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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 5, 2019 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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good morning! welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: a bonfire—night battle over brexit — boris johnson and jeremy corbyn target each other‘s policies as election sparks begin to fly. new rules inspired by the death of 18—year—old oliver mcgowan, will mean mandatory training for all nhs staff on caring for people with learning disabilities and autism. what next for mothercare? 2,500 jobs are at risk as the retailer prepares to call in the administrators. i'll look at what went wrong. england's cricketers have been beaten by new zealand. they've lost by m runs in nelson
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as the hosts take a 2—1 series lead. on set with the cast of the new series of the crown — we get exclusive access, including a royal audience, of sorts. a person made a vow in her 20s to serve the nation, she is now in her 90s, is extraordinary. serve the nation, she is now in her 905, is extraordinary. a north—easterly wind could develop, if you show is around two, but will they dampen the fireworks later? your full forecast on breakfast. it's tuesday, november 5th. our top story: party leaders will step up election campaigning today by challenging their opponents‘ plans for brexit. labour and the conservatives will both attack each other‘s proposals for leaving the eu, while the lib dems will officially launch their "stop brexit" agenda. let's take a look at some of the detail. the prime minister has published a letter to the labour leader jeremy corbyn, demanding that he "comes clean" to voters about his brexit strategy.
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mrjohnson poses five questions for labour to answer. jeremy corbyn is on the road to spread labour's brexit message. he'll promise to "sort" it in six months when he gives a speech this morning in essex and the lib dems will launch their campaign in westminster this morning, standing on a "stop brexit" ticket. leaderjo swinson will claim that staying in the eu will result in a £50 billion "remain bonus" for the uk economy. plenty of messages to get through. our political correspondent jonathan blake is in westminster. jonathan, there's going to be a lot of claims and counterclaims over brexit. how will the parties cut through the noise to get their message across? we are hearing a lot today from the main parties. let's start with the dems than. on brexit, the messages a simple one. over the liberal democrats they say is a vote stop brexit. they have promised to revoke article 50 and pulled the plug on the thing straightaway if they win a majority. they are a long way from
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that as things stand, but we will hear from that as things stand, but we will hearfrom jo swinson, that as things stand, but we will hear from jo swinson, the leader of the lib dems later when she launches her campaign about the so—called remaining bonus, the amount of money that will be saved if the uk doesn't leave the eu, giving more money for things like health, education, the police and other public services. so £50 billion on it over the next five yea rs, £50 billion on it over the next five years, they say would be saved if britain stayed in the eu. and forecasters in general say the economy would be stronger in the short term if exit did not happen, but it is hard to put a specific figure on it. as the labour, jeremy corbyn will make a big speech early on in the campaign about brexit promising, promising to get brexit sorted within the next six months. if that sounds a millionaire and strikingly similar to the conservatived's promise, maybe that is because they are trying to tap into the fatigue. he says it will be
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£500 million transferred from the nhs to us health companies if drugs prices go up after brexit. that is contested by some experts and it's very difficult to say how drugs prices would rise if brexit happen. and then we will hear from the snp and the brexit party as well today, but the conservatives trying to undermine labour's position, boris johnson writing a letter tojeremy corbyn, accusing him to trying to ta ke corbyn, accusing him to trying to take the country back to square one and asking him to come clean about whether he would campaign on the brexit of the brexiteer he negotiated with the eu. if it sounds busy, remember, the election campaign hasn't even officially started out. parliament will be dissolved tonight and then the real countdown to polling day begins. ok, a fine countdown to polling day begins. ok, afinea countdown to polling day begins. ok, a fine a few days ahead. thank you for that, jonathan. and in terms of being a busy day, we will be
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speaking to quite a few people. in about an hour we'll be talking to the conservative mp and cabinet minister, michael gove. and just after 7:30am we'll get the views of the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer. we have ed davey and nicola sturgeon as well. lots to go through this morning. throughout the election campaign, the bbc‘s reality check team will be fact checking each of the parties‘ claims and looking at whether the data backs them up. you can check out all of those details yourself at bbc.co.uk/news, or on the bbc news app. the labour mp sir lindsay hoyle has been elected as the new speaker of the house of commons, replacing john bercow. sir lindsay — who's the mp for chorley — seen here in the middle was dragged to the chair by mps, where he pledged to be a "neutral" speaker. he also paid tribute to his daughter who died in 2017. i wish she could have been here. we all miss her as a family, none more so than her mum, marie. i've got to say, she was everything
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to all of us, she will always be missed but will always be in our thoughts. asi as i promised, i will be neutral, i will be transparent. and we will see that transparency continue. all health and social care staff working in the nhs in england will receive training on autism and learning disabilities, thanks to a campaign led by families. jayne mccubbin has been following this story. shejoins us now. how significant is this move? good morning. mixed reviews about this. this centres on two young people we've spoken about a lot in recent yea rs we've spoken about a lot in recent years you we've spoken about a lot in recent yea rs you have we've spoken about a lot in recent years you have autism and learning disabilities. the first young man is called oliver mcgowan, he died in hospital after being given antipsychotic medication. the second young person is bethany who is guarded spoke so eloquently and powerfully on the sofa just last friday, kept largely in a cell for the last three years for much of that time fed through a hatch and a
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door. the key announcement today is one that there will be mandatory training for all nhs social care staff, and that is going to be child from next year, rolled out after that. but it is still seen as really key in this attempt to break the disparity in health quality. it is a pledge to review within 12 months health services for every one of those people in inpatient care right now. the problem is that this should already be happening as standard in these places, and onto many occasions it isn't. and the figure in the official statistics is that 28% of these people should not be inside these places, should have homes, not hospitals. that is the official government line. but this announcement today doesn't have any mention of those homes. so that has been greeted with disappointment.
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oliver's mum will be here later. 90 very much. —— thank you. swabs or urine samples taken at home could be as effective at identifying women at high risk of cervical cancer as traditional smear tests, according to new research. uptake for nhs screening is at a 21—year low, with embarrassment blamed for putting millions off. researchers at london's queen mary university say the home tests look for subtle changes in dna and hope this could become the standard method for screening. owners of unregistered drones will face fines of up to £1,000 when new rules come into force at the end of this month. the civil aviation authority says anyone wanting to fly the gadgets will now have to pass an online theory test. registration opens today. a tourist reportedly survived for two days adrift at sea in a dinghy near greece by snacking on boiled sweets. kushila stein from new zealand, was rescued from the aegean sea, just north of crete, on sunday.
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during her 37—hour ordeal, ms stein is reported to have rationed a "handful of boiled lollies" and wrapped herself in plastic bags for warmth. sally is pointing at the map. the map is fine. boiled sweets. staying with tough kiwis, sport. england's cricketers have been beaten by new zealand. they've lost by 14 runs in nelson as the hosts take a 2—1 series lead. eoin morgan's side looked set for victory until losing five wickets in three overs. not a great evening for them. chelsea and liverpool are playing tonight, they are on the brink of the knockout stages.
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world anti—doping agency boss, sir craig reedie, has said that wada will investigate all athletes who have trained with banned coach alberto salazar. mo farah was with salazar between 2011 and 2017 but has never failed a drugs test himself. and the england rugby squad have arrived back the uk after their world cup final defeat to south africa on saturday. head coach eddiejones says that his players are going to hurt for the next four years. lots of people also encouraging by lots of people also encouraging rugby clogs to give them a good time of rest. hugely disappointing at the end for england. bruising and lots of ways. a much needed break. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. it is looking better for some compared with yesterday. dense fog patches around southeast england, there will still be some showers and what you will notice later is that an increasingly chilly breeze will come to all of us. now as we go through today, an area of
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low pressure is putting its way southwards and eastwards, allowing those north—easterly winds to develop and it is going to dry down colder and colder airfrom develop and it is going to dry down colder and colder air from the develop and it is going to dry down colder and colder airfrom the north which will bring us a much colder tech and heart of the week than we have started. and showers, damper spots this morning for the commute across parts of south—east scotland, northern england and into the north—west of wales. there are a few heavy showers towards the south—east corner on one 01’ heavy showers towards the south—east corner on one or two to northern ireland. they will continue. it continues for much of the day, doesn't mean a brighter day for most of you in parts of eastern scotland, one or two showers further south but the morning fog will gradually clear. showers later on in the north of scotland. and here is where we will see some of the justice the winds. north— north—easterly direction, it will have an impact on temperatures, sticking them back in single figures throughout much of the day. till around 11— 13 celsius across england and but that will change as we go through tonight and into tomorrow. that only tonight it will turn chillierfor into tomorrow. that only tonight it
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will turn chillier for you. into tomorrow. that only tonight it will turn chillierfor you. if into tomorrow. that only tonight it will turn chillier for you. if you are celebrating go for walks out, a few showers here and there across eastern parts of the country. —— guy force night. many of you will get through the evening predominantly dry, and as it fades away overnight, clearing away from western coasts this is where we see temperatures drop widely. then i could be a widespread frost for the city centres, temperatures across parts of scotland, northern ireland and the far north of england will be below freezing as we start tomorrow morning. should be a brighter start to many, one or two mist and fog patches but already showers for scotland, the irish coast of england and, that is going to develop a bit more widely as we go throughout the day, pushing northwards and eastwards. some parts of northern and eastern scotland, eastern scotla nd and eastern scotland, eastern scotland tomorrow will remain dry throughout wednesday with some sunny spells, but just about all of us will see temperatures sticking in double figures. taking us through the night and into thursday morning, not as cold, but low pressure is
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back on the scene. wrapped around it, bands of rain, so we're back another wet story for someone thursday. the rain will be particularly persistent for the northeast midlands in parts of northern england, especially in the afternoon. sunshine and showers on thursday afternoon stop to the north, a chilly breeze lowering one or two shelves with a better chance of some sunshine and staying dry. so looks like things are going to remain on the wet sided times through the rest of the week and staying cool as well once temperatures drop later today. i'll have more throughout the back to dan and louise. let's take a look at today's papers. the daily mail reports on a possible new alternative to traditional smear tests. developed at queen mary university of london, it allows women to do a urine sample or swab test at home. scientists hope it could become routine within five years. the times also features the new alternative cervical cancer test, but leads on claims that labour's plans for a 32—hour working week could end up costing taxpayers £17 billion.
