—tier, the president of the united states knows
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exactly what he‘s doing and is a little mischievous. i don‘t want to, it‘s for britain to decide what our priorities are and i think it‘s really important that we leave the eu and a british prime minister decides the terms of our trade policy with the united states, if not for us to be pushed around by anyone. what happens if boris johnson does not get his majority, there is not a majority we are back here in six weeks‘ time in the same position? of the brexit block is not just in the building behind me here and listening but the brexit block is in brussels they would barely left to see did that not continue. he wants my data because if they think they can have my day—to—day could eventually get us to abandon the whole enterprise is getting out of the eu. i think it‘s really important that we give boris that majority, he‘s the only person who could break the deadlock. making to abandon the whole enterprise is getting out of the eu. i think it‘s really important that we give boris that majority, he‘s the only person who could break the deadlock. i think if he does not get that
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majority of hiring jeremy corbyn, if there are any bad brexit party mps, extending our membership and going for a second referendum. it is their policy to extend our membership for six months. boris‘s is to get us out within 90 days. but they saying it's six months and you‘ll be out com pletely six months and you‘ll be out completely whereas what nigel farage was saying earlier is this maybe would leave at some point injanuary but still be in a transition period so still follow the rules which could go from one to three years so you rest and effectively following the eu rules. there is a lot of quantification and what you said. i know i would rather have us out in 90 days under boris than apes and maybes and an extension for another six months. what was really interesting is that nigel today was finding reasons to disagree with borisjohnson, he was not so much objecting to what boris has agreed in the deer. he was hypothesizing about what boris may or may not agree ina about what boris may or may not agree in a future trade agreement. now i think that tells us that he can‘t actually find much objection asa can‘t actually find much objection as a brexiteer i find all the things
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i wanted, we leave the jurisdiction of the european courts, we have control of the borders and we take back control of money and we live under her own parliament once again. that is leaving the eu is all about. thank you very much, i‘m sure we‘ll hear more about this of next six weeks. the snp leader nicola sturgeon has said she‘ll make a formal request before christmas for a second independence referendum. she said the upcoming general election will not make a difference to her timetable:0ur scotland correspondent james shaw has been explaining the significance of the move. it was very clear that she will ask for that formal authorisation, to hold a second independence referendum, before christmas. almost an early christmas present for whoever is the next prime minister of the united kingdom. what‘s the significance of it? well, i suppose it shows that the snp are still determined to go for independence. they want to hold a referendum, if they can, next year. and that is part of their election pitch. it is 2—pronged, really.
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0n the one hand, it appeals to the main voters, people who don‘t want the united kingdom to leave the european union, and it intends to appeal to people in favour of independence as well, to hoover up all those voters in scotland, if the snp possibly can. so, here‘s a little bit of what nicola sturgeon said, earlier this morning. oh, i‘ve made pretty clear, and i‘m sticking to this, that section 30 demand will be delivered to downing street, whoever happens to be in it, before christmas. and that is because it is vital that scotland takes control of our own future. right now, our future is being dictated by borisjohnson, who himself, is enthralled to donald trump. that‘s not the future i think the majority of people in scotland want. we can have a better future, by being independent and that‘s one of the big issues that‘s on the line at this election. now, nicola sturgeon also talked to this issue of the post—brexit trade deal between the united states and britain.
