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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 4, 2019 2:00pm-5:00pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm... a party political health warning — don't use us as "a political weapon" in the election campaign — the message to party leaders from nhs bosses. let's try and avoid getting into cheap political slogans and trying to weaponise the service as a means of fighting a party political battle. order, order. mps electjohn bercow‘s successor as speaker of the house of commons later, in the first election for the post in more than a decade. 2,500 jobs at risk, as baby goods retailer mothercare says it plans to call in administrators at its 79 uk stores. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. jane.
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lewis hamilton says it feels surreal to have a six formula 1 world title. it moves the driver to just one behind michael schumacher‘s all—time record of seven. thanks, jane. and louise has the weather outlook. plenty of rainbow pictures coming in they can shower this afternoon. all they can shower this afternoon. all the details, coming up shortly. thanks louise. also coming up... once one of the two most powerful people in the world, we'll hear from the former soviet leader mikhail gorbachev, who, in a bbc interview, warns that current tension between russia and the west is putting the world in "colossal danger" due to the threat from nuclear weapons. translation: automation should declare. all nations. nuclear weapons must be destroyed. to save ourselves, and our planet.
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hello, everyone, this is afternoon live. health service leaders in england are warning politicians not to use the nhs as a weapon in the general election campaign. nhs providers, which represents hospitals and other health trusts, warns all the parties against making ‘empty promises‘ and creating ‘unrealistic expectations‘. the future of the health service will be a key election battle ground, with the parties already promising billions of pounds of extra spending. our health correspondent, dominic hughes, reports. the state of the health service is always a key election issue. but this time, votes will be cast as the nhs enters its most testing time of year. preparations for winter are well under way, but the pressures are greater than ever. the nhs has already featured prominently in the election campaign — but there is a warning that
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politicians need to be straight and clear with voters. we thought it was sensible, at the beginning of the campaign, to basically urge politicians to be honest and open and realistic and clear about the promises that they make. and let‘s try and avoid getting into cheap political slogans and trying to weaponise the service, as a means of fighting a party political battle. to illustrate the scale of the challenge, nhs providers says there are now... 4.4 million people in england waiting for a routine up ratios. —— routine operations. so far, much of the argument has been about in whose hands the nhs is safest. and labour says it needs to be able to make its case on the health service. i think they are right, it shouldn't be weaponised. but we have got to have an honest debate about it. and that is why today i have been
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meeting with nhs staff to see what they have to say. and i tell you, some of the evidence that they are presenting does worry us all, and should worry us all. and the message from them is that we need more respect, we need more resources, and we want to end the privatisation of the nhs. but the conservatives point to the money they‘ve already committed to the nhs, and say their management of the economy is the best guarantee of future funding. that's why we've had this record investment and ongoing investment, with a long—term plan for the nhs. we've increased the capital spending, in order to make sure we get new equipment, new buildings, which help make sure that patients come first in the nhs and are supported by the conservative government. that's only possible with a strong economy and making sure that we can fulfil the financial requirements, in order to provide that care. recruiting more staff, managing growing demand from patients, improving the quality of care. these are the questions health service leaders want politicians to focus on. that may be a forlorn hope,
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in the heat of an election. dominic hughes, bbc news. the leader of plaid cymru, adam price, says he‘s consulting his members about an electoral alliance with other remain—supporting parties. launching his party‘s campaign this morning, mr price said wales is being ‘held back by westminster‘. plaid hopes to deny the conservatives a majority and stop brexit by working together in some constituencies with the liberal democrats and the greens. we have got huge problems that we need to fix in wales — rising child poverty, life expectancy falling, a creaking transport infrastructure. but how do we solve those problems? we don‘t solve them by simply putting jeremy corbyn or borisjohnson into downing street. we solve them by actually having the strongest ever welsh voice in westminster. and contrast the way that wales is often ignored, compare that to scotland where for over a decade now, the people of scotland have been voting for their party. and that has forced scotland right up to the top of the political agenda.
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and that is what we need to do for wales. the snp leader, nicola sturgeon, has challenged borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn to a leaders‘ debate. scotland‘s first minister said she would take on the conservative and labour leaders anytime and anywhere. her comments follow an official complaint from the lib dem leader, jo swinson, of not being included in an itv leaders‘ debate between the two main parties on november 19. sinn fein has confirmed the party won‘t stand three candidates in northern ireland constituencies in the general election. the party will not field candidates in south belfast, east belfast, or north down, and are urging voters to back pro—remain parties. it follows a similar move from the ulster unionist party and the sdlp, who are not standing in north belfast to give sinn fein a better chance of beating the dup‘s deputy leader, nigel dodds. if you want to know about why an election has been called, and the issues that voters care about, see our really simple guide to the general election, at bbc.co.uk/news, or on the bbc
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news app. mps will vote this afternoon to electjohn bercow‘s successor as speaker of the house of commons. the seven candidates will make their pitch before a series of secret ballots. ben brown looks at the importance of the role of the speaker. order, order! john bercow stood down as speaker of the house of commons last week after ten years in the hot seat. thank you, order. as well as pomp and regalia, what exactly does the job involve? we march on our way. well, probably the best—known role of the speaker is keeping order in the house. and ensuring parliamentary rules are upheld. mps don‘t have an automatic right to speak during debates, it‘s the speaker who decides who gets to make their point. the speaker also decides which amendments to bills or motions can be debated and voted on. he or she can force ministers
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to the dispatch box by allowing urgent questions, or emergency debates. one rarely used power is casting the deciding vote, in the event of a tied vote. so, what can we expect from whoever follows john bercow? john bercow came in off the back of the expenses scandal, he felt there was a job to do to rehabilitate the house at that point. the person who comes in after today will be also reacting to the way john bercow did the job and responding to that. i think theirjob will also be massively shaped, in the short term, by the outcome of the election. if we see another minority government or a coalition or something like that, theirjob will be more significant, there will be more focus on them, than if we get a majority government. so, these are the candidates that mps will be choosing from, this afternoon. whoever is elected in the secret ballot will be expected to resign from their party and will not campaign for a seat in the forthcoming general election. whatever happens, they will be
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taking up a very important job, at a crucial time in the history of parliament. hannah white deputy director at the institute for governmentjoins me now. it's it‘s actually quite unusual to be having this vote at this stage in parliament. it is usually the first thing people do when they come back from a general election. because john bercow has decided to stand down, the first thing they have to down, the first thing they have to do today, when they meet, because they don‘t have a speaker, is choose one. the role of speaker, until a few years ago, people didn‘t realise what they did. now, we know they have quite an influence. they can be actual absolutely crucial. the reason thatjohn boco‘s role has
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been so important is because the decisions he has made have had the potential implications, because votes can go against the government. ina minority votes can go against the government. in a minority government situation where the government does not have majority in the comments this become may take the decision in a way that they might not like. if you talk to many backbench mps, he is regarded as something as other hero to them. also, in terms of education and the role he has had with schoolchildren and getting them involved with politics. that has been one of his big pushes, and to beef up the education side of parliament, and that external facing role. education side of parliament, and that externalfacing role. it education side of parliament, and that external facing role. it is true to say that he has been controversial, and i think the government will be pleased to think that there will be a new speaker and see what approach they will take.
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two fm a re see what approach they will take. two fm are currently deputy speaker. will that make them favourites? remember this is the secret map ballot, so they can weigh whatever factors they i think after all mps have the experience as a speaker, so they know what they are looking for isa they know what they are looking for is a speaker, they will count that and —— they will account for that in choosing the speaker. ella eleanor laing shares the deputy role at the moment. harriet harman is the longest serving female mp. it is an impressive cast list isn‘t it? shiloh farah has actually withdrawn, so shiloh farah has actually withdrawn, so it is down to seven now. but these are names that people will be familiar with. often, after a general election, you have a new set
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of people that have come in, and people haven‘t met them and the whips tell them who to vote for. this time, they will have had a relationship, and will have their own views on it. that makes this quite an unpredictable election. last time, when john quite an unpredictable election. last time, whenjohn boco was elected, it went to half past eight in the evening. of the mps who have come to westminster today who aren‘t out on the campaign trail, there has to be more than 50% voting for one candidate for them to be chosen. you go through a series of rounds, and after each round, anyone who has... comes last a whole has less than 75% of the vote dropped out. they will go away and count the votes and see who‘s left.
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go away and count the votes and see who's left. the speaker's role is supposed to be apolitical. they have been involved in some of the brexit proceedings. lindsay hoyle was asked to select amendments on the bill for the election and so on. they have had some involvement, and mps may have formed a view of their partiality or otherwise from that business. they have to give a speech of five minutes each. yes it will be as short opportunity to lay out their priorities. then, there is the first boat this afternoon, then there is all to play for if there is no decision. if one candidate doesn‘t get more than 50% of the vote, we go through another process to find out who will be dragged to the chair. john bercow couldn‘t have looked happier... thank you very
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much for now. another big name on the high street appears on the brink of collapse. mothercare is calling in administrators, putting 2,500 jobs at risk. the company has 79 stores across the uk, which will continue to trade as normal for the time being. here‘s our business correspondent ramzan karmali. in fact, injune of 2018, it applied for a company voluntary agreement, a cva, and that saw 55 of its stores close. only in march of this year, it sold off the early learning centres to its rival, the entertainer. and this administration, now, will put 2,500 jobs at risk across 79 stores, and its head office. i should say that only 500 of those jobs are full—timejobs. this administration will only affect its uk business, not its overseas arm, which is actually quite profitable. but the reasons behind this are basically competition. 0nline, on the high street, it is being squeezed quite heavily. on top of all of that, is the fact that our high streets are suffering too. the amount of empty shops
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at the moment in the uk is at a record high, and this is all down to business rates. they are not the only company that have been struggling recently. many others have been putting in requests with their landlords for restructuring, the likes of new look, carpet right, for example. last year, we saw the demise of toys "r" us and maplin. so, is a really difficult time in high street at the moment. the former soviet leader mikhail gorbachev has warned that the current tensions between russia and the west are endangering the world. speaking to the bbc in an interview to mark the thirtieth anniversary of the fall of the berlin wall, mr gorbachev called for all countries to declare that nuclear weapons should be destroyed. he was speaking to our moscow correspondent steve rosenberg. these days, it‘s rare to see mikhail gorbachev in front of a camera. aged 88, he avoids the limelight. "i‘m slowing down," he tells me. "i can barely stand up."
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but the man who helped to end the cold war has a message for the world — that his achievements are at risk. and one of his greatest achievements was ending the arms race between the soviet union and america. his diplomatic double act with ronald reagan slashed the two superpowers‘ nuclear arsenals. but the arms race has reignited. there is new tension and fierce rivalry between moscow and the west. how dangerous do you think the current confrontation is between russia and the west? translation: as long as weapons of mass destruction exist, nuclear weapons, the danger is colossal. all nations should declare —
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all nations — nuclear weapons must be destroyed. to save ourselves, and our planet. in the past, we used to talk about the cold war. how would you describe the current stand—off between russia and the west? translation: chilly, but still a war. look at what is happening. in different places there are skirmishes. there are shooting. ships and aircraft are being sent here, there and everywhere. this is a situation we do not need. from iron curtains to iron ladies — he famously hit it off
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with margaret thatcher. but what does gorbachev make of brexit? translation: you can figure that one out yourself. you british are clever clogs. i will not give you advice. you decide. so, not only a president — but a true diplomat. steve rozenberg, bbc news, moscow. let‘s cross to westminster where the brexit party is unveiling the 600 candidates who will stand for the party in december‘s general election. flash photography in this. good. i have had 25 years of abuse. applause you see, what we are witnessing with the general election coming down the
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track are the two big tribes in british politics reassembling. for them, this is all about the colour of the rosette. is it the blue tribe is it the red tribe which up actually, issues and principle go out of the window. and the one thing that i think both of them have now com pletely that i think both of them have now completely turned their backs on other promises they made to the british people during the referendum. after the referendum, at the last general election, and we 110w the last general election, and we now face a situation where the public have a menu to vote for on the 12th of december. you can vote liberal democrat. you still can vote liberal democrat. you still can vote liberal democrat. you still can vote liberal democrat if you want to. it isa liberal democrat if you want to. it is a very straightforward offering. it is revoke article 50, and
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cancelled the result of the referendum. you can vote for the labour party. boot. they will offer you the glorious opportunity, that if you vote for them, they will negotiate a new deal in brussels. they will put it to the british electorate in a referendum, and then campaign against the very deal that they have negotiated. applause this labour party, and i will be coming back in the speech to the labour party, because too much of this conversation that is going on in this country today is about the brexit party and the tory party, and it seems to me that the media and everybody else has forgotten the fa ct everybody else has forgotten the fact that 5 million labour voters voted for brexit, and have now been betrayed by the labour party.