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that's according to analysis by the right—leaning think tank the centre for policy studies. like many of the papers, a picture of sir lindsay hoyle being dragged to the speaker's chair — as per parliamentary tradition — features on the front page of the guardian. but the paper leads on a report from the commons intelligence and security committee examining the threat posed by russia meddling in uk politics. the paper says number 10 won't allow the report to be published before the election, a decision that committee chairman and former conservative mp dominic grieve has called "jaw—dropping". and online today, the huffington post leads with an article looking at how the new and 157th speaker of the house of commons, lindsay hoyle, will be very different from the outgoing john bercow. the website says mr hoyle has pledged to be more transparent and will share more duties with other senior mps. walking
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commons, lindsay hoyle, the speaker of the house of commons lindsay hoyle, i know my —— a 12—year—old boy come up to me and said lindsay hoyle, the speaker of the house of commons, i have no idea who that is. thanks, need to know that. ben? you would think that uber was doing pretty well. it made $3.8 billion but the head —— the headline is that it made a loss, loss of $1 billion. it's a problem that uber is stating —— basing, they are hugely sick school, many people use them but theyjust don't school, many people use them but they just don't make school, many people use them but theyjust don't make a puppet because they've spent so much money convincing us that their the one to use. marketing costs, keeping the prices down. and it's meant they made $3 billion in sales but they
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lost $1 billion as far as the profit. one we will keep an eye on because there is so much related to that story about tech companies doing very well. you have got the super pillow. do you travel with a neck pillow? ijust super pillow. do you travel with a neck pillow? i just wedge super pillow. do you travel with a neck pillow? ijust wedge myself in. igo neck pillow? ijust wedge myself in. i go the full wedge. this is incredible. that is the neck pillow of dreams. is he smuggling and other human? he is one the pillow competition. that is joe human? he is one the pillow competition. that isjoe marlowe coming back from japan. it's not the first time he's been pictured with it. isn't it brilliant? this is some research we've got about running. 230,000 people, just over 35 years
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and this is amazing research. it reveals that jogging is and this is amazing research. it reveals thatjogging is linked to reduced mortality. to go for a one just —— are runjust once reduced mortality. to go for a one just —— are run just once a week could cut the risk of death by a quarter. you don't have to run very far. they said it don't even have to go faroffa far. they said it don't even have to go far off a very long, any amount of running was linked. 227% reduction in mortality. one run a week of less than 50 minutes. 50! that's not any amount of running. week of less than 50 minutes. 50! that's not any amount of runningm could be any amount less than 50 minutes. i'm a big fan of running. i was back running yesterday so that is amazing. how long did you run for? 38 units, to be precise. is amazing. how long did you run for? 38 units, to be preciselj is amazing. how long did you run for? 38 units, to be precise. i ran for? 38 units, to be precise. i ran for a whopping eight minutes. that's
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enough! well done. look at these two. the record for the fastest ever father and son marathon. don't hear tommy is 59 years old, two hours and 27 minutes. his son actually picked up 27 minutes. his son actually picked up an injury. three days before. managed to run 2.5 hours. it's remarkable. one other thing, managed to run 2.5 hours. it's remarkable. one otherthing, how managed to run 2.5 hours. it's remarkable. one other thing, how do you feel about watching tv during surgery? have a look at this. these special goggles. you can watch while you are having an operation. it could be very distracting. there is an option if you want. why do you
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wa nt an option if you want. why do you want that? oh, i'm not sure i would like that. you can watch this then. if you are currently having an operation, good morning. you could watch the crown, couldn't you? well done, dan. nice link. the eagerly awaited new series of the royal drama, the crown, returns later this month with olivia colman taking over from claire foy as her majesty the queen. it picks up the story in 1964 and ends 13 years later with the silverjubilee. breakfast‘sjohn maguire was given exclusive access behind the scenes. good morning. it's the first ofjuly 1969, welcome to the investiture of the prince of wales here at con ivan castle. or at least, as it's being reimagined by netflix, the exact
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same castle, the exact same location. as the world's most famous family return, olivia colman, oscar winnerfor family return, olivia colman, oscar winner for one family return, olivia colman, oscar winnerfor one role as family return, olivia colman, oscar winner for one role as a monarch, ta kes winner for one role as a monarch, takes on another one. it's so much fun. look at the hats you get to wear. it's extraordinary.” fun. look at the hats you get to wear. it's extraordinary. iforgot about the hats. it's there, it is pretty good copy. i've seen pictures, no way. yes, way. onset, in between takes, i'm granted a royal audience. for a person in her 20s to serve the nation, she has done it, she's in 905. extraordinary. i become almost accept —— obsessed with her. extraordinary. i become almost accept -- obsessed with her. which is amazing. in the show is much in investigation of the institution as well as the people so it's about those figures within this organisation, the sort of pressures, the weird loneliness of it, obviously what happens to a family
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within those strict jurors and pressures, it's all that kind of stuff that makes the meat of the show. it's going to be an easy one to get used to? what's that? ewing being part of that symbol. your face on every coin and magnet. no. i remember seeing my father's face on a shilling for the first time in thinking how i it look. at the same time realising i would probably have to one day look at my own face but one never knows what one's destiny has in store for one. did you ever imagine you would be prime minister? goodness no. the recurring theme in her crown is the relationship with her crown is the relationship with her prime ministers. jason watkins is harold wilson. i could not possibly have foreseen his death. i'm not going to do it now, you will have to wait. it's called the high larynx. he has a particular voice but myjob is to sort of show him in
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all his eccentricities, perhaps, and his voice and it's a much impersonated voice but i have to fill it up with what's going on and what the real emotions are going on into the real events of the day which were traumatic and assimilating an absolutely fascinating events that he went through, from the moon landings to an attempted coup and there is a kind of, and the devaluation of the pound, all those sorts of events which are fascinating and he is an individual had problems later in his life which are also explored in the series. no, he'sa life which are also explored in the series. no, he's a great character to play. while filming here in north wales, and daniels as lord snowden and helena bonham carter playing princess margaret both stayed in a hotel which was once snowden's family home. it's extraordinary, being in his childhood home, with
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all his photographs, in princess margaret's suite. my suite. i have a picture of myself which i was actually looking at last night, do i look? no, idon't actually looking at last night, do i look? no, i don't actually remotely, like her. iwas look? no, i don't actually remotely, like her. i was going and then looking in the mirror and going, like her. i was going and then looking in the mirrorand going, no. ijust thought, looking in the mirrorand going, no. i just thought, well, looking in the mirrorand going, no. ijust thought, well, hopefully... which photo is it? probably you took it. there is also a photo of her by the bath, they got a really nice freestanding bath in the photo you took of me in the bath with the tiara. they had amazing glamour, they had amazing beauty and they we re they had amazing beauty and they were incredibly clever, they were so multifaceted so let's hope that we do them justice in that way, in that sense. but yeah, you are getting a version. we had to make choices. i
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think once someone described it, which i thought was really good, it's like, as a writer, he is a painter so you get the version, is version that we then kind of fill out with our own kind of colours. like a colour in painting, one, two, three. colour by numbers. but yes, sorry, we're just whispering three. colour by numbers. but yes, sorry, we'rejust whispering because they are actually suiting. they might sack us, we are going to be sacked. and faith and truth i will bear on to the, to live and die against all manner of those. i personally, i, well... we will see prince charles and princess anne as young adults and fourjosh o'connor today, the challenge of acting in
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welsh, although not as nerve—racking perhaps as acting before the man he now has to become. prince charles once came to a play i did. it was very dodgy, he left halfway through. he didn't! charles! you probably had something on, he was busy. you reckon? were you not very good? let's go with that. it was a play at the rac called the shoemaker ‘s holiday. i'm sure it had a brilliant second half. the second half was amazing. and what of taking on princess anne? i love her, i think she's brilliant. just think she is honest and just has no time for, she just doesn't want to waste any time lying or pretending that she feels a certain way, especially when i think there is so many, such a kind of politeness you have to abide by within her family that when it comes to her personal life, she is so
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strictly the opposite because she has no time for it, which is event. ijust think she's great. has no time for it, which is event. i just think she's great. the postmaster general himself commented that the two energies of the young and the slightly older queen are almost identical. yes, master bevins is very kind. he's also a barefaced liar. just the tiniest changes in their hair. a great many changes. there we are. ages rarely to anyone. nothing one can do about it. one just has to get on with it. acting royalty playing real royalty as the crown and the woman who wears it return. john mcguire, bbc news, carnarvon. i love that. icould watch that for about an hour. and the actors were sort of acting at the actors were sort of acting at the same time as talking to us. absolutely brilliant. there is a
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picture of the queen, lots of commenting about the political —— the particular hat that olivia was wearing but it's the same as the original hat she wore on the day. series the crown —— series three of the crown launches on netflix on sunday, the 17th of november. time for some news, travel, and weather wherever you are. national headlines at 6:30am. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. a report into conditions at bronzefield women's prison in west london where a new—born baby died in september has highlighted concerns about its health—ca re. you are a report found there was a "severe shortage of nurses" and an increasing number of prisoners with "complex and enduring" mental health problems. sodexo, which runs the jail, said it would "develop a robust action plan".
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the government is being urged to help fund a memorial to remember the victims of london's prolific slave trade — before its too late.there is planning permission for a sculpture in hyde park, but the government has so far refused to donate any of the 4 million pounds towards it — consent for the memorial expires on thursday. london was one of the largest slave ports in the world with millions of africans being shipped and sold in horrendous condition for profit. the motoring organisation, the rac is calling for more charging points for electric cars — away from central london. it accepts, that compared to other cities, electric vehicle owners are well served — but only in certain areas. the rac wants to see that change. london is doing pretty well. it's got a much better infrastructure of electric charging points and many of those are around the city and around westminster but the problem is as
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you get further out into the suburbs, things tend to decrease in terms of the availability of charging points. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. onto the trains: south western railway — one of the lines towards basingstoke is closed because of a landslip near fleet — some delays and cancellations onto the roads: the a4 knightsbridge is closed eastbound from scotch corner and hyde park corner for emergency repairs. in wandsworth: the a3 west hill is closed out of town from a205 upper richmond road to sutherland grove for gas works. now the weather with kate. good morning. it's not especially cold out there this morning but over the next few days, the temperatures set to fall. for this morning, we've got a bit of mr and fog. it's largely cloudy with some showers in there as well. got a strengthening northerly wind, chilly wind, with showers through to lift any mist and
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fog this morning onwards. wanted to write mills this afternoon through heavier showers but those happy ones, you might just heavier showers but those happy ones, you mightjust your rumble or two of thunder, temperatures today between ten and 12 celsius. into this evening of course if you are out watching the fireworks it's going to be a cloudy start, wins are still in showers blowing through but gradually the clouds will sink south on the showers will follow so we have a clear and to the night and that's where the temperature will fall, between four and five celsius out in the suburbs so much chillier night to come. as we head into wednesday a lovely bright start some sunshine the cloud increases through the course of the day. it stays pretty unsettled through much of this week and the temperature is going to feel that little bit colder. vanessa felts on bbc radio london. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello this is breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. we'll bring you all the latest news
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and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning, all health and social care staff working in the nhs in england will receive training on autism and learning disabilities thanks to a campaign led by families. we'll speak to the mother of oliver mcgowan, who's fought for better training since her son's death in 2016. a person made a vow in their 20s to serve their nation, she is now in her 905. it's extraordinary. breakfast gets exclusive access to the set of the crown where olivia colman prepares to take on the role of another monarch. and hollywood actor and jazz musician, jeff goldblum will be here to tell us how he came to shoot his latest album cover at frank sinatra's house. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. party leaders will step up election campaigning today by challenging
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their opponents' plans for brexit. the lib dems will officially launch their "stop brexit" agenda. the prime minister has published a letter to the labour leader jeremy corbyn, demanding that he "comes clean" to voters about his brexit strategy. mrjohnson poses five questions for labour to answer. jeremy corbyn is on the road to spread labour's brexit message. sir lindsay hoyle has sir lindsay hoyle has been sir lindsay hoyle has been elected sir lindsay hoyle has been elected as the new speaker of the house of commons, replacing john bercow. sir lindsay — who's the mp for chorley — seen here in the middle was dragged to the chair by mps, where he pledged to be a "neutral" speaker. he also paid tribute to his daughter natalie who died in 2017. health and social care staff will receive training on autism thanks to campaigning by families. oliver
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mcgowan's parents campaign for better staff training since his death in 2016. a trial will begin in england next year. swabs or urine samples taken at home could be as effective at identifying women at high risk of cervical cancer as traditional smear tests, according to new research. uptake for nhs screening is at a 21—year low, with embarrassment blamed for putting millions off. researchers at london's queen mary university say the home—tests look for subtle changes in dna and hope this could become the standard method for screening. the civil aviation authority has opened a compulsory registration scheme for drones weighing more than 250 grams, or 8.8 ounces. owners have until the end of this month to register the devices and to complete an online test to show they can fly them "safely and legally". anyone operating an unregistered drone in this category will face a fine of up to £1,000.
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a warning for all drone enthusiasts. the rnli is warning people to stay away from sea walls during high winds after a man and child were nearly swept away by a large wave. the pair were on the seafront at freshwater, on the isle of wight, when they were knocked over and dragged along the concrete. they were not badly hurt. lifeboat officials also urged onlookers not to enter the water if they see someone in trouble. it shows you the power of it all there. it really does. he was saved by the little structure there. so a warning, you can see why. sally is here to talk about the cricket. warning, you can see why. sally is here to talk about the cricketm looked like it was going england's way, but i'm afraid they have been beaten by new zealand overnight. they've lost by 1a runs in nelson as the hosts take a 2—1 series lead. england looked set for victory until losing five wickets in three overs. captain eoin morgan believes inexperience cost his side.