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she said she was concerned about that, whatever donald trump says now, about the nhs not being on the table, she believes it will and she also said she thought there would be a risk to environmental and food standards, and also to workers‘ rights. those are the kind of issues that the snp will be stressing, through this campaign. it‘s just under six weeks until the general election and if you‘re unsure how to register to vote, you can find out how by visiting our website at bbc.co.uk/news. a 23—year—old man has appeared in court in dublin in connection with the deaths of 39 people in a lorry in essex last month. two men have also been arrested in vietnam and charged with organising illegal emigration. it comes as police call on two brothers — wanted in connection with the case — to hand themselves in. earlier i spoke to our correspondent mark lowen, who has been
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following developments. i started by asking him about eamonn harrison, the 23—year—old from northern ireland, who has been arrested in dublin on a european arrest warrant (tx he is charged with multiple counts of manslaughter, conspiracy to commit human trafficking and conspiracy to assist an unlawful immigration. it is alleged that he delivered the trailer to the belt imports before it made itsjourney to essex. now, he will be facing extradition request coming to britain, we are not sure exactly how long that‘s going to take that he is the second man who has not been charged with manslaughter, maurice robinson, the man alleged to have driven the truck last week was arrested and he‘s facing 39 counts including manslaughter and money trafficking people smuggling. let us go to vietnam where two arrests as we understand it. to the people we are not being told the identities but such as confirming that they
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have been arrested, they are arrested on suspicion of people smuggling so you really have a sense now that police here and of course 6000 miles away in vietnam are cooperating very closely for all of these moving parts. he mentioned that call for that two brothers to hand themselves in. his team this morning from essex police and they are calling on a0—year—old ronan houston and 3a—year—old christopher he is to hand themselves in. william hughes had spoken to the police one or possibly two times after the arrest of morris but now they have not spoken since. they are also wa nted not spoken since. they are also wanted on suspicion of manslaughter and human trafficking and the company that owns the trailer out of the truck so —— says that running he was assigned to tape it to rent the container and both are known to have links to haulage and shipping industries in the irish republic and northern ireland. a a believe to be connected to the brothers was seized last thursday. in terms of public speaking together what exactly happened to wayne and exactly who
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the victims are, or placing any more about that? cannot confirming the identities of the victims. so far they are going on that families in vietnam who are coming forward saying they have lost contact with their children were en route to the uk and of course we saw some of those tragic messages from facebook and sms messages from children saying they would contact once they arrived in the uk and that never happened. so two and two are being put together to suggest that they where it may be some of the 39. police in vietnam are going to collect dna samples of blood and hair samples from these families to try to piece together and what about the identities of the 39 people. and obviously it has created a lot of concern about people smuggling, modern—day slavery, is anything developing at the kind of government policy level at this point? well, we are getting snippets of more information about how these smuggling rings work. so, i let of
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them are focused on france and there seems to be a network of the enemy smuggling rings that descended in france with vietnamese crime bosses who are managing the stages of the transport from vietnam and we are told that the wealthiest are being able to fly into china and then travel by road to intellect and give up. the least wealthy are coming by road so it is really now the job of the police to try to crack the smuggling rings in france, belgium and germany and of course also we are hearing about the amount of money that the vietnamese families are having to part with to get their children some people saying they have pawned their houses and use their entire life savings to try to get the children of a hit in the uk. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: nigel farage says his brexit party will fight every seat in england, scotland and wales, unless boris johnson scraps his deal with the eu. a man faces extradition from ireland — as part of the investigation into the deaths of 39 migrants in a lorry in essex. the chief coroner calls
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for tough new laws to tackle extremist propoganda, in the wake of the london bridge attack. and coming up — the first funerals for victims of a train fire in pakistan. in sports, the final game in charge of wales has ended in defeat at the rugby world cup. new zealand at the rugby world cup who finish in third. 0n the eve of england‘s final against south africa, world cup winnerjonny wilkinson pays a visit to the team. while, eddiejones receives a good luck message from the queen. and, arsenal will be without their captain granit xhaka, as he‘s been left out of the squad for tomorrow‘s match with wolves. it follows his behaviour where he swore at fans after being booed off when he was substituted last weekend i‘ll be back with more on those stores after half past
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the chief coroner is calling on the government to consider new laws banning the possession of extremist propaganda. his comments come in the report at the inquest into the backs of those killed in the london bridge attacks. 0ur of those killed in the london bridge attacks. our home affairs correspondent says there are 18 recommendations in the car in a‘s reports aimed at preventing future deaths. so it goes to the home secretary, the head of the metropolitan police and the head of mi5 metropolitan police and the head of m15 and other agencies. let‘s go through three of the key ones. the first one is he questions the criteria for protecting public spaces saying the criteria are weak. what he means by that is there is a secret test behind the scenes of what makes this space vulnerable to a terrorism attack. there have been concerns that london bridge could be a target but nothing was done to protect it before the attack if you remember that the attackers came down the bridge and a band getting to pedestrians and hitting others
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before stabbing people and borrow market. the second key concern is he thinks there should be in mere crime of possession of terrorist material. this may come as a bit of a surprise to people. it can be prosecuted for passing on terrorist material for a specific purpose or possessing documents such as a bomb making manual that the peer possession of it isn‘t a crime and indicates the ringleader he has a normal volume of material on his phone, m15 knew this, there is limited so they could do in the circumstances because they could not prove his intent. the third interesting area is he talked about possible plans for instant reporting of vehicle rentals to security services the attackers rented the vehicle and he wonders whether the uk could come up with a fist and between government and industry to insist —— instantly find a rental, and the security services get to know about that and they can tap into data bases get to know about that and they can tap into databases to see if he faced a fair —— terrorism suspect. mps and peers say mental health legislation must be changed, to stop what they call the ‘horrific‘ and inappropriate detention of young people
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with autism or learning disabilites. thejoint committee of human rights says conditions in mental health mps and peers say mental health legislation must be changed, hospitals across england inflict ‘terrible suffering‘ on those who are detained — and cause anguish to their families. 0ur education & family correspondent frankie mccamley reports. the only physical contactjeremy and his daughter bethany had was through a hatch in one treatment unit. she has autism and was placed in isolation 2a hours a day, seven days a week. she was made to stand at the other side of her room when her meals were being served. she has to sit on the floor, three members of staff come into the corridor outside, almost as if they‘re expecting beth to explode out of the door like a wild animal. at that point, the door is opened, the food is laid inside, and they shut the door again. bethany, who we can‘t fully identify, was doing well inside an adolescent unit.