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applause so, just to recap before that out burst of enthusiasm, it is revoke with the liberal democrats, it is a second referendum with labour, and the choice being remain or reform of remain. and then, we have the conservative party. they are telling us... well, last time round she told us, do you remember, brexit means brexit. what we discovered was that she came back with that plan at chequers, that new eu treaty she
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wa nted chequers, that new eu treaty she wanted the country to sign up to, which frankly was the most abject surrender. it was a document you would have only signed if you had been beaten. it was utterly shameful and thank goodness it got defeated. applause and in that space, step the brexit party. from nowhere, and we reset the political agenda in this country. we made leaving with a clea n b rea k country. we made leaving with a clean break the most popular option out there in the country, and we did more than our bit to get rid of the worst prime minister, notjust in living history, but our entire political history. applause and we got a new prime minister full
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of optimism, energy and indeed fun. and indeed, goodness —— thank goodness, after the last couple of yea rs. goodness, after the last couple of years. what has borisjohnson done? he has picked up that treaty and amended it. he has made it slightly better in terms of the cons —— custom unions membership for britain. in doing so, he has hived offa britain. in doing so, he has hived off a part of the united kingdom, despite his own promises that hewden would never do any such thing. it paves the way, i think, for disastrous problems for scotland over the course of the coming years, and he has now put that treaty back before us in this general election. and he says, vote for this and we will get brexit done. now, that is a very tempting slogan for a public
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that after three years of this process have in many cases just about had enough. the problem is that it doesn‘t get brexit done. all it does is take us into another three years of agonising negotiations with, yes, you‘ve guessed it, michel barnier in charge. we might like to recruit him for our side. he‘s good. charge. we might like to recruit him for ourside. he‘s good. he‘s charge. we might like to recruit him for our side. he‘s good. he‘s really good compared to our duffers. goodness gracious me. what bynea has set out already and that political declaration is that there will be no free trade deal with the european union, unless we stay part, effectively, of the common fisheries policy. there will be no free trade deal, unless our total bill for leaving has actually risen from 39 billion to 69 billion. there will be
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no free trade deal, unless our state aid rules, state under the european union, meaning that we could not help british steel or anybody else we chose. it will mean, above all, that our free trade deal means that we will have to continue in regulatory realignment on social policy, employment policy, environmental law and even taxation. and even if we get that free trade deal, one that i think will prohibit us deal, one that i think will prohibit us from doing trade deals with the rest of the world... in fact, an american friend was chatting about this last week. i‘m sad to say that he was right. even if we get all of that, it will still ultimately be judged by the european court of justice. here is the problem with the proposition that borisjohnson is putting to the british people. it is putting to the british people. it is not brexit. it‘s not brexit
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applause. it's applause. it‘s a sell—out. it is a sell—out. applause thank you. i have tried my best, as you will know, over the course of the last few months, to try and build up adriatic brexit alliance in this country. it would be working together of a conservative party, a brexit party and some very strong voices in the labour party. it would, if it fought this election on the basis that free trade is fine, but whatever we do, we must have a clea n b rea k but whatever we do, we must have a clean break from the institutions of
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the european union, not only be honouring the vote and the promises from 2016, it would win a massive majority in parliament. but we now have but ten days to go until the close of nominations, and the clock is ticking. and it would appear, that far from even attempting to embrace this offer, which is sincere and genuine, the conservative party wa nt to and genuine, the conservative party want to shut down the argument. jacob rees—mogg, who are like personally, said this morning that the brexit party should stand aside and leave it to the conservatives. what kind of conceited arrogance is this? we are seeing it from a party that without the referendum party moving them in the 90s on the euro, without you keep forcing them into giving them a referendum, and without the brexit party forcing
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them to deliver on brexit. i repeat there will be no brexit without the brexit party. of that i am certain. applause thank you. thank you. thank you. they say, that we will split the vote, but we won‘t split the vote, because we will be the only people actually offering brexit leaving the european union and its institutions. applause and i am reading this lazy commentary in the press every day thatis commentary in the press every day that is almost a mirror image of what i read back in 2015 when i led
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you kip —— ukip. they said that it would split the vote. it did far more harm to the labour party than it did to the conservative party. cameron would not have had a majority had it not been for the votes cast the ukip in that election. the missing ingredient in this whole debate is the extent to which traditional working labour voters, patriotic to their fingertips who voted brexit, believing with all their heart and soul that it was the right thing to do, and in doing so, in parts of the country, wales, the midlands and in northern england, in the most extraordinary number, and in nearly every case represented by a remain a
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labourmp. every case represented by a remain a labour mp. what westminster doesn‘t seem to comprehend, and what the commentators haven‘t latched onto is that those 5 million are the most vulnerable group of voters for the brexit party in this country. i will be, from tomorrow, i‘ll be out in those labour constituencies. i‘ll be there applause i'll applause i‘ll be in the east midlands. i‘ll be in south wales. i will be in the north—east. i will be in workington. i want the country... i want the country in this election to have a genuine choice. i want the country to know the sheer extent of labour betrayal. i want the - to know betrayal. i want the country to know that this new eu treaty is not
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brexit, and that... we will pull away from that event, we will keep an eye on what happens. we are expecting them to announce their prospective parliamentary candidate. i will take to the house of the house, sorry, the father of the house, sorry, the father of the house, ken clarke, is on his feet. this is the start of the debate of the next speaker of the house of commons. each speaker will have five minutes to make their case. let‘s just hear from minutes to make their case. let‘s just hearfrom ken minutes to make their case. let‘s just hear from ken clarke. it is purely random. i have asked each candidate to speak for no more than five minutes. the candidates will no doubt be further advised by that response. when all candidates have addressed the house, we will proceed to the first ballot. so, i call... thank you very much. dame rosie
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winterton. mr clarke, i am sure that all the other candidates in the election today will agree with me when i say that none of us can match the experience that you have in this place, or the esteem the experience that you have in this place, orthe esteem in the experience that you have in this place, or the esteem in which you are held. you are leaving us after half a century of service, and we thank you for that service. but others are leaving in part because of what our politics has become. as the house is the crucible of our politics, that should concern us all. it is why the role of the speaker matters so much. i am putting myself forward after 22 years of diverse experience as a backbencher, a government minister, shadow leader of the house, chief whip, and deputy speaker. restoring public confidence in parliament is
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all our responsibility. but the speaker sets the tone. my view is the speaker'sjob speaker sets the tone. my view is the speaker's job is speaker sets the tone. my view is the speaker'sjob is not to dominate proceedings or speak for parliament, but to facilitate debate and allow parliament to speak for itself. with all its different voices. and in all its diverse voices. mr clarke, during my time as opposition chief whip, i worked with the majority and minority parties to build consensus where we could. and i make sure that we didn't fall out when we couldn't agree. as deputy speaker, i have been struck by the fact that in so many of our debates, there is consensus. members many of our debates, there is consensus. members from different parties working together to find common parties working together to find common ground. of course, there will always be times when the house will
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be rambunctious, that is fine. what the public doesn't like is ill temperand poor the public doesn't like is ill temper and poor tolerance. the turbulent time in our politics has put this institution and all of us under great strain. the executive... mobile phone rings that wasn't a setup, i promise you! the executive must be allowed to carry out its mandate where it is given by the people. but mps must also be allowed to scrutinise legislation and hold the government to account. the speaker has a crucial role in getting that balance right. if there is a logjam, the speaker should help parliament to find a way through. bring parties together to solve the problem. in
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all of the posts i have held, i have beena all of the posts i have held, i have been a conciliator. as speaker, i would douse the flames, not pour petrol on them. a stabilising unifying speaker, a speaker from the north, so the public see parliament is about the whole country and not just london. and the last woman from the north did a pretty good job. laughter to gain respect from the public, we must show each other respect. the next speaker must lead by the example she sets. changing the tone and lowering the temperature when the house gets overheated. as deputy speaker, i have tried to do that. i hope members feel i have been impartial, not impatient. as deputy
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speaker, i have seen tempers rise if there is too much disruption of business. urgent questions are an important innovation of our last speaker. but i have seen members become frustrated having worked hard ona become frustrated having worked hard on a speech only to end up being squeezed by a three—minute time limit. urgent business must be debated when it is urgent. but queues and statements should not ta ke queues and statements should not take hours. neither should pmos. if a member doesn't get called, they should get priority next time. and newer members should not always have to wait until last to be called. all oui’ to wait until last to be called. all our constituencies have the same right to be heard. mr clarke, parliament should be a workplace free from bullying and harassment.
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the commission should be at the ce ntre the commission should be at the centre of changing the culture of parliament. it should be accessible to members and to staff, and ipso should stop getting in the way of members doing their job. should stop getting in the way of members doing theirjob. mps who are parents or have caring responsibilities get proper support. we must become a modern, family friendly workplace. mr clarke, my dad was a headmaster and i bump into people he used to work with all the titles that he is not removed as a fierce disciplinarian, but as someone who was fair, encouraging, and trusted. not a bad legacy. my ambition as a speaker would be to follow his example, not seek the limelight, but build trust. thank you very much. chris bryant. mr clarke, politics can be cruel. a
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young lad came up to me the other day, he couldn't quite place who i was, that he knew he had seen me somewhere, may be on tv. sol was, that he knew he had seen me somewhere, may be on tv. so i said," well, maybe it is because i am an mp." and well, maybe it is because i am an mp. " and he well, maybe it is because i am an mp." and he said, "no, that is chris bryant. " mp." and he said, "no, that is chris bryant." and mp." and he said, "no, that is chris bryant. " and he mp." and he said, "no, that is chris bryant." and he is much younger than you!" just for the record, i am 57, older thanjohn bercow. you!" just for the record, i am 57, older than john bercow. and you!" just for the record, i am 57, older thanjohn bercow. and politics has felt, however, especially cruel in the last few years. many of us feel battered and bruised. many of the public deal that parliament has beena the public deal that parliament has been a bit of a bear pit. but i find my own personal expense from earlier this year when i was wandering around looking like i was auditioning for the part of the monster in frankenstein, it was that actually there are untold countless moments of personal enormous generosity in this house. and most of the country would be enormously proud of the way we do our business, if only they knew. the truth is
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politics is an honourable profession. everything the one of us in this house into politics because he wanted to change the world for the better. and often the individual campaigns that we run touch millions of lives. just think of the campaign to get medicines for children with diseases. at the enquiry into contaminated blood. what an children's funerals. or in people trafficking. so many different campaigns. the one i dedicated myself to one acquired brain injury and melanoma. that is why it is so important that we revitalise and stand up for parliamentary democracy and return to the rule book, stitch it back together. i'm standing because i love parliament, i believe in parliamentary democracy, and i wanted to do things properly. that means being a speaker who has absolutely no favourites, a speaker
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who believes in standing by the rules are somebody who is completely impartial, who knows erskine may inside out and back to front. i have it lying by my bedside. laughter a speaker... a speaker... all right, all right. a speaker who is an umpire and not a player. this is one of the most demanding jobs in british politics. for centuries it was said that it could only be done bya was said that it could only be done by a great lawyer. and that is because the decisions that are made by the speaker are of constitutional significance, you have to be quick on your feet, you have to be able to defend a decision and explain it in plain english. there are things i wa nt plain english. there are things i want to do, i want to get prime minister is questions back to 30 minutes. i want to publish a speaking list for debates so that you know when you will be called. and if you don't get called today, he will get called first tomorrow. i
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wa nt he will get called first tomorrow. i want to call colleagues according to their relevance to the subject, rather than some idea of seniority. i want to stop the clapping. applause no! very funny! can we return to waiving the order papers? that is the traditional way. and for that matter, i want to stop the hectoring and the addresses to the gallery. i wa nt and the addresses to the gallery. i want to make sure that every single mp, theirfamilies, and, importantly, their staff, are safe in their constituency office and their homes. i want to make the timing of the parliamentary date more predictable. iwant timing of the parliamentary date more predictable. i want to increase human resources department. and i wa nt human resources department. and i want to... know, i don'tjust want to, i will sort out the wi—fi and the mobile sector. let me end with three speaker from the past. the
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first is betty boothroyd who, when she stood for speaker, said she hoped that she hoped we would vote for her for who she was and is not who she was born. i was taught as a child not tojudge someone according to the colour of their skin, their religion, their gender, their sexuality, what school they went to, what accent they speak with, or what pa rt of what accent they speak with, or what part of the country they are from. but according to the strength of their character and whether they could do the job well. i hope you will alljudge me in exactly the same way today. second speaker, speaker onslow who, in the second century —— he was the second speaker to say that he would be respectful and impartial to all. "that will be my motto. " and impartial to all. "that will be my motto." and most famously of all, the speaker you all know, the speaker who told charles the first, "i have neither eyes to see no time to speak, but as this house is pleased to direct me, whose servant
