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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 2, 2019 6:00am-9:00am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with nina warhurst and jon kay. our headlines today: a chance to make sporting history. england are just a couple of hours away from taking on south africa in the rugby world cup final. it will be the full english, as thousands of venues open early for fans desperate to cheer the team to victory. eddiejones says it is a day he has been planning for since he took over, and is ready for the challenge of south africa. fracking is to end in england after the government orders a halt because of fears of earthquakes. good morning. we've got a deep area
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of low pressure working its way gci’oss of low pressure working its way across the uk today. that's going to bring some very strong winds, with just potentially up to 80 mph for parts of southern england. some heavy rain and the forecast as well. i'll have all the details in the next half—an—hour. it is saturday 2 november. our top story: the wait is almost over. in just a few hours' time, england will take on south africa in a historic rugby world cup final injapan. thousands of england fans have made the journey to the stadium in yokohama, with millions more expected to watch and listen to the game here. it is the first time england have reached the final since 2007. adam wild reports. it is the game's guest prize. both england and south africa knowjust what victory feels like. both desperate to go there again. the teams of 2019 now carry that weight of hope and of expectation. england,
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on the other side of the world, with a chance to showjust how far they have come. we've had four years to prepare for this game. the only sadness is the tournament is going to end. you know, we are having a great time. and we want it to continue. but it comes to an end, so if got one more opportunity to play well. if england's future is to become world champions, their present willow just a little to their past. jonny wilkinson kicks england to glory in 2003, now offering wisdom to 0wen farrell, who hopes to do the same this morning. just how do england improve on that semi—final win over the all blacks? physically i think they can recover. mentally and emotionally, just to accept that yes, that was a phenomenal game, whatever, but it's done now, and it's almost that you start again. and starting again may well, for england, mean finishing thejob. while as well, for england, mean finishing the job. while as a nation they have tasted victory before, so to had they known the pain of defeat, twice
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losing finalists, most recently in 2007, beaten back then by south africa, a nation that understands more than most the significance and power of sporting success. really proud of the way we have done it as a team, and you know, it will be huge for us to lift the trophy. i think it will be not only huge for us think it will be not only huge for us for the country —— not only huge for us, for the country as well. but england are ready, and they know what could just be waiting. let's hope so. the match takes place in yokohama, but the players are staying around 20 miles north in tokyo. the bbc‘s wyre davies is outside their hotel. wyre, any sign of the players yet? yes, the players have been mixing with theirfamilies. yes, the players have been mixing with their families. it is a much more relaxed atmosphere, i think, than many people had expected. and how does that song go? swing low, sweet chariot. england's chariot
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awaits, that is the team bus. in 15 minutes that bus will take the players the half hourjourney down south to yokohama where the world cup football final was played in 2002. it is hosting the world cup by 2002. it is hosting the world cup rugby final now. england i think a tea m eve n rugby final now. england i think a team even better or certainly as good as that one which won the world cup back in 2003. they had a fantastic semi—final against the all blacks. the whole thing is emulating that performance. but the players and their families have that performance. but the players and theirfamilies have been mixing and theirfamilies have been mixing and mingling in the hotel lobby this morning. they are very relaxed. they know they have got a job in hand. this has been hugely successful world cup, not just this has been hugely successful world cup, notjust for the england team, but forjapan as well. wales sadly went out in the semifinals, ireland and scotland at the earliest stages, and a lot rests on england's shoulders. south africa, mind you, i
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quietly confident. they lost their match to new zealand, but since then they have been under the radar. they have got a ridiculously strong defence. both sides and got massive packs, and i think this will be a war of attrition, especially in the first half. but there is a lot of excitement here in japan, first half. but there is a lot of excitement here injapan, and i am sure back at home as well. excitement here injapan, and i am sure back at home as welllj excitement here injapan, and i am sure back at home as well. i was going to say, across england it is by going to say, across england it is rug by fever going to say, across england it is rugby fever at the moment. is it the same there? is there the same level of excitement? yes, it has been a long tournament, about a month and a half, but everywhere i have been in japan, the locals have absolutely got behind the home nations, and of course their own team. a lot of the success course their own team. a lot of the success of this world cup is because japan did so well. they beat ireland, they beat scotland, they got to the quarterfinals. this will be the first rugby world cup in asia, and it has, despite things like the typhoon, which claimed a lot of lives, it has been very, very
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successful. but the locals are now well behind england, many of them behind south africa as well. and it is going to be, i think, a pretty good final. fantastic. we will let you turn around and keep your eyes on that hotel. do not miss them. he is primed, he has his autograph book in his pocket as well. the queen is among those who have been wishing the team good luck. a letter to head coach eddiejones praises their inspirational performances. the duke of sussex is travelling to japan to deliver the message in person. england football captain harry kane has urged his rugby counterparts to bring it home, with a picture of england's now infamous v formation when facing the haka last weekend. the prime minister donned an england jersey to tell the side he knows they can bring the cup back from japan. and for perhaps the first time in a while, the leader of the opposition, jeremy corbyn, agrees with the prime minister, saying the england team has done brilliantly, with just one more game to finish thejob. maybe you are up early this morning because you are going out to watch the game. thousands of pubs and cafe ‘s opening early to screen the match in aboutan ‘s opening early to screen the match in about an hour's time.
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we will be live at harpenden rugby club, which helped to produce four of the current england squad. and we would like to hear from you today. tell us how you are preparing for the big game, and send us your pictures. you can e—mail us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk, or share your thoughts with other viewers on our social media pages. maybe we can get prince harry to deliver some of those as well. get a stamp with harry on. the government has announced plans to suspend fracking in england amid safety fears. a report from the oil and gas authority says it is impossible to predict the impact of earthquakes caused by the process. here is our business correspondent katie prescott. fracking is the extraction of gas from rocks using water and chemicals. its supporters say it is a free—flowing and homegrown source of energy that would cut our gas imports and our carbon emissions. but it has proved to be highly controversial. they had to stop it
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following an earthquake in lancashire in august, and now the oil and gas authority says it is not safe and companies must hold their activity —— 0il safe and companies must hold their activity —— oil and gas authority. but with one important caveat. u nless but with one important caveat. unless and until further evidence but with one important caveat. unless and untilfurther evidence is provided that it can be carried out safely. there is no doubt that extracting more natural gas in the united kingdom would be very attractive. but we've always been clear, we can only do that if it can be done safely, and on the advice from the oil and gas authority, we are no longer convinced that that is the case. but we will be followed... we will follow the science. so in future, should the ability to be certain about seismic events and so on, we will look at it again. fracking's industry body says...
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environmental campaigners are relieved by the news, but this isn't the first time that fracking has been suspended. it was stopped after earthquakes in 2011, and the door is still ajar for activity to begin again in the future. police have confirmed that all 39 people found dead in a refrigerated lorry in essex last month were vietnamese nationals. the victims were initially thought to be chinese, but essex police say they are now liasing with the government in hanoi. a number of vietnamese families have previously come forward fearing their loved ones are among the dead, but police have not yet formally identified any of the victims. a new wildfire is burning out of control in california, the latest in a series of blazes ravaging the state. officials say thousands of people have been evacuated since the fire broke out on thursday in ventura county, around 70 miles north of los angeles. 30,000 people are being asked how
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they would fight climate change. the project is being launched by several commons committees in efforts to achieve zero carbon emissions by the middle of the century. the special citizens' assembly will meet for the first time next year. let's take a look at the front pages. the guardian reports that fracking is banned in the uk with immediate effect, and describes it as a watershed moment for environmentalists. the paper also carries a striking photo of a gold coffin which is part of a new tutankhamun exhibition in london. strictlyjudge shirley ballas tells the sun that she feels a responsibility to warn young girls away from breast implants as she recovers from having hers removed. she is still expected to take part in tonight's live show. the daily mail's headline reads, "we don't need you, nigel". it says that the conservatives have gone to war with the brexit party leader, nigel farage,
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after he threatened to ruin boris johnson's election campaign by fielding candidates in every seat against the tories. there was of course speculation that they might unite in order to make sure brexit happens. a fascinating start to the campaign with yesterday. and the mirror sport's website has spoken with former england rugby world cup winner paul grayson, who lays out how eddiejones's men can beat south africa this morning. so much pressure on them. there is a kind of expectation. let's see. less than three hours away from that match starting. here is alina with a look at this morning's weather. lots of people staying indoors, at least for the morning, in england. lots of people staying indoors, at least for the morning, in englandlj think least for the morning, in england.” think it is probably a good call, at least for the morning. some warm and wet weather across a large swathe of the uk. heavy rain, gales if not
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severe gales. we are likely to see some disruption to travel, to transport, possibly some damage around as well. it is all down to a deepening area of low pressure. we can see this as well of cloud on the earlier satellite picture, and this area of low pressure continues to slowly track its way across the uk today. strongest winds on its southern and northern flank, but there is particular concern for the strength of the wind across parts of south wales, south—west england, south—east england and east anglia. for a time this morning those wind gusts touching 70—80 mph across parts of south—west england, possibly along the coast towards the isle of wight in hampshire as well. inland, those gusts 50 to 60 mph, strong enough to bring branches down from trees, maybe even some trees over as well. further north, from the north midlands northwards, the winds are not quite as strong. we still have every four areas of rain pushing across wales, south—west england, then across into east anglia and parts of north—east england for a time through this afternoon. heavy rain as well across
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northern parts of scotland, where we will see gusts of 50—60 mph. there isa will see gusts of 50—60 mph. there is a slice of something a little bit drier, less windy and brighter across southern scotland, the far north of england and may be parts of northern ireland. essentially, for many of us today, it is wet and windy day. 11— 13 celsius, not much higher than they are at the moment. now crucially, through this evening and overnight, the strongest winds do slowly start to ease down. they will take their time. there will be areas of rain spiralling around that areas of rain spiralling around that area of low pressure and some clear skies starting to develop across parts of northern england, through the midlands, north wales, northern ireland and western parts of scotland, and temperatures typically 6- scotland, and temperatures typically 6— eight celsius overnight. still gotan area 6— eight celsius overnight. still got an area of low pressure tomorrow but the winds are not really as strong. they will have been weakening all the while overnight, so are weakening all the while overnight, so are less windy day tomorrow. still gusty across parts of south—west england, still some showers, longer spells of rain here moving into parts of south wales through the day. likely to see some showers across northern ireland, northern england and parts of scotla nd northern england and parts of scotland as well. for central,
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southern and eastern england, drier, brighter day. less windy, with some spells of sunshine. temperatures still in the range, really, 10— 13 celsius. maybe even a little bit higher in the best of the opening sunshine. low pressure stays close by in the week ahead. so it is still u nsettled. by in the week ahead. so it is still unsettled. there will be showers along with spells of rain for many of us on monday. a drier day for most on tuesday but we start to pick up most on tuesday but we start to pick up more of a northerly wind, so things are set to turn little bit colder through tuesday and wednesday. but really, on most days next week, most of us are going to see some showers or some longer spells of rain. it is really quite an unsettled outlook. back to you. already looking grim out there, thanks. there has been a rise in the number of women being diagnosed with hiv in many areas across the uk. that is despite rates falling overall. analysis of official figures by breakfast reveals half of women with the virus are diagnosed late, after their health has already suffered. jayne mccubbin reports.
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people first hear that i am hiv—positive, they kind ofjump. they step back. adrian is 70 and was diagnosed hiv positive when she was 52.i diagnosed hiv positive when she was 52. i think it is diagnosed hiv positive when she was 52. ithink it is a diagnosed hiv positive when she was 52. i think it is a shock. i think it is, people are still terrified of it. i just need it is, people are still terrified of it. ijust need to get a cloth. almost 20 years after adrian's diagnosis, rates of hiv among women are rising in many areas, booking a national decline. half of women today adrian back then miss early diagnosis because they are not seen as at risk. my partner had died two yea rs as at risk. my partner had died two years previously but it had been a monogamous relationship but not on his side. and you would have had no idea. i had no idea. idid his side. and you would have had no idea. i had no idea. i did not find out until after he had died. i will never forget being told. how can —
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how can that even be, you know? i had no idea. then i had to go back and tell my mum. she was 80. it is a horrible thing to say for the first time, mum, i'm hiv—positive and i'm sorry, ijust time, mum, i'm hiv—positive and i'm sorry, i just thought about my time, mum, i'm hiv—positive and i'm sorry, ijust thought about my mum, she said it's ok, we can cope with this. at least it is not cancer. so, yeah. she sounds great. she was! the tape measure is like measuring time... the acceptance adrienne's mum showed has not been the overwhelming response, and two decades later, she is still facing discrimination. i've been refused treatments once for a facial and the latest was for tonal clipping. they wouldn't touch me. i was a leper again. it was like having a hiv diagnosis all over again. we did a pantomime where all of the characters were the old hiv drugs.
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yet modern medicine today means everyone's hiv is undetectable. undetectable means and transmittable. undetectable means and tra nsmittable. and that undetectable means and transmittable. and that means the levels of hiv in her blood are so low, she cannot pass it on. the first day that i heard that word myself, and i went in to my doctor and he said you were undetectable and he said you were undetectable andi and he said you were undetectable and i went oh, that is such a lovely word! and i went around all day, singing undetectable, that's what you are. it meant so much to me. what is the message you are so keen to get out? two women, to go and have a test. if you have got any doubt at all. because if you find out early, it will save your life. it saved my life. worrying statistics and later we will talk to a consultant of hiv medicine and find out what can be done to increase prevention. lots to come here on bbc the spirit
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microphone breakfast this morning with the build up to the massive world cup game this morning. 0h, with the build up to the massive world cup game this morning. oh, no, don't forget, that is the stadium in yokohama where they will be! inside that stadium and you can see the flags are up and the crowds are gathering and much excitement! we will talk to our correspondence here, yeah, people on the sofa this morning who have trained with some of the england players over the yea rs. of the england players over the years. what is nice about this timing is you can wake up, put the kettle on, get yourself a bacon buttie and then watch it. it is you we are thinking about! now it's time for the film review, with mark kermode and jane hill. my my glasses on the floor! hello, and welcome to the film review on bbc news.