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when she turned 18, though, she had to move to a treatment centre for adults, where things turned from bad to worse. it‘s a unit that has no autism provision whatsoever, and once again my daughter is locked up in a cell that does not even have a hatch, i cannot hold her hand. it‘s horrific. she is falling apart in there. the lack of human contact is damaging her already fragile state. she asked me if i could find her dolls that smelt like real babies, that looks like real babies, because she‘s lonely. that broke my heart. completely broke my heart. today a report from the joint committee on human rights says that seclusion and restraint is the horrific reality for too many young people with disabilities and autism who too often face inappropriate detention in brutal circumstances which inflict terrible suffering.
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the breaches that we heard about, whether from parents or from young people themselves who have been subject to detention, were appalling. the committee was really traumatised by the evidence that it heard. the inquiry is calling for urgent change to the system and an ovehaul of the care quality commission‘s inspection regime. the cqc says it‘s been implementing changes but admits there is much more to be done. frankie mccamley, bbc news. the first funerals have been held in pakistan for victims of yesterday‘s train fire, in which more than seventy people died. many of the victims were pilgrims from the same area in sindh province, travelling to a religious festival. secunder kermani sent us this report. tears for the dead — mourners pay their respects to one of the more than 70 victims, of this horrific tragedy. they‘re laying to rest a young father, who leaves
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behind five children. translation: i went into one room, there were two dead bodies. then i went into another room, and there were 15 or 20 bodies there. they showed me one — it wasn't my cousin. then i looked at another one, and i recognised him. this town has been particularly ha rd—hit. a large group was travelling from here to a religious gathering, on the train. a number of other funerals are taking place, pretty much at the same time, nearby. it‘s thought that many more of the victims were from this area, but the authorities are still trying to identify their bodies. it‘s now known more than 70 people lost their lives, in the fire on the train that was travelling, yesterday, from karachi to rawalpindi. officials say the fire began when a gas cylinder, some passengers were using to cook food, exploded. 0thers refuse to accept that, blaming an electrical fault.
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either way, many hold the government ultimately responsible. translation: what will they do, suspend the driver, arrest him? what's the driver's fault? who is in management? it is the railway minister. they should get rid of him, he should resign. there have already been half a dozen funerals in this town, today, and more are expected. the prime minister has ordered an inquiry. people here want answers, but they aren‘t sure they‘ll get them. secunder kermani, bbc news, mirpur khas. the government wants to close a legal loophole that‘s enabled some drivers to escape prosecution for holding a mobile phone while driving. the existing laws are mainly designed to stop people making calls and texting behind the wheel. but the transport secretary grant shapps wants to tighten the rules to stop drivers filming, taking photos or browsing the internet.