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lam, pleased to direct me, whose servant i am, whose servant i am. " that is all i ask — i am, whose servant i am. " that is alllask— a i am, whose servant i am. " that is all i ask — a chance to serve. i am, whose servant i am. " that is all i ask - a chance to serve. thank you. sir edward leigh. mr clarke, what an honour to stand for this particular job. what an honour to stand for this particularjob. like all those standing, i love this place, and i only wish to serve it. i think it is a pretty good training to be speaker to have been, as i have been, a backbencher 33 out of the last 36 years. although, to be absolutely honest, nobody has been serving long on the front bench. one of the reasons i think many people enjoy their service on the backbenches is they love holding the government to account. in being sincere to their
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beliefs. however unpopular those beliefs. however unpopular those beliefs are. and that is the sort of backbencher that i want to encourage. so that is enough for me, just a moment to talk about what i believe the speaker should be. i am with chris and rosie on this, i think the speaker should submerge his or her character in the job. the speaker should be the servant of the house. the speaker should be a dignified and quiet voice. and i believe that all the candidates standing today can achieve that. i believe in this parliament that we should not be contentious of what we have achieved over the last three years. insults have been held at us, but chris mentioned our famous
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forebear and how he, as i was speaker made clear, that he only was a surfeit of the house. and i think that we who sit in the house should be proud of what we have achieved over the last three years, at the pulpit of a political nation, where every point of view can be heard, debated, and thrashed out. and i believe that we can make this place even better. i believe that it is no accident that the great speeches in history in our place were precisely that, speeches. they were not interminable self regarding points of intervention or points of order or statements going on forever. i believe that we should recreate the great debates in this place and allow ahead of time, and to be fair to everybody so that everybody gets a fair crack of the whip. literally to put their point of view. sol think that we can actually go from
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strength to strength. but this place is notjust strength to strength. but this place is not just about words, important as they are. not just about votes. it is also about a sense of history and a sense of place. and i particularly wanted to stand in this election to make this point, that we must preserve this world heritage site, but we must preserve it in a way, and here i speak as someone who served 18 years in the public accounts committee, we must preserve it in such a way that we look after the interests of our paymasters, the taxpayer. we cannot waste billions of pounds, we have to do the job properly, but we have to do it right. my personal view, and you have all received a letter from the architectural association which proves that we can do the job cheaply, efficiently with the erection of a temporary chamber, rather than demolishing richmond house and wasting billions of pounds. so i particular wanted to make that point, because we do have a duty of care in terms of money to our constituents. so those are my
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priorities — ensuring that, once again, this place can be the forum of great speeches, determined and sincere speeches. and i want to end by saying that nobody here should worry about what they have done or what they have achieved in recent years. be of good heart, and above all, dear friends, hold years. be of good heart, and above all, dearfriends, hold the executive to account. whoever they are. the sincere to your beliefs, because that is what this place is all about. thank you to edward. dane eleanor laing. thank you, mr clarke. when i was growing up in the small village of elderly in the west of scotland, who would have thought
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that little eleanor from across the road would one day end up standing to be the speaker of the house of commons, certainly i didn't. it is a great testament to our country and to our democracy that this moment is even possible. can i begin, mr clarke, by paying tribute to you, on this your last day in the house after nearly 50 years? thank you for your service. i imagine that you are finding that the house looks rather different from where you are now sitting compared to your usual seat up sitting compared to your usual seat up here. well, i know how you feel. standing where i am today for the first time in six years reminds me how easy it is to see ourselves as us and them. whereas, for the last
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six years, sitting there in the chair, it has seemed to me just to be us. thus, the house. because that is how it should be. that is how it should be from the chair. it is not the role of the speaker to create division or rancour in this house, but seek to remind us of the things that unite us. our rules and procedures and our precious conventions. as rosie and chris have rightly said, and despite what i believe that our detractors say, the house of commons is —— and despite what our detractors say, the house of commons is full of good people. laughter good people! good people in all corners of this place, good people who genuinely wa nt place, good people who genuinely want to make the world a better place. of course, we all have
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different ideas about how we would do that. but even if we sometimes full short, our intentions are, in a word, honourable. i full short, our intentions are, in a word, honourable. lam full short, our intentions are, in a word, honourable. i am very sad that so many honourable members i see as i looked around have decided to leave the house tomorrow. it is time that someone had the courage to defend members of parliament, not just inside this house, but outside it as well. defending members of parliament, that is what i would do if the house makes me speaker. because failing to stand up for the honourable men and women who come to this place to do their public duty, harm is notjust the individual mp, but weakens parliament in the eyes of the nation. mr clarke, we all know that beyond the westminster bubble' there is a real anxiety
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about the health of our democratic system. we need to rebuild confidence and trust in our politics, and it must begin with this election today. there are times of continuity, and there are times for change. this is a time for change. i want to be that change. this is 21st—century for goodness' sake, we need to escape from an overbearing and hierarchical structures that have made it all too easy for a culture of bullying to ta ke easy for a culture of bullying to take root. as deputy speaker, i hope that i have always discharge my duties with consistency, with courtesy, and with kindness. hear, hear! i always try to roma, that despite being a lawyer, for which you will have to forgive me, we are
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not dealing withjust you will have to forgive me, we are not dealing with just laws and rules here, we are also dealing with the welfare of people. that is why the most urgent change that i want to see is making the speaker more accountable, more accountable and at any time in our history. and while i am at it, can ijust say that it is not the role of the speaker to say any more than needs to be said? hear, hear! nor to take up time in this chamber, especially when that robs backbenchers of their precious allocated minutes. i robs backbenchers of their precious allocated minutes. lam robs backbenchers of their precious allocated minutes. i am glad someone agrees with something. laughter the speaker is not the ruler of the house of parliament. but it's servant. and it is in that spirit that i asked the house to entrust to me this most historic and special
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role. thank you. thank you. miss meg hillier. thank you, mr clarke. i think we all know that there is a lack of trust in parliament and politics right now. everything from the behaviour in the chamber, the allegations of bullying and sexual assault. we have had three such allegationsjust since assault. we have had three such allegations just since this assault. we have had three such allegationsjust since this race assault. we have had three such allegations just since this race the speaker we began six weeks ago. and the state of politics generally out there in the nation. so the next speaker is a key role in setting the tone, yes, in the chamber, but also with colleagues in this place who support us in our work and in the country. and i would be a speaker who spoke less, but when i speak, it will be with the clear intent of standing up formps. will be with the clear intent of
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standing up for mp5. i think you have heard from other candidates today and at the hustings that we are in broad agreement about how to manage the chamber. we want to be champions, and i certainly would be, a better conduct. iwould be champions, and i certainly would be, a better conduct. i would be an impartial speaker, a director rather than an actor, and we want better timekeeping. statements are going on too long, and that greater discipline that timekeeping would be, would give greater certainty overtiming so be, would give greater certainty over timing so that we could plan the rest of our lives. and we need an end to the short time limits. i have a track record, mr clarke, of fairness and of delivering what i promise. i have chaired the public accounts committee for the last 4.5 years, where i have introduced a new way of working in the select committee corridor. and as a minister, ideal fairly with all mps, whatever their party. because let's not forget, we are all only here because our constituent elect us. so we respect each other, we
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respect our constituents, it is as simple as that. and some time ago, mr clarke, simple as that. and some time ago, mrclarke, iwas simple as that. and some time ago, mr clarke, i was mayor of a hung council in london where i have the casting vote while also being the first citizen. so i have to handle some pretty difficult situations in a fraught council chamber. but i am not a grandstanding politician, mr clarke, i would speak little. and as many of you know, i am incredibly discreet when you come to cini about matters in your constituency. and i would not seek self publicity, but speak up only for mp5 and parliament and our democracy. we need better support for mp5, there is too little personal development and careers advice. and that shows up starkly when so many members are leaving with short notice, and we have members losing seats. and of course on restoration and renewal, it was my amendment that moved us forward so we will be leaving the building. and we need to tackle that, and i am
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already working on plans to how we monitor the cost, of course that is important. but this is an opportunity to rekindle trust in our politics and our democracy, rekindle how we do things, how we change the culture of this place. and as a speaker, i would culture of this place. and as a speaker, iwould have culture of this place. and as a speaker, i would have your back. on unfair publicity on expenses. more than that, i would work to educate the public about what great work mps do in this place. and i would step up do in this place. and i would step up the approach to personal security and online bullying, which is leading to too many colleagues leaving this place because it is intolerable. but the main thrust of why i am standing is the bullying and harassment that is still too rife in this building. it isjust over one year since dame laura cox reported, and, yes, we needed an independent process in place, but we need more than that. jimmy white's reported earlier in this year highlighted problem is in our own offices. there is a good list of mps
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to work for comedy bad list to work for. staff know this, we know this. it may be an uncomfortable message, it may not be a vote winner today, but we should not be complacent, evenif but we should not be complacent, even if we are on that goodness. we should not rest while young staff in this building are fearful, tearful, and afraid to raise concerns about how they have been treated. we need hr, how they have been treated. we need h r, supported and trained office managers, and we need to tackle this now. it has to stop, it will be the next expenses scandal, colleagues, if we don't tackle this. we have to lead by example. we have to put our own house in order and call out bad behaviour when necessary, but prevented before it gets to that point. we do that externally, we need to do that here. i would be an utterly committed to this, i have worked up plans, i have talked to staff and unions about how to deliver on this. and we need to work
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with staff, we can't talk about them without them. we need a culture shift. we have to lead by example. don't let this moment pass. hear, hearl don't let this moment pass. hear, hear!. sir lindsay hoyle. i will say, as every body else, you will be missed in this house, but i know one thing, i don't think it will be the end of your voice, i think your voice will continue to go for a lot longer in time. of course, a great hero of mine is here today, that is baroness boothroyd. she was the white rose, she was the voice of the north. what the white rose brought, hopefully the red rose will follow. laughter of course, it is an absolute privilege to speak again from these backbenchers. these are the
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backbenchers. these are the backbenchers that matter. these are the backbenchers that hold the executive to account. there has been no better time than the 13 years i spent here, some with a labour government, and shortly after with a different government. but it is about making sure that whoever is in power, that these benches have the right to question and hold to account. that is what matters. but of course, it is about having an accountable speaker to back that up. it is notjust about accountable speaker to back that up. it is not just about the backbenchers, it is about a speaker that endorses and supports the backbenchers. and that is what i hope i have always shown during my nine years as deputy. i have tried to ensure there is not one part of this house that has not been brought to speak. whatever size of party, i have encouraged to make sure their voices heard. and i want to continue to do that, because it is not a club
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that says you have been here for 35 years, don't take it wrong, mr clarke. fact is that when i look at 35 years people in this house, i think i have earned that speech once more, and once again and many more times. that speech is important, but the person who walked through the door yesterday isjust as the person who walked through the door yesterday is just as important to their constituents. their voice must be heard as well, and the pecking order ought not to be there. it is about equality. we are all equal in this house when we come to speak, and that is the point that we must retain. and i promise you, that is what i will do. of course, a speaker has to be trusted and hopefully i have built up trusted and hopefully i have built up that trust. it is about having a prove n up that trust. it is about having a proven track record and i hope you will agree that i have it. when people say that i will do this in
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such an amount of time and prime minister questions, i have done it. i have been there. and yes, we did reduce the time because it is not about me. it is about these benches. that is where you can do it in good time, and that is what i want to continue to do. so, when i say that i have done it, i have done prime minister's questions, i have done the budget, i have done many things in this house. it is all with fairness, and of course, that is what matters to us all. reform. we need to continue reform. we need to support people in security. when i took over security, there were no measures for mp5. there was so little for us, we didn't matter. i hope people recognise what i have done and stood up, and made sure that we can feel self. that job done and stood up, and made sure that we can feel self. thatjob has started but it has not finished. i wa nt started but it has not finished. i want you to give me that chance to finish it as speaker of this house.