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to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. a very interesting mixed bag of this week. we have the aeronauts, up, up and away in a huge balloon. doctor sleep, the sequel to the shining. chuckles. and after the wedding, starring julianne moore and michelle williams. that was my nervous laugh. let's start with the lovely felicityjones and eddie redmayne. so, how are you with heights? are you 0k are you ok with heights? i am not too bad, actually. i'm terrified of heights. this is basically a mixture of fact and fiction and spectacle. it is basically about an attempt by a meteorologist and a balloon pilot to go the highest above the earth that anyone has ever gone in the 19th century. two characters are james glaisher, played
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by eddie redmayne — who is a real—life character — and amelia wren, played by felicityjones. she is a composite character, based on many people but mostly sophie blanchard. they are essentially talk and she's — he's a pilot and a showman. she understands the need to put on a show. together, they are attempting to break the record for altitude and of course, the higher they go, the more they encounter weather, storms, cloud — and everything else that the film—makers chose to throw at them. here's a clip. i'm not sure your instruments are much use to us now. we need to batten down. please put on your wet—weather clothing. there are no prizes for obstinacy! james, if you won't listen to me... thunder claps. ..listen to that. but not one of my readings
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suggested a storm. well, that's what it is. and we're inside the cumula, which is precisely where we shouldn't be. don't worry, she's not made of conductive material, so we won't attract lightning. and if we are struck, the gas will explode, so we won't live long enough for me to point out... argh! i should not laugh. imean, i i mean, i don't mean to... it is nervous laughter. it's an entertaining cinematic spectacle. 0n the one hand, you have the narrative, which follows some fairly basic parameters. they are chalk and cheese characters who are stuck together in a basket which is up in the air and they have to learn to put their differences aside and work together. 0k? it takes liberties with the truth — although in the back of it, there is a true story which has been much polished. however, for me, the main thing was that i went in thinking eddie redmayne, felicityjones, it was going to be a character study and i did not realise how much of a spectacle it would be. i am actually terrified of heights. i have been up in a hot—air and this is really good at giving you the spectacle of climbing around and inside a balloon, lost in the highest reaches.
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i found several moments of it thrilling, but absolutely terrifying. it is a really good piece of cinema. narratively, there are some hokey elements to it. i like the characters, largely because these are good performances and the story is interesting, if fanciful. but the sheer cinematic spectacle of it is what won me over. i was going like this... i'm not kidding. 20—25 minutes of the film like this. that is like me at any horror film. now you know! have you ever seen the walk? it was about walking between the twin towers? 0h! oh! i know the one you mean, yes! i felt like that for a good 25 minutes. it was fanciful, but entertaining.
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0k. having said i am 0k 0k. having said i am ok with going up 0k. having said i am ok with going up in heights, i'm not brave enough to go up in one. because i am more worried about the landing. the coming down is always going to... now, on the subject of absolutely terrifying... yes. doctor sleep is the sequel to the shining. and famously, stephen king was not a fan of stanley kubrick's film of the shining. he had many problems with it. this picks up the story years later and danny has grown up and dealing with the demons of the past and other people in the world have his shining abilities. psychological powers, psycho kinetic powers. they are being pursued by the character rose the hat, who is played by rebecca ferguson. we know the narrative will move back towards the 0verlook hotel. but, here's the thing. the shining — many people feel it is terrifying. i have never done. but i do not think it is terrifying, it is atmospheric. this is not primarily a horrorfilm, it is much more like it and all those stephen king stories, like firestarter or carrie —
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about a young person who has a ability they do not understand and then what happens to them. it is an adventure, rather than a horror. it is an episodic psychological journey. i went on to it thinking how will anyone pull off a sequel to the shining. it is a completely different movie. it is absolutely its own thing and much more about the narrative and storytelling, whereas the stanley kubrick film was to do with atmosphere and that feeling of dread. actually, i thought it was much better than expected. it is well played, it is made quite sincerely. clearly, mike flanagan, who wrote it, cares much for the stephen king text and the stanley kubrick film. and there are sort of cheeky callbacks to the stanley kubrick film. i went in there scared that it would let me down, and actually being pleasantly relieved. i say this advisedly, it reminded me of things like — there were elements of twilight in there — i do know that some people think
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that is a criticism — i love the twilight movies, and there is an element of fantasy in there, which i am a big fan of it. 0k. you would be fine with it. you would be absolutely fine with it. but you have to see the shining first. let's move on to after the wedding. a remake of a danish film? yes, made by susan b. they slip the genders of the originalfilm. it is a remake of the 2016. michelle williams runs an orphanage in kolkata and has to go to the america to meet an investor. she does not want to go but she has told you have to go. she meets julianne moore, businesswoman, and says her daughter is getting married tomorrow and she says to come. as soon as she gets the wedding and set eyes onjulianne moore's husband and daughter, she panics and freaks out and runs off to be on her own. here's a clip. i couldn't agree more. i am not into weddings. i'd like to be alone. tell me about it. crowds are awful. music, laughter in background.
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ok, i can take one for the team and drink them both. you know how at every wedding, there are always a few single people pretending not to care they're single? well, we're those people. chuckles. i'm divorced. what's your story? get away from me. 0k. what you see in that clip is everything you need to know about that film is playing out on herface, not on what he is saying, but in how she is reacting. when she first set eyes on the family, the way that she reacts tells you the story. you know from that moment what the big reveal is and it turns out the story then has further reveals, which are more schematic
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and a little too neat for me. for me, the film balances between two things — very good performances in which individual moments worked really, really well and an overarching narrative which is kind of melodramatic and a schematic and rather too neatly laid out. 0n the basis of the performances alone, it is really great. i love the show—don't—tell film—making. my favourite thing in the film is when someone does not say anything, butjust by the way they look or stand, you know exactly where you are. there are a couple of things. i think it is a flawed film. some critics have been very sniffy about it, but there are individual moments in this which worked really well and justify the thing that do not work about it. it is just those moments, and julianne moore is always terrific. and michelle williams, i like her a lot. there is a dynamic between the two of them, although they're chalk and cheese. they are very, very different. but as the drummer plays out, you realise that they are two sides of a
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similar coin. you realise they are two sides of a similar coin. and best 0ut this week? i know what we are going to choose. did you see it? it was so stressful. it was so stressful when i saw it. did you like it? i thought it was very well—made. i was so stressed. your thing earlier. i was sitting like this. i struggle to enjoy films that stress me out that much. but it was excellent and the score was unusual and interesting. it is meant to be a film about teenagers, but it is kind more. it's like lord of the flies and that mika levy score, it is unbelievable and gets under your skin. are you glad that you saw it? i can tell that you did not enjoy it. i am a bad person because i only managed about two—thirds of it. because i was so stressed. i could not take any more. i was thinking, "why is no—one dying of hypothermia ? who is the hostage?" you know. all of this. i know, iam being too literal. it is intense. it is an intense cinematic experience. and when we get to the end of the year, i think it will be on my best of the year list.
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it is. i know this. i know this. we thought about dvd? because i liked that too. the souvenir, which is a film byjoanna hogg, is my best dvd. she is one of britain's best film—makers. it is based on a relationship which she had many years ago and about which a degree of mystery still exists. brilliant performances. she is currently cutting the souvenir part two, which is about the aftermath of the relationship, and i cannot wait to see it because i think this is hogg's most accessible film, although it is still very, very chilly. it is almost like a psychological thriller, a gaslighting story. i think it is really wonderful. she is a brilliant film—maker and it is really worth seeing. it is fascinating. i loved it. oh, you have seen it? looking forward to part two? very much. very much. it is an interesting week. enjoy yourfilm—going, whatever you see. and have a great weekend. goodbye.
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hello, this is breakfast, with nina warhurst and jon kay. our top story this morning is that england are preparing to take on south africa in a historic world cup final injapan. the england squad are due to leave their hotel for the stadium in yokohama shortly.
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thousands of england fans have travelled to be there, with many millions more expected to tune in around the world. john will have the latest for us shortly, plus we'll be live injapan throughout the morning. first, here is a summary of our other main news stories: the government has announced plans to suspend fracking in england, amid safety fears. a report from the oil and gas authority says it is impossible to predict the impact of earthquakes caused by the process. fracking has been suspended since august after a tremor near a site in lancashire. it has already been banned in scotland and wales. police have confirmed that all 39 people found dead in a refrigerated lorry in essex last month were vietnamese nationals. the victims were initially thought to be chinese, but essex police say they are now liasing with the government in hanoi. a number of vietnamese families have previously come forward fearing their loved ones are among the dead, but police have not yet formally identified any of the victims.
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a new wildfire is burning out of control in california, the latest in a series of blazes ravaging the us state. officials say thousands of people have been evacuated since the fire broke out on thursday in ventura county, around 70 miles north of los angeles. 30,000 people are being asked how they would fight climate change. the project is being launched by several commons committees in efforts to achieve zero carbon emissions by the middle of the century. the special citizens' assembly will meet for the first time next year. so that is your news. john is with us now. what are you leaving with? yes, a bit of football, a few premier league games. astonishing, isn't it? asa league games. astonishing, isn't it? as a professional rugby player you can be the player of your generation and still not get a chance to play ina and still not get a chance to play in a world cup final. it is such a
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huge moment and it might be the first world cup final, it might be their last. they will be desperate to get over the line, won't they?‘ massive amount of pressure, as well. 0ur correspondent andy swiss joins us from the stadium in yokohama. the england team should be departing shortly and arriving with you there. what is the atmosphere like? give us a sense of the build—up and what the players will be going through before that kick off at 9am this morning. as you say, hundreds if not thousands of fans are streaming into the stadium. it has been a glorious afternoon in yokohama, and of course they are looking forward to the big final tonight. england against south africa. and i am delighted to be joined now by two of the many fans who are arriving here at the moment. david and henry. now, you are friends, you have come out here to watch the rugby. but as i can tell
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by your clothing, you are very different allegiances, it is fair to say. what are the odds of england versus south africa meeting in the final? it will be the second time with england and south africa, last time, in 2007, in paris we saw england lose sadly in the final that henry andl england lose sadly in the final that henry and i were at. i think it will bea henry and i were at. i think it will be a tough game today. both sides are very good. we had a fantastic victory over new zealand but i think the springboks are going to give us a race. is rugby testing your friendship today? not at all, our friendship today? not at all, our friendship goes much deeper than that, but we are deadly competitors today. and is going on as underdogs helping south africa? yes, i think so. helping south africa? yes, i think so. i think england has probably got the edge, but you never know until the edge, but you never know until the day. i am looking forward to the forwards fighting it out, and the backs. all sorts of little bits going on that i am really looking forward to it. i get goosebumps when i think about it. and as far as the
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england team are concerned, you obviously will have seen their victory over new zealand last weekend. does that worry you a little bit? yes. yes, i think so. come on, if they play like that, nobody is going to beat them. do you play like that two times in a row? i don't know. it is a different game today. we will find out in 2.5 hours' time. south africa do have a pretty good record in world cup final ‘s. played two, and 12, that must count for something. yes, we are hoping to keep that. and tell us about the atmosphere. we have arrived in the last few hours and already there are loads of fans going into the stadium. what has it been like today and over the last few weeks travelling around and watching england in japan?m
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few weeks travelling around and watching england in japan? it has been absolutely brilliant. japanese people have been so friendly and welcoming. i have been to many world cup matches. there is a great atmosphere between the fans, there is never any fighting, serious rivalry but we're all here for by. rivalry but we're all here for rugby. it is absolutely brilliant stop finally, i have to ask both of you for a score prediction. henry, first of all. being loyal, i have to say south africa by five. david? england by eight. there we have it, a balanced end to our conversation. thank you very much indeed for joining us. good luck to both sides. a little while to go until kick—off, but already a fantastic atmosphere here at yokohama. and you just wonder what 0wen farrell will be saying to his players. they are due to be departing for the stadium where andy is at the moment. they are due to be leaving any minute now. we should be able to just get a picture of the coach. this is it. all the essentials being packed on board, the kit, the water bottles, all the essentials ahead of that big match to come, and we should be seeing those england players and head coach eddiejones for that those england players and head coach eddie jones for that journey, around 30 minutes or so to yokohama, to the
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stadium. we know that farrell was giving that inspirational talk on the eve of that game to come. ijust wonder what he said to his players last night. plenty more coverage to come from japan throughout the morning. coverage already under way on 5 live ahead of kick off at 9:00am this morning. what a match we have in store. and there are eight games in the premier league today — manchester united up against bournemouth, leaders liverpool taking on aston villa, and manchester city taking on southampton. but even city manager pep guardiola been keeping an eye on the rugby, and had this message for the team. all the best, good luck. it's an honourfor england, all the best, good luck. it's an honour for england, you all the best, good luck. it's an honourfor england, you know, to win in the cup final. for him, for his staff, four, of course, the players. so all the best. it is an incredible event for england. so all the best. great britain's rugby league side lost the first of two tests against new zealand this morning. 12—8 they went down in auckland. it was only 2—2 at half—time, but the hosts took control
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after the break. roger tuivasa—sheck‘s brilliance set upjamayne isaako, before the kiwis powered over again. great britain replied through daryl clark, but it wasn't enough to avoid their second consecutive defeat of the tour. you can catch highlights on bbc one at 1:15pm. lewis hamilton looks set to win his sixth world title this weekend, finishing fastest in second practice ahead of tomorrow's american grand prix. he was 0.3 seconds faster than ferrari's charles leclerc. he only has to finish in eighth or better in sunday's race to secure the drivers championship. qualifying's later today. joe denly will play no further part in england's t20 series in new zealand. the batsman has been ruled out with an ankle injury picked up during practice on thursday. that forced him to miss the opening match of the five—match series. so the build—up is under way in
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japan, and the eddiejones factor is coming into play. he let australia in 2003 when they took on england. he was a coach when south africa won it in 2007. he masterminded that brilliant victory for japan it in 2007. he masterminded that brilliant victory forjapan against south africa at the last world cup. you just wonder, all those little things might come into play. and he feels at home injapan. things might come into play. and he feels at home in japan. he does, and he knows the game inside out. the way that england seems to be peaking at just the right way that england seems to be peaking atjust the right time. for him, it is as much about psychology as it is about fitness. instilling that belief in your players and those around you, your coaching team. he has looked so relaxed this week, that that's the thing. saying it is just another game, which it clearly isn't, but that is the mentality he has been trying to instill in his players, and it has paid off so far. it was reflected in the semi—final, wasn't it? just solid. famous faces have been wishing england good luck as they prepare for the final. the queen says the team's performances have inspired many throughout the country in a letter to head coach eddiejones. the duke of sussex is travelling
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to japan to deliver the message in person. england football legend gary lineker remembers the last time he set an alarm to watch england in a rugby final, in 2003. it turned out all right. the team beat australia that morning to win their first world cup trophy. a man that played for england in that famous victory, neil back, urges the current squad to make all the sacrifices worthwhile. and, in a rare show of support, scotland rugby said it will be supporting its home nation rival, but warned normal service will be resumed at the six nations in february. i would reckon normal service resumes about midday. if you have a
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message for the england team, get in touch with us on social media and we will play some of those later and repost them. let's all get together on this. fascinated to see how eve ryo ne on this. fascinated to see how everyone is preparing this morning. send us photos if you are baking butties, and popping champagne. disney has been behind some of the most loved children's films of all time, and has more recently taken over the box office with hits like star wars and the marvel movies. now, the company isjoining the world of tv streaming to challenge the likes of netflix. in his only uk interview, disney's boss, bob iger, has been speaking to the bbc‘s media editor amol rajan. earlier this year, the avengers: endgame from marvel entertainment became the biggest—grossing movie in history. 0k. who here hasn't been to space? marvel is part of a bigger media giant, the walt disney company, known as disney. over the past 15 years, it has been on an acquisition spree under the leadership of bob iger.