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he‘s ordered an urgent review and says any changes could be in place by spring next year. warren gatland‘s12—year reign in charge of wales‘s rugby team ended with a defeat against new zealand today. the all blacks ran out winners by a0 points to 17 in the world cup third place play—off in tokyo. but english fans dream of victory in tomorrow‘s final. bars and pubs are preparing to open early for the 9 am kick off and stocking up on extra supplies of beer, bacon and sausages for a world cup breakfast. danny savage is in leeds to see the preparations there. in pubs up and down england, the beer pumps are being primed. if england win the rugby union world cup, it will be a super saturday. the time difference, between here and japan, means this will be a breakfast experience. somebody will surely come up with a number for how many bacon sandwiches will be consumed. landlords expect queues at the door from 8:00am. busy, it‘s going to be busy, a lot of interest, a lot of phone calls,
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a lot of people interested, so we‘re opening at 8am, busy, busy for breakfast and, you know, we have a big rugby union community, we sponsor leeds university, we sponsor trinity, we‘ve got big links with the rhinos and the rugby league with the rhinos and carnegie, so there‘s a lot of interest. for england rugby fans, there‘s only one thing to be doing tomorrow — watch, hope and be inspired. i think it's massive for the whole country, for rugby, sort of going from grassroots level, right up until the top, really. i think a lot of, like, local clubs are really getting behind the national team, as well, and it's just really exciting to watch us do well. and for some fans of the union code, it will be their first sight of england in a world cup final. it's amazing, because it tells you what you could be, when you're older, what position you could be, how good you are, and you get to watch all the other good players, you might meet up with them in the future and see them, yeah. do you think they‘ll win?
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yeah, they'll probably win. it‘s really special, because i‘ve never watched a rugby final before, with england in it, and i think it‘s going to be really exciting to see how they play and how they cope with the intensity of it. a number of the england players attended st george‘s school in harpenden — rugby is in the blood here. you bet they‘ll be glued to the tv in the morning. everyone is inspired by them, and it's great we've got that connection with four world cup finalists, so everyone is really aware of what they've achieved. every one of the england players started offjust like this. tomorrow, a sport with discipline and respect at its heart will be showcased. 80 minutes of play will decide if it‘s going to be disappointment or elation. danny savage, bbc news, leeds. the queen has sent this message to the team...which will be given
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to the team by the duke of sussex ahead of the match tomorrow. ‘your performances during the tournament have delighted supporters, and inspired many people throughout the country. i send my congratulations to the england team, management and support staff on reaching the 2019 rugby world cup final, together with my very best wishes for a memorable and successful match‘ , and it‘s signed off elizabeth r. some familiar faces have been spotted at the nec in birmingham this week — but in cake form. some of the world‘s best cake artists rose to the challenge at birmingham‘s cake international showcase. among the baking creations werejodie comer‘s killing eve character villanelle a life—sized armoured bear from the fantasy series his dark materials
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and a donald trump creation. go to birmingham and take a slice. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with stav danaos it's it‘s expected to turn even more u nsettled it‘s expected to turn even more unsettled as we head into the weekend. very windy for some in fact weekend. very windy for some in fact we are expecting a spell of gales or isomeric deals across southern britain —— britain more on that in a moment. it‘s also pretty mild out there at this time of year we and there at this time of year we and the year on a mild melt. 12 to 15 degrees and a lot of crowd around some mist and murky, heartbreaks of rain spreading east rates, next batch pushing to the southwest later in the night along with dale starting to develop ear. temperature is not falling much before nine to 11 degrees across the country. into
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saturday morning here is our area of low pressure, we are squeezing those into the southern flank which are affecting set in morning. they deals become widespread across southern areas, gusts of 60, 60, 70 become widespread across southern areas, gusts of60, 60,70 mph in length, outbreaks of pretty heavy rain as well. it will also be wet and will —— windy but some drier slots in between.
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this is bbc news, our latest headlines. nigel farage says his brexit party will fight every seat in england, scotland and wales, unless boris johnson ditches his deal with the eu. boris tells us it is a great new deal. it is not. it is a bad old treaty and, simply, it is not brexit. a man faces extradition from ireland, as part of the investigation into the deaths of 39 migrants found in a lorry, in essex.