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i will continue to fight to ensure that we are safe and our families are safe and our staff and the house is safe as well. that is what matters. it is about delivering for all, and i will assure you that that is what i will do. it is a bad experience and drive, that i will make sure, as i say to continue reform for the best of all. this chamber, i believe, is underused. we should see how much more we can get out of the chamber. i think they're are great ideas we can come forward to. my points to you is that this house, i will be here for them and for you, and to make sure that you have a deputy speaker that can become speaker, that will not let you down. i will be accountable, thank you. thank you, say lindsay. ms harriet harman. thank you, mr
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clarke. these are difficult times, even dangerous times for our democracy. the house is divided. the public view of this device —— parliament is at an all—time low. relations between this house and the government are broken. many of us work under a hail of threats of violence to us, to our families, to our stuff. so, your choice of next speaker is really important. i know you want to speaker who will be, and will be seen to be scrupulously impartial, and fairto will be seen to be scrupulously impartial, and fair to every mp from every party. when i was leader of the house, iwas every party. when i was leader of the house, i was exactly that. it is notjust the house, i was exactly that. it is not just about being the house, i was exactly that. it is notjust about being fair, though, it is about perception. we cannot go on with huge decisions being made by
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one person behind closed doors. i would reform the speaker's powers to make them transparent and accountable to this house. i would be fearless in standing up for the rights of the house. i know you want to speaker who understands what it is to bea to speaker who understands what it is to be a government backbencher, and an opposition backbencher, and a government minister, and a shadow minister, and! government minister, and a shadow minister, and i have been all of those things. my guiding principle would be that all constituencies are equal, and because of that all members are equal, and are owed equal respect. so, as speaker, i would regard it as my responsibility to help you, where ever you are in the house, and however long you have been here, to be. one thing that i have not been is a member of one of
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our minority parties. that is why, ifi our minority parties. that is why, if i were speaker, i would want to force deputy in my team drawn from the members of the minority parties, so that i would have that perspective right at my side. i know you want to speaker who will help parliament change with the times. i have fought for and won reform, making our select committee is powerful and independent, by giving us the right to elect the chairs, rather than their being appointed by the whips. i did that when i was leader of the is mac. setting up the backbench business committee so that we could choose the business of debates. i did that to come over as leader of the house. i change the voting system for election of
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speaker to bake it by secret ballot. i hope that that was a good idea. love the macjust this year, by working with member across parties, getting the right for new mothers and fathers to vote by proxy when your baby is born. so, i am running for speaker in these difficult times because i have unparalleled experience, and an unparalleled re cord experience, and an unparalleled record of reform of this house. but there is one other reason that i wa nt there is one other reason that i want your vote. parliament has changed. it's nothing like the old boys network it was when i first came in. when i was one of only 3% women members amongst 97% of men. now, there are notjust 211 women in every party in the house, men here
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speak up for women's's rights to. but, in 600 years, there has only ever been one speaker who was a woman. i do not actually agree with making reference to the gallery that lam going making reference to the gallery that i am going to break with precedent here and pay tribute to betty boothroyd. it is 600 years and only ever one woman. there have been 156 men. this is my question to the house today, can we show the country that we have changed by putting the second woman in that speaker's chair? many of you are standing
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down, some after only a short time here, and that should concern us all. i want to thank all of you who served in this house, and to say to all of you who are standing down, i wish you well for the future. some are standing down after decades here, and that brings me to the father of the house, ken clarke. ken, you have been a phenomenal exemplary parliamentarian, and i just wanted to say that thank you. thank you very much, miss harman. i‘m genuinely grateful. i have no idea what voter appeal that very kind words the rest of you have. all the candidates have now addressed
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the candidates have now addressed the house, so in a moment i will declare open the ballot. before i do, i have a clear explanation of the process, which is not actually familiar to the process, which is not actually familiarto any of the process, which is not actually familiar to any of us. person —— firstly, members with surnames with the letters beginning a —— k, inclusive, the members in the imac lobby. elton said, in the noma clubby. —— when you pass the desk, you will be given a ballot paper, and when you have completed it, please place it in one of the ballot boxes at the exit of the lobby. that
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should be familiar, but i would remind members that they should vote only for one candidate. it is not a tra nsfera ble vote, only for one candidate. it is not a transferable vote, it is an exclusive vote. vote only for one candidate. the ballot will remain open for 20 minutes. i would hope to renounce “— open for 20 minutes. i would hope to renounce —— announce the result of each ballot around 45 minutes after closure of the ballot. the house will be... that, i think, closure of the ballot. the house will be... that, ithink, is closure of the ballot. the house will be... that, i think, is for counting and full printing of new ballot paper. they house will be alerted by the annunciator, before it is to resume and division bells will also be rung. so, i declare the
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ballot open. so, voting gets under way. vicki, is watching what is going on? it was an interesting list of speeches. they dealt with it in different ways. yes, but i think the common different ways. yes, but i think the common thread was i am not going to be likejohn common thread was i am not going to be like john bercow. common thread was i am not going to be likejohn bercow. in the different ways, and without naming him, talked about the style that he had. he was an incredibly controversial speaker. the main thrust of the argument from all of them was that i am going to speak a lot less tha n them was that i am going to speak a lot less than the last one so that you can speak a lot more. and also, really being impartial. lots of criticism forjohn bercow in terms of being impartial particularly over brexit. he stood at the back benches. in the old days, prime
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minister‘s questions used to be half an hourand minister‘s questions used to be half an hour and that is it. it stretched to almost over an hour every week. all of them were saying that they we re all of them were saying that they were going to take it back to 30 minutes. a lot of it is of course about how this place works, and how government is held to account. the rights of backbenchers mps to speak and get their voices heard, and how they are looked after. lindsay hoyle is the favourite, and has been deputy speaker for nine years, looking after mps and their families, particularly when they are facing threats. that was interesting, there. rosie winterton said that she would douse the flames are not perpetual on them. chris brya nt are not perpetual on them. chris bryant said —— talked about being an umpire and not a player. that is really the pitch for most of them. to say that they will be fair and not get so involved. lindsay is prepared to say it is not about me,
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but the commons. it is all about defining themselves against the previous speaker who has had such an impact on this place over the last ten years. a lot of people won't know what a club promontories, but if you watched opportunity knocks. probably lindsay hoyle got the best reaction than anybody else. he got cheers from other members in the house. a lot of conservatives have said that they are going to vote for him. because he has been the deputy speakerfor nine him. because he has been the deputy speaker for nine years he him. because he has been the deputy speakerfor nine years he has not been political. deputy speakers, lindsay hoyle, and eleanor laing, don‘t vote. i think people don‘t realise that. it is not only the speaker that does not take part in votes, the deputies do not either. he has been taken away from the current thrust of politics for some
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time, and has not even told me how he voted on brexit, for example. he is seen as very popular, a safe pair of hands with a different approach. he has stood in for the speaker on big days. i remember when he was in the chair and john bercow wasn‘t here, prime minister‘s questions when tom fell 35 minutes and he barely spoke throughout. i think thatis barely spoke throughout. i think that is what a lot of mps are hoping for. there has been a lot of controversy about choosing the speakerjust as controversy about choosing the speaker just as they controversy about choosing the speakerjust as they go for a general election. a lot of mps do not want is to go on for too long. the voting went on for hours last time. they want to go off and start campaigning. the funniest thing i have read today‘s people talking about the last time this happened, ten yea rs about the last time this happened, ten years ago. when everybody was asked to speak for five minutes, john bercow spoke for ten. imac and
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what happened to him? thank you vicky. this is almost a shop steward role mps as well. it is interesting that vicky mentioned the point that it is unusual to have a vote before a general election. watching those speeches, it was quite that these we re speeches, it was quite that these were cancer dents to talking to mps who have experience those issues. issues about fixing the wi—fi and harriet hierarchy were noticeable. you may only have been here for a couple of years, but that shouldn‘t mean that you don‘t get the opportunity to speak. these are issues that they candidates are aware that mps will be conscious of. if we were doing this after the election, there may be mps who were not aware of those things. it would
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appear that lindsay hoyle does seem very popular. in terms of reaction in terms of reaction to what he was saying, there was a good response from the chamber. a lot of people will be voting on record and personal characteristics. 0thers we re personal characteristics. 0thers were talking about how they would handle the role and making positive changes. chris bryant bryant and lindsay hoyle were noticeable. edward leigh picked up on the restoration and renewal question on whether the house should be decanted and where it could be decanted to to fix parts of westminster. it is things like that they do seem to strike a chord with members of parliament. they might be things that to an external observer might not seem that difficult, but in this election the mps are the electorate,
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and they were going away to cast their secret ballots, and we‘ll see who they decide to elect. if we get more than 50% straight off we will get a result quite soon. that's it. if not, people get knocked out and we have subsequent ballots. you‘re watching afternoon live. preparations for winter are well
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under way. the pressures are greater than ever. elections have already featured problem permanently. there was a warning that politicians need to be straight and play with voters saying that we thought it was important to urge politicians to be open and honest and realistic and clear about pallet promises that they make, and let‘s try and avoid getting into cheap political slogans and trying to weaponised this services. boroughmuir4.4 and trying to weaponised this services. boroughmuir 4.4 million people in england waiting for routine operations. imac there are 107,000 staff vacancies. so far, much of the argument has been about in whose hands the nhs is the safest. in these cases they need to make its case on the health service. i think they are right. it shouldn‘t
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be weaponised. that is why today i have been meeting with nhs staff to see what they have to say. some of the presenting should worry us and does worry herself. but the conservatives point to the money that they have already committed to the nhs that is why we have had this record investment and ongoing investment and record for the nhs. we have increased it that is only possible with a strong economy and making sure that we can fulfil their financial requirements in order to supply that care.
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recruiting more staff, managing growing demand from patients, improving the quality of care. these are the questions health service leaders want politicians to focus on. that may be a forlorn hope, in the heat of an election. dominic hughes, bbc news. the leader of plaid cymru, adam price, says he‘s consulting his members about an electoral alliance launching his party‘s campaign this morning mr price said wales is being ‘held back by westminster‘. plaid hopes to deny the conservatives a majority and stop brexit by working together in some constituencies with the liberal democrats and the greens. we have got huge problems that we need to fix in wales — rising child poverty, life expectancy falling, a creaking transport infrastructure. but how do we solve those problems? we don‘t solve them by simply putting jeremy corbyn or borisjohnson into downing street. we solve them by actually having the strongest ever welsh voice in westminster. and contrast the way that wales is often ignored, compare that to scotland where for over a decade now, the people of scotland have been voting for their party. and that has forced scotland
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right up to the top of the political agenda. and that is what we need to do for wales. the snp leader, nicola sturgeon has challenged borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn to a leaders debate. scotland‘s first minister said she would take on the conservative and labour leaders anytime and anywhere. her comments follow an official complaint from the lib dem leader, jo swinson of not being included in an itv leaders debate between the two main parties on november 19. sinn fein has confirmed the party won‘t stand three candidates in northern ireland constituencies in the general election. the party will not field candidates in south belfast, east belfast or north down, and are urging voters to back pro—remain parties. it follows a similar move from the ulster unionist party and the sdlp, who are not standing in north belfast to give sinn fein a better chance of beating the dup‘s deputy leader, nigel dodds. britain‘s national terrorism
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threat level has been lowered from "severe" to "substantial". announcing the move, home secretary priti patel said terrorism "remains one of the most direct and immediate risks" to national security. the threat level has been at "severe" since september 2017; it what has happened today? the set level has been at substantial since just after the... for five years, we have been considered to be highly likely from a terrorist threat. that has been lowered substantially for the first time in five years, which means that it is likely, and no longer highly likely. it is quite a significant moment after five years of worrying about the islamic state.
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these things take quite a long time and there is a six month timeframe. it isa and there is a six month timeframe. it is a coincidence after it comes after this high profile iris man was killed. before the fall of the islamic state, they lost the last bit of tension, they had the ability to pump out lots of tension to people in the west. they have the ability to guide and advise people in the west. lots of people taken into custody by the kurdish fighters, so their ability to pump out propaganda and tell people how to build devices, have massively degraded, and i think that is the most significant part influencing the decision. what does it mean to
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anybody walking down the high street? it doesn't really mean anything to ordinary people. truthfully, if you are suspicious of someone are worried about somebody, you need to go to the police and express your concern. it is really a threat level that is their first security professionals who can make decisions about what they do one protective security and what they do for the people they are responsible for. for a long time now, the decision has been made for... it doesn‘t really change how people should go about their daily lives, but it does mean that there is an assessment at the moment that the threat is actually slightly less thenit threat is actually slightly less then it has been for the last five yea rs. the death has been announced of rte broadcaster gay byrne
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at the age of eighty five, after a long illness. he was the presenter of ‘the late late show‘, one of the world‘s longest running chat shows, first airing in 1962. the show also featured discussions on issues such as divorce, abortion and lgbtq issues, which were then rarely spoken about on television. we can cross to belfast and speak well use the word institution about the presenter but he really was wasn‘t he? yes, he was. it won‘t be on television and radio is because of the nature of what he did. he was known for being the host of the late late show, one of the longest running chat shows in the world, that it still airs on a friday night for a couple of hours, and gave then that hosted it from 1969. —— from 1962. some of the discussions that he hosted on that show, featuring
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abortion as contraception, and lgbt issues, sent a shock to the nation at the time. they were probably seem pretty ta m e at the time. they were probably seem pretty tame by today‘s‘s standards. in the late late show on those discussions hosted by gay byrne, a seminal numbers where northern ireland was dominated by conservative government. it was a very dumb he also worked in the uk for granada television and the bbc for granada television and the bbc for a for granada television and the bbc fora time, for granada television and the bbc for a time, but it is without doubt his contribution to tv and radio into his home country of northern ireland for which it will be remembered. michael d higgins has said that he was one of the most distinctive voices of his time. such is the esteem with which he is held in ireland, they have started
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running tributes to him in the programme in northern ireland already. his death in the last couple of hours or so, he was 85 and had been ill for the some time. broadcasters will have noticed that he had the ability to combine serious stuff with that light entertainment, a light touch that... frankly, there was none better. absolutely. the late late show made a name for itself by combining light issues with the big names from the moment with serious current affairs. as the presenter of the show, he was to all intents and purposes he was the producer. so, that programme made a massive impact on northern ireland, and really generated so many iconic generation moments. it it was new when he began
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broadcasting in 1962. he really pioneered that style of broadcasting. he has left its mark on irish broadcasting like no other broadcaster has done. that is why i think we will be seeing over the next few hours and days tributes from all walks of life. . as you are speaking, leo radtke has tweeted i‘m sure there will be minimal from around the world, i suspect. in ireland, it generated so many major moments and it ended up being broadcasting many other countries. famous example was one of the interviews with gerry adams in the
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late 80s and early 90s. there were many moments which epitomise the journey of northern ireland from the state that it was into the state to get day, and the state that the current finds himself then. the director—general of rte, the irish broadcaster, said that gay byrne not only defined generations, but definitely arbitrated the growth and development of verdant nation. very few broadcasters around the world for whom that can be said i suspect. i don‘t know about you simon, but everywhere i went over the weekend there were a lot of firework demonstrations. people werejust moaning at me about the weather. how much rain they had seen in october, and when it was going to stop. they
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we re and when it was going to stop. they were measurable. some places get very excited when we have rain. take a look at this. that is how to celebrate. this is in new south wales. the cheek of the man. the ba refa ced wales. the cheek of the man. the barefaced cheek of the men. this was in new south wales. they had an inch of rain in six months, and actually, this is a farmer when they had 100 millimetres of i don‘t expect you to do that next time you see me, but it will stay wet, u nfortu nately. time you see me, but it will stay wet, unfortunately. because of low pressure and areas of low pressure in france spiralling around that low, still producing some rain. some heavy and some persistent across eastern scotland. sharp showers further south and west, some of these have the odd rumble of thunder and it is still pretty windy across the east coast of scotland. in terms of the feel of things, it is quite mild out there. we are looking at
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double digits widely across the country. but the story is set to change. so as we go through this evening, that where the front will continue to slip its way across the borders into the north east of england and we can with time. elsewhere, the showers died back to the coast. we will see the cloud breaking from time to time, but temperatures nestling around six to 7 degrees. we start off tomorrow morning still with some rain around, but a change in the forecast because that low moves after the near continent. and as it pushes its way into france, it takes with it that milder air. so into france, it takes with it that milderair. soa into france, it takes with it that milder air. so a noticeable difference in the feel of the weather from tomorrow onwards. a northerly wind feeling down that cool air across the country. it does meana cool air across the country. it does mean a relatively drier story on tuesday. still outbreaks of showery rain from time to time, driven in a log east facing coast. the further west you go, the best of the brighter weather and the temperatures are starting to tumble. not making double digits into scotla nd not making double digits into scotland at around nine or 12 celsius. the real cold weather is
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likely to arrive overnight on tuesday into wednesday. so the blue tones take over, temperatures dipping below freezing in a few spots. it will be a cold and possibly frosty start in sheltered eastern areas. that is where the best of any sunshine will be. could best of any sunshine will be. could be some early morning fog here as well, but further west, another front starts to show its hand. there will be outbreaks of rain further west. a bit of a west — east divide with the weather on wednesday. wetter to the west, we keep the clear skies with a noticeable difference in the feel of the weather. in this cooler theme is a to continue. not as heavy and widespread as it has been.