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foreman england player stephen agrees. i think today they will sit down and see that the obviously lost them the game. but that's the only period where they lost it, i can tell than they were in complete control. it's about getting over the line and that comes with experience. we have a lot of experience guys playing in the team today, but it might have sowed in those last five overs. “— might have sowed in those last five overs. —— showed. the champions league returns this evening across europe and chelsea are hoping to make it two wins from two against last season's semi—finalists, ajax. one man hoping to make another positive impact for chelsea at stamford bridge is mason mount. the youngster spent a year playing in the netherlands on loan earlier in his career and he says that helped to kickstart his career. liverpool host belgium side genk, in what's the start of a huge week for them. the premier league leaders also face manchester city on sunday, but despite that, game manager jurgen klopp says his side are fully focused on tonight's match. nobody has to tell the boys that
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city's on sunday, tomorrow's genk. we have a lot invested and it is still open crew, we have to be 100% spot on tomorrow night. we have two create an incredible atmosphere again and make life as uncomfortable as possible for genk. everton midfielder andre gomes is "expected to make a full recovery" after he had surgery to repair a fracture dislocation to his right ankle. gomes suffered the horrific injury on sunday, during their draw with tottenham hotspur. everton announced that the surgery had went extremely well and have said that the midfielder is recovering well in hospital. west bromwich albion have returned to the top of the championship after they won away at manager—less stoke city. matt philips opened the scoring early on with his sixth goal of the season before hal robson kanu scored the second to pile more misery on stoke who are bottom of the table. world anti—doping agency president sir craig reedie has said wada will investigate all athletes who have trained with banned coach alberto salazar. salazar is the former coach of mo farah, and was found guilty
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of doping violations after a 4—year investigation by wada. farah himself has neverfailed a drugs test and has always strongly denied breaking any rules. england have arrived back in the uk after their rugby world cup final defeat to south africa on saturday. head coach eddiejones has said that his players will be hurting for the next four years after the defeat, and the players certainly looked pretty dejected when they arrived back in heathrow yesterday. and reanne evans has made snooker history by becoming the first woman to play against a man in a televised ranking event. she faced shaun murphy at the champion of champions tournament. evans put on a superb fightback from 3—0 down to force a deciding frame, before losing to the former world champion. one thing! one thing i do quite like about this is murphy said very nicely, he said even his wife wanted him to lose that one. he said, she wished me good luck, but only through gritted teeth stop see you later on. the liberal democrats have pledged an additional £50 billion for public services if they win the next election and deliver
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on their promise to voters, to cancel brexit. it comes ahead of the launch of the party's general election campaign later. we can speak now to their deputy leader, sir ed davey. good morning to you. thank you very much forjoining us. you call this a remain bonus, but the bbc reality checks as it isn't a bonus per se but comparing one hypothetical scenario with another, so you can't guarantee the money. most people think if we stay in the eu, if we stop brexit, there will be a big extra money to the checker because economic growth will be higher and it will generate extra tax revenue. we are saying that would be our remain bonus and we would use that extra £50 billion to invest in the future, to invest in schools, education, and to tackle inequality, so we have a fairer country. what about the money we won't have to pay to the eu if we did have brexit? we have included that in our calculations, so we are paying our subscription but of course we won't have to pay the divorce bill only
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conservatives will have to pay for the money the eu was putting into the money the eu was putting into the uk. so these figures are robust, we have used the independent institute for fiscal studies' green budget numbers which were published last month, and many people think we're being very cautious. but it is very good news for those people who aren't sure about voting remainer lives of the liberal democrats because now we can so there would be this remain bonus, we would be able to and for that extra investment in our schools and education and tackling inequality. it's a pot of money that won't be available to either the conservatives or the labour party, that is how the liberal democrats are showing the benefit of remain. i understand this is over five years. £10 benefit of remain. i understand this is overfive years. £10 billion benefit of remain. i understand this is over five years. £10 billion a year. healthcare, £155 billion every year, so actually, how much of a difference can 10 billion make?l
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huge difference. if we invested this in schools we would recruit more teachers, deal with the problems of special education needs, we could com pletely special education needs, we could completely overturn the austerity of the conservatives. this would be massively good news and welcomed by head teachers and governors and pa rents all head teachers and governors and parents all around the country.“ you spent all the money on education it is less than 10% of the education budget. it's a dramatic increase. if the budget increase by 10%. well, not entirely on education but a large chunk would go to schools. it's a big number, and it would actually make a dramatic difference. what the liberal democrats are saying in this election, we are really ambitious for our country. we wa nt to really ambitious for our country. we want to make sure there are more jobs and there is no economic growth by staying in the european union, by stopping brexit. and we want to show that has a real benefits to families across the country and to those people who are struggling on low wages. so this is a really positive
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message and it contrasts with the conservatives and labour party were battling over past ideas, you really can't trust boris johnson, i battling over past ideas, you really can't trust borisjohnson, i think eve ryo ne can't trust borisjohnson, i think everyone really now accept that. and people are really worried about the calamity that will be jeremy corbyn and his left—wing economics. so this policy from the liberal democrats of stopping brexit will have a huge benefit which i think the country will enjoy. if you have the benefit of that money, the people who voted leave and the many millions of them might say for example, a price they happy to accept? well, if we don't get the remain bonus, if we don't stop brexit as the liberal democrats want, there will be less money for our schools, there will be less money to tackle inequality. and i think many of the people who voted leave were frankly not told the truth by borisjohnson. everyone now knows the $350 million on the side of the infamous red bus was com pletely of the infamous red bus was completely made up —— £250 million. even dominic cummings admitted it
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was made up. this figure we are putting forward today is based on independent institute of fiscal studies. it's a very robust figure. and i think people, therefore, can get behind it and say, whether they voted leave or remain, rather liberal democrats offering something tangible for our community, for our family. we will be speaking to the labour party and the conservative party later on breakfast as well. those winds imagine she might start legal action because he is not part of this first leadership debate. is that actually happening? yes, we are very strong about this. it's quite outrageous thatjeremy corbyn and borisjohnson won't debate outrageous thatjeremy corbyn and boris johnson won't debate jo swinson. have you started the legal action? we have started that process , action? we have started that process, absolutely. we are extremely alarmed the british people will not hear from the party that is the one stop brexit party, we know borisjohnson the one stop brexit party, we know
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boris johnson wants a the one stop brexit party, we know borisjohnson wants a very hard brexit, we knowjeremy corbyn supports brexit, how can we have a debate in a general election that has brexit as its top issue between two people who support brexit? if we're going to have a proper, democratic debate in the selection we have to a party leader leads the largest remain party in britain, making the case for britain remaining in the european union, otherwise it would be a catastrophe for how we debate these issues in this election. there will be other parties who will want to be part of those debates, for example the snp or the green party, whether you talk to them about it as well and legal action with them? well, i will talk to all people, but let's be clear, the snp are only standing in scotland. the liberal democrats are standing in scotland and the rest of the united kingdom. therefore we are the united kingdom. therefore we are the largest remain party across the uk. so it makes sense that it should bea uk. so it makes sense that it should be a 3—way debate betweenjo swinson and the leaders of the two old
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parties. said david, thank you very much for your time. later parties. said david, thank you very much foryourtime. laterwe parties. said david, thank you very much for your time. later we will be speaking to michael gove, keir starmer and jo swinson. what are we, 38 days away? —— and nicola sturgeon. quite a bit of build—up. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. sure way a bit of a mix around today. one finite. in the south—east of england, dense patches of fog to watch out for. while it's going to turn increasingly chilly, that show you whether showers are most prevalent. across parts of south—east scotland and northern england. this is the wind will gradually bring chillier hour. but once we have showers during down
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through the irish sea, many other parts are dry. a few showers turn up on the north of scotland. a brighter day for eastern scotland compared to yesterday. drifting down into the east midlands, east anglia. the further west, predominantly dry. a north—easterly wind, never a particularly warm direction but we have impact across parts of scotland. and that chillier feel will head southwards as we head into the evening. if you are after any displays. a few showers around. some of you, maybe a damp squib. one or two further north. many of you will
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get through one finite reasonably dry with some clear skies developing. it is clear skies developing. it is clear skies develop widely. into the morning, temperatures will drop. the indication that the some of you in rural parts of scotland, temperatures will drop to around freezing. a touch of frost everywhere. a lot more sunshine around. showers across the south—west of scotland. they are going to turn heavier, more widespread through the day. rain spreading later on andrew parts of northern scotland, wanted to showers. here are the areas most likely to stay dry and bright through wednesday but for all, a bit chilly. temperatures for many staying in sim —— single digits. this area of low pressure moves its way back in. back to wet and windy weather. a bit of snow, the tops of the scottish mountains, nothing too
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much. maybe northern england, north wales, we have to watch for ongoing risk of minorflooding. wales, we have to watch for ongoing risk of minor flooding. some wales, we have to watch for ongoing risk of minorflooding. some heavy showers developing with sunshine towards the south. there will be a chillierfeel, a towards the south. there will be a chillier feel, a lease towards the south. there will be a chillierfeel, a lease by friday, most chillierfeel, a lease by friday, m ost pla ces chillierfeel, a lease by friday, most places will become dry but more wet and with the did —— more wet and windy weather to take us. i forgot to wear my firework dress. we told you yesterday that mothercare was preparing to call in the administrators — so what next for the 2,500 staff? ben's looking at this one for us. we told you good morning. that's right. we've been here before. another high street name struggling to make the numbers add up. mothercare has been on our high street since 1961. in its heyday had hundreds of stores and was the go—to place for new—parents. it also has shops around the world —
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it's in 50 countries. but its uk business has been struggling for a while. not least because it's a competitive market — everyone from zara and h&m to asda and tesco have got in on the act — and there's no shortage of places to buy children's stuff. )last summer, mothercare announced its finances were in a perilous state and entered into a form of insolvency that allowed it to close 55 stores with the loss of 800 jobs. at the same time, it raised £32 million in a cash call to ensure its survival. but that wasn't enough. earlier this year after delaying its results it reported a loss of around £36 million in its uk business and tried to find a buyer at the start of this week we learned that no buyer had been found and that the company was in the process of appointing administrators. they‘ re accountants who will continue to run the business at least for a while , but look at ways of salvaging what it can, maybe trying to find another buyer , and cutting costs which may mean the closure of more stores. so will parents actually miss it? at the moment mothercare employs 2,500 staff in the uk. 500
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full—time members of staff and 2,000 on part—time contracts. mothercare isn't alone. big names like bonmarche, i've used it in the last two weeks. i had i've used it in the last two weeks. ihada i've used it in the last two weeks. i had a look at some christmas gift ‘s,. i had a look at some christmas gift '5,. i have used it quite a lot actually because the twins were six weeks early. there were the only shop that had tiny baby clothes. some things i get from supermarkets and some things i got from mothrcare but other things i got from a different website on line. i'm not surprised really because i think a lot of high street shops are struggling on line. at the moment mothercare employs 2,500 staff in the uk. 500 full—time members of staff and 2,000 on part—time contracts. mothercare isn't alone. big names like bonmarche,
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some have decided that now, it all comes down to stock and christmas, can they get that stock in, will supplies still supply them. an interesting time, a lot to keep an eye on in the run—up to christmas and certainly january, when eye on in the run—up to christmas and certainlyjanuary, when a lot of bills come through. bristol could become the first city in the uk to ban diesel vehicles from the centre, in a bid to cut pollution. the council is deciding today whether to approve the clean air plan, which would also include a congestion charge. fiona lamdin is in bristol this morning. fiona, what can you tell us? good morning. it's not even seven o'clock yet, and the city centre is looking quite busy. if plans are approved in 16 months' time. because
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you wouldn't be able to bring your diesel car into the city centre. bristol is busy, it's bustling and, it times, it's hard to breathe here. just ask dominic. he commutes through the city centre by bike. i'd like to think i'm reasonably fit but sometimes it feel likes —— feels like your lungs are chugging away up the street, gear got a lot of buses there, you've got a lot of vehicles that are semi stationary and yes, it doesn't feel great. but for dominic and everyone else here, could soon be improving. let's take a look at the detail. within the white boundary, would be a new charging zone, meaning the most polluting of taxis, buses and goods vehicles, but not private cars, would have to pay to drive within. the cost, between £9 to £100 a day. but take a look at
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the area in red. it's where bristol is going further than any other city, setting itself apart. an outright ban on all diesel vehicles in the city centre, no matter what age they are, between 7am and three p.m. age they are, between 7am and three pm. the mayor has always pushed back on suggestions for a citywide congestion charge. he said that would adversely affect the poorest in the city but he admits this plan will be a challenge. it needs to be ambitious because we have to get our outlook clean in the shortest possible time. there will be changes in the way people move around in the motor transport and that they have to use. we have spent our time doing is how we have assessed those impacts and how we make sure we don't solve one problem and create three others. taxi drivers are under no illusions about the extra cost will fall. cost will be transferred to the customer. if you charge us £5 every time, i will charge £5 to my customers so whatever the mayor wa nts to customers so whatever the mayor wants to do, he is going for the
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public. bristol does pride itself on being environmentally minded. for many residents, this idea would be abreast of fresh air but if it's approved, or motorists, the reality of the politics of pollution could prove a step too far. kim lamdin, bbc news. there is a lot of detail to be ironed out but just there is a lot of detail to be ironed out butjust coming to simon williams from the rac, what do you think of it as an idea in principle? this is very much a blunt instrument. every other local authority is taking a base approach. london is looking to tackle the most polluting vehicles which are the most miles in the centre of these zones most miles in the centre of these zones and here, we'rejust banning all private diesel cars which causes hardship for thousands and thousands of people, people south of the still will have great faculty reaching the
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major motorways and networks because they will just be major motorways and networks because they willjust be cut off and we really urge the government to intervene here and actually take a commonsense approach and force the council to do a much more phased approach. and what have motorists been saying to you about it? are people worried? they are very concerned about it. naturally people are keen to use other forms of transport, people will have to use public transport and bristol has old plans to improve its public transport but that's going to take quite some time so people with families looking to move children around, getting to work is going to cause massive problems because the area actually excludes, or includes some of the major routes to the 32, to the m5, it's going to be possible to the m5, it's going to be possible to gain places. bristolwants to the m5, it's going to be possible to gain places. bristol wants to play a city that is clean and green. we should be proud of the fact that we have made the bold moves. we know
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that emissions of diesel vehicles are harmed. of course, they encourage people to have not have diesel cars. what we're going to haveis diesel cars. what we're going to have is a situation where everyone is going to driving petrol cars. in reality, what do you think people are going to do? they going to have trouble, it's going to devalue the ca rs. trouble, it's going to devalue the cars. it's going to be years before eve ryo ne cars. it's going to be years before everyone will be able to move into electric. a few thousand pounds of quite an extensive vehicle. the problem needs to be looked it. to change bristol's plans. thank you very much forjoining us. as you can hear, there are so many things to sort out. it hasn't been passed yet. the voters later this evening but there are many hurdles to get across
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but, in 16 months' time. people will be moving around the city very differently. we will be speaking to the mayor of bristol later. we need to give you a geoff goldblum warning. how exciting is it? he is a very tall man,, is it big enough? if you a fan of the crown, we got highlights. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. a report into conditions at bronzefield women's prison in west london — where a new—born baby died in september — has highlighted concerns about its health—ca re. a report found there was a "severe shortage of nurses" and an increasing number of prisoners with "complex and enduring" mental health problems. sodexo, which runs the jail, said it would "develop a robust action plan".