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the chief coroner calls for tough new laws to tackle extremist propaganda, in the wake of the london bridge attack. sport now, on afternoon live with katie sha na han. we‘ll talk about england and the world cup final in a moment, but there was disappontment for wales this morning? it‘s the end of the road for wales who have finished fourth at the rugby world cup, after losing their bronze medal match, to new zealand. the all blacks were always on top, running in 6 tries, to claim the victory by a0 points to 17, in tokyo. that means that warren gatland‘s last game as head coach of wales ends in defeat, as he‘s stepping down after 12 years in charge. i really hope that, for what we have achieved in the last ten or 12 years, that we have earned respect and put respect back into wales as an international team, that they continue, the new coaches
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come in and continue to build on that, because i think what we‘ve done and what we‘ve achieved, it would break my heart if wales went back into the doldrums, i think. so carrie, disappointment today for wales, but at the same time, they can leave with their heads held high. especially warren gatland, as he signs of his career as wales head coach with three grand slams and two world cup semi—finals over the last 12 years. and as for england, they‘ve been benefitting from the experience of a man who knows how to win a world cup? also a very special good luck message? yes, the queen has sent a good luck message to the england team, before the world cup final against south africa, tomorrow. she has congratulated them on their performances so far, and sends her "very best" wishes, for a memorable and successful match. and they‘ve also had someone who knows what it‘s like to lift the webb ellis trophy with them this
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morning — jonny wilkinson — who scored that dramatic drop goal, to win the world cup back in 2003. he appeared to be giving some kicking tips to skipper, 0wen farrell, during a training session earlier. england will be hoping they can write their own piece of history tomorrow, against south africa in the final. the match is a repeat of the 2007 final that the springboks won. jonny wilkinson played in that match. and he believes england are in a good position to go a step further this time, despite having faced new zealand in their semi. physically, i think they can recover no problem. their fitness is great and the structure they have in place with the physios and knowledge and everything will help them recover physically. mentally and emotionally, just to accept that was a phenomenal game, whatever. but it is done now and it is almost that, you start again and start,
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when you have nothing to compare it to, there is no such thing as complacency, you literallyjust prepare for this one game and the strength to do that is there to football now, as granit xhaka has been left out of the arsenal squad for tomorrow‘s match with wolves. this news comes after he swore at fans while he was being sustituted in their 2—2 draw with crystal palace in the premier league. he has tried to explain his behaviour, while he was playing for arsenal, last weekend. he says in a statement that, after repeated threats to his wife and daughter, it had pushed him to "boiling point". adding that he did react, disrespectfully. but he had been "hurt deeply", by comments on social media and at matches. liverpool manager, jurgen klopp, has attacked the fixture schedule which leaves his players facing 17 matches in the next nine weeks. liverpool reached the quarterfinals of the league cup, but are not sure when they are going to play it. it is obvious, it is obvious it is too much.
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everyone involved in the game would tell you that and you know it as well. premier league, what a competition, sensational, but then carabao cup, nice, wonderful game we had, stuff like this. but then, in the end ofjanuary, after a very busy schedule in december, there are two semifinals. and maybe then the football league, that is something else but they have to sit on the table and really discuss and think about the players and not about their wallets. england cricket head coach, chris silverwood, has made a winning start in his new role, they beat new zealand by seven wickets in christchurch in the first t20 of their five match series. james vince scored his maiden international t20 half century. he got 59 off 38 balls in what was the sides first meeting since the world cup final that england won in the summer.
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that‘s all from me. bye for now. more now on the general election. the brexit party has delivered an ultimatum to the conservatives, to form an ‘leave alliance‘ and reject borisjohnson‘s deal, or the party will stand candidates in every seat in england, wales and scotland. nigel farage said that leave—supporting labour mps were welcome tojoin, saying it‘s the only way to deliver a true brexit. there are labour figures out there i have spoken to who would more than happily stand in the selection, if we could put this coalition together. but if it was done, boris johnson would win a very big majority. and on that manifesto, we
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really could get brexit done. in fa ct, really could get brexit done. in fact, to quote a friend of mine, we‘d become an unstoppable force. i hope, and pray, that after 25 years of endeavour on my part, that this works. but if it doesn‘t, well, then the brexit party will be the only party, standing in these elections that actually represents brexit. and if that‘s the situation, there are two things that we will do. the first is to make sure that every house in this land is informed as to what is in the treaty and what is in the political declaration, what the costs of this are, what the time implications are, to make people truly understand the extent to which this is a sell—out. and the second thing in those circumstances that we will do is that we will contest every single seat in scotland
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england and wales. earlier we heard from sirjohn curtice, professor of politics at the university of strathclyde. 0ne one thing nigel farage claimed in his speech was that when you kept it well in 2015 under his leadership er good i did more damage to labour than the conservatives. he argues now that we as a party can win over labour parties and seats the conservatives could never touch. if thatis conservatives could never touch. if that is his perspective it is then rather odd that he thinks that by threatening to stand everywhere he will persuade conservatives to change their mind. presumably he only thinks the threat of standing everywhere is going to have an impact on the conservative stance and brexit ethnic conservatives are afraid of the fact that he is going to stand. therefore that they well lose out. so a bit of a disjunction between the claims mr nigel farage made. and the threat he has made.