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this is bbc news. our latest headlines... a party political health warning, don‘t use us as "a political weapon" in the election campaign — the message to party leaders from nhs bosses. let‘s try and avoid getting into cheap political slogans and trying to weaponise the service‘s means —— asa to weaponise the service‘s means —— as a means of fighting a party political battle. mps electjohn bercow‘s successor as speaker of the house of commons later, in the first election for the post in more than a decade. 2,500 jobs at risk, as baby goods retailer mothercare says it plans to call in administrators at its 79 uk stores. the uk threat level from terrorism is reduced from severe to substantial — meaning an attack is no longer ‘highly likely‘ but ‘likely‘.
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just to let you know we are awaiting a press co nfe re nce just to let you know we are awaiting a press conference from the leader of the liberal democrats. that means imight of the liberal democrats. that means i might interrupt you, jane. in the meantime, welcome to sport. no, you should be saying that to me! it‘s momentous, it puts lewis hamilton second in the world of the all time greats of formula 1. people are still saying, "is it the man or the car?" formula 1 drivers have to be incredibly fit to withstand the g force. valerie bott asked, his team—mate has the same, and he has been managed to get beaten by a considerable amount. he has been second in the world of the greats of former one, and only one man in the world has won more titles. that is michael schumacher who has won seven. hamilton said afterwards that this
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had been the toughest season for him because, don‘t forget — three time champion and mercedes advisor niki lauda died earlier this year. he was instrumental in bringing lewis hamilton to mercedes. they were very close. hamilton also paid tribute to his father antony saying he always told him to never give up. jolyon palmer spent the best part of two seasons racing with hamilton and told us the world champion isn‘t getting the recognition he deserves. he is, he has almost been two dominant this year to get the plaudits he should get if he won it with a dramatic race in the finale, i‘m sure he would get a lot more praise than he actually does winning more races earlier on. and winning it with two races to go. it has become, to the outsider, a bit boring. that is just how good he is, really. it is a tough one for him. asi really. it is a tough one for him. as i said, number six, really. it is a tough one for him. as i said, numbersix, next really. it is a tough one for him. as i said, number six, next year number seven, that will tie him with michael schumacher for the all—time greatest achievement. that is the one that will be a big one in 12 months. two more races before the season
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ends — brazil and abu dhabi. england‘s rugby world cup finalists are back home. yes, it‘s a long trip back from japan without silverware. no—one‘s suggesting that this wasn‘t a good world cup for england. they had such convincing performances against australia and new zealand, but fell short in the final against south africa. some despondent faces there. 0ur sports correspondent, katie gornall, was at heathrow to meet them. this was not the homecoming that england‘s players and staff had envisaged. they had hoped to arrive here at heathrow with the trophy in their hand luggage. as it was, they arrived looking fairly dejected and despondent. they walked through here without speaking to the media, but he did speak to a few young fans who approached them to ask for a photo, really putting a brave face on things. you could tell that they are still licking their wounds, still smarting from what was a demoralising and comprehensive defeat at the hands of south africa. england, remember, were widely
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tipped to beat the springboks after demolishing the all blacks in the semifinal. but they were just unable to bring that same level of performance when it mattered on saturday evening. in the end, defeated by 20 points. eddiejones, england head coach, afterward was at a loss to fully explain where it all went wrong for his side. but he will have time to think about that, there will be an official review into the tournament, as there always is after major tournaments for the rfu. and i think england will reflect on a tournament that was really brimming with positivity until that final game. this is a young side with a bright future ahead of them. the players now in the meantime are going home to their friends and families. they have been in camps, training camps sincejune, and i think they deserve a well earned rest after what has been a physically and emotionally draining few weeks. the everton midfielder andre gomes has undergone surgery today to repair the horrific injury he sustained in their 1—1 draw with tottenham. everton have confirmed the operation
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on a fracture dislocation to his right ankle went well, and he is recovering in hospital. the portuguese midfielder was fouled by son hueng min before colliding with serge aurier. son was sent off for his role in the incident that left him, players, and supporters visibly distressed. his manager, marco silva, has backed him to come back stronger, whilst spurs are expected to appeal son‘s red card. ellen white has been called up to phil neville‘s squad for the first time since the world cup. the manchester city player only came back to club football last week after knee surgery. it means the striker, who won bronze in the golden boot award, will be available to face germany at wembley on the 9th of november in front of what‘s expected to be a sell out crowd. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. thank you very much. we are keeping an eye on what is happening at westminster. jo swinson is about to give a news conference. the lib dems having made a formal complaint after itv
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excluded the party from debating borisjohnson excluded the party from debating boris johnson and jeremy corbyn. excluded the party from debating borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn. we are expecting her to be referring to that. it will take you straight there as soon as we have it. millions of people in the indian capital delhi are being urged to stay indoors because of a toxic smog. it‘s the worst pollution there for years. some of the city‘s 20 million residents have been finding it hard to breathe, and their eyes have been itching and burning. other emergency measures include many schools being closed and a traffic restriction scheme, where people can only drive their cars every other day. from delhi, pratiksha ghildial reports. it‘s a real public health emergency. the air here is poisonous. by many accounts, this is the worst pollution in years. many are choosing to stay indoors, and those who do go out are experiencing health complications. because of this pollution level, you have so many symptoms,
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i have headache every day i wake up, and then it‘s suffocating to breathe also sometimes, and inflammation in the nostrils and the eyes also. like it kind of burns. for the last few days, delhi has barely seen any sunlight, because a thick layer of toxic smog hangs over it. delhi residents continue to breathe highly toxic air, as pollution levels remain severely high — even today. the government says it is doing what it can. private vehicles on the roads are being restricted, and schools remain shut. but critics say, when pollution levels are so high, delhi needs more drastic policy measures. delhi‘s city government is restricting the use of private vehicles on the capital‘s roads. from today until the 15th of november, only cars with either odd or even numberplates will be allowed on the roads each day. but many are sceptical, as this system has been used before.
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but it‘s not clear if it actually helps bring down pollution. of course it's ineffective in dealing with air pollution as an issue, you know. if air pollution was solely due to the vehicular traffic, then this would be a solution. right now, it cannot be a solution, because motorised, private transport has a very small share in the whole pie. another major cause of the high pollution levels is farmers, in neighbouring states, burning crop stubble to clear their fields, because they lack modern machinery. campaigners say there isn‘t enough political will to combat the problem. and, until that happens, delhi will continue to choke. pratiksha ghildial, bbc news, delhi. the former soviet leader mikhail gorbachev has warned that the current tensions between russia and the west are endangering the world. speaking to the bbc in an interview
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to mark the thirtieth anniversary of the fall of the berlin wall, mr gorbachev called for all countries to declare that nuclear weapons should be destroyed. he was speaking to our moscow correspondent, steve rosenberg. these days, it‘s rare to see mikhail gorbachev in front of a camera. aged 88, he avoids the limelight. "i‘m slowing down," he tells me. "i can barely stand up." but the man who helped to end the cold war has a message for the world — that his achievements are at risk. and one of his greatest achievements was ending the arms race between the soviet union and america. his diplomatic double act with ronald reagan slashed the two superpowers‘ nuclear arsenals. but the arms race has reignited.
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there is new tension and fierce rivalry between moscow and the west. how dangerous do you think the current confrontation is between russia and the west? translation: as long as weapons of mass destruction exist, nuclear weapons, the danger is colossal. we will take you to westminster, jo swinson has just arrived and is addressing a crowd outside the houses of parliament. it is so important, that in 2019, that our parliament and our politics properly represent the country that we are here to serve. and it is so important that that is the message, and i am delighted to lead a party that has 50 men and
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women mps. and it is why we are determined that the debates that ta ke determined that the debates that take place, the tv debates, about who will be the next prime minister of our country, cannot and should not exclude the only woman leader who is able to be the next prime minister. because i stand as a candidate to be prime minister, and as the leader of the biggest and strongest party of remain, it is a nonsense to suggest that these debates should go ahead, tap leave a verse lead, with no voice will remain whatsoever. the voice of millions of people who voted to remain, who wanted to stop brexit and stay in the european union must be hurt in those leaders debates. so as liberal democrats, we will take
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any action required to make sure that that voice of remain is represented in those debates. we are taking legal advice, and we will pursue legal avenues if itv do not change their format. because pursue legal avenues if itv do not change theirformat. because it pursue legal avenues if itv do not change their format. because it is so important that millions of remainers can make sure their voice is represented, that it is a fair debate between the different options on offer, and that for the girls and young women across our country, on offer, and that for the girls and young women across our country, that they see that a woman can be a political leaders and prime ministers too. any questions? we are taking advice on all of the possible avenues. we do not rule any out, we have had meetings with itv, and we will be following up with letters and legal action. and we will keep
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you informed about those steps as those actions progress. but we are very clear that we think that the 0fcom code gives good ground for saying that there should be the liberal democrat leader represented in that debate against borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn and that he will be the next prime minister of our country. you‘re not even the third party. you are not even the third party. you are not even the third party. we beat both labour and the conservatives in the national elections for the european parliament in may of this year. and so we are the largest and strongest party of remain, and we are a party standing right across the great british seat who can form that next government. in 2010, when our poll ratings were very similar to the ones we have now, gordon brown, david cameron, and nick clegg were the leaders in those debates. nine
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yea rs the leaders in those debates. nine years on, as i say, when we are on a similar poll ratings, i should be in those debates with borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn, and frankly, if they are refusing to debate me, it looks like they are sexist or they are scared or possibly both. you don't even get a question and prime minister is questions. will you boycott debates if this doesn't change? boycott debates if this doesn't change ? would boycott debates if this doesn't change? would you like to see other changes? we are determined to make this change. i would say that politics has changed quite a lot since 2017. notjust in terms of opinion polls, but in terms of where the parties stand, and where the fault line of our politics is. because it is no longer a left— right to divide, this is about our values and who we are as a country, whether we are open closed, liberal or authoritarian, and the liberal democrats are very clearly on one side of that political divide. the two title parties of labour and the
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conservatives, they are stuck in the past in the old way of doing things. we need to make sure the futures represent it in these debates. we need to make sure the futures represent it in these debatesm theresa may was still prime minister, she would be in this debate, do you genuinely believe this is a gender issue? they didn't have a clegg that exact problem having nick clegg in the debates, they didn‘t have a problem. having nick clegg in the debates, they didn't have a problem. he had three times as many mps as you. you need to look at the momentum and poll ratings. we are closer to the other parties in poll ratings, far closer than he was in 2010. the fact they were prepared to do that in 2010 but here in 2019 they are seeking to have a different format suggest to me that borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn have engaged in an establishment stitch up to say they will only debate each other, they will only debate each other, they will write out all the script the voice of millions of remainers across the country who also happens to bea across the country who also happens to be a woman. why are they so scared of taking on a girl? what do
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you make of the government's decision not to publish the national securitysecurity's committee report? it can be nothing short of suspicious that they have not published that report. i have not seen that report, but respected members of the intelligence committee like dominic grieve who have think it should be published. presumably because it is relevant to the election we are about to embark upon. and we need to make sure that we can have confidence in our elections, therefore that report should be published before parliament rises so that everybody can see what the government knows and what the threats are. i would market it is at stake, and it is hugely important that the report is published. what would you consider going head—to—head with nigel farage for example? i will debate anyone to ta ke for example? i will debate anyone to take on the cause of remain. it deserves to be represent it. we are
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exploring legal avenues and are confident we have a right to be in these debates, and that remain voters must have a voice. thank you very much indeed. jo swinson is the leader of the liberal democrats are surrounded by prospective parliamentary candidates standing at the election confirming they are that the party is taking legal advice. this is over and itv debate. they have already made a formal contract they have already made a formal co ntra ct to they have already made a formal contract to itv having been excluded from the debate between boris johnson and jeremy corbyn. the party president said thatjo swinson should be taking part in the november 19 showdown. she has written to the itv chief executive saying that voters deserve to hear from a remainer, notjust from two men who want to deliver brexit. as we heard that, jo swinson not actually issuing a legal challenge, but saying that they are still seeking legal advice. we will keep an eye on any of elephants on that. that is happening in westminster as
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we sort live a moment ago. we will keep an eye on any developments on that. we were watching an expletive interview with mikhail gorbachev. —— we we re interview with mikhail gorbachev. —— we were watching an exclusive interview with mikhail gorbachev. the bbc russian senior correspondent 0lga ivshina is here. how h ow ofte n how often do russians hear from gorbachev? very rarely. there is not that much demand from the russian audience, because russian tv at the moment is totally state—controlled, it doesn‘t like to go back to those images, doesn‘t like to go back to that period which is considered a period of national disgrace almost. the ending of the soviet union? as
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president putin called the end of the soviet union a tragedy, the biggest tragedy of the 20th century. it was interesting hearing from gorbachev talking about the increased dangers and how the cold war hadn‘t gone away. he didn‘t want to mention vladimir putin.|j war hadn‘t gone away. he didn‘t want to mention vladimir putin. i think they are both politicians, even though gorbachev isn‘t active that much at the moment for the piece the remains of a politician. that is why he is always careful with his a nswe rs. he is always careful with his answers. he never opposes putin openly. but by intonation you can see that definitely there is a certain disagreements between the first and last president of the united states and president of russia. watching it in this country, russia. watching it in this country, russia made a warning about the dangers, when it appears to us that russia is a very constant and present threat. i think it is interesting to note the attitude
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towards gorbachev is totally different here and in russia. here, he is viewed as a saviour, as a person who made sure from the transition from the soviet union to russia was peaceful, the fall of the berlin wall was peaceful, that the withdrawal of soviet troops from eastern europe was peaceful. in russia, by the majority of the publishing, he is seen as a traitor. by publishing, he is seen as a traitor. by the majority? yes, this nostalgic feeling for what was the soviet union is still there. many people, especially those above 40 years old still dream that the soviet union would come back or something in some form. it sounds like wanting to go back to the stars. we are looking at the 30 year anniversary of the wall coming down, it is interesting that there is almost affection in the west foot mikhail gorbachev because of that. it is how you put your