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the government is being urged to help fund a memorial to remember the victims of london's prolific slave trade — before thursday. there is planning permission for a large scale version of this sculpture in hyde park, but permission for it expires this week. the government has so far refused to donate any money — despite london having been one of the largest slave ports in the world with millions of africans being shipped and sold in horrendous conditions. the motoring organisation, the rac is calling for more charging points for electric cars — away from central london. it accepts that compared to other cities electric vehicle owners in london are well served — but only in certain areas. the rac wants to see that change. london is doing pretty well. it's got a much better infrastructure of electric charging points and many of those are around
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the city and around westminster but the problem is as you get further out into the suburbs, things tend to decrease in terms of the availability of charging points. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning but the trains: on south western railway — one of the lines towards basingstoke is closed because of a landslip near fleet. expect delays and cancellations. onto the roads: slow from the sun in the sands roundabout up to the blackwall tunnel — tunnel was closed earlier because of an overheight lorry. now the weather with kate. good morning. it's not especially cold out there this morning but over the next few days, the temperatures is set to fall. for this morning, we've got a bit of mist and fog. it's largely cloudy with some showers in there as well. we've got a strengthening northerly wind, chilly wind, with showers through to lift any mist and fog this morning, mid—morning onwards. wanted to write mills
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this afternoon through heavier showers but those heavier ones, you mightjust hear a rumble or two of thunder, temperatures today between ten and 12 celsius. into this evening of course if you are out watching the fireworks it's going to be a cloudy start, winds are still in showers blowing through but gradually the clouds will sink south and the showers will follow so we have a clear end to the night and that's where the temperature will fall, between 4 and 5 celsius out in the suburbs so much chillier night to come. as we head into wednesday, a lovely bright start, some sunshine the cloud will increasee through the course of the day. it stays pretty unsettled through much of this week and the temperature is going to feel that little bit colder. it's bonfire night tonight but with a difference if you're going to the display in wimbledon park tonight. because there'll be no bonfire. merton council, says it causes pollution — so they've scrapped it. vanessa feltz has more on that in a few minutes on bbc radio london. bye fo now.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: a bonfire night battle over brexit — boris johnson and jeremy corbyn target each other‘s policies as election sparks begin to fly. new rules inspired by the death of 18—year—old oliver mcgowan will mean training for all nhs staff on caring for people with learning disabilities and autism. a tale of two high streets. thousands of mothercare jobs at risk. but primark is expected to buck the trend. i'll have the latest. england's cricketers have been beaten by new zealand.
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they've lost by 1a runs in nelson as the hosts took a 2—1 series lead. and on set with the cast of the new series of the crown — we get exclusive access, including a royal audience — of sorts. a person made a vow in her 20s to serve their nation, she's done it. she's now in her 90s, is extraordinary. a cool breeze, a few showers here and there, but will bonfire night be its best? i'll have the full hmmfi its best? i'll have the full forecast later on. it's tuesday, november 5th. our top story: party leaders will step up election campaigning today by challenging their opponents' plans for brexit. labour and the conservatives will both attack each other‘s proposals for leaving the eu, while the lib dems will officially launch their "stop brexit" agenda. let's take a look at some of the detail.
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the prime minister has published a letter to the labour leader jeremy corbyn, posing five questions for labour to answer about their brexit strategy. jeremy corbyn is in essex to spread labour's brexit message, he'll promise to "sort" it in six months when he gives a speech this morning. and the lib dems will launch their campaign in westminster this morning. their leader, jo swinson, will claim that staying in the eu will result in a £50 billion "remain bonus" for the uk economy. and there with you spoke to a member of the lib demsjust and there with you spoke to a member of the lib dems just a and there with you spoke to a member of the lib demsjust a moment and there with you spoke to a member of the lib dems just a moment ago about that. our political correspondent jonathan blake is in westminster. jonathan, there's going to be a lot of claims and counter—claims over brexit. lots of big numbers and promises coming out of the parties today on brexit, so let's take a look at what they are saying. the lib dems for starters launching their election campaign this morning, they have a simple message, a vote for the lib dems is a vote to stop brexit. they say they were the majority and can form a government they would revoke article 50 and pull the plug on the
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whole process, they are a long way from that of course at the start of the election campaign, but from jo swinson, the leader, later, when they launch the election campaign, she will talk about the remain bonus, £50 billion overfive she will talk about the remain bonus, £50 billion over five years that would benefit the economy as a result of staying in the eu. that has been described as the instep student for fiscal studies —— institute for fiscal studies is a reasonable estimate. but the number can't be predicted with any certainty and the deputy leader of the lib dems, ed davey this morning on breakfast says the party stands by those numbers. these figures are robust. we use the independent institute for fiscal studies' green budget numbers which were published la st budget numbers which were published last month. many people think we are being cautious. but it is very good news for people who aren't sure about voting remain or are wondering about voting remain or are wondering
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about the liberal democrats because now we can so there would be this remain bonus. we would be able to avoid extra investment in our schools, future and education and tackling inequality. it a pot of money that won't be available to either the conservatives or the labour party. jeremy corbyn says he will get brexit sorted in six months. that involves getting a new deal be negotiated and putting it forward to a referendum. the conservatives trying to undermine that, a letter sent from boris johnson tojeremy corbyn questioning if he can do that within six months and asking him to come clean on his position on whether he would back remain in that referendum he wants to hold. in a few minutes we'll be talking to the conservative mp and cabinet minister, michael gove. and just after 7:30am we'll get the views of the shadow brexit secretary, sir keir starmer. and nicola sturgeon of the snp.
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throughout the election campaign, the bbc‘s reality check team will be fact—checking each of the parties' claims and looking at whether the data backs them up. you can check out all of those details yourself at bbc.co.uk/news or on the bbc news app. the labour mp sir lindsay hoyle has been elected as the new speaker of the house of commons, replacing john bercow. sir lindsay — who's the mp for chorley — seen here in the middle was dragged to the chair by mps, where he pledged to be a "neutral" speaker. he also paid tribute to his daughter natalie who died in 2017. i wish she could have been here. we all miss her as a family, none more so than her mum. i've got to say, she was everything to all of us, she will always be missed but will always be in our thoughts. as i promised, i will be neutral,
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i will be transparent. thinking this how does my house we can do more to see that transparency continue. all health and social care staff working in the nhs in england will receive training on autism and learning disabilities thanks to a campaign led by families. jayne mccubbin has been following this story shejoins us now. it's a story you have been following for years. even if the changes came and it would take a while to be established? that's right. that me tell you about the two young people at the very heart of today's announcements. the first is oliver mcgowan, a young man we have spoken about a lot in the past. he died in hospital after being given antipsychotic medication. the second person that we know is that the hearts of the changes is bethany, locked in a cell for the best part of three years, her dad spoke so eloquently and powerfully on the
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sofa last week, and a review last week spoke about the horrific, brutal reality of people with disabilities and autism locked away, farfrom home. so two disabilities and autism locked away, far from home. so two aspects. disabilities and autism locked away, farfrom home. so two aspects. the first is the mandatory training for all nhs and social care staff in learning disabilities and autism, that will be trialed from next year with the intention to roll out after that. but still it is seen as a huge positive in trying to address the health inequalities that the people with learning disabilities on average day 25 years sooner than the rest of the population. the second aspect of the day's announcement, let me read this from matt hancock. for those living with learning disabilities and autism, the current system disabilities and autism, the current syste m ca n disabilities and autism, the current system can leave them in isolation for long periods of time with no prospect of release into the community. i'm determined to put this right and today we are determined to review the care of every patient with autism or a learning disability over the next of months. can ar, what is called ctr
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reviews should already be happening every 6—12 months. —— can ar? official data also shows that 28% of people inside, we already know shouldn't be there, they should be in their own home, not hospitals, thatis in their own home, not hospitals, that is the phrase the government gives. but there is no mention in today's announcement about those homes and where they will come from and that is the disappointment. we will speak to paul mcgowan in about an hour. a diy home urine or swab test could potentially help more women discover whether they are at risk of cervical cancer, researchers say. uptake for nhs screening is at a 21—year low, with embarrassment blamed for putting millions off. researchers at london's queen mary university say the home tests look for subtle changes in dna and hope this could become the standard method for screening. the civil aviation authority has
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opened a compulsory registration scheme for drones weighing more than 250 grams, or 8.8 ounces. owners have until the end of this month to register the devices and to complete an online test to show they can fly them "safely and legally". anyone operating an unregistered drone in this category will face a fine of up to £1,000. the male is reporting on a possible alternative to traditional smear tests, which we just mentioned. alternative to traditional smear tests, which wejust mentioned. it allows women to do a urine sample or su btest allows women to do a urine sample or subtest at home. scientists hope it could become routine within five yea rs. could become routine within five years. the times, they also feature the new alternative cervical cancer test. they are leading on claims that labour plans to have a 32 hour working week which could cost
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taxpayers £17 billion, according to the right—leaning think tank, the centre for policy studies. so lindsay hoyle being dragged to the speaker's chair, leading on reports from the commons intelligence are the examining the threat posed by russia meddling in uk elections. the paper won't be published in still after the election, which dominic grieve has cold jawdropping. and an article on how the new and 157 speaker in the house of commons will be very different from the outgoing john bercow. mr hoyle has pledged to be more transparent and will share more duties with senior mps. be more transparent and will share more duties with senior mp5. let's ta ke more duties with senior mp5. let's take a look at the front pages of the newspaper, it's 7:10am. the prime minister borisjohnson isn't on the election trail today — he's dealing with government
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business in westminster. but that hasn't stopped him clashing withjeremy corbyn over that key battleground: brexit. he's written to the labour leader to demand clarity over his plans for leaving the eu, should he win the election. let's find out more from the prime minister's cabinet colleague, michael gove, who is in westminster. good morning, mr gove. good morning! good morning, mr gove. good morning! good to speak to you. in terms of clarity with labour, they say they wa nt clarity with labour, they say they want a new deal and put it to a referendum, is that not clear?|j think labour's position is clear as mud. let's consider what they are proposing. at the moment we have a great deal. if we have a conservative majority government, we would get a great deal. butjeremy corbyn wants to go back to square one to read josie ate a new deal, they could take months, or years. then at the end we will have a referendum. the jeremy then at the end we will have a referendum. thejeremy corbyn wouldn't tell us on which side he will campaign. we know there are some people in labour party who say whatever dealjeremy corbyn gets
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back, they would then vote against it. well if diane abbott can't have faith injeremy corbyn to get a good deal, why should the rest of us? surely having a referendum on an issue like brexit is a more precise way of getting an answer to something specific like that, rather than, you could argue, a general election? don't know what that referendum would be on, we don't know what the shape of his new deal would be. we hear he wants us to be in the customs union, will that mean europeanjudges in the customs union, will that mean european judges and bureaucrats would be in charge of our nhs, in charge of our trade, in charge of our economy. but it may well be the case the jeremy our economy. but it may well be the case thejeremy corbyn, not perhaps the world's office negotiator, might not get a good deal for this country. —— toughest. we don't know the set of the deal, we only know what we would have in parliament are months more dither and delay in stilljeremy corbyn eventually comes back with who knows what variety of dogs' dinner he comes back with. so
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there is no clarity at all. and if we have a second referendum we are basically saying to the people of this country the first time you voted, you didn't really know what you are voting for. you are either too full this or misled, i think that would be insulting to the bitter sleep i would undermine democracy —— to fullest. bitter sleep i would undermine democracy -- to fullest. isn't there some hypocrisy going on saying you are unclear and divided over the issue of brexit when in actual fact, most parties are in that situation? particularly your own as well? you know, i'm afraid that's not true. are you saying the conservatives are united on brexit entirely? yes, because when boris got his great deal back from axa, every single labour party mp backed it. as well as some labour mps, it enforces the sense of labour being split. —— after boris got his great deal back