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mr iger, who considered a run for the us presidency, bought pixar animation off stevejobs, lucasfilm off star wars creator george lucas, and last year, in one of the biggest deals in media history, 21st century fox from rupert murdoch. why do you think rupert murdoch wanted to sell? well, i think the primary reason is that he looked at what was going on in the world of media, and all the disruption, and he didn't believe that the hand that they had was a strong as it needed to be. it's that simple, and he didn't have a solution. but what are the underlying trends reshaping the media industry which makes those sort of mega—acquisitions necessary? well, i think if you look at today's media landscape, whether you are in the uk or the united states, or in many other places in the world, first of all, it starts with content. content is king. quality stands really tall in a sea of choice. and then secondly, get content that is so valuable,
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so important, so loved by consumers, that they'll access it or buy it almost any way they possibly can. it was rival netflix that pioneered streaming, which allows you to watch what you want, when you want. in the time that i've been on the throne, what have i actually achieved? # for the times, they are a—changin'... apple tv+ launched in london today, with hollywood stars jennifer aniston and reese witherspoon promoting its biggest production. this winter, several technology giants are launching their own streaming services. disney's own service, disney+, launches here next spring. i think netflix is a volume play with a lot of quality in it, and they created the market in the direct—to—consumer space with video. and we come in with a different play. it's much more branded, less volume, and there's plenty of room for us to occupy space as well, and not...
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i mean, it may to some extent be at their expense, but not necessarily. there may be room for people to have more than one subscription. 0n current evidence, that seems a safe bet. amol rajan, bbc news. and you can hear more of amol‘s interview with bob iger on radio 4's the media show, which is available on bbc sounds. the western film is commonly thought of as an all—american creation — but did you know that the very first one was filmed right here in the uk? yes, blackburn in lancashire was the location and later today, the town will play host to a sceening of the film for the first time in more than 100 years. here's our entertainment correspondent colin paterson. kidnapping by indians by 1899, the world's first western according to the bfi and it was filmed in blackburn. ron northgate in the centre of blackburn on the site that they worked from, the year that they made the first western kidnapped by
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indians. mitchell and ca nyon's documentaries captured everyday life, including in their hometown, but they also liked to experiment. in 1899 that changes, they stop filming the world around them and start telling stories and one of the first is the first western. jamie holman tracked down a surviving copy in the archives of london's cinema museum. today it will be shown for the first time in a sentry at the british textile daniel in the turn. very simple story, a frontier family encounters a native american, and they try to take the child and they are saved by the plucky cowboy so it has got, locks, feathers, smoking pistols, it is a cowboy film. it is often claimed that the great train robbery made in the us in 1903 was the first western. but kidnapping by indians was shot four years earlier and they are good reasons why the wild west was known in the north—west. there is this connection between the cotton growing obviously in america and the east lancashire
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weavers, why wouldn't they be some kind of link that allowed them to know about that world and kind of be able to turn it into the world's first western? if you asked anyone in the street where was the first western made, no—one with say blackburn. no, nobody would say blood turn. it is an example of creativity and culture that comes from the working classes that has beenin from the working classes that has been in god and screened here in blackburn is about the people of blackburn is about the people of blackburn get to see that and it is their culture. the western is once again home on the range and that home is blackburn. amazing! i never knew that! i grew up around here and i never knew that. spaghetti westerns are the ones made in italy so westerns are the ones made in italy so is it the black pudding western? brilliant. i think we have some live shop actually from japan? that is the hotel where the england team are staying in tokyo and they are heading off to the big showdown! the match kicks off, the rugby world cup
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final, as if you didn't know, kicks off in yokohama at nine o'clock and the players have been staying in his hotel which is about 20 miles away. in tokyo. and they are about to start the journey very soon, we are hoping they will be coming up shortly. they are paying their bills, settling up for the minibar. that's it. and then they will be out. someone has been caught trying to ta ke out. someone has been caught trying to take too much bubbles. right! getting the weather now, we saw the western there and it is wild in the west of england, isn't west of england, western there and it is wild in the west of england, isn't it? spot on. windy and wet weather in the forecast today and some extreme gusts across parts of south—west southern and sent them —— central england were because even touching for a time about 80 miles an hour and it is all down to an area of low pressure and we can see it here on the satellite picture, the swell of cloud which continues to track its way across the uk, very deep area of
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low pressure, the strongest winds on its southern flank as i mentioned across south wales, southern england but also on its northern flank so it is the top and tail of the country seeing the strongest winds but the most concerned for this morning would be across south—west england and all the way across to east anglia but for a time this morning asi anglia but for a time this morning as i mentioned we of those gusts touching 70—80 miles an hour across coasts of south—west england and towards hampshire and the isle of wight and even inland missing gusts of 50-60 wight and even inland missing gusts of 50—60 miles an hour so the met 0ffice warnings for the strength of the wind and also met office warnings for the rain because parts of wales and south—west england could see 60—80 millimetres across the higher ground of the moors and hills of south wales, pushing its way east through the day and in between some intermittent bright sunny spells, a swathe of something dry and bright across northern ireland, the far north of england and southern scotland but will northern scotland here, heavy rain. again, 30—a0 millimetres widely, as much as 80 across the playground and also 60 mile an hour gusts as well. for a large swathe of the uk today,
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it is wet and windy but mild, 12— 13 celsius the top. through this evening and overnight, strongest max starter is down and we are still keeping areas of wayne spiralling around the pressure, in between some clearer spells as well. temperatures dropping lower than they have done on the nightjust gone, so 6— eight celsius is a typical range come dawn tomorrow. still got this area of low pressure around tomorrow. it is not as deep or intense but we still have some windy conditions across parts of south—west england and still some showers along —— and long spells of rain across south—west england, wales, northern ireland, northeast england and scotland. they will push their way east through the day and actually across parts of the ink —— midland, drier and windy day with of sunshine and temperatures tomorrow in the range of 10— 13 celsius. low pressure is close by really in the week ahead so more rain to come on most days next weekend it will start to feel a bit cooler as well. back
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to feel a bit cooler as well. back to feel a bit cooler as well. back to you. thank you very much, it is not looking the best for the week ahead but never mind because you are probably all stopping in to watch the rugby and here we have live pictures, we have been waiting for these in tokyo, the england team heading on the coach. can you imagine what is going through their head at the moment? so much pressure on them at the moment. england expects and all that but england expects and all that but england expects them to win today or at least hopes and they are playing south africa and the game starts at nine o'clock our time and i think they have about what, 20 mile journey from tokyo there from the hotel? to yokohama, to the stadium. it will have courage of them arriving later. the coach they treated like any other game. how would you do that? it is a big one, big for them, because of the country, and we will enjoy the build up country, and we will enjoy the build up to that on breakfast this morning. now it's time for click
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with lara lewington. taiwan. an island shaped like a leaf at the meeting point of four seas. between the 19605 and the 1990s, taiwan underwent massive industrialisation in what has become known as the taiwan miracle. huge tech firms grew, becoming household names, asus, htc, acer. at the centre of this was the semiconductor industry, led by a company you have probably never heard of, tsmc. it is the one of the largest semiconductor manufacturers in the world, producing chips in some of the best phones, including the iphone11.
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it is most likely if you have a smartphone, you have something made by tsmc. and these chips were only made possible thanks to the discovery of semiconductors. why are semiconductors important or interesting? because it changes your life. with factories, or ‘fabs' as they are known across the globe, the largest is here in taiwan. and we have been granted exclusive access to see just how those chips that form the heart of our electronic devices are created. but before we could go into the fab, there was quite a process to undergo. i have to take my shoes off on the carpet. and that was just the start. i had to put on a hairnet, wash my hands, and wear this to keep the dust out. cute. but it is time for an air shower.
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weird. i feel like i'm in the tumble dryer. the manufacture of wafers has to be extremely precise. they cannot tolerate any particles because they fall onto the wafer —— they cannot tolerate any particles that may fall onto the wafer and damage the chips. so finally, we were allowed in the factory and it was a good reason for all that faff. the speed of these chips relies on how many transistors you can cram into a tiny space. and when i am talking tony, i am talking nanometres. i don't really know how to describe how fine that 5—nanometre or 7—nanometre is, but i think people very often say if you look at 28 nanometres, it was like 1000th
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the diameter of a human hair. in this fully automated factory, the lights are kept yellow to protect the product, and the machinery is moving all around. but there are quite a few things in here we're not allowed to film because this is seriously cutting—edge technology and it needs to remain pretty secret. we have to protect our customers' information. and so basically, we do not allow cameras to freely roam inside ourfabs because inevitably, they may pick up customer information. between all the automated devices in this facility, they travel 400,000 kilometres a day. to put that into context, that is ten times around earth. all of this is about the concept of keeping up with moore's law, as predicted by intel engineer gordon moore in the ‘60s. it refers to the doubling
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of transistors on a chip every two years, whilst the cost is halved. a concept increasingly hard to keep up with, despite us expecting a lot more from our ever—connected lives. the next driver is what we call ‘ubiquitous computing'. it is computation everywhere at any time. all the devices are connected. billions and billions of etched devices that are smart, that can compute at any time, and communicate and link and that will be the future enabled by semiconductors. welcome to the week in tech. it was the week that a device dispatched by samsung to send selfies to space came back to earth with a thud, crash—landing in a back garden in michigan, usa. thankfully, nobody was injured. on a slightly safer note,
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the korean tech samsung giant has teased a flip phone. how very early naughties of them! with a foldable screen. let's hope this one's more successful than the last attempt at a folding phone. twitter has banned all political advertising worldwide on its platform, saying that the reach of such messages should be "earned, not bought. " the move puts pressure on rival social media outfit facebook which recently ruled out banning political ads. in other facebook news, the social network has agreed to pay a £500,000 fine issued by the uk data protection watchdog over the cambridge analytica scandal, ending a year's worth of legal wrangling over the issue. as part of the agreement, facebook has made no admission of liability. facebook subsidiary whatsapp is suing the nso group, an israeli surveillance company, alleged it created various whatsapp accounts, allowing malicious code to be sent to over 1,400 mobile
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devices with the purpose of spying. the nso group said it disputes the allegations and would vigorously fight them. and finally, an american company has developed a pair of smart glasses designed to improve concentration and prevent destruction. —— destruction. —— destraction. sensors in narbis' smart specs measure the wearer's brain activity. if they decide the wearer is not playing attention, they darken, preventing them from seeing the distraction. the glasses will cost $690. they will launch in december. we have come out in central london to try three of the latest smartphone cameras to see how they cope with low light. the huawei mate 30 pro, the iphone 11 pro and google's pixel 4. they all boast they can take impressive shot that night but will any impressive shot that night but will a ny leave impressive shot that night but will any leave the competition in the dark? i will also take photographs
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with the iphone seven, a few years old, to show how cameras have improved. we start with huawei mate 30 pro. huawei says it's phone takes really good pictures at night because the camera sensor in here is 125% bigger than the one in the iphone 11 pro's. so it lets in more light. so how do they stack up? all three of the new phones took sharp, bright photos of the skyline at night. the mate 30 pro's look crisp, but the colours were less saturated. the iphone 11 pro's looked vibrant, but not so sharp. the pixel for had a nice college balance. —— pixel four had a nice colour balance. but there was no clear winner, all of them is of nice photos. my next stop is the embankment. i'm here with the london eye, and using the google pixel 4. it says it's a special sauce is
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computational photography. it will ta ke computational photography. it will take a string of photos and stitch them altogether and use machine learning to clean up any noise or a rtefa cts so learning to clean up any noise or artefacts so i have to hold still. all three of the new phones took a brighter photo than the iphone 7 plus. 0nce once again, the mate 30 pro seem to ta ke once again, the mate 30 pro seem to take the sharpest photo. my fakers in focus and it picked out a lot of detail in my jumper. in focus and it picked out a lot of detail in myjumper. —— my face is in focus. it picked out a lot of detail on myjumper, and the pixel 4 photo had a flattering colour balance. i would be probably happy to post this one on my instagram. i think the iphone 11 pro struggled. it didn't pick up much detail in myjumper and the coloursjust looked weird, no matter how many times i took the shot. when apple introduced the iphone 11 pro, it said it would be better at taking photos in dimly—lit bars. it does not get more dim than this. this is gordon's wine bar in london, only lit by candles.