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accents. he in the west —— here in the west, people give him credit. that is absolutely a thing that should be done, i guess. he made sure that there was no major war, that the withdrawal of troops was peaceful. in russia, many people see it as peaceful. in russia, many people see itasa peaceful. in russia, many people see it as a personal tragedy and remember that, for exam for those of soldiers who are leaving east germany, they had nowhere to return. the units weren‘t ready for them. there was no infrastructure. they we re there was no infrastructure. they were stateless? they were stationed in forests or fields for months. that is how they see it. it is interesting that both sides are seeing only one part of the story. former leaders in the west are fated, they tend to live quite well. what do we know about gorbachev? does he live in moscow? he has protection and lives well. the only thing he makes sure he isn‘t that bothered by russian press,
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especially some outlets which seek for yellow news. what is yellow news? like tabloids. why is it called yellow news? is it what something like we would call red top news? something like that. he wants to make sure he is not reached by the tabloids. he only speaks to people he trusts. and the bbc reporter is one of those. thank you very much. always good to see you. most of us glad to see the back of 0ctober, it really has been quite an u nsettled 0ctober, it really has been quite an unsettled month. the start of november has been wet and windy so far. through the middle part of the week, it will turn noticeably colder with a dry interlude before more rain returns. for the time being, it is unsettled out there. low pressure
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in the driving seat and spiralling a bit like a catherine wheel around that low as several frontal systems produce rain. so far today, it has been a case of sunny spells and scattered showers across england and wales with more persistent rain in scotla nd wales with more persistent rain in scotland which could lead to localised flooding before it is true. 0n localised flooding before it is true. on top of that, we have gusty winds across eastern scotland as well. for the rest of the afternoon, it does look as though those temperatures will be around ten to 12 celsius, 11 to 12 further south. the rain in scotland will drift its way across the borders and weaken as it pushes into northern england. most of the showers elsewhere will die back towards exposed coasts. a few showers around, temperatures holding at around six or seven celsius. there will be some clear interlude in between. we are going to start off tuesday morning with bits and pieces of light rain around. but that area of low pressure, i am pleased to say, is easing away. that means there is a north—easterly flow which will turn ita north—easterly flow which will turn it a bit colder from the north over the next few days. you really will
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notice the difference when you are out and about. we start off on tuesday still with some outbreaks of light rain across north—east england stretching down through wales, the midlands, but weakening all the time. behind it, clearspells and sunshine coming through, but still the northerly wind driving a few showers on exposed coasts. single figures is a daytime maximum for most of scotland, elsewhere there will be highs of ten to 12 celsius. now, with clearer skies through tuesday night, we will see the blue tones which denote the temperatures will fall below freezing in real spots on wednesday morning. it will bea spots on wednesday morning. it will be a colder start, but a crisper start with sunshine around. maybe a bit of patchy fog, but elsewhere the frost and fog will lift and we will see some decent spells of sunshine across eastern england. not for long before the next batch of wet and windy weather starts to push into the extreme south—west. wednesday will be a cool day with temperatures struggling from five to 10 degrees. the temperatures are still going to struggle and more rain to look out
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for.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. today at 4pm... a party political health warning: don‘t use us as "a political weapon" in the election campaign — the message to party leaders from nhs bosses. liberal democrat leader jo swinson says she will pursue legal avenues if her remain—backing party is not included in the itv leaders debate. 0rtake any 0r take any action required to make sure that that voice of remain is represented in those debates. we are taking legal advice and we will pursue legal avenues if itv do not change their format. order, order. and a new order —
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mps electjohn bercow‘s successor as speaker of the house of commons, in the first election for the post in more than a decade. the uk threat level from terrorism is reduced from severe to substantial — meaning an attack is no longer ‘highly likely‘ but ‘likely‘. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. lewis hamilton says that it feels so real to have a six formula 1 champion championship title. that is just one behind michael schumacher‘s all—time record of seven. thanks. and we‘ll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past. louise has all the weather. it was a wet and windy weather at time but we will see some improvement today. things will calm down over the week. i will have all the details shortly. thanks, louise. also coming up... once one of the two most powerful people in the world, we‘ll hear from the former soviet leader mikhail gorbachev,
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who, in a bbc interview, warns has that current tension between russia and the west is putting the world in "colossal danger" due to the threat from nuclear weapons. health service leaders in england are warning politicians not to use the nhs as a weapon in the general election campaign. nhs providers, which represents hospitals and other health trusts, warns all the parties against making ‘empty promises‘ and creating ‘unrealistic expectations‘. the future of the health service will be a key election battleground, with the parties already promising billions of pounds of extra spending. our health correspondent dominic hughes reports. the state of the health service is always a key election issue. but this time, votes will be cast as the nhs enters its most testing time of year. preparations for winter are well under way, but the pressures are greater than ever.
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the nhs has already featured prominently in the election campaign — but there is a warning that politicians need to be straight and clear with voters. we thought it was sensible, at the beginning of the campaign, to basically urge politicians to be honest and open and realistic and clear about the promises that they make. and let‘s try and avoid getting into cheap political slogans and trying to weaponise the service, as a means of fighting a party political battle. to illustrate the scale of the challenge, nhs providers says there are now 4.4 million people waiting for routine operations. 107,000 staff vacancies. so far, much of the argument has been about in whose hands the nhs is safest. with labour blaming the conservatives for cancelled operations and longer waiting lists.
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some of the evidence that they are presenting, should worry a soul, and the message from them, we need more respect more resources and we want to end the privatisation of the nhs. but the conservatives already point to the that they‘ve put into the nhs. that's why we had this record investment and ongoing investment, with a long—term plan for the nhs. we've increased the capital spending, in order to make sure we get new equipment, new buildings, which help make sure that patients come first in the nhs and are supported by the conservative government. that's only possible with a strong economy and making sure that we can fulfil the financial requirements, in order to provide that care. recruiting more staff, managing growing demand from patients, improving the quality of care. these are the questions health service leaders want politicians to focus on.
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that may be a forlorn hope, in the heat of an election. dominic hughes, bbc news. the liberal democrats are seeking legal advice over their exclusion from the first tv election leaders debate. the only tv contest ahead of december‘s snap poll to be announced so far is a head—to—head between boris johnson and jeremy corbyn on itv. the liberal democrat leader, jo swinson, is promising to "take any action required" to ensure she can join the tv debate: we are determined that the debates that take place, the tv debates about who will be the next prime minister of our country cannot and should not exclude the only woman leader who is able to be the next prime minister because i stand as a candidate to be prime minister, and as the leader of the biggest and strongest party of remain. it is a nonsense to suggest that these debates should go ahead, leave
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versus leave, with no voice for remain whatsoever. the voice of the millions of people who voted to remain, who want to stop brexit and stay in the european union must be heard in those debates. and so, as liberal democrats, we will take any action required to make sure that that voice of remain is represented in those debates. we are taking legal advice and we will pursue legal advice and we will pursue legal avenues if itv do not change their format, because it legal avenues if itv do not change theirformat, because it is legal avenues if itv do not change their format, because it is so important that millions of remain as can make sure their voices represented, that it is a fair debate between the different options on offer and that for the girls and young women across our country, see that women can be political leaders
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and prime ministers too. our home affairs correspondent, tom symonds, was listening to that speech in westminster. she is angry. she is angry and is taking two prong approach to fighting itv and this decision to read borisjohnson fighting itv and this decision to read boris johnson and jeremy corbyn. it is about refusing a very seniorfemale corbyn. it is about refusing a very senior female politician to corbyn. it is about refusing a very seniorfemale politician to be part of this debate, and for a remain backing mp to be also part of the debate. when asked who they are legal action will be against, she suggested that itv might be a target of that legal action, and she said that 0fcom which covers programmes broadcast during the election period did seem to suggest that she might be included. the code says that broadcasters much must take account
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of broad support. liberal democrats we re of broad support. liberal democrats were 32% behind the labour party last time they were pulled. —— in previous polls. but in most recent polls they fared much better. they should be a balance given to that position. she could equally argue that the liberal democrat position regarding brexit make that something that should be part of this decision. it seems to be a staple of modern campaigns, a book to row about the broadcasts to start with. there are calls to be some sort of legal framework in future to stop this sort of thing. exactly. because there isn‘t any legal framework at there isn‘t any legal framework at the moment. if you look at the 0fcom code, it doesn‘t talk about these debates, which have become a massively hot political potato for
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the broadcasters to rest. itv have come out early to say what their plans are, they are also planning a seven way debate for political leaders. the other broadcasters are working their way gingerly around the issue. the bbc say they are not quite there yet in their negotiations with the party. of course, any party can potentially pull the plug on what is being suggested by the broadcasters. labour and conservatives have the biggest ability to do that. and there is a call for this to be formalised, and we might see more cover this in future. the snp leader, nicola sturgeon, has challenged borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn to a leaders‘ debate. scotland‘s first minister said she would take on the conservative and labour leaders anytime and anywhere. the leader of plaid cymru, adam price, says he‘s consulting his members about an electoral alliance with other remain—supporting parties. launching his party‘s campaign this morning mr price said wales is being ‘held back by westminster‘. plaid hopes to deny the conservatives a majority
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and stop brexit by working together in some constituencies with the liberal democrats and the greens. we have got huge problems that we need to fix in wales — rising child poverty, life expectancy falling, a creaking transport infrastructure. but how do we solve those problems? we don‘t solve them by simply putting jeremy corbyn or borisjohnson into downing street. we solve them by actually having the strongest ever welsh voice in westminster. and contrast the way that wales is often ignored, compare that to scotland where for over a decade now, the people of scotland have been voting for their party. and that has forced scotland right up to the top of the political agenda. and that is what we need to do for wales. sinn fein has confirmed the party won‘t stand three candidates in northern ireland constituencies in the general election. the party will not field candidates in south belfast, east belfast or north down, and are urging voters to back pro—remain parties. it follows a similar move from the ulster unionist party
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and the sdlp, who are not standing in north belfast to give sinn fein a better chance of beating the dup‘s deputy leader, nigel dodds. the brexit party has unveiled its general election candidates this afternoon. leader nigel farage said the party will stand in more than 600 seats after borisjohnson rejected an electoral pact to deliver a majority of brexit—backing mps. mr farage said the party could "exert a great influence" if there‘s a hung parliament after the election and said there would be no brexit without the brexit party. i want the country, in this election to have a genuine choice. i want the country to know the sheer extent of labour betrayal. i want the country to know that this new eu treaty is not brexit, and if it goes through, we will never get independence in our nation. and to that end, as your leader, it is not the last time that you will be seeing me in the next few weeks.
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because what is more important... applause what is more important than me being hunkered down in a constituency, fighting to get myself elected... what is more important than that, ithink, and i believe, and i hope you support me, is what i can do with and for all of you. i‘m with you. i‘m going to be out there supporting you. let‘s fight this election, and let‘s win. thank you. applause mps are currently voting on a new speaker of the house of commons, following the retirement ofjohn bercow. mr bercow stood down last week after ten years in the role. each of the seven candidates addressing the chamber this afternoon, and a result is expected shortly. the contenders include the current deputy speaker, lindsay hoyle and former deputy prime minister harriet harman. i‘m joined now byjill rutter, a senior research fellow at the uk in a changing europe.
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so, we are waiting for a clear majority, so in the next few minutes we might actually know who this is. what did you make of the pictures from the various contenders?” thought the most interesting thing was that they all contain quite a lot of implicit criticism of the previous speaker. quite a lot of comments about that than speaker should be... chris bryant said that he should be an umpire and that a player. another said that they wouldn‘t speak as much. i think that was interesting because we had glowing tributes, at the end of the last session overseen byjohn bercow. it was quite an interesting contrast. i think they also raise quite a lot of the issues that the forthcoming speaker will have to
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deal with. there was a lot of in—house stuff like bad wi—fi. it was very close to home. we are actually watching an election in which none of us have votes. there is quite a lot about the restoration and renewal of that big project, to decant the house of commons. people we re decant the house of commons. people were saying they might have different ways of doing it. quite a lot of people making it clear about bullying, and actually, she made that interesting comment about interesting —— good mps to work for bad mps to work for. i thought there was an interesting pitch. 0ther issues where the security of mps. in the last few days, we have seen mps saying that they don‘t feel safe and there are warnings for mps not to go out on their own. so this is pitching to a very narrow electorate. that is the point. it is not pitching to you and me. it is
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pitching to the votes of the 600 plus mps voting today. we just have these pictures coming in. so, we are expecting the result of that first vote now. this is the result of the first ballot. the total number of ballots cast was 562. the number of votes cast for each candidate in alphabetical order was as follows. chris bryant, 98. ms harriet harman, 72. meg hillier, ten. sir lindsay hoyle, 211. dame eleanor laing, 113.
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sir edward leigh, 12. dame rosie winterton, 46. there were no spoilt ballots. a remarkable achievement for this particular assembly. firstly, no member received more than the 50% of the ballots cast, so, we proceed to a further ballot. meg hillier received the fewest votes, and sir edward leigh, also received fewer than 5% of the ballots cast. so, under the rules, they both leave the contest. before i confirmed the list of candidates for the next ballot, i now invite
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any candidate who wishes to withdraw to inform me in the chamber within the next ten minutes. that means that i sit here for ten minutes... waiting for each of the candidates to carefully consider their position, and then come to inform me if they wish to in —— withdraw from the ballot. and we would have to have new ballot papers printed before we actually go to the next round of printing. but the present position is that the house is now adjourned again, and in ten minutes‘ time, i will announce the candidates who are proposing to proceed to the second round of the ballot. oh, heck. they have to print more ballot papers for the next round.