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from brussels. talking about weaponising the nhs, ha deal with the us could see £500 million per week taken out of the nhs and handed to american drug companies, according tojeremy corbyn, is that true? that is the most ridiculous nonsense i have true? that is the most ridiculous nonsense i have ever true? that is the most ridiculous nonsense i have ever had on my 52 yea rs nonsense i have ever had on my 52 years in this earth. that is a huge claim considering you've been around a half a century. why that's out and such an outrageous claim? is a fa ntasy such an outrageous claim? is a fantasy plucked from thin air in order to distract attention from the rigours ofjeremy corbyn's position on brexit and the fact that across a range of policies he doesn't have a nswe rs range of policies he doesn't have answers the british people's questions. it's the conservative government that has been responsible for the biggest cash injection in the life of the nhs ever and we've made it perfectly clear that prices won't be going up. jeremy corbyn is attempting to perpetuate halloween into november by telling ghost stories and frankly no—one can
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believe them. so you can make guarantees about the trade deal being made? yes. what are they? the nhs is not on the table, drug prices will not rise. 100%, guaranteed. can i ask you to be absolutely, 100% on something else? we mentioned it while you are getting ready for this interview in some of the front pages today. this 50 page dossier talking about examining russian infiltration of the uk politics, why is that being held back? it's always the case with select committee reports, particularly when they deal with sensitive issues that there is a process they go through before they are published and for a response is issued. this is no different the standard procedure as i understand it, that occurs with the select committee reports. eight you are not sitting on it? no, i'm not. i'm standing on the roof from your bank. you know what i mean. standing on the roof from your bank. you know what i meanlj standing on the roof from your bank. you know what i mean. i do. absolutely not. the guardian is
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saying that the document was available as a final draft on october 17. i don't available as a final draft on october17. i don't know available as a final draft on october 17. i don't know anything about that, although i know is that these reports take weeks to review and in this case it's going to the same process as ever. but ultimately, in this general election, the choice is between borisjohnson, a election, the choice is between boris johnson, a strong election, the choice is between borisjohnson, a strong prime minister who stands up for this country, and jeremy corbyn, who, as we know, if we are talking about foreign countries in the past, jeremy corbyn is, i'm afraid, reg retta bly, jeremy corbyn is, i'm afraid, regrettably, has sided with organisations like haswell hezbollah and the mast, i hope he will represent during the course of this campaign. i was going to ask you about that. if there was a document out there talking about attempts to infiltrate the labour party is this document might talk about criminal attem pts document might talk about criminal atte m pts to document might talk about criminal attempts to infiltrate your party, you demand this is published before the general election?
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this ship i would always think that appropriate procedure would be good. but again, —— i would always think that appropriate procedures would be good. if we are going to ask about foreign interference in british politics, jeremy corbyn has received money from the iranian state television channel for his activities in the past. during the course of his election campaign, he will take the opportunity and stand up will take the opportunity and stand upfor will take the opportunity and stand up for britain are not the someone who is he has in the past, taken a position that is not always in the best interests of this country. i've not asked you aboutjeremy corbyn, i'm asking about this dossier. there is nothing to hide, why not publish it? reports go to a particular procedure and the select committee report is going through the same
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procedure as others. has been discussed in cabinet? no. appreciate your time this morning. in the next 15 minutes we will be speaking to sir keir starmer as well. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. looking foggy for some of you this morning. could be a bit of a sluggish commute if you head onto the roads. elsewhere, some damp weather around, gloomy sense to start the day, just a few moments ago. those outbreaks of rain also affecting other parts of south—east scotland, northern england, mace —— mainly on the eastern side of the pennines. down to the north—west of wales. most of you dry, fog will
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ship from east anglia and the south—east, continuing to see outbreaks of rain leading across the
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eastern half of england. one or two showers around elsewhere. dryer and showers around elsewhere. brighter weather around. what you will notice is the breeze developing. the wind starts in the south—east. that will be bringing ever chillier air. temperatures in single figures across much of scotla nd single figures across much of scotland and parts of northern ireland. sunny moments towards the south. fewer showers than what we saw yesterday. showers heading out for bonfire night, there will be some around, particularly across the eastern half of the country. what a
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chilly evening and a cold night is about to set in. let's look at the details. eastern england, most prone to showers. a few dotted around scotland. down towards the far western fringes of wales. clear skies developing and because there is cold air in place coming down from the north widespread for us to start the morning journey to work. a chilly but i'd start this morning. a bit more widespread and edge further. turning wetter through the day in northern ireland after a reasonably bright start. some parts of the north and east will stay dry throughout may but overall, a chilly day for me not as cold by night but further outbreaks of rain developing. further outbreaks of rain developing. more bands of rain smiling around. it looks like parts of the east sunshine, a some snow in the hills dissipates. another cool day and night. friday will be more wet and windy nicola sturgeonjoins us from edinburgh this morning. why do you want another referendum? there was an independence referendum
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in 2014 but i think most people would accept you're watching breakfast. still to come this morning.
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oliva colman tells breakfast what it was like to take on the role inhabit continuing eu membership. celtic and lengthy negotiations. it's a chance to escape the mess of exit. it's a real crossroads moment. either we dictate over by the likes of borisjohnson either we dictate over by the likes of boris johnson boris johnson either we dictate over by the likes of borisjohnson borisjohnson has ruled it out? he said he ruled out a second referendum. do or die. that he would die in a ditch rather than remaining. more fundamentally, this is an election campaign. i'm putting forward a proposition in the ma nifesto forward a proposition in the manifesto which says, not that we are deciding the issue but i would like scotland to send a signal that we wa nt like scotland to send a signal that we want to be in charge of our own future and we do choose independence. for any westminster politician. it's not a particularly
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attractive message. why would anybody vote for that. we could be facing a hung parliament. that's an incredibly powerful and intellectual position for scotland to be in. the only way to get that is to ensure we get rid of his many tory mps as possible. if you want to see the back of the tories, it's the way to secure that. the price for your support would be a second independence referendum. this election campaign in the last two general elections. if i did, the
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incumbents wouldn't be imposed. if you gotjeremy corbyn, because of his prevarication and lack of leadership and from a scottish perspective, far better to have strong snp voices making sure that scotland's interests are protected and the kind of progressive values we cherish in scotland but are important across the uk. you've been clear on no coalition. what about support? if there is a hung parliament and the contingent, we will seek to exercise that influences strongly as we can. we would put scotland's interests first but for viewers across the uk, the snp is left of centre social democratic political party, those values that many people across the uk hold dear, they are values the snp would prioritise. we want to see
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an end to brexit. we are the unequivocal biggest strongest remain party in scotland so if you want to see an escape to brexit, and into this chaos, and scotland vote snp that we will work with others across the uk to bring an end to this mess. some of your opponents say every time you bang the drum for independence, you send more votes their way. is there a risk? do you alienate voters you would need?” would say firstly, the opponents, if they are confident, they are putting forward their own messages and then see what the people of scotland would say. i'm confident about the position of the snp but i would say to people in scotland, those who do or don't support independence but nevertheless believe that is a question that should be determined in scotland by people who live in scott, no matter where they come from, not by westminster politicians, then the way to send that message is to vote snp and if
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you don't want to see us ripped out of the european union with all the damage done, you need to send a strong possible message to vote snp. just briefly, we know thatjo swinson from the liberal democrats is starting legal action because she is starting legal action because she is not part of that leadership debate. would you consider it? we are considering all options. it's absolutely outrageous that at a time when the population appears to be moving away from the two—party system that the broadcasters appear to be retreating back into that so my message to the broadcasters is reflect politics and democracy as it is. and my message to the other political parties, borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn in particular, what are you scared of? i will debate any of them any time. and you'd go as far as legal action. well, we will consider that option. i'm not going to share details of our strategy with you this morning but we are considering all options and i think
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all broadcasters should think very carefully about and they represent the different opinions in this election. the snp is notjust the biggest party in scotland, the party of government in scotland, we are the third biggest party in the uk andi the third biggest party in the uk and i think excluding us from debate is not wrong democratically only but it's letting down voters. first minister, thank you. politicians all over the place this hour. only another 38 days of this. we will have jeff goldblum. new series of the crown comes out as well. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. i'm asad ahmad. a report into conditions at bronzefield women's prison in west london — where a new—born baby died in september — has highlighted concerns about its health—ca re. a report found there
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was a "severe shortage of nurses" and an increasing number of prisoners with "complex and enduring" mental health problems. sodexo, which runs the jail, said it would "develop a robust action plan". the government is being urged to help fund a memorial to remember the victims of london's prolific slave trade — before thursday. there is planning permission for a large scale version of this sculpture in hyde park, but permission for it expires this week. the government has so far refused to donate any money — despite london having been one of the largest slave ports in the world with millions of africans being shipped and sold in horrendous conditions. the motoring organisation, the rac is calling for more charging points for electric cars — away from central london. (tx 00v)it accepts — that compared to other cities — electric vehicle owners in london are well served — but only in certain areas.
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the rac wants to see that change. london is doing pretty well. it's got a much better infrastructure of electric charging points and many of those are around the city and around westminster but the problem is as you get further out into the suburbs, things tend to decrease in terms of the availability of charging points. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. onto the trains: on south western railway — one of the lines towards basingstoke is closed because of a landslip near fleet. expect delays and cancellations. and on the roads: the blackwall tunnel — was closed earlier because of an overheight lorry — and that's causing delays back to the sun in the sands roundabout. now the weather with kate. good morning. it's not especially cold out there this morning but over the next few days, the temperatures is set to fall. for this morning, we've got a bit of mist and fog. it's largely cloudy with some
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showers in there as well. we've got a strengthening northerly wind, a chilly wind, with showers through to lift any mist and fog this morning, mid—morning onwards. we might get one or two brighter spells this afternoon through heavier showers but those heavier ones, you mightjust hear a rumble or two of thunder, temperatures today between ten and 12 celsius. into this evening of course if you are out watching the fireworks it's going to be a cloudy start, winds are still in showers blowing through but gradually the clouds will sink south and the showers will follow get a clear end to the night and that's where the temperature will fall, between 4 and 5 celsius out in the suburbs so a much chillier night to come. as we head into wednesday, a lovely bright start, some sunshine but the cloud will increasee through the course of the day. it stays pretty unsettled for much of this week and the temperature, it is going to feel that little bit colder. vanessa feltz is on bbc radio london, and she has the founder of a dating app aimed specifically at people with african &
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caribbean heritage — doing the newspaper review. that's in a few minutes. i'll be back before 8:00. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: party leaders will step up election campaigning today by challenging their opponents' plans for brexit. the prime minister borisjohnson has published a letter tojeremy corbyn demanding clarity over his proposals for leaving the eu, while the labour leader will accuse mrjohnson of using brexit to "sell out the nhs". the lib—dem's jo swinson will officially launch her pa rty‘s "stop brexit" election campaign today. it's the conservative government that has been responsible for the biggest cash injection in the life of the nhs, ever, and we made it
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perfectly clear that prices won't be going up. jeremy corbyn is attempting to perpetuate halloween into november by telling ghost stories, that frankly, no—one can believe. the labour mp sir lindsay hoyle has been elected as the new speaker of the house of commons — replacing john bercow sir lindsay — who's the mp for chorley — seen here in the middle was dragged to the chair by mps, where he pledged to be a "neutral" speaker. health and social care staff working in the nhs in england will receive training on autism and learning disabilities thanks to a campaign led by families. the training programme has been named in memory of teenager oliver mcgowan, whose parents campaigned for better staff training since his death in 2016. a trial of the new training will begin in england next year. a diy home urine or swab test could potentially help more women discover whether they are at risk of cervical cancer, researchers say. uptake for nhs screening is at a 21—year low, with embarrassment blamed for putting millions off. researchers at london's queen mary university say the home—tests look for subtle changes in dna and hope this could become the standard method for screening.