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because the threat is only a threat if he is going to do damage to boris johnson and it doesn‘t look like he will win the election. you are saying he will only do damage if you concentrates his fire? at the end of the day what nigel farage is promising is that i will fight this election across the board and he will fight it on a stance which exit party has an creon for a while which isawe party has an creon for a while which is a we should leave without a deal and b, that the current till the prime minister has got is brexit in only. the interesting question is how successfully he will be persuading leave voters of this argument. the thing that has going on so far is that the conservative party has been gradually squeezing the brexit party vote, leave voters have been moving from there to the conservatives. the question is whether nigel farage can stop that
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process. one reason it looks unlikely he will succeed is that relatively few leave voters seem to blame boris johnson for the fact relatively few leave voters seem to blame borisjohnson for the fact he failed to meet yesterday‘s deadline. you may have thought they would be outraged. there is clearfrom you may have thought they would be outraged. there is clear from the polling that there is a substantial body of new voters, borisjohnson is deal might be more popular but it is not exactly the bee‘s knees amongst leave voters. therefore you can see how maybe nigel farage will be able to push some people back in his direction but it is that apparently that argument which will go on not in particular parts of the uk but across the uk as a whole particularly what impact that might have on the labour held seats, many of which are in strongly leave areas, that borisjohnson basically has either as his pathway to
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victory, but there is no reason to believe boris johnson victory, but there is no reason to believe borisjohnson is going to suffer less than jeremy corbyn. we had nigel farage quoting donald trump from that lbc interview yesterday saying together he and borisjohnson would be an unstoppable force. looking at the electoral arithmetic, is that a fair comment? one of the reasons there was so much interest in today‘s announcement was the feeling that if nigel farage was announcing he was not to stand in many places and only concentrate in labour seats this would be a boost to borisjohnson. where was the 20—25% of the leave vote still saying it will vote for the brexit party, where was it going to go? but obvious, maybe some will go back to the labour party, but not many because not many come from labour party in the first place. i don‘t think they are going to vote forjo swinson whojust don‘t think they are going to vote forjo swinson who just wants to cancel the whole thing, the only
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game left in time would be the conservatives so i think the reason for the interest was if nigel farage did stand—up it would be unstoppable force, in the shape of boris johnson. that is in a sense what nigel farage is trying to point out. that if he does stand against boris johnson, he is going to make things more difficult for her and that is why you might want to think about being willing to depart on nigel farage‘s terms. millions of face masks have been handed out to students in delhi, where toxic air has prompted authorities to declare a public health emergency. the air quality has been measured at 20 times worse than the levels deemed acceptable, by the world health organization. 0ur reporter, pratiksha ghildial, has more from delhi. i‘m in central delhi, just near the main business district and with the iconic india gate behind me. but as you can see, it‘s barely visible. with a thick blanket of smog around it. for a third consecutive day now,
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residents here are having to breathe the season‘s most toxic air. no amount of efforts, by the government, seem to have controlled the pollution levels. this happens year after year, and anger among people is growing. in some parts of the city, the levels of pm2.5 — that‘s the tiny particle that can travel deep into our lungs — have been peaking at more than 500 micrograms per cubic metre. for perspective, the who says the safe levels are no more than 25 micrograms. translation: i didn't realise how bad it will get. do we really want our kids to grow in such an environment? no one really cares. no one wants to improve the situation. there are several reasons that contribute to delhi‘s pollution problem. traffic, dust, construction activity. but the main reason is the burning of crops doubled by farmers
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in the neighbouring states of haryana and punjab. crop stubble. the smoke from their is carried by winds, into delhi, and it gets trapped in the winter air. shrouding the city in a thick white smog. by many accounts, delhi is the most polluted city in the world now. it really is a public health emergency. campaigners in bradford are calling for action to stop fireworks being let off in the city late at night. it‘s claimed the problem is making people‘s lives a misery and its not just confined to bonfire night or religious festivals. the police are warning people caught setting off fireworks that they could face a curfew. bbc look north‘s corinne wheatley sent us this report. fireworks exploding. this is not bonfire night, eid, or new year‘s eve. this was about midnight on a monday in bradford and it is this kind of behaviour —