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this does take a long time. i did warn you , this does take a long time. i did warn you, last time it took hours and hours to go through this. i do think that ken clarke should write out the ballot papers himself. that could be quicker. lindsay hoyle, eve ryo ne could be quicker. lindsay hoyle, everyone had said in advance, was the clear favourite. everyone had said in advance, was the clearfavourite. some had predicted he might get to 50% in the next round. now it is all about seeing what happens to the votes of those who drop out. and let‘s see if...i those who drop out. and let‘s see if... ithink those who drop out. and let‘s see if... i think chris bryant said —— was thought to have made and a good speech. the result of the ballot now is whether people do vote on ballot
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that line —— party lines are not. somebody they trust in somebody who they thought would be impartial. that has been the theme through the speeches. a lot of them, without naming john bercow, have claimed they will approach this in a different way, namely by not talking as much, seem to be the general consensus. as much, seem to be the general consensus. it was more about him thanit consensus. it was more about him than it was about ventures. they don‘t want to get as involved and they don‘t want to get as high—profile as he was. let‘s see what happens as ken clarke sits there in his chair over the next five minutes. why was there a big do? i think that was because there we re do? i think that was because there were a lot not voting. i don‘t know if they were from a particular party or not, but of course this is happening during a general election. now this doesn‘t particularly ——
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technically happen until tomorrow night, but these may be people wanting to hang onto their seats, rather than coming out this afternoon they are on the campaign trail. there have been over ten yea rs trail. there have been over ten years since the last one. there are some here that say it was a long way to come down from scotland. presumably the mps live in scotland. yes. one area that people will be familiar with, is that once people do get a result, the opposition is then dragged against their will into position. yes, they are reluctantly taken to the chair, to symbolise the fa ct taken to the chair, to symbolise the fact that they are there, not for themselves, but elected by the house of commons to give the house of commons assay. this is all about, and has been underjohn bercow, giving backbench mps, not part of
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the government, a voice and being able to question the decisions of the government a lot more. that is what happened withjohn bercow. particularly ringing an urgent question, so an issue that is compelling on the day can be discussed in parliament. in the old days, you might have a huge story going on somewhere that was very important, but unless somebody came to talk about it in the house of commons, it may not be mentioned all day. that has changed. john bercow used to allow a lot of those to take place. is sure 2pm cues got a bit of a cheer. and the issue with that is that it used to be half an hour and then got to 45 and 50 minutes. i looked at the clock the other day, and as jeremy corbyn looked at the clock the other day, and asjeremy corbyn was asking his sixth question, it was 25 past 12.
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so the problem then, is that the backbenchers don‘t get as their questions. that means it is all about the front benches. if you go back to 35 minutes. you do have to say to the leader of the opposition they have to ask a shorter question, because it does crowd out the backbench mps. net i will come back to you a bit later. let‘s come back to you a bit later. let‘s come back to the studio. it was an interesting response. there are two clear contenders, lindsay hoyle and chris bryant. where does party politics now kick in? doesn‘t it? bryant. where does party politics now kick in? doesn't it?” bryant. where does party politics now kick in? doesn't it? ithought what was interesting was the low score for harriet harman who, clearly, to the public is the
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best—known of all those candidates. i think she got 70. rosie winterton got 46. a former deputy of the leading labour party harriet harman, very much a speaker in their berkel mode, and it is very interesting that she seems to have not got that far because she has quite a distinctive pitch to the others. it is interesting that chris bryant was doing very well because he‘s sort of... to an outsider that looked... the interesting thing is that this is just the role that chris bryant once. you think that this is the guy that really, really wants the job,
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andi that really, really wants the job, and i think the other interesting thing is that eleanor laing... she said this was too uncomfortable listening. i think they meddle in their lang is an interesting candidate. she is quite low—key. she is possibly emerging as being alternative, quieter speaker. harriet harman made a very big pitch for the fact that there has only been one woman speaker and 156 male speakers. so, if you wanted to go with that, let‘s go with another woman, may be dame eleanor laing is looking stronger than some people had expected. i am trying to look at the screen to see if anybody has gone to ken clarke to say they
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withdraw. it is hard to tell. you can see michael gove in the foreground. michael gove supported chris bryant which has an interesting move. now it is a secret ballot, people can say what they wa nt ballot, people can say what they want behind closed doors, can they? the speaker doesn‘t have quite so many favours to pursue. i thought an interesting theme from the speakers was that seniority wasn‘t going to get quite as big a hearing as it did underjohn bercow. there will be more chance for newer members to speak. that was one of the things that was interesting about the brexit debates. you could also —— almost exactly predict the order in which he was going to call members. this is being elected by house which
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is about to dissolve, so those who would benefit most from that are probably out to be elected, out on doorsteps today trying to be out on doorsteps today trying to be out on doorstep —— trying to be elected for the first time. we have a cluck at the first time. we have a cluck at the bottom there, and the club in the bottom there, and the club in the house of commons as well which says just after 25 past four. we will return to the house as we get to the next stage. it's quite fun. i quite like elections even if we don‘t get a vote. the question is will it make much difference? john bercow has had a great role in making parliament more topical, but perhaps he gets it slightly too far. he wisdom a lot behind the scenes.
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he wisdom a lot behind the scenes. he has achieved much.” he wisdom a lot behind the scenes. he has achieved much. i think, raising the profile of the debates in the chamber, it used to be, when i was in the chamber, it used to be, when iwasa in the chamber, it used to be, when i was a civil servant, once in a blue moon you were answered and urgent question, and usually you could rely on the speaker. it wasn‘t exactly parliament dominating the news agenda. i think that has been a good new development even if it will be reined back slightly. he has a lwa ys be reined back slightly. he has always made it interesting in that sense. but one of the reasons that john bercow has had such a high profile has clearly been because of brexit, and there has been lots of business on the floor of the house, and we have had a minority government trying to govern us.
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kenneth clarke is back on his feet. the next ballot will be open as soon as the ballot papers have been printed, checked and put in place, which is likely to be in about 20 minutes. this is an early stage of these proceedings. we haven‘t made a great deal of progress. i will cause the bells to be run as soon as the luvvies are ready. the ballot will start. as before, members will have 20 minutes to vote. cani can i suggest that the honourable member comes to the table and tries
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to explain what the point is.” think colleagues know who has dropped out. it seems utterly absurd not tojust dropped out. it seems utterly absurd not to just reprint the ballot dropped out. it seems utterly absurd not tojust reprint the ballot paper so people don't put nx. it seems absurd. with great respect, these arrangements do need revising and various other respects. with the arrangements we have, it is not possible to know who the candidates we re possible to know who the candidates were for the next round, until a proper opportunity was given for the candidates who wish to withdraw withdraw. i declare the house is suspended until the next stage of the proceedings. we will return to the proceedings. we will return to the house of commons for the next spade —— stage in this nail—biting
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contest, which is reaching fever pitch now. we will return when we know something is about to happen. the key will be on standby as well. we are all geared up for that. when the next stage of this result... there are other stages that we could get to, but obviously, there is some frustrating —— frustration that the process is taken so long already. let‘s have a look at the weather. the step most of us glad to see the back of october, it really has been quite an unsettled month. the start of november has been wet and windy so far. through the middle part of the week, it will turn noticeably colder with a dry interlude before more rain returns. for the time being, it is unsettled out there. low pressure in the driving seat and spiralling a bit like a catherine wheel around that low as several frontal systems produce rain. so far today, it has been a case of sunny spells and scattered
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showers across england and wales with more persistent rain in scotland which could lead to localised flooding before it is true. on top of that, we have gusty winds across eastern scotland as well. for the rest of the afternoon, it does look as though those temperatures will be around ten to 12 celsius, 11 to 12 further south. the rain in scotland will drift its way across the borders and weaken as it pushes into northern england. most of the showers elsewhere will die back towards exposed coasts. a few showers around, temperatures holding at around six or seven celsius. there will be some clear interludes in between. we are going to start off tuesday morning with bits and pieces of light rain around. but that area of low pressure, i am pleased to say, is easing away. that means there is a north—easterly flow which will turn it a bit colder from the north over the next few days. you really will notice the difference when you are out and about. we start off on tuesday still with some outbreaks of light rain across north—east england stretching down through wales, the midlands, but weakening all the time. behind it, clearer spells and sunshine coming through, but still the northerly wind driving
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a few showers on exposed coasts. single figures is a daytime maximum for most of scotland, elsewhere there will be highs of ten to 12 celsius. now, with clearer skies through tuesday night, we will see the blue tones which denote the temperatures will fall below freezing in real spots on wednesday morning. it will be a colder start, but a crisper start with sunshine around. maybe a bit of patchy fog, but elsewhere the frost and fog will lift and we will see some decent spells of sunshine across eastern england. not for long before the next batch of wet and windy weather starts to push into the extreme south—west. wednesday will be a cool day with temperatures struggling from five to 10 degrees. the temperatures are still going to struggle and more rain to look out for.
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this is bbc news. our latest headlines... a party political health warning: don‘t use us as "a political weapon" in the election campaign — the message to party leaders from nhs bosses. liberal democrat leaderjo swinson says she will pursue legal avenues if her remain—backing party is not included in the itv leaders‘ debate. we will take any action required to make sure that that voice of remain is represented in those debates. we are taking legal advice, and we will pursue legal avenues if itv do not change the format. the uk threat level from terrorism is reduced from severe to substantial — meaning an attack is no longer ‘highly likely‘ but ‘likely‘. it isa it is a remarkable achievement for lewis hamilton. it‘s momentous, it puts
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lewis hamilton second in the world of the all time greats of formula 1. only one man in the world has won more titles, and that‘s michael schumacher who won seven. hamilton said afterwards that this had been the toughest season for him because, don‘t forget — three—time champion and mercedes advisor niki lauda died earlier this year. he was a bit of a mental for lewis hamilton. —— he was a bit of a mentorfor hamilton. —— he was a bit of a mentor for lewis hamilton. he was instrumental in bringing lewis hamilton to mercedes. hamilton also paid tribute to his father antony saying he always told him to never give up. jolyon palmer spent the best part of two seasons racing with hamilton and told us the world champion isn‘t getting the recognition he deserves. he has almost been too dominant this year to get the plaudits he should get. if he won it with a dramatic race in the finale, i‘m sure he would get a lot more praise than he actually does winning more races earlier on. and winning it with two races to go. it has become, to the outsider, a bit boring.
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that is just how good he is, really. it is a tough one for him. as i said, this year number six, next year number seven, that will tie him with michael schumacher for the all—time greatest achievement. that is the one that will be a big one in 12 months. two more races before the season ends — brazil and abu dhabi. england‘s rugby players are back home? yes, it‘s a long trip back from japan without the webb ellis trophy. no—one‘s suggesting that this wasn‘t a good world cup for england. they had such convincing performances against australia and new zealand, but fell short in the final against south africa. some despondent faces there. 0ur sports correspondent, katie gornall, was at heathrow to meet them. this was not the homecoming that england‘s players and staff had envisaged. they had hoped to arrive here at heathrow with the trophy in their hand luggage. as it was, they arrived looking fairly dejected and despondent. they walked through here without speaking to the media, but they did speak to a few young
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fans who approached them to ask for a photo, really putting a brave face on things. you could tell that they are still licking their wounds, still smarting from what was a demoralising and comprehensive defeat at the hands of south africa. england, remember, were widely tipped to beat the springboks after demolishing the all blacks in the semifinal. but they were just unable to bring that same level of performance when it mattered on saturday evening. in the end, defeated by 20 points. eddiejones, england head coach, afterward was at a loss to fully explain where it all went wrong for his side. but he will have time to think about that, there will be an official review into the tournament, as there always is after major tournaments for the rfu. and i think england will reflect on a tournament that was really brimming with positivity until that final game. this is a young side with a bright future ahead of them. the players now, in the meantime, are going home to their friends and families. they have been in camps, training camps sincejune, and i think they deserve a well earned rest after what has been
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a physically and emotionally draining few weeks. the everton midfielder andre gomes has undergone surgery today to repair the horrific injury he sustained in their 1—1 draw with tottenham. everton have confirmed the operation on a fracture dislocation to his right ankle went well, and he is recovering in hospital. the portuguese midfielder was fouled by son hueng min before colliding with serge aurier. son was sent off for his role in the incident that left him, players, and supporters visibly distressed. his manager, marco silva, has backed him to come back stronger, whilst spurs are expected to appeal son‘s red card. the leeds united goalkeeper kiko casilla has been charged by the fa over an alleged racial abuse of the charlton playerjonathan leko. the fa have been investigating the former real madrid keeper since the alleged incident, which is said to have taken place during leeds‘s match against charlton on the 28th of september. leeds have acknowledged the charge and say the player plans to appeal. casilla has until next tuesday to officially respond.