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the civil aviation authority has opened a compulsory registration scheme for drones. owners have until the end of this month to register any devices weighing more than 250 grams. they also have to complete an online test to show they can fly them "safely and legally." anyone operating an unregistered drone in this category will face a fine of up to £1,000. you are up—to—date with all the latest news. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn is promising to have brexit "sorted in six months" if he wins the general election. that's the pledge he'll make this morning when he visits harlow, in essex — a key marginal seat where two—thirds of the people voted to leave the eu in the 2016 referendum. the shadow brexit secretary sir keir starmer will be with him. but right now he's in our westminster studio. good morning! where you just about
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to have a drink? i was listening to what you are saying. have a slurp mid question, if you would like to. thank you for coming on the programme today. we have had a few politicians in the last few moments. we have had nicola sturgeon and ed davies and michael gove. brexit, sir keir starmer is a hot topic of debate. i think clarity is what a lot of our viewers are desperate for at the moment. would your ideal scenario before the uk to remain in the eu? let me put it as clearly as ican. the eu? let me put it as clearly as i can. what we want to do is come into government, scrap forest johnson's deal, secure the best leave deal that we can, and then put that deal up against remain in a referendum within six months, and then break the impasse and move on. secure the best deal we can, put it against a
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secure the best deal we can, put it againsta —— secure the best deal we can, put it against a —— against remain in a referendum, get the outcome and move on. and you personally would rather stay, a remainer? what's important to get across is this, we are taking this decision away from politicians that we have been stuck with for 3.5 yea rs, that we have been stuck with for 3.5 years, and say to the public it is your decision. you can see what this deal is, you know what remain is. which outcomes you want? so in a sense, it's not just which outcomes you want? so in a sense, it's notjust the mechanics ofa sense, it's notjust the mechanics of a referendum, but saying that parliament has been unable to get out of this impasse, let's take it away from politicians and give it to the public to make this important decision about where we go next. do you concede one of the toughest mountains were labour it's a claim is in places like halle where 68% of people voted to leave. and convincing them you are the party
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that are going to do what they wanted, and also convincing them when they say to you you've been blocking brexit for the last few yea rs, blocking brexit for the last few years, how do you win those arguments? far from blocking brexit, we've put up amendment after amendment on the sort of deal we would support and the government has voted them down. we then went into cross— party voted them down. we then went into cross—party talks with theresa may in good faith but they broke down because she couldn't deliver on the contents because she couldn't deliver on the co nte nts of because she couldn't deliver on the contents of the talks. but to go back to your broader point, i think, in my view, going around the country, most people when they voted remain, they won an outcome now. this provides an outcome for those people —— they want an outcome now. if you want to remain, you can vote for remain, and if that happens we will remain. so it's finding a way
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out of this impasse, asking a very straightforward question, i think, and moving on. " apart from the frustration of the last few years, they have been wasted years. we have had no real discussion about austerity, about homelessness, about mental health, about no crime, things that really, really matter to people. they are blocked out because of this drained of energy and resources on brexit. i think people genuinely want to find a way through. you've just touched on the conundrum there, really. you say most people you speak you just want an outcome yet you are proposing to negotiate another deal! from all that we have seen in the last few yea rs, that we have seen in the last few years, what makes you think you could negotiate a better deal than the one on the table? let me tell you straight on. i have been going backwards and forwards to brussels for the last three years, talking to people in the council and the
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commission and to senior politicians in all the eu27 countries. i'm very well aware of the parameters of the deal that could be struck, and i think they could be struck very quickly. some of this was actually tested in the cross—party talks where there were discussions with brussels about how quickly they could change aspects of the deal on offer. so i am very confident this can be done, i'm confident it can be done swiftly because, as it were, two or three years' worth of work has already been done by myself and the team. and here is the knob. you are talking about the deal you want to negotiate, but then you, as a remainer, would vote against it. what i think we need to go secure the best deal we can, and that means a deal that protects manufacturing and the service industry and the good friday agreement. but surely
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you appreciate that is an uncomfortable position? you are saying we will negotiate this deal, boris johnson's isn't saying we will negotiate this deal, borisjohnson's isn't good enough, i have had assurances we could do this, but when the rubber hits the road i would like you to take this position instead because i would like to stay. i don't think it's uncomfortable at all because those of the discussions i have been having. do i know what the best leave deal looks like? i think i do andi leave deal looks like? i think i do and i have had intense discussions about what that needs to have in it. but any incumbent government would wa nt to but any incumbent government would want to get the best leave deal possible. and then that goes up against remain, and that offers are chilly a difference, the conservative party saying we will have a hard right brexit, which i believe will damage the economy and much more. the lib dems saying let's rub it out with revoke. quite a lot of people i know who voted remain and are passionate about it are not co mforta ble and are passionate about it are not comfortable with rubbing out the result. they say it should be
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something argued for and one in a referendum. so this is the labour party saying there is a way in the middle, a way out and the best possible deal. there are two more things i would like to talk to you about. i know you have been busy, but michael gove was on.” about. i know you have been busy, but michael gove was on. i have been busy. i can tell you what he said. i asked you aboutjeremy corbyn, he said the us — uk trade you could cost the nhs as £500 million per week, but i put that to michael gove and he said it's the most ridiculous thing he had heard in his 52 years on this earth, what is your response to that? it's a very odd thing for michael gove to say. what i would say, it is a matter of record that for many of the years, us drugs and medicine companies feel that the nhs has kept medicine prices too low
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because of the way they commission and by. what those us companies want to do is introduce what they call competition, which would drive those prices up and make more profit from medicine companies. so the problem here, and it is a real problem, it's in the negotiating guidelines and it's what the secret thoughts have been about. if you open up a deal with the us, that carries with it the very real likelihood that the way the nhs buys its drugs and medicines will change and prices will go up. now, i don't approve of that. i don't agree that the prices of medicines should go up, and therefore this is a very real aspect of the trade deal that we need to understand. i have not met many people who say it will be a good thing if the price of medicines and drugs went up. more profit of cost of the companies were making those drugs and medicines but a greater cost to the nhs and ultimately to all the many people who depend on those drugs and medicines. ok. said this is a very, very serious part of
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— whatever the numbers are, this is a very serious thing to understand what a trade deal with america actually carries with it. master dickens over a fellow mp of yours, talked about her election leaflet has said it can't on it and not jeremy corbyn, do you think that is a concern for labour mps and that the leader wouldn't even be mentioned in the campaign leaflet —— marsha's leaflet mentioned in the campaign leaflet —— ma rs ha's leaflet has mentioned in the campaign leaflet —— marsha's leaflet has sadiq khan. it's up to them to decide what is on the leaflet. will you have jeremy corbyn on yours? i haven't had time to sit down with my team and even start drafting that leaflet yet. but we will make a judgement call. i have no problem whetherjeremy is on it or not. then i ask you? what is
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thejudgement call, it or not. then i ask you? what is the judgement call, would you it or not. then i ask you? what is thejudgement call, would you put your leader on your leaflet? in my last leaflet, from memory, we said a lot about things that mattered to local people in euston, the local issues and what appealed most of them. what each mp wants to do, with respect, is to win in their constituency and usher in their government. it's really good to speak with you, sir keir starmer. it's 7:45am. sally is here with the cricket. it's actually not quarter to seven, it's 7:45am. at least you got the month ride. i'm really listening and paying attention.”
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was listening to sir keir starmer, and not focusing on the time. plus england's cricketers have been beaten by new zealand. they've lost by 14 runs in nelson as the hosts take a 2—1 series lead. england looked set for victory until losing five wickets in three overs. captain eoin morgan believes inexperience cost his side. former england player steven finn agrees. i think today they will sit down and think the blues are five and ten. they have obviously lost the game that's the only. though where lost it. after that point they were incomplete control. we had a lot of inexperienced guys playing in the tea m inexperienced guys playing in the team today. the champions league returns this evening with holders liverpool looking to move within a point of the knockout stages. they host belgium side genkjust five days before a crucial game against manchester city. despite that match manager jurgen klopp says his side are fully focused on tonight.
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nobody has to tell the boys that city is sunday. tomorrow is genk. it's an open group. still, everything possible so we have to be 100% spot on tomorrow night. we have to create an incredible atmosphere again. we have to make life uncomfortable as possible for genk. chelsea are hoping to make it two wins from two against last season's semi—finalists, ajax. one man hoping to make another positive impact is mason mount who spent a year playing in the netherlands on loan earlier in his career. just before i go. andrew gomez and his injury against spurs. he had successful surgery yesterday. we squeezed with politicians. it's going to be like that. we also want
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to talk about the crown later. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. fog around. drifting off the land. a few brighter breaks above it. a rather gloomy start in parts of northern england. this sums it up on the outskirts of sheffield. the radar chart, something has gone there but there are some showers across eastern areas. they will push south and west. particularly across eastern counties. further west, brightest guys. they will gradually ease, as for the downpours. some sunny spells in between. many paces, the chill through the day. that
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north— north—east to the wind, with temperatures back into single figures. if you are heading to some of the organised bonfire events, wrap up. increasingly chilly through this evening. a few showers around, damn prescription for some of you. those showers could be a little bit heavy. elsewhere, most places with clear skies. it's going to be a chilly night. coldest for many. particularly across the northern half of the country. a chilly start many. showers around these western coast of england, wales, south—west scotland. they start to develop widely and push eastwards. turning wetter into northern ireland.