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fireworks late at night in heavily residential areas — that has got lots of people feeling frustrated. it is claimed this is happening far too often, even three orfour times a week, in some areas. for emma, and herfamily, the disturbances became just too much to cope with. the sound is absolutely horrendous around terraced houses, itjust resonates all the way through and it is what i would think, i know this sounds extreme, but a war zone. because it is that loud. she moved out home she‘d lived in for 30 years moved to another part of the city to escape the fireworks, usually connected to weddings or anti—social behaviour. i wasn‘t getting enough sleep, i was trying to work, i was having to get up at 5.30am in the morning, to take the dogs out, it was when the fireworks had just finished and the dogs had calmed down enough for me to take out but it was day to day living, the stress levels were immense and you did not dare go out of your house come dusk
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because there people were running up and down the streets, throwing fireworks at each other. and pressure is mounting for action on the issue, including in west bowling, where some residents claim they have seen a significant increase in fireworks over the last few years. it used to a be a one off thing on 5th november. nowadays, when we have a wedding, they are competing against each other, going off in a big way so it is getting silly, it's getting out of hand. and it is a nuisance overall, it is a pollution. all the community is fed up with it. it is against the law to let off fireworks after 11pm, except on key dates. 0ne campaign group says stricter enforcement is needed, but they are also appealing for people to be better neighbours. what we are saying is respect and consider your neighbourhood and don‘t explode them at an hour when it is going to be an inconvenience to everybody else, especially young children who are trying to sleep and elderly people are trying to sleep. bradford council says, following resident‘s concerns, it will run a review of excessive fireworks over the next six months. campaigners hope they will see this
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sight less often on the streets. in a moment, the business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live. the brexit party says it will fight every seat in england, scotland and wales, unless boris johnson scraps his deal with the eu. a man faces extradition from ireland, as part of the investigation into the deaths of 39 people found in a lorry, in essex. the chief coroner calls for tough new laws to tackle extremist propoganda, in the wake of the london bridge attack. here‘s your business headlines, on afternoon live. the thomas cook brand name — along with hotel brands casa cook and cook‘s club — has been bought by chinese conglomerate fosun, for £11 million, the business has announced. fosun had attempted to save thomas cook from collapse, leading a refinancing arrangement.
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but the dealfailed, when banks said the travel company needed to find more money. this announcement has added to speculation that the firm could be back, as an online only travel agent. whirlpool used "chilling" non—disclosure agreements, "to silence customers", while fire—prone tumble dryers remained in uk homes according to mp5. the house of commons business committee said the manufacturer deflected concerns and was too slow to fix the fire danger, which first emerged four years ago. the dangerous dryers were sold in the uk for 11 years, from 200a. a rush to stockpile goods, ahead of yesterday‘s aborted brexit deadline, helped manufacturers last month. new data shows that orders didn‘t fall by as much as some had feared. the purchasing managers‘ index produced by ihs markit cips rose to a9.6 last month, up from a8.3 in september. a figure below 50 indicates the sector is contracting, but it is still the highest level recorded since april. another interesting development
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today which you have been covering is launch of apple tv services? yes, the tv streaming war has heated up today, as apple launches its tv plus service here, as part of its roll out to 100 countries. apple hopes to take on market leader netflix — and rivals hulu and amazon — with quite aggressive pricing of £a.99 a month. ‘the morning show‘ — a tv news drama — is among eight new series commissioned for the apple launch. will it work? let‘s get the market view. paola binns is a senior fund manager, royal london asset management. they have a big budget, $6 million
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so they should be able to buy good content and it will live or die by the content. they are underpricing competitors, offering the service at around a.99 per month, free for people who purchase new apple devices for idea. it is undercutting competition but as you mentioned earlier, a lot of competition out there. netflix and amazon have big budgets, 20 billion and hbo, disney channel coming online as well. 0nly time will tell and it will really depend on the content because if the shows are not at the same level as the others on the other streaming, offers, it just won‘t the others on the other streaming, offers, itjust won‘t be attractive enough for the consumers. watch and see, thank you very much for that analysis. let‘s talk about uk manufacturing now. we had this bounce, didn‘t we? but that is a contraction still going on? this is
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just a brexit story. businesses in the uk stockpiling because a survey was taken at the beginning of 0ctober was taken at the beginning of october when it was not clear whether we would get an extension or not. it was also, on the other side of the equation, use or eu businesses accelerating purchases from the uk. so we will get a much better gauge next week when we see other surveys coming out. as to how the economy really is performing because this is exactly what we saw at the last deadline under theresa may‘s government earlier this year when we saw stockpiling and an increase in economic activity. let's look at the us economy. what do you think it indicates? some investors say it is a bit more rosy than predicted? definitely. the numbers surprise on the upside. i think most