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if found guilty, the spaniard faces a minimum six week ban. that‘s all the sport for now. now it‘s time for news nationwide. now on afternoon live, let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country, in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. north west tonight‘s rogerjohnson is in salford, there he is. he‘ll be following up on saturday‘s story about the government pulling the lug on fracking. did they mean plug? i think the script might be wrong. they are trying to stop fracking anyway! and in birmingham is mary rhodes where the team at midlands today have been covering the opening of the 2019 royal british legion field of remembrance, back with you shortly, mary. but first, roger, the government announced a ban on fracking for the foreseeable
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future at the weekend. what does that mean for the site up there? there is a site on the new new road which has been a site of fracking. that fracking is putting high pressure into shale rock to fracture it and the gas rises back through the liquid and is collected at the surface. they have done some tracks there over the last year or so, and over the course of that, they have started to release some of the shale gas. however, all the way along, there has been a limit of 80.5 magnitude tremor which has meant that if it goes above that, they need to stop for 18 hours. they had numerous situations where that happened. they say that is because the regulations are so tight. however, back in august, a 2.9 magnitude tremorforced however, back in august, a 2.9 magnitude tremor forced an indefinite pause. the oil and gas authority then got involved and wrote a report and at the weekend, they came out and said the ban will
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now be indefinite. in terms of what it means for the site, not a lot, because nothing has happened there since august. because they haven‘t been fracking since about 2.9 magnitude earth tremor then. however, it does put an indefinite break on the developments in the process there. and those protesting against the operation of the site must be pleased? extinction rebellion, protesters, campaigners, labour said they would ban it, lib dems say they would ban it. the conservatives who haven‘t been behind shale gas, they say it is an important transition fuel for us to be able to use our own gas reserves rather than importing from other countries to help us to move towards a greener future. other countries to help us to move towards a greenerfuture. that other countries to help us to move towards a greener future. that is what the government has said, they are trying to exploit this natural resource. however, you are right, those who are against it are
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delighted that this cessation is indefinite. my reaction initially was indefinite. my reaction initially was cautious optimism, and i was concerned that it might be electioneering by the conservative party. i can't see how they can do that. we are going nowhere. we are not naive or complacent, until the day when that site is closed down, we are going nowhere. why would you continue to take a fossil fuel out of the ground when we are meant to be committing to reducing our carbon emissions? the reason they are not going anywhere is because this is not an outright ban, it is not a definite. there is a suspicion, cynics say, that the government will stop this because of this particular finding from the oil and gas authority. what they have said, andrea leadsom the business secretary has said, they will always listen to the science and the science on this occasion says that they can't predict how big and how bad the earth tremors will be. and
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until they can really drill down into that a bit better, if you will excuse the pun, they will keep this ban in place. what driller, the company behind it, they say they will work to address concerns so the moratorium can be lifted —— won say they will work to address concerns. roger, thank you very much. the field of remembrance is moving ceremony, field of remembrance is moving ceremony, what has been happening today? the royal british legion's field of remembrance officially opened at the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire earlier today. the tributes planted each carry a personal message to someone who lost their life in the service of their country. the field makes a very impressive site with up to 10,000 individual tributes from members of the public. the field cove rs members of the public. the field covers around in a car, set aside for two weeks as a site to visit and reflect. it removes civilians as well as service personnel who have
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been affected by conflict, and row upon row of tributes with their scarlet poppies, personal messages and photographs really bring home the individual stories behind those very large numbers. veterans of conflict, some from d—day 75 years ago, joined in the act of remembrance earlier today. what was the reaction from those? because as you say, different people have different reasons for going to these symmetries. lots of memories for each of them. everyone has a story, and you can see that in the tributes and you can see that in the tributes and certainly in those who came along to the service of remembrance. the whole of the national memorial arboretum is incredibly powerful at any time of year. but there is something about the simplicity of this field of remembrance which are particularly moving. the names, mostly written on crosses, but there are symbols of other faiths too, a reminder of the scale of the loss of life over the years and why it is so important to commemorate them.”
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think it is always well to remember because you can't just forget those who gave so much, can you? you have got to do this, you have. they tell just one story mode reminds you of what it was all about. and quite frankly, it is very impressive, we have people who were affected by war in theirown have people who were affected by war in their own homes. if you think about terrorist attacks, i think people want to remember the civilians as well as the service personnel who have sacrificed or been affected by war and conflict. the royal british legion seizes not only as a place to remember, but also as reminder not to nurture what could be potential conflict between neighbours or nations. and the field is open for anyone to visit until the 17th of november. mary, another 20 more on your programme tonight on six 30p on bbc one. roger, how much trouble did you get into when i
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mention of the state of the sofa last time? are you going to do it ain? last time? are you going to do it again? what has happened? they still haven‘t fixed it! this is notjust the north west tonight sofa, it is the north west tonight sofa, it is the breakfast sofa. don't, you'll get fired! roger, ican‘t the breakfast sofa. don't, you'll get fired! roger, i can‘t believe you have just done that! it is covered by my bottom. thank you, roger. if you would like to see any more on those stories, you can access them via the bbc iplayer. a reminder that we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm here on afternoon at 4:30pm here on afternoon live —— here on afternoon live. britain‘s national terrorism threat level has been lowered from "severe" to "substantial". announcing the move,
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home secretary priti patel said terrorism "remains one of the most direct and immediate risks" to national security. the threat level has been at "severe" since september 2017. it had previously been moved up to "critical" following the manchester arena attack that killed 22 people. earlier, i spoke to out home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford. setting aside the manchester attack, when we did move to critical, the threat level in britain has been substantial since just after the caliphate was declared by the so—called islamic state in iraq 2014. so, for five years we‘ve been at severe, which meant that an attack was considered to be highly likely, and today, that threat level has moved down to substantial. that‘s for the first time in five years, which means that while an attack is still assessed to be likely, it is no longer assessed to be highly likely. so, it is quite a significant moment after five years of worrying, really, about the threat from the islamic state. of course, within the last week, news of the death of abu bakr al—baghdadi. yes, these things take quite a long
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time, so a six—month timeframe over which these threat levels are assessed and looked at, and i think it is a little bit of a coincidence that it comes just after abu bakr al—baghdadi was killed. i think much more significant is a degredation of islamic state‘s capabilities on the ground in syria. if you think, before the fall of the islamic state in baghuz, where they lost the last bit of territory that they held, they had the ability to pump out lots and lots of propaganda to influence people in the west. they had the ability to guide and advise people in the west. lots and lots of fighters died in baghuz, or were taken into custody by the kurdish fighters, and so, their ability to pump out propaganda, and their ability to tell people how to build devices was massively degraded. i think that‘s probably the most significant part of this decision making by the joint terrorism analysis centre. what does changing the level down a notch, like this... what does this mean to anybodyjust walking down the high street? well, actually, it doesn‘t really
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mean anything to ordinary people, because truthfully, if you are suspicious about somebody, or you are worried about something, you still need to go to the police and express your concerns. it‘s really a threat level that‘s there for security professionals who can then make decisions about what they do about the protective security over the buildings of the people that they are responsible for. but for a long time now, since 2006, the decision was made that these threat levels should be public, so the public should be aware of the decisions that are being made. so, it doesn‘t really change how people should be going about their daily lives, but it does mean that there is an assessment at the moment that the threat is actually slightly less than it has been for the last five years. the magic of television, he has been replaced! health bosses warn politicians not to use the nhs as a political
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weapon in the general electio, but say a bidding war has already begun. liberal democrat leaderjo swinson says she will pursue legal avenues if her remain—backing party is not included in the itv leaders debate. mps will elect a new speaker of the house of commons today, following the retirement ofjohn bercow. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. mothercare is to go into administration, putting 2,500 jobs at risks. 2,500 jobs at risk. the store chain‘s demise will mean 79 shops closing across the country. the baby goods retailer said that it was "not capable of returning to a level of structural profitability". mcdonald‘s has fired its chief executive, steve easterbrook, after he had a relationship with an employee. the relationship was consensual, but the us fast—food giant said that mr easterbrook had "violated company policy" and shown "poorjudgment". the british businessman had been in charge of mcdonald‘s since 2015. british construction activity shrank for the sixth month in a row in october.
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the sector is stuck in its steepest slump since the 2009 financial crisis, as brexit worries and a general economic slowdown held back growth. mcdonald‘s has fired its boss for having a "consensual" relationship with an employee? why are they cracking down on this? first of all, there‘s mcdonnell said of a training programme for its employees because of complaints about members of staff in the us and uk. it is a growing thing in the corporate world that they are cracking down on dating within the workplace. there he is. he is british? he is. he has been at the firm since 2015, and he has done a fairly good job if you look at the share price for instance. mcdonald‘s prohibits any manager from having a relationship with any subordinate.
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tracey hudson provides hr advice to small and medium sized businesses and despite people having a right to privacy in their relationships she‘s not surprised companies are implementing changes. the employer, though, has to protect the business, so when there is a relationship that, say, develops between a line manager and their employee, that can cause problems within the team. that person might get preferential treatment, they might get the betterjobs to do. you know, there are all sorts of positives for those two individuals, but what message is that sending to the rest of the team? and also, how is the business going to manage things if it goes wrong? i work in hr, so i always plan for the worst. so, what happens when that relationship turns sour? what impact is that going to have on those two individuals and the team? and that is what you have to think about, and that is why you put it into a policy. let‘s get more on this and other stories affecting the markets with
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tom stevenson. putting the policies to one side, steve easterbrook as i was telling simon, he has done a pretty good job at mcdonald‘s. was telling simon, he has done a pretty good job at mcdonald's. he has done a very good job actually, and this is an abrupt end to a pretty remarkable career. 25 years ago, steve easterbrook was the manager of a single mcdonald‘s restau ra nt manager of a single mcdonald‘s restaurant in london. as you say, he isa restaurant in london. as you say, he is a brit, and he worked his way all the way up the business and run the uk business. then he has done a very good job running the us business. the share price since he took over as chief executive four years ago has doubled. so he has done a very good job. let's focus on markets, us markets are flying today. that is down to a number of things, isn‘t it? we had the usjobs numbers on friday which were better than expected. and some movement with trade talks with the chinese? there has been a pretty perfect storm of good news for the us market and
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markets generally around the world. the trade talks do seem to be going somewhere. wilbur ross speaking from bangkok said he is pretty confident that a deal can be struck later on this month between president trump and president shooting pain. that bill is in good news we had over the last week of the federal reserve cutting interest rates. —— between president trump and the president of china. much strongerjob creation than had been expected. an earning season, we have had about 80% of us companies announcing their figures. and while they are down on what they we re and while they are down on what they were last year, much better than a nalysts were last year, much better than a na lysts ha d were last year, much better than analysts had expected. one last question, just eat, the merger that will take place with takeaway .com worth about £9 billion. it looks like it‘s closer to actually happening. is this good news. ? some
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would argue that he is a british technology company that is really doing extremely well, it has become a ftse 100 doing extremely well, it has become a ftse100 company valued at around £5 billion, and it is being taken over, either as part of a share deal with a lookalike company called ta keaway with a lookalike company called takeaway .com, or more recently we have had a cash offer from a takeaway .com, or more recently we have had a cash offerfrom a big south african technology company. this is what is going on at the moment, the takeaway .com side has a slightly tweaked the terms of their deal in order to get it through. but i thinkjust eat shareholders are sitting pretty because they have got at least two parties bidding for the company, and it could go further yet. tom, thank you very much. let's have a quick look at the markets. look at that, all higher, all up.
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the former soviet leader mikhail gorbachev has warned that the current tensions between russia and the west are endangering the world. speaking to the bbc in an interview to mark the thirtieth anniversary of the fall of the berlin wall, mr gorbachev called for all countries to declare that nuclear weapons should be destroyed. he was speaking to our moscow correspondent, steve rosenberg. these days, it‘s rare to see mikhail gorbachev in front of a camera. aged 88, he avoids the limelight. "i‘m slowing down," he tells me. "i can barely stand up." but the man who helped to end the cold war has a message for the world — that his achievements are at risk. and one of his greatest achievements was ending the arms race between the soviet union and america. his diplomatic double act with ronald reagan slashed the two superpowers‘ nuclear arsenals.
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but the arms race has reignited. there is new tension and fierce rivalry between moscow and the west. how dangerous do you think the current confrontation is between russia and the west? translation: as long as weapons of mass destruction exist, nuclear weapons, the danger is colossal. all nations should declare — all nations — nuclear weapons must be destroyed. to save ourselves, and our planet. in the past, we used to talk about the cold war. how would you describe the current stand—off between russia and the west?
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translation: chilly, but still a war. look at what is happening. in different places, there are skirmishes. there are shootings. ships and aircraft are being sent here, there and everywhere. this is a situation we do not need. from iron curtains to iron ladies — he famously hit it off with margaret thatcher. but what does gorbachev make of brexit? translation: you can figure that one out yourself. you british are clever clogs. i will not give you advice. you decide. so, not only a president — but a true diplomat. steve rozenberg, bbc news, moscow. in a moment, the bbc news at 5
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with huw, now a look i think the big story will be the fear of the weather. it is going to start to feel quite a lot colder as we develop a northerly wind. through the rest of the day, we will see showers across many parts of the uk, some of them heavy and thundery in the south. persistent rain for eastern scotland which could cause some localised flooding and some travel problems. there will be some spells of sunshine here and there, temperatures between ten and 13 celsius. and quite windy across scotla nd celsius. and quite windy across scotland in particular. as we go through tonight, as we go through eastern scotland it will go to northern england. showers continue for a time down towards the south. they will tend to peter out as the night wears on. it will be quite cloudy, but there could be mist patches here and there. temperatures of six or seven celsius. as we go through tomorrow, we will see rain continuing to sink its way south—eastward, but as you pick up more of a northerly wind, temperatures will dip away and for the middle of the week it will feel
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very chilly indeed.
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today at five, as the election campaign gathers pace, party leaders are warned not use the nhs as ‘a political weapon‘. both conservatives and labour have vowed to spend billions on improving care in england, but health bosses say ‘over—dramatising nhs difficulties‘ does the service no favours. let‘s try and avoid getting into cheap political slogans and try to weaponise the services as a means of finding as a means of fighting a party political battle. we‘ll have the latest on one of the key issues of the election campaign. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. the house of commosn is voting to elect a new speaker, the first election for the post in more than a decade. the baby goods retailer, mothercare, plans to call in administrators, putting two and half

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