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eastern england, dry and bright. a pretty chilly day. yesterday it was all about the problems on the high street and mothercare in particular. this morning there is better news from one of the big names in retail. if we look at the case first of all of mothercare, on our high street since 1961. administrators expected to be called later. a bit of to—ing and fro—ing. it means the future for those staff is uncertain, especially before christmas. mothercare doing really well internationally, less so domestically. it has stores around
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the world. the uk ones are not doing well. we've had all sorts of firms that have been struggling but some are managing to make it work. primark profits are up 8%. and it's notjust a young new upstart. primark celebrates its 50th anniversary this year — but opened 14 new stores across uk and europe this year, and now has stores in the us. two retailers doing very differently. what's happening on the high street? this morning the body that represents retailers, the british retail consortium, says shop sales were up 1% in october but only because stores were offering heavy discounts
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to tempt shoppers. part of it is that we're buying more online. but it's not as much of a shift as we might think. actual shops still account for 80% of retail spending. but — and here's the biggest challenge for retailers. we are in the midst of a transformation and restructuring in the way the industry operates. there will be fewer shops in the future, more options for us all as customers so retailers are really investing in their on line offers, the digital offers, how they fulfil and deliver up offers, how they fulfil and deliver up to the expectations that we all have and what we need really is the right policy environment to facilitate and enable it to happen. we need the cost of operating
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physical space to come down. helen dickinson finishing rather a plea. firms finding it tough to navigate our changing firms finding it tough to navigate ourchanging spending firms finding it tough to navigate our changing spending habits. they give us an insight into what we are spending. this is one of the biggest issues for them. spending on takeaway is in fast food up 7%. pub and club spending up by nearly 6%. and for younger can sermons —— consumers. buying less stuff, enjoying more experiences. should we have fewer shops in more places to go and enjoy yourself? that might be a change in how the high street can survive. very interesting conundrum. remember when you told me if we
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talked too much, we couldn't show our viewers the crown. the eagerly—awaited new series of the royal drama, the crown, returns later this month with olivia colman taking over from claire foy as her majesty the queen. it picks up the story in 1964 and ends 13 years later with the silverjubilee. breakfast‘sjohn maguire was given exclusive access behind the scenes. good morning. it's1july, 1969, welcome to the investiture of the prince of wales here at carnarvon castle. or at least, as it's being reimagined by netflix, the exact same castle, the exact same location. as the world's most famous family return, olivia colman, oscar winner for one role as a monarch, takes on another one. it's so much fun. look at the hats you get to wear. it's extraordinary. i forgot about the hats. it's there, it is pretty good copy. i've seen pictures, no way. yes, way. on set, in between takes,
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i'm granted a royal audience. for a person in her 20s to serve the nation, she has done it, she's in her 905. extraordinary. i've become almost obsessed with her. which is amazing. and the show is much an investigation of the institution as well as the people so it's about those figures within this organisation, the sort of pressures, the weird loneliness of it, obviously what happens to a family within those strict jurors and pressures, it's all that kind of stuff that makes the meat of the show. it's not going to be an easy one to get used to. what's that? the recurring theme in the crown is the relationship with her prime ministers. jason watkins is harold wilson. i could not possibly have foreseen his death. i'm not going to do it now, you will have to wait. it's called the high larynx. he has a particular voice but myjob is to sort of show him in all his eccentricities, perhaps, and his voice and it's a much impersonated voice but i have
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to fill it up with what's going on and what the real emotions are going on into the real events of the day which were traumatic and assimilating in absolutely fascinating events that he went through. while filming here in north wales, ben daniels as lord snowdon and helena bonham carter playing princess margaret both stayed in a hotel which was once snowdon's family home. it's extraordinary, being in his childhood home, with all his photographs, in princess margaret's suite. my suite. i have a picture of myself which i was actually looking at last night, do i look? no, i don't actually remotely, like her. i was going and then looking in the mirror and going, no. ijust thought, well, hopefully... which photo is it? probably you took it. and forjosh o'connor today, the challenge of acting in welsh, although not as nerve—racking perhaps as acting before the man he now has to become.
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prince charles once came to a play i did. it was very dodgy, he left halfway through. he didn't! charles! he probably had something on, he was busy. you reckon? were you not very good? let's go with that. it was a play at the rac called the shoemaker‘s holiday. i'm sure it had a brilliant second half. the second half was amazing. and what of taking on princess anne? age is rarely kind to anyone. nothing one can do about it. acting royalty playing real royalty as the crown and the woman who wears it return. john maguire, bbc news, carnarvon. it's great to get that access. and people talking so candidly about a huge bit of telly. that so you a picture of the queen on the day. reenactment of wearing a hat. very similarto
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reenactment of wearing a hat. very similar to the one olivia was wearing as well. series three of the crown launches on netflix on sunday the 17th of november. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. a report into conditions at bronzefield women's prison in west london — where a new—born baby died in september — has highlighted concerns about its health—ca re. a report found there was a "severe shortage of nurses" and an increasing number of prisoners with "complex and enduring" mental health problems. sodexo, which runs the jail, said it would "develop a robust action plan". the government is being urged to help fund a memorial to remember the victims of london's prolific slave trade — before thursday. there is planning permission for a large scale version of this sculpture in hyde park, but permission for it expires this week. the government has so far refused to donate any money — despite london having been one of the largest slave ports in the world with millions
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of africans being shipped and sold in horrendous conditions. the motoring organisation, the rac is calling for more charging points for electric cars — away from central london. it accepts — that compared to other cities — electric vehicle owners in london are well served — but only in certain areas. the rac wants to see that change. london is doing pretty well. it's got a much better infrastructure of electric charging points and many of those are around the city and around westminster but the problem is as you get further out into the suburbs, things tend to decrease in terms of the availability of charging points. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning — apart from the jubilee line which has minor delays because of ongoing problems with the trains. onto the trains: on south western railway — one of the lines towards basingstoke
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is closed because of a landslip near fleet. expect delays and cancellations. and on the roads: the blackwall tunnel — was closed earlier because of an overheight lorry — and that's causing delays back to the sun in the sands roundabout. now the weather with kate. good morning. it's not especially cold out there this morning but over the next few days, the temperatures is set to fall. for this morning, we've got a bit of mist and fog. it's largely cloudy with some showers mixed in there as well. we have a strengthening northerly wind, a chilly wind, with showers through to lift any mist and fog this morning, mid—morning onwards. we might get one or two brighter spells this afternoon through heavier showers but those heavier ones, you mightjust hear a rumble or two of thunder, temperatures today between 10 and 12 celsius. into this evening of course if you are out watching the fireworks it's going to be a cloudy start, winds are still in showers blowing through but gradually the clouds will sink south and the showers will follow so we'll get a clear end to the night and that's where the temperature will fall, between 4 and 5 celsius out in the suburbs so a much chillier night to come. as we head into wednesday, a lovely bright start, some sunshine but the cloud will increasee through the course of the day. it stays pretty unsettled for much
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of this week and the temperature, it is going to feel that little bit colder. vanessa feltz is on bbc radio london, and today, is november the fifth. one is bonfire night and not bonfire night. it's you had to wimbledon park and vanessa will tell you why. you can also tune in on the bbc sounds it. good morning, welcome to breakfast, with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines: a bonfire night battle over brexit, borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn target each other‘s policies as election sparks fly. new rules inspired by the death of 18—year—old oliver mcgowan will
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mean training for nhs staff in caring for people with learning disabilities and autism. a tale of two high streets. thousands of mothercare jobs at risk, as it becomes the latest big name to go under. but primark bucks the trend, reporting an 8%jump in profits. england's cricketers have been beaten by new zealand. 00v)they've lost by 14 runs in nelson as the hosts take a 2—1 series lead. on set with the cast of the new series of the crown — we get exclusive access. we arejust whispering. we are just whispering.” we are just whispering. i think they are going to be sacked! it will be foggy for east anglia and parts of the south—east, but will bonfire night be a damp squib or a sparkler? we will have your forecast. it's tuesday november 5th. our top story: party leaders will step up
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election campaigning today by challenging their opponents' plans for brexit. labour and the conservatives will both attack each other‘s proposals for leaving the eu, while the lib dems will officially launch their "stop brexit" agenda. let's take a look at some of the detail. the prime minister has published a letter to the labour leaderjeremy corbyn, posing five questions for labour to answer about their brexit strategy. jeremy corbyn is in essex to spread labour's brexit message. he'll promise to sort it in six months when he gives a speech this morning. and the lib dems will launch their campaign in westminster this morning. leaderjo swinson will claim that staying in the eu will result in a £50 billion remain bonus for the uk economy. earlier on breakfast, figures from the two main parties gave a conflicting picture. ifjeremy corbyn were prime minister he would go back to brussels, we negotiate the whole deal, go back to square
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one, taking months, possibly years. at the end of the process have a referendum, butjeremy at the end of the process have a referendum, but jeremy corbyn at the end of the process have a referendum, butjeremy corbyn will not tell a referendum, butjeremy corbyn will not tell us and which side he would campaign.” corbyn will not tell us and which side he would campaign. i have gone backwards and forwards to brussels for the best part of three years, talking to people in the parliament, the two senior politicians in all eu 27 countries. i am very well aware a deal that could be struck, and i think very quickly. our political correspondent jonathan blake is in westminster. as we said earlier, everyone is trying to get their key points across this morning? lots of big promises, big claims and numbers coming our way from all the main parties today as this election campaign continues, and the liberal democrats. it is launching their campaign officially today, talking about what they call a remain bonus, £50 billion to the economy over the next five years, they say, as a
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benefit of not leaving the eu, and the party is clear that a vote for the party is clear that a vote for the lib dems is a vote to stop brexit, they promised to revoke article 50 straightaway if they were to wina article 50 straightaway if they were to win a majority. they are a long way away from that. as for the £50 billion, independent financial experts have described it as broadly accurate but not something which can be specified in too much detail, so we had to take these numbers and claims with a pinch of salt. as for the labour party, jeremy corbyn will again set out his party because 's policy today, renegotiating a new brexit deal and putting that to the public ina brexit deal and putting that to the public in a new referendum. people talk about potentially 500 million p a week going from the nhs to american drug companies if the health service opened up as part of a future trade deal between the uk and the eu, something the government would deny, and it rests on drugs
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prices increasing after brexit, and there is no guarantee it would necessarily do that. have a look online at bbc reality check for more details. the prime minister trying to undermine jeremy corbyn's details. the prime minister trying to underminejeremy corbyn's speech and brexit by writing him a letter on headed paper from and brexit by writing him a letter on headed paperfrom ten downing street asking him to come clean about what he thinks on brexit and challenging his campaign that he can get brexit sorted within six months, renegotiating the dealer putting it back the public in a referendum. the conservative slogan is to get brexit done, so both parties perhaps trying to tap into the fatigue that leave and remain voters are feeling about the key issue of brexit, which today is anything to go by, it will certainly dominate in the five weeks in two days of this election campaign to come. throughout the election campaign, the bbc‘s reality check team will be fact checking each of the parties
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claims and looking at whether the data backs them up. you can check out all of those details yourself at bbc.co.uk/news — or on the bbc news app. the labour mp sir lindsay hoyle has been elected as the new speaker of the house of commons — replacing john bercow. sir lindsay — who's the mp for chorley — seen here in the middle, was dragged to the chair by mps, where he pledged to be a neutral speaker. he also paid tribute to his daughter natalie, who died in 2017. i wish she could have been here. we all miss her as a family, none more so than her mum. i've got to say, she was everything to all of us, she will always be missed but will always be in our thoughts. as i promised, i will be neutral, i will be transparent. i think this house, we can do more to ensure that the transparency continues. health and social care staff working in the nhs in england will receive training on autism and learning disabilities thanks to a campaign led by families. the training programme has been named in memory of teenager oliver mcgowan, whose parents campaigned for better staff training since his death in 2016. a trial of the new training
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will begin in england next year. a diy home urine or swab test could potentially help more women discover whether they are at risk of cervical cancer, researchers say. uptake for nhs screening is at a 21—year low, with embarrassment blamed for putting millions off. researchers at london's queen mary university say the home—tests look for subtle changes in dna and hope this could become the standard method for screening. the civil aviation authority has opened a compulsory registration scheme for drones weighing more than 250 grams, or 8.8 ounces. owners have until the end of this month to register the devices and to complete an online test to show they can fly them safely and legally. anyone operating an unregistered drone in this category will face a fine of up to £1,000. the south african rugby team arrive back home today, amidst huge celebrations after their win against england in the world cup final injapan.
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captain siya kolisi made history when he became the first black south african captain to lift the william webb ellis trophy. our correspondent milton nkosi is outside the airport injohannesburg and joins us now. good morning, there must be so much excitement. what do they have plans for them? i'm extremely disappointed, because we can't hear him, and! disappointed, because we can't hear him, and i wanted to hear about that. i can tell you they are going on tour of some of the major cities of south africa, no doubt it will go down incredibly well. siya kolisi was talking about how sometimes results are bigger than... he made a really beautiful speech. i think he was talking about hopefully uniting south africa. if we can, we will try to get more about that report later.