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commentators expected job creation on the month to be around 85,000 because of distortions for general motors strike but actually we got one to 8000, so it was pretty positive. —— hundred and 28,000. it was then followed by a manufacturing survey so again i think the market will take cheer from this. the payroll numbers certainly don‘t look that bad. it should not have any impact on screen consumer confidence. we have had three rate cuts in the uk scratch much us. 0ne say what has not been on dollar? this is obviously on the back of lower rates. see pressure on the manufacturing and business side. markets are watching very closely for any sign that the us consumer
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might be feeling any pressure but we are not seeing that so far. you have very low unemployment levels, and pretty strong employment levels we saw this month. but we will have to, these are just forward—looking indicators and we will have to see where they take us but we are seen contraction in business areas still. thank you very much. not much change then. positive territory. that‘s all the business news. the wreckage of a british submarine, that vanished during the second world war, has been found in the sea off malta. hms urge disappeared, after setting sail in april 19a2. there were more than a0 people on board and its fate had remained unknown until now. tim allman has the story. deep beneath the waves of the mediterranean, a mystery,
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nearly 80 years old, is finally solved. schools of fish move through the rusting, corroded wreck of what‘s believed to be hms urge. still on deck, its giant gun, silent for so many years, standing guard, over a metal grave. the wreck is in absolutely fantastic condition. it‘s sitting upright on the sea bed, very proud, in the direction that it was ordered to take, on its way to alexandria. archive: a british submarine makes her way in to her depot ship — coming home to mother, as they call it. malta was a strategically important base, for british submarines, targeting german and italian shipping, in the mediterranean. hms urge was part of the tenth submarine flotilla, known as the fighting tenth, a vital part of the allied war effort. on 27 april 19a2, it left malta, ordered to set sail for the egyptian
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port of alexandria. but, just after leaving valletta, it is believed to have struck a mine. the submarine and its crew went down. all lives were lost. a ceremony is expected to take place next year, where this will be declared an official war grave. the heroes of hms urge honoured, at last. tim allman, bbc news. iam glad i am glad they are being honoured. jane will be here at 5pm. now it‘s time for a look at the weather. hello there. just in time for the weekend, we‘re expecting some extremely wild weather in places, it‘s southern britain which looks to be bearing the brunt of some very strong winds, through saturday morning. gusts of 60—70 mph, maybe even more in exposure, across the south coast. here it is, hurtling in over the next 2a hours, into our shores, squeezing the isobars across southern parts
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of the country, it will bring a lot of rain with it too. one thing you will notice, in the next 2a hours, and even next couple of days, is that it is going to be fairly mild for the time of year. and it‘s a very mild end to today with temperatures, across england and wales, around 12—1a celsius. closer to 9—10, further north. plenty of cloud across the countries, mist and murky conditions outbreaks of reins spreading north. more rain spreading in northern ireland and into the south—west as we head through the course of the night along with gales developing here as well. by the end of the night, temperatures ranging from 9—11d, turning very windy in the south—west, with the arrival of this area of low pressure, like i mentioned. a real squeeze in the isobars, affecting southern parts of england and wales, certainly through saturday morning. very windy start, with potentially damaging gusts across the south—west, this rain and wind spreads eastwards through the course of the morning. the focus of the strongest winds will be across the south, like i mentioned. gust—wise, 70, perhaps even 80 mph possible across the south—west and along the south coast around
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the isle of wight. further inland, gusts of 50 or even 60 mph, so that is a strong enough to cause some damage and lead to some disruption so stay tuned to the forecast. elsewhere, further north, heavy rain and strong wind affecting northern scotland but southern scotland and northern england could stay dry with plenty of sunshine. further south, it will be wild, very windy with areas of heavy rain. temperatures ranging from around 10—13 degrees, might not feel like that with the strength of the wind in places. as we head into sunday, the area of low pressure still with us but it will be filling, it will be weakening, so i think sunday is looking like being a better day of the weekend. fairly breezy conditions, but nowhere near as windy, areas of cloud and outbreaks of rain but equally some sunny spells around too. winds a little bit lighter, it might feel a bit more pleasant. top temperatures around 13, maybe 1a degrees in the south.
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today at five — the brexit party says it will fight every seat in england, scotland and wales unless boris johnson drops his deal with the eu. nigel farage proposes a leave alliance with the conservatives, otherwise he says he has 500 candidates ready to stand in next month‘s election. boris tells us it is a great new deal. it is not, it is a bad treaty and simply it is not brexit. we‘ll be assessing the implications of todays announcement from the brexit party. the other main stories on bbc news at 5.00pm — a man faces extradition from ireland as part of the investigation into the deaths of 39 migrants in a lorry in essex.

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