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let's see how it manages. i don't have to activate night mode with the iphone 11 pro, it does that automatically when it detects that it is dark. and it is telling me to hold still while its stitches together several photos like the pixel 4. apple calls this "deep fusion." all three phones took a picture that would not have been possible on the phone a few years ago. the previous shots, the mate 30 came out brighter overall, and sharper. it's hard to believe this was taken in candlelight. once again, the pixel 4 had a more flattering colour balance and there was less detail on the iphone 11 pro shot, which you can see if you zoom in on her hair. this might be the biggest challenge for the phone. we are in stjames park. it is dark, there is no light here. so will the cameras be able to pick up any photos at all and will we get robbed for waving around a few grand
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worth of cameras? let's find out. it looks like daytime. the fact that any of these phones took a clear shot in new darkness is impressive. if you zoom in, you can tell none of them are crystal clear, but that is probably not the point here. the new phones all took snaps in the dead of night that look like they were taken during the day. it's pretty impressive how much phone cameras have improved injust a few years, thanks to new hardware and a lot of heavy lifting by the software. i found some of those night mode shots looked a little bit artificial and in some cases, the phones took nicer shots in regular camera mode. the real test was that new darkness shot taken in saintjames park, that was truly impressive. but i wonder how useful that will be for the majority of people and whether people will really want to take lots of photos in complete darkness? it remains to be seen. that is it for the short version of click. the full—length programme can be
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found on the bbc iplayer. you can keep track of the team on facebook, instagram and twitter at @bbcclick, as usual. thank you for watching. good morning. welcome to breakfast, with nina warhurst and jon kay. 0ur headlines today: a chance to make sporting history. england are on their way to the stadium as they prepare to take on south africa in the rugby world cup final. it will be the full english, as thousands of venues open early for fans desperate to cheer
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the team to victory. they are a big bunch of lads, but they play a different game to the england guys, and i think it is going to be high—scoring, and i think we are really going to make and impact, and they are not going to expect it. we are going to win emphatically. eddiejones says it is a day he has been planning for since he took over, and he is ready for the south african challenge. fracking is to end in england after the government orders a halt because of fears of earthquakes. good morning. we've got a deep area of low pressure working its way across the uk today. that's going to bring some very strong winds, with gusts potentially up to 80 mph for parts of southern england. some heavy rain in the forecast as well. i'll have all the details in the next half an hour. it is saturday 2 november. our top story: the wait is almost over. in just a few hours' time, england will take on south africa in a historic rugby world cup final injapan. thousands of england fans have made the journey to the stadium
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in yokohama, with millions more expected to watch and listen to the game here. it is the first time england have reached the final since 2007. adam wild reports. it is the game's biggest prize. both england and south africa know just what victory feels like, both desperate to go there again. the teams of 2019 now carry that weight of hope and of expectation. england, on the other side of the world, with a chance to show just how far they have come. we've had four years to prepare for this game. the only sadness is the tournament's going to end. you know, we're having a great time, and we want it to continue. but it comes to an end, so we've got one more opportunity to play well. if england's future is to become world champions, their present will owe just a little to their past. jonny wilkinson kicked england to glory in 2003, now offering wisdom to 0wen farrell,
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who hopes to do the same this morning. butjust how do england improve on that semi—final win over the all blacks? physically, i think they can recover. mentally and emotionally, just to accept that yes, that was a phenomenal game, whatever, but it's done now, and then it's almost that you start again. and starting again may well, for england, mean finishing thejob. whilst as a nation they have tasted victory before, so too had they known the pain of defeat — twice losing finalists, most recently in 2007, beaten back then by south africa, a nation that understands more than most the significance and power of sporting success. really proud of the way we've done it as a team, and you know, it will be huge for us to lift the trophy. i think it will be not only huge for us, but for the country as well.
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but england are ready, and they know what could just be waiting. fantastic pictures from the last time england won it. 0ur correspondent andy swiss joins us from the stadium in yokohama. good morning to you. we can see lots of fa ns good morning to you. we can see lots of fans already arriving. what has the atmosphere been like? as you say, still two hours to go until kick—off, but already thousands of fa ns kick—off, but already thousands of fans are streaming into the stadium to soak up the atmosphere. i have to say, there are a lot more england shirts than south african shirts at the moment, and we havejust heard the moment, and we havejust heard the first chorus of swing low sweet chariot. i suspect we could be hearing that quite a lot over the next few hours. it is a glorious evening in yokohama, perfect conditions for rugby, and in the last 15 minutes or so the england players have left their team hotel in tokyo to make the shortjourney here to yokohama. they got a good reception from some waiting fans as they left their hotel. what a day it
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is for eddie jones they left their hotel. what a day it is for eddiejones and his players. england will start this match very much as the favourites, after their breathtaking victory over new zealand in the semifinals. 0ne breathtaking victory over new zealand in the semifinals. one of the finest performances that really we have ever seen the finest performances that really we have ever seen from an england side. but south africa are very dangerous. they are very powerful, very sickle team, and both sets of fa ns very sickle team, and both sets of fans here are in confident mood. —— very physical team. the south africans lost to the all blacks, the all blacks lost to us. so we when. if we play like we played against new zealand, we should absolutely smash the springboks. that is the plan, anyway. well, the boks have never lost a quarterfinal, never lost a final. they are going to win. it is going to be a pretty brutal game, but we will win. there is a
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sense of unity and a sense of national participation in this that is very similar to 1995. and it is a very powerful, emotive force to join. well, it has been a long 16 years. i think it would just be awesome, it would be fantastic for the nation. everything that is going on with brexit, we need a bit of a lift. both sets of fans will be hoping this is their day. south africa, you have to say, do have a very impressive record when it comes to world cup finals. played two, 12. they won on home soil and most recently in 2007 when they beat, yes, you guessed it, england in the final -- yes, you guessed it, england in the final —— won two. that said, though, england are very much the favourites, and the last time these two tea ms favourites, and the last time these two teams met it was exactly a year ago and england won by 12—11. could that be an omen? could we be in for
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another cliffhanger in the world cup final? we will find out injust under two hours' time. it certainly bodes well, andy, doesn't it? and it is true what that fan is just saying, we are heading into winter, a general election, all this brexit worry, it is great to have something like this, even if they don't win it, which they will. and thousands of venues are opening early today to screen the match. in about an hour, we will be live at harpenden rugby club, which helped to produce four of the current england squad. and we would like to hear from you today. tell us how you are preparing for the big game, and send us your pictures. you can e—mail us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk, or share your thoughts with other viewers on our social media pages. the government has announced plans to suspend fracking in england,
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amid safety fears. a report from the oil and gas authority says it is impossible to predict the impact of earthquakes caused by the process. here is our business correspondent katie prescott. fracking is the extraction of gas from rocks using high—pressure water and chemicals. its supporters say it is a free—flowing and homegrown source of energy that would cut our gas imports and our carbon emissions. but it has proved to be highly controversial. they had to stop it following an earthquake in lancashire in august, and now the oil and gas authority says it is not safe and companies must halt their activity, but with one important caveat — unless and until further evidence is provided that it can be carried out safely. there's no doubt that extracting more natural gas in the united kingdom would be very attractive. but we've always been clear, we can only do that if it can be
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done safely, and on the advice from the oil and gas authority, we're no longer convinced that that's the case. but we will be followed by the — we will follow the science. so, in future, should the ability to be certain about seismic events, and so on, we will look at it again. fracking's industry body says... environmental campaigners are relieved by the news, but this isn't the first time that fracking has been suspended. it was stopped after earthquakes in 2011, and the door is still ajar for activity to begin again in the future. police have confirmed that all 39 people found dead in a refrigerated lorry in essex last month, were vietnamese nationals. the victims were initially thought to be chinese, but essex police say they're now liasing with the government in hanoi.
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a number of vietnamese families have previously come forward, fearing their loved ones are among the dead, but police have not yet formally identified any of the victims. a new wildfire is burning out of control in california, the latest in a series of blazes ravaging the us state. officials say thousands of people have been evacuated since the fire broke out on thursday in ventura county, around 70 miles north of los angeles. 30,000 people are being asked how they would fight climate change. the project is being launched by several commons committees in efforts to achieve zero carbon emissions by the middle of the century. the special citizens' assembly will meet for the first time next year. so those are your news headlines, at
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7:12 a.m., but there is one show in town. that is the excitement building at the stadium in yokohama. with kick—off at the rugby world cup final now less than two hours away. many of the england players' wives and girlfriends have also made the long journey to japan. let's speak now to amanda mcclatchie. her fiance, piers francis, has been playing as part of the england squad. good morning, amanda. hi there, how are you? we are good, thank you. thank you forjoining us. you have got your seat, you are ready for the game. what is it like in there?m is absolutely amazing. the atmosphere is building up, we got here really, really early. 0n the bus, all the girls were like this. three hours to ago and we are here really early. it is so exciting, i feel like my heart is going, heart beating really quickly. so excited for kick—off, just can't wait.
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beating really quickly. so excited for kick-off, just can't wait. you talk about how you are feeling, you are 33 weeks pregnant right now. so you have to take care there. yes, 33.5, actually. everyone is like, are you 0k? please don't go into labour. but fingers crossed. with all the excitement. we have seen pictures in the last few minutes of piers and the other players heading off on the coach to travel from tokyo to the stadium, which i think is about half—an—hour away, isn't it? what has it been like for you, this whole experience? for the families, the supporters, the support squad, if you like, for each of those players? it has obviously just been such a long journey. you know, the boys went into the camp at the end ofjune, and this willjust be part of the whole thing, each week getting further, getting further. when the actual tournament kick off in september, as well. quite a few of the girls came out
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here for that, and just following the whole journey, and just excitement. and then i think a lot of us have been out before and then went home, we said we're not going to go back, it is such long journey, but during the last game, we all decided we have to go. we have to be here for this experience. amanda, people who don't live with or no professional sports players in the way you do don't necessarily understand the sacrifices that they make, day after day, year after year. what is that like? people don't understand what goes into it. they see them on the pitch and they don't get sometimes that they have been away from their families for months and months and when the world cup starts in september, people were messaging, saying you must be so sad yours has left and i said he has been away sincejune! i have not seen him for so sincejune! i have not seen him for so long! you see them on the
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weekend. but so much dedication and sacrifice goes into it. i guess from the players and also from all of us as well. i mean, each time i see him,i as well. i mean, each time i see him, i have got a bigger bump which is funny. you will get him back soon, amanda. i know! thank you for your time. you are you supporting by the way? let me think about that. i dare you! most importantly, good luck with your baby. thank you so much! very exciting. amanda joining us much! very exciting. amanda joining us from the stadium in yokohama. one group watching today's final with particular pride will be the members of harpenden rugby club, which helped to produce no fewer than four of the england squad which travelled to japan, including the captain, 0wen farrell. the bbc‘s kathryn stanczyszyn is with them. a nervous day there, catherine.
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—— kathryn? could this be the day and you english team comes over as teams of the world, —— take over as king of the world, —— take over as king of the world. excitement is building and some unusual breakfast i imagine getting under way at the moment, some of them potentially of the liquid variety, but a lot of sausage and bacon baps and how many sausages have gone on in there? 400. 400 sausages in harpenden rugby club and are you excited today? cheering and applause. excited about the baps as well. harpenden club of course has reasons to be excited, four more reasons, actually. up here on the wall, 0wen farrell, maria ecog, george forder and i don't think his here at the moment but he is well respect, and jack singleton
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who is not in the squad, sorry, he is but he is not playing today, but all four of them sons of harpenden, they all grew up playing junior by they all grew up playing junior rugby here and you are very proud of them. this is president peter danby. how much does it mean to you to have these four in the squad? a tremendous achievement for a junior clu b tremendous achievement for a junior club that all of these four guys, including singleton, are included in the english squad and three starting for the game. of course, i heard matt dawson talking earlier that they will be thinking to get to this huge moment in their career, will think about the career —— the people who have helped them get there and some of that is you guys.” who have helped them get there and some of that is you guys. i remember when i went arrived here at 13.5 when i went arrived here at 13.5 when his father played for saracens that he could kick from the halfway line then, he played with my son mark and he was here for five years, yes. lots of people have said the assumption is if they can get through the all blacks game with a stunning performance, they can win this final but complacency is not a thing to having a final, is it,
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especially not a world cup one because many things are unprepared ball. this is a big one, the all blacks's victory was amazing and i have never seen blacks's victory was amazing and i have never seen anyone blacks's victory was amazing and i have never seen anyone play better than that but they have to have a similar performance to beat south africa. you have got hundreds of people expected? 400, with the outside screen, it is a big day for the clubs we are welcoming embers and nonmembers today so they can get introduced to rugby if they have not been out and enjoy the day. would you rather it have been a wales final? just asking, to see whether it, to see if i can ramp people up further? i would prefer to play south africa. playing wales would have been a big blow to me personally. i think it will be a great final. peter, we will let you crack on with your preparations and you can see here they have got a wonderful set up in the main room. big screen. the prime position is outside here. look at this. the comfy seats. right here with this
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massive screen, overlooking the fantastic pitch. people daring to dream, right? but has been up in the night he is so worried. daring to dream that england make get the victory today with kick—off coming at six am, nine o'clock our time. come on, england! thank you, get your mitts on one of those sausages before they disappear. she does not need to move, she has got the sofa. do not give it up. so many of you already at this time, 20 minutes past seven, letting us know how you have preparing this morning. louise dennis has these spectacular nails! fantastic. she would have to be carefully —— careful with her sausage bodies. and sue norwich bringing up the bunting. lovely, sue! and this is a dedicated fan, said the tortas. it is amazing that he could do that himself. with his
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tiny arms. he put stickers on his shell. he is asking can you get those off me, please? well done. more pictures and more of your support through the morning. please keep sending in your photographs and we will check in now for a look at the weather. good morning. hello, i love said, isn't he great? windy conditions across a large swathe of the uk today and went as well, a number of what met office warnings in place and eventually we are seeing the winds gusting in excess of 80 miles an hour across parts of cornwall. just a sign that some of the exposed areas across south—western southern england could see some strong gusts this morning, all tied in with a deep area of low pressure, on the earlier satellite picture, and it will track its way across the uk today. strongest winds on its northern flight across northern scotland but exceptionally so across southern northern scotland but exceptionally so across southern parts of england and south wales here met offers warnings for the strength of the winds, 70—80 miles an hourfor a time this morning across parts of
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south—west england and potentially along the coast towards hampshire and the isle of wight. and widely inland, 50—60 miles an hour with the strong wind expecting into east anglia and even into south lincolnshire as well. to the north of this, the winds not quite so strong and also a swathe, something prior across southern scotland, northern england and northern ireland but you can see heavy rain piling on across wales, south—west england, extending its way eastward through the day and behind it, some bright sunny spells and also some heavy rain across northern scotland, and strong and gusty winds here too, 50-60 and strong and gusty winds here too, 50—60 miles an hour. for many today, it is wet and also very windy. temperature wise, not much higher than what we have got right now, 10-13 the than what we have got right now, 10—13 the top temperature this afternoon. 0utbreaks 10—13 the top temperature this afternoon. 0utbrea ks of 10—13 the top temperature this afternoon. outbreaks of rain and strong winds for a time this evening, slowly they will start to ease down. we'll continue to keep some areas of france piling around this area of low pressure overnight, becoming more showery and in between, some dry, clear interludes.