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let's talk about something we have discussed a little already. when 18—year—old oliver mcgowan died in 2016, his family began campaigning for better training for nhs staff working with patients with learning difficulties and autism. they work they and other families have done has resulted in the launch of a new training programme, named in oliver's memory. it's due to be trialled in the nhs in england next year. we can speak to oliver's mum paula, who joins us from new south wales in australia, and dan scorer from the charity mencap. hejoins us in the he joins us in the studio hejoins us in the studio in sa lfo rd. hejoins us in the studio in salford. paula, you have been campaigning about this for an awfully long time, do you feel it is awfully long time, do you feel it is a big breakthrough?” awfully long time, do you feel it is a big breakthrough? i do. it is the first step forward, it has been worth the campaign work, it is the beginning to addressing the inequalities of the health care needs of people who have autism and learning disabilities.” needs of people who have autism and learning disabilities. i know you
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have spoken to us on this programme during your long fight to get this to happen, tell us about oliver and what happens? oliver wasjust, really, just a normal teenager enjoying his life. he had autism and a mild learning disability as a result of meningitis as a baby. he was a talented footballer, playing for our england development squads. he was an athlete, ranked third best in the country and was in training to bea in the country and was in training to be a paralympian. he was full of life and we all absolutely loved him. people were drawn to him as a person. he was always striving to be the best he could be, always helping people less able than himself, who we re people less able than himself, who were vulnerable, that was my boy, he was just lovely. he were vulnerable, that was my boy, he wasjust lovely. he was given an anti—psychotic medication, wasn't he? oliver had what we call partial
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seizures, many will recognise them to be absence type sieges. we brought into hospital having these seizures, and because of a previous reaction to anti—psychotics we brought a folder saying oliver's previous reactions and watch other doctors had said, it was that he was intolera nt to doctors had said, it was that he was intolerant to all anti—psychotic medications, we made this clear to the doctors treating oliver, oliver himself had made it appear. sadly because, i believe, of his labels attached to him, his autism and his learning disability, that medication was given that evening with outers knowing about it. sadly it causes brain to swell so proudly it was coming out of the base of his skull, and he lost its life due to people not being able to understand his autistic behaviours, not being able to understand his learning disabilities, not being able to understand how to make reasonable
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adjustments, and oliver paid a heavy price for that. we are joined by dan scorer from price for that. we are joined by dan scorerfrom mencap. price for that. we are joined by dan scorer from mencap. it price for that. we are joined by dan scorerfrom mencap. it is also hearing that. do you think this training will make a difference to people in similar situations? we hope so, and we have to remember that every year people with a learning disability die unnecessarily, if they were given the correct treatment there lives could have been saved. it is vital that the government moves ahead with this. jayne mccubbin, who has followed this, says it might have been 2022 by the time this is fulfilled? people with autism and learning disabilities are dying unnecessarily, if staff in the health anchor sectors had training
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on how to make simple changes about how people could be cared for, their lives could have been potentially saved. giving people more time, giving them more information in an easy read format they can reach, giving people with autism acquired space where they can be communicated with the way from bright lights and noise, really simple things which can make a big difference.“ noise, really simple things which can make a big difference. it seems like there might be different levels of training for different levels of co nta ct? of training for different levels of contact? a blow everyone in the health and care services needs this training, whether a receptionistm a doctor in a surgery, they need the training to potentially save lives. paula, was that something specific you think might have made a difference in your case or something you are difference in your case or something you a re really difference in your case or something you are really looking forward to knowing that all staff will be aware of going forward? doctors and
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nurses, medics, understanding oliver and treating him as a person rather than as a person with a label would have helped greatly. we assurance, modifying language, adapting how their behaviour affected him. just their behaviour affected him. just the most basic things, to be honest. it could have had a different outcome for oliver. it is respecting people, treating them as equals and keeping them at the heart of everything you do. give them a voice, they have a voice in the right to be listened to.” voice, they have a voice in the right to be listened to. i know the training has been named in memory of oliver, how does that make you feel? obviously we are incredibly happy with this, this is why a had campaigned so hard and so long, dedicating over 13 hours a day to
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this. this is oliver's legacy. what it does is personifies the training so that when nhs staff and social ca re so that when nhs staff and social care staff receive this training, they will see oliver's face and remember that he is the absolute reason we have this training, because oliver lost its life in a way that he should never have done. it is oliver's legacy and we are very proud, it is a way of oliver giving back, but we must also remember exactly what it is about, it is about getting this training to try to prevent some of these horrendous debts that are happening in this country. thank you very much for your time on breakfast, paula mcgowan and also dan scorer from mencap. let us know what you think about that. social media, all morning, or you can e—mail us, the
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e—mail address is always busy. i understand it will be a little bit cold. i have been watching matt's temperatures? it will get colder through the next 36 hours. the sun is obscured by fog. others. patches of fog across parts of east anglia and south—east, clearing in the next few hours, but for others it is notjust cloudy, it is grey and damp. there is rain across parts of north—east england and the pennines, shows making it west of the pennines, and in the western fringes of wales, cornwall, some in kent at the far north of scotland. lots of dry weather across scotland, northern ireland and central england and wales. there will be showers through the day, mostly limited to eastern england and the far north of scotland through the afternoon, meaning many of you will stay dry, brighter conditions the further west you are, a chilly north to north—easterly breeze will start to drop temperatures more widely compared
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with recent days. temperatures in scotland, a good part of northern ireland and the far north of england staying in single figures, may be 13 degrees in the south—west, sheltered from the breeze and showers. fewer showers across southern counties compared with today. you will need to wrap up well if you are going to an organised bonfire event, guy fox night tonight, there will be a few showers around, mainly across northern and eastern parts of the country. let me show you the details, subjecting into northern scotland, east anglia and the south—east, we continue to see those showers feeding before fading away later. some showers developing around irish sea coast, but most are made, particularly in land, will become dry, clear and cold. here are some temperatures out of town into the countryside as we start tomorrow, a chilly commute, frost possible in the suburbs and the countryside, it will be a brighter start with more sunshine, any
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morning mist and fog patches clearing. showers across the south—west of scotland and around the western coast of england and wales, developing widely and drifting further eastwards, turning water into the south and west of northern ireland, but for many across the north and east of scotla nd across the north and east of scotland and eastern england, staying dry tomorrow but a chilly davis after that. a frosty start folsom, temperatures in single figures for the vast majority. colder than we would normally expect this time of year. wednesday night and into thursday, not as cold as tonight because low pressure is pushing on, more cloud and bands of rain spiralling in, back to some pretty wet weather folsom on thursday, rain heading northwards across england and wales could persist across parts of the midlands, northern england, north wales into the afternoon. a showers in northern scotland could bring some winteriness over the hills. damp and louise, it is staying a little chilly as well. you just made me shiver. thank you, matt. i have
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had the big coat out for a while, i might crack at the gloves for fireworks night! very bad news for mothercare, better news for primark. a tale of two high streets. mothercare is set to call in the administrators today, putting 2,500 jobs at risk with the closure of 79 stores. the firm has tried and failed to find a buyerfor its uk business. its international business remains profitable, but in the uk it made a loss of £36 million last year. but it's a very different story over the road at primark. the high street giant — which celebrates its 50th anniversary this year — has just reported an 8% rise in profits. it's opened 15 new stores in the uk this year and now has stores across mainland europe and in the us. and uber has reported a loss
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of more than $1 billion despite a 30% rise in revenues. the firm now says it has 103 million users around the world, that's up sharply on the 82 million the year before. it underlines how difficult it has proved to be for popular new tech startups to actually turn a profit. the firms are forced to spend heavily on advertising, and convincing people to use their new services by offering cheaper prices. and i want to show you this, facebook looks a little different. new logo, they have gone capitalised for a start, and it changes colour. this is trying to remind everyone that facebook owned instagram, those figures are instantly recognisable as instagram, and this is their logo, it animates normally, it goes green, whatsapp, that is to remind eve ryo ne green, whatsapp, that is to remind everyone that they are the big pa rent everyone that they are the big parent company of facebook which owns all sorts of things, notjust the facebook website. facebook has
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beenin the facebook website. facebook has been in the headlines for all the wrong reasons about data sharing and access to information and how much information is being shared with other organisations, facebook is trying to draw a line under it and saying that facebook is just one pa rt saying that facebook is just one part of our business that we are also about instagram, oculus, that 3d had such, they are trying to set up 3d had such, they are trying to set upa new 3d had such, they are trying to set up a new currency, they are trying to distance themselves from it, but a cynic would say don't call yourself facebook, then. you might wa nt to yourself facebook, then. you might want to do what google did, they call their parent company alphanet. facebook is opting to keep the facebook is opting to keep the facebook name, it is in capital letters now, so clearly a huge difference! i have a mate who will not do facebook or whatsapp, instagram, completely stays off social media. what was that film with gene hackman? when you go properly off grid? what is that
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called? enemy of the state! ivri somebody is paying attention. you are right, going off grid, more and more people are trying to do that. in otherjob we probably can't, we rely on social media volatility but i have friends who have ditched facebook entirely because they were really spooked about how much data facebook has. i don't need any more friends. i love my friends, but i am out. i need to swap some in or something. hit a limit. we keep thinking all of these services are provided for free, google thinking all of these services are provided forfree, google providing maps, providing shopping and all that, it is nothing to do with providing it forfree, that, it is nothing to do with providing it for free, it that, it is nothing to do with providing it forfree, it is that, it is nothing to do with providing it for free, it is an exchange. we pay in alligator, that is what they get from us, remember that. if you ever unfollow me on social media... you have been swapped! ijust
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social media... you have been swapped! i just reach social media... you have been swapped! ijust reach a limit! i am sure i can make exceptions! bristol could become the first city in the uk to ban diesel vehicles from the centre, in a bid to cut pollution. the council is deciding today whether to approve the clean air plan, which would also include a congestion charge. we can speak now to the mayor of bristol, marvin rees. a very good morning to you, thank you forjoining us. it is clearly busy behind you, why are you trying to do this? we need to make sure people in bristol had clean air to breathe. this is the intervention that we know puts us on track to deliver that clean air in the shortest possible time. we spoke to the rac earlier, some people are talking about this being a really blunt instrument. going to be consequences to everything we do. all cities across this country, many have been required to produce clean and plans and put clean—air zones in place to improve the quality of our air, which is a major health hazard.
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the truth is we have very few options, there is a set of interventions available to us, clean airzones, interventions available to us, clean air zones, diesel restrictions, we put in place the combination that gets as to comply with this in the shortest possible time and reduces the burden on lower income families. the only alternative is to introduce a general charging zone which we know we'll have a disproportionate impact on lower income people. lots of different questions, the rac are saying this could cause hardship for thousands of people, people trying to get across the city to get from the south to motorways. what you say about that? i recognise there will be challenges, over the last year or soi be challenges, over the last year or so i had taken a raking in the price because we had taken the time to think about those consequences, we know there are challenges to business, retail, hospitals, small
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businesses, one of the reasons we took the time thinking through the intervention we would make is because we had taken that into account, what we have brought forward as the option allowing us to get to compliance in the shortest possible time and reduces the burden on lower income people, now we get to the point when we are looking at the mitigations, how do we support with transition and blue badge holders? bristol is a member of uk 100, uk cities leading on climate change. we have been clear that we need the support and the investment to put into the public transport system and support particularly those least able to afford the transition, to make that into a lifestyle where they are not so dependent on diesel and reducing our c02 dependent on diesel and reducing our co2 footprint. dependent on diesel and reducing our c02 footprint. i don't necessarily
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understand the geography, either in the south, i want to get to a motorway, if i have a diesel car, what will happen? there will be signage around, there is a wider area clean air zone which you will pay a charge to come into if you are a commercial vehicle, a bus or an hgv, lgb, if you're not compliant. if you are a private car driver you would not pay to come into that zone, we are not charging private car drivers. within that clean air so there is a smaller area in which we are restricting diesel access, users of any diesel will not be able to go therebetween 7am and 3pm, that only applies to private car drivers. commercial vehicles, taxis, anyone coming into the clean as own. how
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much difference will it make in the immediate term to what you see behind you? it will help sb compliance by 2025, it will put us on track and we will notice a difference in those wheel hotspots, the city centre is the real hotspot. this is a major public—health challenge in cities all across the country, we have a moral, ecological and legal requirement to become compliant. marvin rees, i can see you struggling with your earpiece, thank you for bearing with us. i was going to read some diesel comments, we are a little bit late so shall we do them in a moment? jeff goldblum is on the way after the news, travel and weather wherever you are watching.
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good morning. quite a bit of mist and fog this morning in central and eastern parts of england, rain affecting northern areas of england. the rain associated with this weather front, moving southwards, low pressure sliding away into the near continent. some sunshine at times in south—west england, wales, northern ireland and eventually across scotland but the rain starting to move southwards into the afternoon. the morning fog will clear, maximum temperature is still in double figures across england, wales and northern ireland but turning chillier in scotland, temperatures in single figures. if you're heading out this evening for bonfire night, the risk of a few showers, feeling quite chilly, you may need an extra layer, hat, scarf and gloves perhaps, and into wednesday, rather chilly start to
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the day, some fog but quite cloudy with rain into the west.
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this is worklife from bbc news, with sally bundock and david eades. fast—fashion fortunes — british pioneer primark says international expansion is helping its profits grow. live from london, that's our top story on tuesday 5th november is a t—shirt for a few quid a sustainable way to go? the industry is under scrutiny for its enviornmental impact — and the welfare of millions of workers around the world. also in the programme ...ride—sharing giant uber continues to lose money — billions of dollars —

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