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0vernight temperatures lower than they have been on the nightjust gone, 6— eight celsius typically. starting tomorrow, still on a breezy note but not as windy, an area of low pressure firmly in charge, the strongest winds all have eased down overnight. still some rain to deal with, fairly showery nature, and initially across north—eastern scotland, england, northern ireland, also south—west england and wales, some of the showers pushing their way eastward through the day. drier, brighter day across many central southern and eastern parts of england. the wind but not as strong and once we get the sunshine, 13— 14 celsius where we have the showers, it is more like ten or 11. at least the winds will not be as strong. low pressure still close by as we get through the week ahead. some rain on most days, particularly on monday and also later in the week. it will turn a little cooler again from tuesday onwards. back to you. thank you! see you a bit later. back to one of our main stories this morning, and the news that the government has
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suspended the controversial process of fracking in england, saying it's "no longer convinced" of its safety. a report by the oil & gas authority, found it was impossible to predict the impact of earthquakes caused by the practice. let's talk now to energy analyst, david cox, whojoins us from our london newsroom. very good morning to you. the right decision, david? i don't think so. i think it is more to do with the current political issues of elections rather than any scientific fa ct. elections rather than any scientific fact. accept the report by the oil & gas authority, trusted says it is just not possible to accurately predict the probability or magnitude of earthquakes linked to fracking operations. it sounds like it is a safe thing to do at the moment.” think really they are stating the obvious. geology is not an exact science and when you drill into rock and any other, anything under the ground, you are not going to be sure
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of what is going to happen. what you have to do is to the exploratory drilling, which is what has been going on, and then test and see what actually happens in practice. the idea that you can drill a well and predict what is going to happen is frankly fantasy. i mean, they have said they are pausing it until they know that it is safe and you are absolutely right, these are test carried out. it has to happen now if the government is committed to maximising this natural resource?” cannot really see that there is going to be some scientific evidence in line with what the report is suggesting. i think what you have got is evidence around the world where in the us, fracking has been going on for years, it is not a new technology, it has been going on for a long time, and all completely safely. so you could look over there but the problem with geology... has been banned in canada, for example, and some european countries. those are political decisions and not based on science, they are based on
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just feeling that people don't want fracking on land. we are all quite happy to see our gas imported from the us. so some of it is now with our central heating on today, we are burning fracked gas produced in the usa. you know, that is coming over here in chips and lng tankers and we are burning it in our boilers in our homes. so the anti- fracking protesters are celebrating today, they are treating this as a victory for them. in your eyes, they are treating this as a victory forthem. in your eyes, is it they are treating this as a victory for them. in your eyes, is it simply a political victory for the government, who wants to silence the opposition, who have long been anti— fracking? all of the parties now against fracking so i think it is unlikely we will it in this country in the near future. unlikely we will it in this country in the nearfuture. the problem with the decision of courses it isn't so much to do with overt >> environment are concerned, it will do nothing for climate change, this decision, we will study the same amount of gases before but it means we import more rather than produce it ourselves. and the downside of it for the uk economy is
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less jobs downside of it for the uk economy is lessjobs in this downside of it for the uk economy is less jobs in this area, fewerjobs in oiland gas, less jobs in this area, fewerjobs in oil and gas, and also the billions of pounds the government could raise from revenue from tax and royalties on this production to build hospitals and schools, we won't get. we willjust go on paying for gas that we import from the middle east and fracked gas from the usa. david, people who live in these communities will say the roads have become congested, they worry about the tens of millions of litres of water that have been brought into their environment, they worry about potential carcinogenic pollutants in the air. what would you say to reassure people in lancashire? all of the gas production that we have relied on in the past, including zero c production, including other onshore gas fields, gases produced conventionally, are subject to regulation and health and safety, environmental monitoring, i used to be an environmental scientist and used to do some of the environmental monitoring. this is all done with immense care and dedication by the
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people working in the industry so frankly, you know, nimbys are all very well but they all drive there in the gas and petrol cars and use gas from somewhere else in their homes so we need to be honest that in this transition to a carbon free economy, which we have got to make, i'm here, we have got to deal with it, but it will take a long time and just shutting down resources in this country that we could produce safely and economically, if we can, we don't know that until we have done the drilling, we will never know now because politicians have decided it is easier to, in an election period, simply say let's put it on hold and we will think about it in the future. ok, david, many thanks. you may never know, it may well be resurrected once the selection is done. thank you. it is nearly half past seven and lots of excitement ahead with the rugby here on brea kfast ahead with the rugby here on breakfast this morning. still to come this morning.
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the story of how the world's first western film was made in england — blackburn to be precise. i bet you didn't know this. this is a fa ct i bet you didn't know this. this is a fact of the day for me. amazing. stay with us. we'll have a summary of the news injust a moment.
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hello, this is breakfast, with nina warhurst and jon kay. our top story this morning is that england are preparing to take on south africa in a historic rugby world cup final injapan. the england squad are on their way to the stadium in yokohama. thousands of england fans have travelled to be there, with many millions more expected to tune in around the world. john will have the latest for us shortly, plus we will be live injapan throughout the morning. first, here is a summary of our other main news stories: the government has announced plans to suspend fracking in england, amid safety fears. a report from the oil and gas authority says it is impossible to predict the impact of earthquakes caused
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by the process. fracking has been suspended since august after a tremor near a site in lancashire. it has already been banned in scotland and wales. police have confirmed that all 39 people found dead in a refrigerated lorry in essex last month, were vietnamese nationals. the victims were initially thought to be chinese, but essex police say they are now liasing with the government in hanoi. a number of vietnamese families have previously come forward fearing their loved ones are among the dead, but police have not yet formally identified any of the victims. a new wildfire is burning out of control in california, the latest in a series of blazes ravaging the us state. officials say thousands of people have been evacuated since the fire broke out on thursday in ventura county, around 70 miles north of los angeles. 30,000 people are being asked how they would fight climate change. the project is being launched by several commons committees in efforts to achieve zero carbon emissions by the middle of the century.
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the special citizens' assembly will meet for the first time next year. that is a good idea, isn't it? a citizens assembly, there has been talk about that on brexit and all sorts of things, has in there? john is with us now. are you feeling nervous? just treating it as any other week, as eddiejones has treating it as any other week, as eddie jones has been treating it as any other week, as eddiejones has been telling everybody. how do you do that? it is just not every other game. you saw that on the faces of the england players, very focused. it is interesting because some of the players have been using the psychologist to prepare them mentally as well as physically for the game. that is quite a prominent thing now in the game. that inspirational team talk which 0wen farrell gave last night, wouldn't you love to have been a fly on the
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world to hear that, and he will have to deliver another one. 0ur correspondent andy swiss joins us from the stadium in yokohama. atmosphere building, the coach is on its way to the stadium. what a match is going to be, and we have spoken so much about getting to a world cup final. england will be desperate to get over the line and emulate what happened back in 2003. that's right, john. yes, just an hour and that's right, john. yes, just an hourand a that's right, john. yes, just an hour and a half now until the start of the world cup final and thousands upon thousands of fans are making their way into the stadium behind me. i have to say, a lot more england shirts than south african shirts from the fans we have seen going past. a few choruses of swing low sweet chariot. a glorious evening in yokohama, perfect conditions for running rugby, which will suit england down to the ground. they will start this game very much the favourites after their spectacular victory over new zealand in the semifinals. 0ne spectacular victory over new zealand in the semifinals. one of the finest winds of their recent years, and eddiejones, the winds of their recent years, and eddie jones, the head winds of their recent years, and eddiejones, the head coach, believes they can play even better
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tonight —— sweetest wins. that said, south africa are a very powerful unit, a huge pack of forwards. some very fast movers as well. watch out for one of the fastest and most spectacular wingers in world drug. he could be a danger man for south africa, but england very much the favourites, as you say, as they look to win the world cup for the first time since 2003. we will talk south africa in a moment, but we have to talk about eddie jones africa in a moment, but we have to talk about eddiejones on the way he shaped and guided this team. surely his experiences in australia in 2003 and when he was coaching south africa back into thousand seven, when they beat england in that final, that is all going to contribute, isn't it, to the side and the way he has shaped side today. that's right, yes. eddie jones, as you say, hugely experienced when it comes to world cup final ‘s. he was the losing coach for australia when england beat them back into thousand three,
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pa rt beat them back into thousand three, part of the springboks set up when they won back in 2007. he has been so they won back in 2007. he has been so instrumental to england's success here. remember, he took over after the last world cup back in 2015. you can probably hear a bit of swing low sweet chariot at the moment. but eddiejones took over over the last —— after the last world cup. england we re —— after the last world cup. england were at rock bottom at that point. it has not been an easy build—up. they have been waddles along the way, a lot of questions of his management, his tactics, but they have found their best form at the perfect time. certainly he has never produced a better performance in his england reign as the one they showed against new zealand last week, and if they can reproduce that sort of form here tonight, it is very difficult to see how anyone can beat them. what a performance it was, they will be hoping for more of the same. many thanks indeed. let's join our correspondent milton nkosi, who is with some south africa fans injohannesburg, where i imagine the atmosphere is building. milton, siya kolisi, the south africa captain, has said he has never known support
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for the team quite like it. yes, indeed. and one of the interesting stories about the captaincy is that his father has travelled for the very first time abroad to see him play in the world cup final. and this is his 50th time wearing the springbok jazzy cup final. and this is his 50th time wearing the springbokjazzy today —— jersey today as he takes on england in the final. i am here in northern johannesburg, with a lot of fans, as you can see, who are waiting to support the springboks. and i am joined by robert rennie. he is already on the beer. he thinks he has already won the world cup. i am not so sure. are you confident you are going to win? we have been celebrating since last night, so in my eyes the trophy is already in south africa. no doubt we will bring it home. such as the level of
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confidence. so be careful in england, because south africans are just as confident. milton, i am amazed he can even speak if he started his preparations last night. it is going to be a special moment, and a very special time for the country, let's not forget. they want it back into 1995 and into thousand and seven. if they can emulate those achievements, what a talking point that will be in the country. yes indeed. they are hoping that the 12 year cycle will come. you know, they are very superstitious here. they won it in 1995. 12 years later they wa nted won it in 1995. 12 years later they wanted in 2007, and now it is 12 yea rs wanted in 2007, and now it is 12 years since they won it in france. so they are hoping that the 12 year cycle will kick in. great stuff. i will let you enjoy some of those celebrations as well. i don't want you missing out on the party there.
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his guest seems to have dropped out of shot. i think he is horizontal. gone to pour himself a beer, i think. you kind of want to be in johannesburg, don't you? you can follow it live on bbc radio 5 live. kick—off at 9:00am. and even some premier league managers will be keeping an eye on the game today. manchester united up against bournemouth, leaders liverpool taking on aston villa and manchester city taking on southampton. and pep guardiola has got this message for england team. all the best, good luck. it's an honour for england, you know, to be in the cup final — for him, for his staff, for, of course, the players. so all the best. it's an incredible event for england, so all the best. great britain's rugby league side have lost the first of two tests against new zealand this morning. 12—8 they went down in auckland. it was only 2—2 at half—time, but the hosts took control after the break, jamayne isaako with the try here after a brilliant offload, before the kiwis powered over again.
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great britain replied through daryl clark, but it wasn't enough to avoid their second consecutive defeat of the tour. you can catch highlights on bbc one at 1:15pm. lewis hamilton looks set to win his sixth world title this weekend, finishing fastest in second practice ahead of tomorrow's american grand prix. he was 0.3 seconds faster than ferrari's charles leclerc. he only has to finish in eighth or better in sunday's race to secure the drivers championship. qualifying is later today. it is set to be a huge weekend for great britain's hockey teams and ireland women, as the final spots for the tokyo 0lympics are upforgrabs. there are two legs of qualifiers. ireland's women will take on canada. gb's men will face malaysia, while the women play chile. we have done the preparation we needed to do. i think the lads have been outstanding in the way they have gone about the last six weeks.
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we have worked really hard, good focus, a really great attitude. so a little bit of nerves, but also knowing that we have done the hard work. joe denly will play no further part in england's t20 series in new zealand. the batsman has been ruled out with an ankle injury picked up during practice on thursday. that forced him to miss the opening match of the five—match series so there we go. a few beers being consumed in johannesburg. i so there we go. a few beers being consumed injohannesburg. i dare say there are a few beers being consumed in pubs, which as we know have opened early to show the game. thousands have opened early. paint with your full english, am sure that is being consumed. we don't have an excuse to do it every day. world cup finals don't that often. don't we know it. kevin is having pizza for brea kfast know it. kevin is having pizza for breakfast and general whiskers says it isa breakfast and general whiskers says it is a perfect morning to get the groceries in early while the shops are empty. i probably wouldn't be going for that myself. i would be
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settling down and enjoying all of the build—up. consuming. settling down and enjoying all of the build-up. consuming. well done, general whiskers. it might be the perfect day to stay inside, notjust for the rugby, but for the weather. here is alina with a look at this morning's weather. certainly a day for some of us to stay indoors. some heavy rain in the forecast, strong winds as well. severe gales in places. in fact, when gus are already reaching 80 miles an hour across parts of south—west england, tied into an area of low pressure. we can see this on the satellite picture, this spiral of cloud and quite deep area of low pressure continues to track its way slowly eastwards across the uk through today. the strongest winds on its northern and southern flank, so it is the top and tail of the country, really. we've got yellow warnings from the met office for the strength of the wind from south—west england to east anglia.
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asi south—west england to east anglia. as i mentioned, for a time this morning those gust touching 70 to 80 mph across parts of south—west england and long parts of the hampshire coast towards the isle of wight. even inland, gus whiteley of 50-60 wight. even inland, gus whiteley of 50—60 mph. we are likely to see some travel disruption and damage to trees as well. and some heavy rains are trees as well. and some heavy rains a re co nte nt trees as well. and some heavy rains are content with across wales and south—west england. this will be slowly pushing its way eastwards across the midlands into east anglia and south—east england through the day. some intermittent brightness behind it. not too bad across northern ireland, the far north of england and southern scotland. a few showers, mainly dry, not as windy. across the far north scotland we have some rain and gusty winds, 50 having 60 mph. shetland perhaps escaping from all the rain in the strongest of the winds. it has been a mild start to the day but temperatures won't rise much from what we have got at the moment, so high is this afternoon of10— what we have got at the moment, so high is this afternoon of 10— 13 celsius. more areas of rain spiralling around the area of low pressure through the evening and overnight, starting to become more showery, and the winds slowly start to ease down. so while it does a windy across western and southern coast, we will lose those strongest that we have been seeing through the
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day. some clear skies in between the showers. temperatures falling to between 6— eight celsius, so a little bit cooler than that ijust gone. no pressure still with us tomorrow. we are seeing those really strong winds tomorrow, but a better day for many. still some showers around, especially across parts of wales, south—west england, northeast scotla nd wales, south—west england, northeast scotland and northern england, a few across northern ireland as well. a dry day across the midlands, central and eastern england. some spells of sunshine. breezy but not as windy, and in the best of the sunshine we should see temperatures getting up to 13 or 14 celsius stop where we have the showers more like ten or 11. this area of low pressure stays close by, really, in the days ahead. so we have still got some outbreaks of rain around on monday. they were clear. by the time we get to tuesday, a drier day for many of us, a few showers around, it will start to feel a little cooler again from tuesday onwards. back to you. oh dear. says it all. it does, doesn't it? stay in and watch the rugby.
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the western film is commonly thought of as an all—american creation, but did you know that the very first one was filmed right here in the uk? yes, blackburn in lancashire was the location, and later today the town will play host to a sceening of the film for the first time in more than 100 years. here is our entertainment correspondent colin paterson. kidnapping by indians in 1899 — the world's first western, according to the british film institute, and it was filmed in blackburn. in northgate, in the centre of blackburn on the site that they worked from, the year that they made the first western kidnapping by indians. mitchell and kenyon's documentaries captured everyday life, including in their hometown, but they also liked to experiment. in 1899, that changes. they stop filming the world around them and start telling stories and one of the first is the first western. jamie holman tracked down a surviving copy in the archives of london's cinema museum.
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today, it will be shown for the first time in a century at the british textile biennial in blackburn. a very simple story — a frontier family encounters native americans, who try to take the child, and they are saved by the plucky cowboy, so it has got feathers, smoking pistols — it is a cowboy film. it is often claimed that the great train robbery made in the us in 1903 was the first western. but kidnapping by indians was shot four years earlier, and there are good reasons why the wild west was known in the north—west. there is this connection between the cotton growing obviously in america and the east lancashire weavers. why wouldn't there be some kind of link that allowed them to know about that world and kind of be able to turn it into the world's first western ? if you asked anyone in the street where was the first western made, no—one with say blackburn. no, nobody would say blackburn. it is an example of creativity and culture that comes
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from the working classes that has been ignored and screened here in blackburn, so the people of blackburn get to see that and it is their culture. the western is once again home on the range and that home is blackburn. i never knew that. who would have thought. well done, blackbird. the biggest story at —— today is of course the rugby world cup final, loads of good luck messages are coming in from you this morning for england. this has not come in direct to bbc breakfast, mind you! the queen says the team's performance has inspired many throughout the country. that is a letter she has written to their head coach eddie jones and the duke of sussex is in japan and will deliver the message in person. the england football legend gary lineker remembers, he could have dropped it off himself! he only works next door. he remembers the last time he set an
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alarm to watch game of rugby with england in the final in 2003. the tea m england in the final in 2003. the team beat australia to win their first world cup trophy. can they make it a second? he will know what pressure is like. one man who played for england in the famous victory, millbank, urges the current squad to make all of the sacrifices worthwhile. —— neil back. and scottish rugby in a rare show of support, say they will support their home nation rival but they worn normal service will be resumed at murrayfield. we enjoyed the friendly rivalry between the home nations. it is coming up to ten minutes to eight o'clock. now it's time for newswatch. this week, shaun ley examines how bbc news plans to cover the election campaign. hello and welcome to newswatch with me, shaun ley, standing inforsamira. coming up on this week's programme: as borisjohnson gets the election
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he has been seeking, what challenge does bbc news face in covering the campaign ahead? and why did the bbc feel the need to break the embargo on the grenfell enquiry report and reveal what it had learned from a leak? now, they've been under starter‘s orders for so long now, when the election starting gun was fired, the campaign began almost immediately. a general election — the third in four years — may not be popular with everyone, but for political junkies — me included — the next six weeks promise a rich diet of speeches, sound bites and stunts. here's laura kuenssberg, looking forward to the fun on wednesday's news at ten. the warm—up. pa rliament‘s cameras capturing the last moments of this particular generation. jeremy corbyn: the whole world knows that. why can't he get it? the commons has examined every angle of brexit and failed to come to a conclusion. so that conclusion will now be for all of us to decide
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what we make of them. well, with me now, a man who can expect to be almost as busy as the candidates, ric bailey, the bbc‘s chief political advisor. ric, thank you very much for coming into the newswatch studio. you have been with us before but, of course, elections is really the time when you come into your own and the guidelines come into their own — the bbc‘s fabled election guidelines. how much are they about preventing broadcasters from making mistakes? the guidelines are specific to each election and i thought about in the context of each election and, of course, they... you don'tjust take them off the shelf and dust them down every four years? 0r two years at the moment. exactly. we think about each election, and we think about the context of that election and, of course, at the heart of them is often the different levels of coverage you are going to give to different parties. and at the heart of that is electoral support, so we look at past and current electoral support. it's also within the framework of 0fcom. 0fcom publishes a digest which sets all of that out. but in the end, that's a framework for editors of each programme
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to make good judgements about what is fair, what is impartial, what's important for the audience, what's important in terms of scrutinising the politicians and the guidelines offer a framework for that. now, you mentioned past electoral performance. that's a difficult concept for a lot of people to judge what is fair by. and obviously, an example in this election, we have a new political party that only came into existence earlier this year, the brexit party, yet associated with a party leader who is very well—known and has been known for many years. how do you judge what's fair in terms of both the brexit party and nigel farage? of course, when you're in a general election, you will look back at what happened at the last general election. but you'll also look at other elections and, of course, we just had a uk—wide election in very peculiar circumstances. and, as you say, there's a brand new party. so that's the sort of thing where it's a new context, you've got to take it into account. how can you be fair to the supporters, let's say, of the brexit party without being
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unfair to the supporters of ukip? because they might say "well, hang on. quite a lot of the calculation you'll make about coverage for the brexit party is actually based on the performance of ukip from local elections, previous parliamentary elections." is it fair that effectively — because the same person and profile has gone to this new party — that they should take some of that value with them? as i say, electoral support is measured in many different ways, you know. votes is clearly one. seats is another. but, of course, when people move from one party to another, it's something you will take into account. and the brexit party — and, indeed, you know, a number of independents who have moved party or moved to become independents, shifted parties, all of those things are exactly what is the specific context of this election. and in terms of the independents you mentioned, let's take an example, a high—profile example. dominic grieve was elected as a conservative mp at the last election in beaconsfield, is standing out as an independent conservative, he says he hopes to style himself as. how will the coverage he gets be different from, say, another independent who happens to stand in that constituency or another constituency, and should it be any different, because you could argue that much of his support, however popular he may be as an individual, will be because of the party label
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he was wearing last time. well, i don't want to get into individuals or constituencies because that in itself is something — during an election campaign, when you're talking about constituencies, you have to do it in a fair way and think about all the other candidates. so clearly somebody who has already been elected, even if they change party, they have evidence of electoral support, and that is part of... is it their support or the party's support? that's the difficult calculation. it can be both. i don't think it needs to be an either/or. i think it will depend on the circumstances. tom watson, the deputy leader of the labour party, has already written to the director—general of the bbc, even as the campaign has barely begun, urging broadcasters to call out what he calls "fake news" — or, as he calls it, "the prime minister's fake news". obviously, it's a partisan point. is this kind of standard for you before elections? you get these kind of pre—emptive strikes by the parties? i mean, as far as fake news goes, of course it's something that's very important at the bbc,
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and the director—general has made very clear that we are taking on and we have got various things we are trying to do to combat that. but in the end, it is the bbc‘s job to look at evidence, it's to look at things and call them out if they are wrong. but it's not to get into the sort of name—calling business of politics itself. let me pick you up on that point about calling things out when they are wrong, and think back to the european referendum. there was a number of things that came up then. one example was the prospect of turkeyjoining the european union. penny mordaunt did an interview with the andrew — andrew marr, in which andrew marr challenged on whether they mayjoin, and he said "i thought each country has a veto on accession". and she said "no," and then went on to talk about why she believed the european union would admit turkey. now, that was factually inaccurate. you know, the bbc‘s subsequent news coverage didn't really challenge it. and subsequently, people like norman smith, the assistant political editor, have said "well, actually, i think on reflection, we should have challenged it and called it out". has the bbc learned from that example and other examples from the referendum campaigns?
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i think one of the things that you'll have noticed, that people hopefully will have noticed, is the increasing pre—eminence of a reality check. i think it is something whereby, when people say things in interviews or when people report things or talk about them in press conferences, we now have a particular way of saying "actually, let's check that. let's set it before." now, you may not always be able to do that instantly. you know, it will be great if everybody knew — if you as a presenter knew everything all the time, but actually, sometimes that will take a bit of time and a bit of effort and a bit of digging. but i think it is important that we, given that fake news and given that whether politicians are trusted or not is such an important element of elections, i think it is important that people know they can go somewhere in the bbc where we will have looked at the evidence and we're in a position to be able to call something out of it's not true or point out if it's misleading or, indeed, sometimes say "actually, yes, that was the case". are you looking forward to it? it's very busy time and it's,
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um — put it this way. we'll be looking forward to christmas as well. ric bailey, chief political advisor. thanks very much. what would you like to see from the bbc‘s election coverage over the course of the campaign? here are some of the hopes and fears which you've have been expressing so far. a twitter user sarah asks for: james roriston would like: and chris rhodes wants: well, we'd like to know more of your wishes for the bbc‘s election reporting and, in particular, we are looking for viewers interested injoining in a discussion on the programme soon. if that appeals to you, please get in touch. stay tuned for our contact details a little later.
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now, it was in the week following the last general election in june 2017 that the grenfell tower in west london was destroyed by fire. 72 people died in one of the worst disasters of modern times. and this week, the first phase of the enquiry into what went wrong was concluded. here's special correspondent is lucy manning with a powerful report shown on wednesday's news at ten. el—alami hamdan lost his daughter, her husband and their two children. lena, six months old, died in her mother's arms. why? this is our family! unintelligible. i worked for family! for family! apart from those understandably emotional scenes, the report — and much of the bbc‘s coverage — featured footage of the burning tower. although there was a warning that some might find the images used upsetting, delivered by the presenter in the studio before lucy's report began,
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several viewers still felt the use of the fire pictures was unwarranted. here'sj goddard. well, although the enquiry‘s report was published on wednesday, the bbc, along with the daily telegraph, had cited some of its findings a day earlier, as reeta chakrabarti made clear on tuesday's news at six. fewer people would have died in the grenfell tower fire, had the london fire brigade acted differently — that's according to a report into the 2017 tragedy in which 72 people died. the documents, sections of which have been seen by the bbc, is due to be published officially tomorrow. so, was it right for the bbc to report on what it had seen
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of the report, even though it had been embargoed until the following day? andy ramsbottom thought: a twitter user called ruhi agreed, asking: others were concerned about the motives of those responsible for the leak, withjonathan edwards wondering: well, we did ask bbc news if we could interview someone on this subject, but nobody was available. instead, bbc news gave us this statement:
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thanks for all of your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions on bbc news and current affairs or even appear here on newswatch, do get in touch. and do have a look at our web page. that's all from us. we'll be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. until then, from all of us on the programme, goodbye.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and jon kay. 0ur headlines today. a chance to make sporting history as england prepare to take on south africa in the rugby world cup final. it'll be the full english as thousands of venues open early for fans desperate to cheer the team to victory.
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iamat i am at harpenden rugby club as the atmosphere hots up and people get ready to cheer england hopefully to victory. eddiejones said it is a day he has been planning for since he took over and is ready for the south africa challenge. fracking is to end in england after the government orders a halt because of fears of earthquakes. good morning. we've got a deep area of low pressure working its way across the uk today. that's going to bring some very strong winds, with gusts potentially up to 80 mph for parts of southern england. some heavy rain in the forecast as well. i'll have all the details in the next half an hour. it's saturday, the 2nd of november. our top story. the wait is almost over. injust an hour's time, england will take on south africa in an historic rugby world cup final injapan. thousands of england fans have made thejourney
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to the stadium in yokohama, with millions more expected to watch and listen to the game here. this was the scene in yokohama within the last hour or so as fans began to arrive. this is how some of them were feeling. the south africans lost to the all blacks in the all —— my all blacks lost to us, so we win. the springboks have never lost against england in the final, nor have they lost the final, so i think we will ta ke lost the final, so i think we will take it. we are going to win. i am not sure by how many. it is going to bea not sure by how many. it is going to be a brutal game but we will win. there is a sense of unity and national participation in this that is similarto national participation in this that is similar to 1995. it is a
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powerful, emotive force to join. is similar to 1995. it is a powerful, emotive force to joinm has been a long 16 years. a final in between. it will be fantastic for the nation. everything going on with brexit, we need a lift. he says with a bottle of beer in his hand! they we re a bottle of beer in his hand! they were at the stadium in yokohama. let's see what's happening at one of the official fan zones in tokyo. wyre davies is there. wyre, it looks like the excitement is building. good morning. indeed, good morning. england fans are excited but the england fans are excited but the england players eyes saw as they boarded the team bus were cool calm and collected. they have a massive job on today, they know. they are favourites to win and it is down to the 80 minutes and as they boarded the 80 minutes and as they boarded the bus with eddiejones, they were very thoughtful. this is the stadium
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in tokyo and it is sold out with japanese fans watching the game on a large screen tv. andy, you have lived in japan 15 years. large screen tv. andy, you have lived injapan 15 years. wearing your england jersey. what has it been like in the build—up? fantastic, the whole thing. japan has done really well. there have been great matches and everyone is having fun. have the japanese themselves, obviously they did well, got to the quarterfinals, do you think the tournament has been a success despite them being knocked out? i think so. this is my son. i am on tv! it has been a great success am on tv! it has been a great success forjapan. am on tv! it has been a great success for japan. if am on tv! it has been a great success forjapan. if they keep on winning and get a professional league in place i thinkjapan can go on and regularly challenge the best in the world. you are a england fan, can they win today? of course. but
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the springboks are strong. 70, 70 5% england, i think. the springboks are strong. 70, 70 5% england, ithink. what the springboks are strong. 70, 70 5% england, i think. what is your son called? leo. andy and leo are supporting england today. it is in our until kick—off and the excitement in tokyo is off the scale. i think england could do with leo, he was pretty swift. sign him up leo, he was pretty swift. sign him up right now. it tells you something when a stadium sells out to watch on a big screen. you've been letting us know how you're preparing for the rugby world cup final this morning. jane and her son dawson have their red rose head pieces on. dawson is named afterformer england world cup winner matt dawson. jess is excited for kick off and can't wait to bark the boys in white on. and could this be england's youngest rugby fan?
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bless him. baby harry from wigan was born on sunday and his parents hope he is a future england prop. not even one—week—old and they have his sporting future laid out. please send them in we are loving seeing what you are doing this morning. and we are so what you are doing this morning. and we are so close what you are doing this morning. and we are so close now. more to come throughout the morning. another big news story. the government has announced plans to suspend fracking in england amid safety fears. a report from the oil and gas authority says it's impossible to predict the impact of earthquakes caused by the process. here's our business correspondent katie prescott. fracking is the extraction of gas from rocks using high—pressure water and chemicals. its supporters say it is a free—flowing and home—grown source of energy that would cut our gas imports and our carbon emissions. but it has proved to be highly controversial. they had to stop it
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following an earthquake in lancashire in august, and now the oil and gas authority says it is not safe and companies must halt their activity, but with one important caveat — unless and until further evidence is provided that it can be carried out safely. there's no doubt that extracting more natural gas in the united kingdom would be very attractive. but we've always been clear, we can only do that if it can be done safely, and on the advice from the oil and gas authority, we're no longer convinced that that's the case. but we will follow the science. so, in future, should the ability to be certain about seismic events, and so on, we will look at it again. fracking's industry body says... environmental campaigners are relieved by the news,
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but this isn't the first time that fracking has been suspended. it was stopped after earthquakes in 2011, and the door is still ajar for activity to begin again in the future. police have confirmed that all 39 people found dead in a refrigerated lorry in essex last month, were vietnamese nationals. the victims were initially thought to be chinese, but essex police say they're now liaising with the government in hanoi. a number of vietnamese families have previously come forward, fearing their loved ones are among the dead, but police have not yet formally identified any of the victims. a new wildfire is burning out of control in california — the latest in a series of blazes ravaging the us state. officials say thousands of people have been evacuated since the fire broke out on thursday in ventura county, around 70 miles north of los angeles.
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it is saturday morning, thank you for joining it is saturday morning, thank you forjoining us. and our top story, the english nation is getting ready for that big rugby game. one of the stars of england's world cup team has been harlequins prop kyle sinckler. he credits much of his success to a teacher who helped him set up a school team and realise his ambition. and that teacher, anastasia long, joins us now. very good morning to you. it is an unusual story. when you began coaching him, it is fair to say you did not know much about rugby union. how did it happen? he approach me with his friends from school and askedif with his friends from school and asked if they could have a school by asked if they could have a school rugby team. they played outside school for a local club and they wa nted school for a local club and they wanted a school team and they asked ifi wanted a school team and they asked if i would help them set up a team andi if i would help them set up a team and i said i would be able to drive the minibus and fill up water
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bottles a nd the minibus and fill up water bottles and organise fixtures but that was the limit of my knowledge. we know how it has gone, but it progressed at the school? to stop we did not have enough players to get a tea m did not have enough players to get a team from one age group say we combined ages but kyle was instrumental in encouraging other stu d e nts to instrumental in encouraging other students to get involved to try to tra nsfer students to get involved to try to transfer from other sports. football was a big sport in the school so many boys were athletic and quite quick. i would sit in assembly and survey who might be suitable and we cobble together a team. we were a bit rough around the edges but we started that way. it says something about his character he wanted this to happen and he made it happen. he was determined as a youngster. he was determined as a youngster. he was passionate about rugby and i could tell he was determined to achieve his goals and he knew where he wanted to go. he was also keen to help others get involved in rugby
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and try a sport they had not tried before which can be daunting as a youngster if you have not played a contact sport before. he was instrumental in that. when you see him play on the international stage, what is it like as his coach, mentor, friend and teacher?m what is it like as his coach, mentor, friend and teacher? it is quite surreal. i remember the kyle who sat in the minibus and help me understand the game and he would help me pick the team. to see him on the television. i watched him play for the lions. is it true he still sends you a text before matches and still calls you miss. yes. and i text after the game to say well done and say how proud i am. you could give him a ring now! there is something about him. rugby is perceived as a posh sport. he is
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one of the new generation breaking that stereotype. that is important. it is particularly important for youngsters coming into the sport. i think it is important everyone involved in the game sees the potential pathway for them in the sport. maybe previously, just because by default the majority who made it in the sport came from independent schools, schools that played rugby, because they had more opportunity to play and train and that kind of thing. i think that is why they probably made it but now the demographic is changing. if you look at premiership academies and cou nty setu ps look at premiership academies and county setups and most clubs, the demographic is different. at my by demographic is different. at my rugby club, we are massively inclusive and have programmes where if children cannot afford to pay they can stilljoin the club and still play. that means the diversity
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within the rugby club is different from may be what it used to look like and we actively go out and encourage state school kids to get involved and england rugby have a programme that is working in 750 state schools to encourage them to get involved and the more clubs can do to encourage boys and girls from different backgrounds is key. and the talent is there in droves. particularly in inner london. the kids who have come through since kyle, so many have followed in his footsteps. 0bviously kyle, so many have followed in his footsteps. obviously not to this extent but i am sure there will be others who will follow him and get two internationals. thank you. i feel quite bad. how would you watch the game after coming on?” feel quite bad. how would you watch the game after coming on? i hope you quys the game after coming on? i hope you guys will have it on! we will let you. your heart will be in your mouth? yes. we look forward to the text afterwards. and you should take some credit. you
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got the ball rolling for him. he was helped by my support and guidance. prediction? definitely england. england by 12, at least. that is the most ambitious we have had. thanks very much indeed. here's alina with a look at this morning's weather. less excitement around the weather. look at what is behind me. forgive the quality of the picture but it was taken in devon an hour ago and it gives you the idea of the strength of the wind, whipping up the waves. very poor visibility, as well. and the gusts causing concern with yellow warnings for the strength of wind. up to 60 mph. across southern parts of england and into south wales, driven by low pressure. you can see into south wales, driven by low pressure. you can see the cloud on the earlier satellite. slowly
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tracking east through the day and the strongest winds on the northern and southern flank but it is southern england and south wales where we have the warnings. up to 80 mph fora time where we have the warnings. up to 80 mph for a time across south—west england and potentially along the coast to hampshire. we could see 50 mph in southern parts of lincolnshire through the day. windy conditions and wet conditions. initially across wales in south—west england, across the midlands, eastern and south east england during the day. into northern ireland and southern scotland, some sunny spells and then strong winds in scotland in the north and heavy rain, up to 80 millimetres over higher ground of eastern parts of aberdeenshire and into caithness. shetland perhaps escaping with a
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largely dry day. temperatures 10—13. this evening and overnight the strong gusts ease. rain spiralling around the low pressure becoming more shower read. between, drier slots. clearer skies and temperatures could fall down to 4—5. where we have the showers 6—8 celsius. low pressure with us tomorrow but not as intense. the wind will not be as strong. but still windy in south—west england and showers here extending into parts of wales, northern ireland and also across eastern scotland and northern england tomorrow morning. slowly moving away and a dry day in the midlands, central and south—east england. east anglia, spells of sunshine. 10—14 the high. low pressure close by in the week ahead so pressure close by in the week ahead so still unsettled. dry on tuesday
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but feeling cooler for all as we go through the week. back to you. holding out for tuesday. it is not yourfault, we do not blame holding out for tuesday. it is not your fault, we do not blame the messenger. swing low pressure. i like it, well done. you have been waiting to drop that in all morning. waiting four years for that! there's been a rise of up to 15% in the number of women being diagnosed with hiv in some areas of the uk — that's despite rates falling overall by 6% nationally. analysis of official figures by breakfast reveals half of women with the virus are diagnosed late, after their health has already suffered. jayne mccubbin reports. when people first hear that i'm hiv—positive, they kind ofjump. they step back. adrienne is 70.
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she was diagnosed hiv positive when she was 52. i think it is shock. i think it's — people are still terrified of it. ijust need to get a cloth. almost 20 years after adrienne's diagnosis, rates of hiv amongst women are rising in many areas, bucking a national decline. half of women today, like adrienne back then, miss early diagnosis because they aren't seen as at—risk. my partner had died two years previously, but it had been a monogamous relationship. but not on his side. and you had no idea. i had no idea. i didn't find out until after he died. i'll never forget being told. how can that even be, you know? ijust had no idea. and then i had to go back and tell my mum. she was 80. it was a horrible thing to say for the first time — "mum, i'm hiv—positive,"
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and she — sorry, i'm just thinking about my mum. she said "it's all right, love. we can cope with this. at least it's not cancer." so, yeah. she sounds great. she was. the tape measure isjust like measuring time... but the acceptance adrienne's mum showed hasn't been the overwhelming response. and, two decades later, she still faces discrimination. i've been refused treatments — once for a facial and the latest was for toenail clipping. they wouldn't touch me. i was a leper again. it was like — it was like having my hiv diagnosis all over again. we did a pantomime, where all of the characters were the old hiv drugs. yet, modern medicine today means adrienne's hiv is undetectable. undetectable means untra nsmittable. and that means the levels of hiv in her blood are so low, she can't pass it on.
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the first day that i heard that word myself — and i went in to my doctor and he said "you're undetectable," and i went "oh, that's such a lovely word!" you know, and i went around all day, singing "undetectable, that's what you are!" itjust meant so much to me. what is the message you are so keen to get out? to women, to go and have a test if you've got any doubts at all. because if you find out early, it will — it will save your life. it saved my life. we're joined now by dr yvonne gilleece, a consultant in hiv and sexual health. really interesting because a lot of headlines we have heard have been positive. fewer people are contracting hiv and to know it is women in particular, the statistics are rising, what is behind that? the
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report has shown that diagnoses of hiv are falling but not as quickly in women as men and the public health england report, it has shown in sexual health clinics where there are missed opportunities to test, 71% of missed opportunities are in women so women are not 71% of missed opportunities are in women so women are not being tested for hiv and not perceived to be at risk of hiv. is that coming from clinicians or the women not engaging with the opportunity? it is the combination. the narrative in the uk is hiv is a predominantly male infection but the reality is of the 100,000 in the uk living with hiv, one third, 30,000 women, 30,000 are women. i think this narrative it is only seen in men is wrong. women are at risk and missed opportunities are at risk and missed opportunities are a problem because they result in
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late diagnoses and half the women diagnosed with hiv are being diagnosed with hiv are being diagnosed late. the sooner it is diagnosed, the sooner you can treat and begin to prevent, or make it not detectable. early diagnosis is the key. late diagnosis is associated with a ten fold higher risk of dying within the first 12 months of diagnosis compared to someone diagnosed early and in my experience asa diagnosed early and in my experience as a doctor in brighton, i have seen u nfortu nately a as a doctor in brighton, i have seen unfortunately a number of women, professional women who became unwell, sought health care, were not tested until the point where they had disabilities that included paralysis and in one case brain damage. these women are living with life changing disabilities now. had they been diagnosed earlier, they could be living normal and healthy lives. with the treatment we have
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available. there are problems with certain demographics. we see among women living with hiv that two thirds are black african women, but we have 20% of the women who are white uk women. we see a spread of the demographics. some women will arrive in the uk with hiv but a large number will live in the uk a long time and we do not know where exactly the transmission occurs. we need to diagnose women so they do not have life changing problems and early death as a result and we need to test them because they are at risk. we remember those public health warnings with the tombstone that were controversial at the time. some people said they were counter—productive at the time, but is it time for a more sensitively done public education campaign that makes people of all groups aware of the dangers? absolutely. that was of
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its time because we had a new disease and we did not know how it was spread and how to stop it and people were dying early and young. 30 years later it is an illness with a normal life expectancy on treatment and being on treatment and not detectable means you cannot pass it on, so the stigma needs to change because now stigma is what is killing people rather than hiv itself. thank you very much. good advice. let's take a look at the front pages. the guardian reports that fracking is "banned in the uk with immediate effect" and describes it as a "watershed moment" for environmentalists. the paper also carries a striking photo of a gold coffin, which is part of a new tutankhamun
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exhibition in london. strictlyjudge shirley ballas tells the sun that she feels a responsibility to warn young girls away from breast implants, as she recovers from having hers removed. she's still expected to take part in tonight's live show. the daily mail's headline reads ‘we don't need you, nigel‘. it says that the conservatives have "gone to war" with the brexit party leader nigel farage after he threatened to ruin boris johnson's election campaign by fielding candidates in every seat against the tories. and the mirror sport's website has spoken with former england rugby world cup winner paul grayson, who lays out how eddiejones' men can beat south africa this morning. they can and they will we say. businesswoman and media
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commentator anne—marie imafidon this is a great story. urging other women who faced abuse for being mps to come forward. 58 mps so far. a disproportionate amount are women which we have seen this week and i am sure there will be more coming through, running up to the election. it isa through, running up to the election. it is a sad state of affairs. we celebrated 100 years of the vote, progress, and at the same time moving backwards in this representation we have of women mps but what gloria is talking about, she has done nine years. she said she has done nine years. she said she would do ten. she has worked on things like the domestic violence bill from opposition. it is a call to arms to other women to step up but a frank telling of she does have a panic button in her house. we are seeing bad things happening. and the
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threats are becoming more sinister and feeling more real. but the opportunity to change things is so great. the shame of it. i spoke with another female mp who had a death threat and she said she is seeing the young talent turn away from politics at a time we need it most. it is not a nice place to be. it is not. and it is a shame we do not have that but we need it. having those voices saying i am stepping down, handing on to someone else, almost having someone who has been there, done that, might make it easierfor them to go there, done that, might make it easier for them to go through it and have the mentoring and the perspective to say this is something we can fight with law, legislation, with women in parliament saying these are then changes we need to bring. there is a contradiction. young people seem to be more politically engaged. politics courses at colleges are oversubscribed. and yet people do
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not want to be politicians, they wa nt to not want to be politicians, they want to influence in different ways. politics, it is notjust being a politician. the nice thing is people are more engaged and doing other things to lean on politicians to change things but you cannot throw away the baby with the bath water. we need politicians. the nhs will be talked about during the election campaign. an interesting piece here in the mirror. talking about car park charges at hospitals which has been controversial. we are at 2496, been controversial. we are at 24%, nhs staff themselves are paying for parking at work. the number of blue badge drivers are having to pay for parking and the reason i picked up on this, it costs money to run a car park so there is an element of
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someone somewhere park so there is an element of someone somewhere having to pay, which we have to think about. we have the strap line, 15% of revenue goes to the nhs, and that might be an overestimation. if you are making that much profit, and it is the nhs, people who need hospitals. u nfortu nately, people who need hospitals. unfortunately, more of that revenue should probably go back into the nhs. when you pay a lot to park you think it is pumped back into the hospital. and it is not and even that 15% is not a given. a lot may be we will hopefully see in the election. the tories said they would do something and it was tabled. let's see how it can change. what do we say about staff having to pay? paying so much to park at work. nurses. not being paid well enough and then an extra cost to go to work. the department of health is quoted in this piece saying it is up
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to individual trusts to set charges but clearly it is one of those things, car park spaces, it is not the sexiest subject, but it is the kind of thing that people are affected by, it is real life. mechanically it is not the trust setting. if you outsource to a company they set it and agree how much they will give you as a trust. this is in the mirror today. is that right? this is the kindness of the secret millionaire. and this is audrey, from cottingham, a village. she lived there through her life and sadly died last year. there were ten people at her funeral. it turns out she was a millionaire, leaving 1.3 million to the village to various trusts around the village. everybody remembered her as a nice person but no one knew she was a millionaire
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who would go to the pub for a roast dinner every two weeks, treat herself in the hairdresser. she had no children. her partner had died 11 yea rs no children. her partner had died 11 years ago. she has left it to the village, which i think is really nice. imagine being on the village council. 1.3 million, what do we spend it on? the christmas lights will be spectacular. i used to live in cottingham. do you reckon a former resident can apply? ! your new famous resident. there is something lovely about that generation. they were modest about things like that. not ostentation. thank you very much. stay with us for the headlines and a bit more by for the headlines and a bit more rugby coming right up.
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hello this is breakfast with nina warhurst and jon kay. our top story this morning is that england are taking on south africa in a historic rugby world cup final injapan starting in half an hour. the england squad have headed to the stadium in yokohama. thousands of england fans have travelled to be there too, with many millions more expected to tune in around the world. john will have the latest for us shortly, plus we'll be live injapan throughout the morning. first here's a summary of our other main news stories. the government has announced plans to suspend fracking in england, amid safety fears. a report from the oil and gas authority says it's impossible to predict the impact of earthquakes caused by the process. fracking has been suspended since august, after a tremor near a site in lancashire.
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it's already been banned in scotland and wales. police have confirmed that all 39 people found dead in a refrigerated lorry in essex last week, were vietnamese nationals. the victims were initially thought to be chinese, but essex police say they're now liasing with the government in hanoi. a number of vietnamese families have previously come forward, fearing their loved ones were among the dead, but police have not yet formally identified any of the victims. a new wildfire is burning out of control in california the latest in a series of blazes ravaging the us state. officials say thousands of people have been evacuated since the fire broke out on thursday in ventura county, around 70 miles north of los angeles. 30 thousand people are being asked how they would fight climate change. the project is being launched by several commons committees in efforts to achieve zero carbon emissions by the middle of the century.
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the special citizens' assembly will meet for the first time next year. it's a clever idea, isn't it? talking about weather, we will get an update in a few minutes' time. a perfect morning to stop in and watch the rugby. potentially, a historic morning for rugby and for english sport. great news for england going into this for the biggest match of their lives is that they are at full strength and it is sunny. we have good conditions and that is all that we wa nt good conditions and that is all that we want but they are at good strength. some players had injuries coming into it but they have shaken
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them off. as far as england are concerned, they are going into this looking really good. earlier, our sports correspondent andy swiss spoke to us from outside the stadium at yokohama. we have had a few choruses of swing low, sweet chariot. a glorious morning here and perfect conditions for rugby which will suit england down to the ground. they will start this game very much the favourites after their spectacular victory against new zealand, one of the finest wins of their recent yea rs. the finest wins of their recent years. eddiejones believes they can play even better tonight. that said, south africa are a very physical and powerful unit. some very fast wingers. they have one of the
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fastest, most spectacular wingers in by fastest, most spectacular wingers in rugby and he could be a danger man for south africa but england look to win for the first time since 2003. we have to talk about eddiejones and the way he has guided this team. when south africa beat england in the final before,... eddie jones is usually experienced when it comes to world cup finals. part of the springboks set up when they won in 2007. he has been so instrumental to encompass success here. remember, he took over after the last world cup backin took over after the last world cup back in 2015 for the top you can here a bit of swing low, sweet
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chariot at the moment. eddiejones took over after the last world cup and england were at rock bottom. there have been a lot of questions of his management and tactics but they have found their best form at they have found their best form at the perfect time. certainly, he has never produced a better performance in his england reign as the one they showed against new zealand last week. if they can reproduce that tonight then it will be very difficult to see how anyone can beat them. a bit of cheering there for some of the fans. let's see what's happening at one of the official fan zones in tokyo. wyre davies is there. iimaginea i imagine a similar mood and it will start to fill up with the fans as the game kicks off at nine m. start to fill up with the fans as the game kicks off at nine mm start to fill up with the fans as the game kicks off at nine m. it is com pletely the game kicks off at nine m. it is completely sold out for tonight's game which begins in half and our.
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the japanese public have really taken to this world cup. their own tea m taken to this world cup. their own team did really well going to the quarterfinals. the crowd here are anticipating the final. divided loyalties between england and south africa. the all blacks were knocked out last week so hopefully that some of that japanese support will tra nsfer to of that japanese support will transfer to england today. this has been a hugely successful world cup, disrupted by a world —— typhoon. england are overwhelming favourites here in the streets of tokyo but i saw the england team about half an hour ago and they were steely, determined, they know that it is the
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next 80 minutes which really counts to whether they can lift a trophy that they did in 2003. so far, it has been a great world cup. you can follow it live on bbc radio 5live. kick—off at 9. all eyes may well be on the rugby but dan's here to take us through today's football. morning, dan. football focus is on after the rugby so football focus is on after the rugby so you football focus is on after the rugby so you can football focus is on after the rugby so you can tune in after that. we have a pack to show to date because it isa have a pack to show to date because it is a big weekend in premier league as well. chelsea have six games unbeaten. they take on watford a little bit later on today. one of
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chelsea's babies has really come through and that young crop of players have come through through frank lampard. they take on leicester who. .. frank lampard. they take on leicester who... it could be an interesting one today. he has spoken about his really humble upbringing which has made a real difference into how he sees his charity work.” know what it feels like to have nothing. i remember days when i used to go to training and i didn't have boots, stuff like that. i managed to get to where i have got to and if i have the opportunity to help other people i am always going to do it. he gives 10% of his earnings to charities, some in the ivory coast
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as well. union berlin, are the first side from east berlin and the fans there have an incredible connection to the club. in 2008, the stadium was crumbling. two and a half thousand fans turned up and with many work together they rebuilt the stadium. in germany, you get money for giving blood so fans gave blood to get money to give to the club. you talk about connection. it is a lovely piece looking at the history of that club and why the fans are so integrated into the structure of it as well. we also have peterborough against northampton. at wolves we have a couple of players asking each other questions. there was —— also
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speaking to some arsenal fans. we are on at midday. great britain's rugby league side have lost the first of two tests against new zealand this morning. 12—8 they went down in auckland, it was only 2—all at half time but the hosts took control after the break. jamayne isaako with the try here after a brilliant offload, before the kiwis powered over again. great britain replied through daryl clark but it wasn't enough to avoid their second consecutive defeat of the tour. you can catch highlights on bbc1 at 1.15. lewis hamilton looks set to win his sixth world title this weekend, finishing fastest in second practice ahead of tomorrow's american grand prix. he was three tenths of a second faster than ferrari's charles leclerc. he only has to finish in eighth or better in sunday's race to secure the drivers championship.
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qualifying is later today. not long to go, just 15 minutes. you can be the best rugby player of your generation and you may not get the chance to play in a rugby world cup final. for the fans, it is a once—in—a—lifetime experience. people have been spending thousands for a ticket. i spoke to someone today who has been to all of the matches. not like those people for east berlin who have literally been bleeding for their club. thank you, we will see you again a bit later. from december, all couples in england and wales will have the choice to form a civil partnership, rather than get
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married. it's only been been available to same sex partners until now but it means couples will have the same financial rights paul lewis from radio 4's money box is in our london studio this morning. paul, what are the financial benefits? there are huge financial benefits to being married or in a civil partnership and what this does is open up those benefits to couples who, for whatever reason, don't want to get married. there is a lot of historical baggage, patriarchy and religion that is associated with marriage. now they will be able to have all the same rights by being a civil partner. what sort of rights are we talking about? all of rights that affects couples. if one partner
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dies, you can leave inheritance to the other which doesn't happen if you are just living together. similarly, on divorce will stop looking at all the bad things first. 0n divorce, you will have the right, as married couples do, to have half the property each. that is a starting point but that is a big advantage over simply living together because you —— if you are living in your partner's house and you separate then you have no rights. similar things about children and maintenance as well. also, with a company pension you will find it a lot easier in a civil partnership to make sure that if your partner dies then you will get a share of their pension rise if you arejust a share of their pension rise if you are just living together those
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things do not happen. people think that if you live together for a long time then you acquire rights. people talk about it as if it is a de facto marriage but you have to have a legal process and opening up civil partnerships to all couples is a big step. you talk about what happens when relationships come to an end, what about in day—to—day life if everything is going well. are there any financial benefits for just normal, happy life. ? joint mortgages, joint bank accounts, are perhaps a bit easier. if one of you pays tax and the other one doesn't then you can get a marriage allowa nce then you can get a marriage allowance which is the equivalent of
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about £250 a year. one is paying basic rate tax and the other isn't, may be to with children or losing theirjob then you can get this tax allowa nce theirjob then you can get this tax allowance so that is a positive advantage. you can also make decisions for each other and the right to be consulted about decisions. it is a great advantage to have this legal framework and if you don't want marriage and all that goes with it then you can have a civil partnership, get all those rights in exactly the same way. thank you. it will be interesting to see thank you. it will be interesting to see what the social implications will be of this as well. it starts in december and the first civil partnerships ceremonies will be on the 31st of december.
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he had a cracking tie this morning. here's alina with a look at this morning's weather. a bleak but very artistic picture behind you. yes, we have already seen behind you. yes, we have already seen gusts reaching 80 mph this morning. we have a number of met 0ffice warnings in place, notjust for the strength of the winds but for the strength of the winds but for heavy rain as well. all details are on our website. we could see some damage to trees and disruption to transport. you can see how this pressure is spiralling to net spiralling around. this will be going eastwards throughout the day. let's look at the southern half of the uk first. here we have met 0ffice winged warnings. those gusts
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are touching 70 to 80 mph across south east of england —— mckay southwest. perhaps 50 to 60 further along as well. quieter lighter winds some heavy rain across northern scotla nd some heavy rain across northern scotland although shetland probably escape. across northern scotland, 50 to 60 mph gusts. you can see the extreme weather is on the northern and southern halves of this pressure. temperatures won't get much higher today, 11 to 13, may be 14 celsius. rain spiralling through this low pressure. it will become more showery but in between there will be some dry interludes. by
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dawn, it won't be nearly as windy. still some showers around and ate slightly cooler night ahead. low pressure is still where there's tomorrow but it has lost some of its intensity. still quite windy here although not those extreme gusts we have seen this morning full stop still some showers around but midlands, east anglia, a drier brighter day with temperatures tomorrow at ten to 14 celsius. the weekend ahead is still looking u nsettled weekend ahead is still looking unsettled and starting to feel a bit cooler again. back to you. a little break there on tuesday. we just have
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a message here saying that already in cornwall 31 incidents relating to the weather. it is expected to be heavy winds right throughout the day to this evening so stay in, stay safe and take care. let us know if you experience any of that bad weather today. ten minutes away from the world cup final. eight minutes. sorry, eight minutes. the western film is commonly thought of as an all—american creation — but did you know that the very first one was filmed right here in the uk? yes, blackburn in lancashire was the location — and later today the town will host to a sceening of the film for the first time in more than 100 years. here's our entertainment correspondent colin paterson.
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kidnapping by indians from 1899 — the world's first western, according to the british film institute, and it was filmed in blackburn. in northgate, in the centre of blackburn on the site that they worked from, the year that they made the first western kidnapped by indians. mitchell and kenyon's documentaries captured everyday life, including in their hometown, but they also liked to experiment. in 1899, that changes. they stop filming the world around them and start telling stories and one of the first is the first western. jamie holman tracked down a surviving copy in the archives of london's cinema museum. today, it will be shown for the first time in a century at the british textile biennial in the town. a very simple story — a frontier family encounters native americans, who try to take the child, and they are saved by the plucky cowboy, so it has got feathers, smoking pistols — it is a cowboy film. it is often claimed that the great train robbery made in the us in 1903 was the first
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western. but kidnapping by indians was shot four years earlier, and there are good reasons why the wild west was known in the north—west. there is this connection between the cotton growing obviously in america and the east lancashire weavers. why wouldn't there be some kind of link that allowed them to know about that world and kind of be able to turn it into the world's first western? if you asked anyone in the street where was the first western made, no—one would say blackburn. no, nobody would say blackburn. it is an example of creativity and culture that comes from the working classes that has been filmed and screened here in blackburn and about the people of blackburn get to see that and it is their culture. the western is once again home on the range and that home is blackburn. let's return to our main story now —
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and we're just minutes away from the start of the rugby world cup final between england and south africa. one group watching with particular pride will be the members of harpenden rugby club, which helped to produce no fewer than four of the current england squad — including the captain, 0wen farrell. the bbc‘s kathryn stanczyszyn is with them. it's packed now! massive cheers as england where walking out. how is everyone feeling? excited! then...
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for of the players are from harpenden rugby club. we have made sure on where the owen farrell mask. what is it like being in a place like this? i thought it might be a bit intimidating being the only south african here but what an atmosphere. do you think you can do it? i think so, atmosphere. do you think you can do it? ithink so, it atmosphere. do you think you can do it? i think so, it will be an exciting game. england are the favourites though. certainly everyone's favourites in here. you weren't even born when they won in 2003, what does this mean to you?”
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have heard how amazing that was and it is now notjust a story but i will be able to tell my kids about this story. this means a lot to you, are you daring to dream that this wind is happening? absolutely. great reveal there. you coach younger people here, this could really be a real invigoration for people and thatis real invigoration for people and that is what happened in 2003. we have a massive junior section and we are hoping for a good influx of people in september. it seems that people in september. it seems that people here are very confident and i note that my dad is very confident and he has had a framed photo of the 2003 squad and he is hoping to have
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that replaced today. my prediction is england by 12. you havejust been injapan at some of is england by 12. you havejust been in japan at some of the is england by 12. you havejust been injapan at some of the group stages, how was that? the atmosphere was amazing and i'm just so pleased to have been a part of it. would you rather be there? i'm just happy to be here with my family today. you can feel the atmosphere and we are just going in to the moment that everyone has been waiting for, daring to dream this will be a wind.
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sings national anthem if you can still hear me, grabbed the remote and switch to bbc one.” can still hear you and i am not leaving here. enjoy. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and jon kay. our headlines today. a chance to make sporting history as england take on south africa in the rugby world cup final. they sing. is thousands of venues open

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