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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 7, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm shaun ley. today at 2pm: labour sets out plans to borrow £150 billion over five years to replace, update and expand schools, hospitals, housing and care homes. this will begin the urgent task to repairour this will begin the urgent task to repair our socialfabric this will begin the urgent task to repair our social fabric which has been torn apart by the tories. for the conservatives, the chancellor sajid javid also promises spending on infrastructure but insists his priority is to control government borrowing. this election it could be won or lost in the north of england so today we are in leeds where there are two or three rather tight marginals. caught on cctv, the last moments of british backpacker grace millane,
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as she's seen embracing the man who stands accused of her murder. a police officer has been charged with the murder of retired footballer dalian atkinson who died after being tasered. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. good afternoon simon. the former england captain, dylan hartley has announced his retirement from professional rugby. northampton saints — where he's played at for m years — say the hooker had been unable to recoverfrom a knee injury. and you have the weather at your fingertips. persistent rain across england with the risk of flooding. we were also the casting our eyes towards india we have a couple of cyclones to look at. also coming up: would
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you pay £5 99 a month to be able to binge on british classic television series? the election campaign has turned attention onto the economy with both labour and the conservatives setting our their spending priorities. and they‘ re planning a big spending spree. with the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell, setting out plans to borrow £150 billion over five years to replace, update and expand schools, hospitals, housing and care homes. mr mcdonnell said the investment would be on a scale never seen before outside of london and the south east. chancellor sajid javid says the conservatives would increase borrowing to pay for new infrastructure, but he insists that controlling borrowing is a priority
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and that we must live within our means. this report from our economics correspondent andy verity. the man who wants to be the next chancellor of the exchequer has already promised £250 billion in extra spending in the next ten yea rs. extra spending in the next ten years. today, he promised another sizeable sum in half that time. social transformation fund will begin the urgent task of repairing oui’ begin the urgent task of repairing our socialfabric which begin the urgent task of repairing our social fabric which has begin the urgent task of repairing our socialfabric which has been torn apart by the tories. hundred and 50 billion to replace and upgrade and expand our schools, our hospitals, care homes and yes, council homes once again. another £150 billion over five years is roughly £30 billion a year. to give you an idea of how much that is, 1 billion will pay to run the nhs over three days. it is enough for a government to build up to 111,000 new social homes or to pay fair 20,000
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new secondary school teachers. but it will mean loosening the governance rules on spending. the next government will... it will mandate as to improve by the end of the... when we invest in the infrastructure our country needs it will be recognised by both as a cost and a benefit. before john mcdonnell has spoken, the existing chance i was attacking his spending plans. you mention 150 billion. he might as well say a trillion, 2 trillion, 3 trillion because they are meaningless numbers. even if you tried to do what he said, if he tried to do what he said, if he tried to do what he said, if he tried to keep his word, he would crash the economy. but the conservatives also want to loosen the strings, known as the fiscal rules. the aim in the last decade has been for the debt to fall as a proportion of the economy and in recent yea rs proportion of the economy and in recent years it has full stop today,
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both parties ditched that by saying that the governments that can rise. instead, they will have a rule on servicing that debt. they say debt repayment shouldn't cost more than 6% of the government's revenue. labour sentient because more than 10%. some economists welcome that. there needs to be investment in the country. there is a shortage of investment in the last ten years or so investment in the last ten years or so since the financial crisis and to some extent both parties are offering these spending plans. the thing that worries as greatly as it not being underpinned by a comprehensive spending review or indeed an assessment of the taxes that will be required to meet those spending plans and that is a grave concern to us. labours plans to more than double spending and even the conservative cap would mean the highest spending in a0 years. they look less so in the new year,
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especially if the economy slows down. as labour tries to deal with the continuing fallout following the resignation of its deputy leader tom watson, there's a new headache as former labour mp ian austin said thatjeremy corbyn is ‘completely unfit‘ to be prime minister. mr austin advised people going to the polls to vote for borisjohnson. here he is, ian austin at the heart of the labour party working for gordon brown in 15 years ago full stop he has devoted his adult life to the party as a counsellor, an adviser attending cabinet but his disagreements withjeremy corbyn are not new. he sat as an independent mp since february but nonetheless his intervention today is still astonishing. take a look at this. i thinkjeremy corbyn is completely unfit to lead our country and the labour party. after 3a years, i have worked for the labour party, in my
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30s worked for the labour party, in my 305 i worked for the labour party, in my 30s i was a government adviser and an mp and it tells them labour voters that they should vote for borisjohnson, i voters that they should vote for boris johnson, i can't voters that they should vote for borisjohnson, i can't believe this is where it has come to. that is a former labour minister saying you should vote conservative.” former labour minister saying you should vote conservative. i could have kept it all quiet and got on with it all and disappeared back off to dudley but i think you have got to dudley but i think you have got to stand up and tell the truth. i think you have to stand up and tell the truth and if you're not going to do what is right on a fundamental question, what are you going to do it on? he wasn't done there. he was in westminster with another former labourmp,john in westminster with another former labour mp, john woodcock, who said he will vote conservative. their views are clear. ian austin's dad was a jewish refugee. he views are clear. ian austin's dad was ajewish refugee. he has long been deeply angry as what he sees as
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jeremy corbyn‘s not being able to deal with anti—semitism. he added that the decision of labour's deputy minister tom watson who has had his disagreements withjeremy corbyn to leave politics was enormously significant but mr watson said he will still campaign for labour and still wa nts will still campaign for labour and still wants to seejeremy corbyn when. it is a very personal decision,. i have been a labour politics for 35 years was not i'm 52, i have been on a healthjourney in years and i wanted to take leave and do something new. what do labour make of what ian austin has said? that mr austin... he is now employed by the tories. what else do you
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expect him to do in an election campaign when you are employed by the tories, you speak on behalf of the tories, you speak on behalf of the tories. that is what this was about this morning. the conservatives had a bumpy start to this campaign. now, it is labour's ten. let's cross to liverpool now — norman smith is there for us. a couple of unhelpful headlines that jeremy corbyn will not have wanted. tom watson's resignation and in austin calling people to vote conservative. there had been this move to get rid of tom watson before the election, presumably he would have had to tell his party a few weeks ago when he was standing again so weeks ago when he was standing again so do we understand what has changed? i don't know. i suspect he reflected on his own circumstances, his health, his family, the thought of going through another five years in parliament and whether he really wa nted in parliament and whether he really wanted to do that and may be that just triggered a moment of reflection where he thought he
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didn't really have the stomach for the fight which he would inevitably have faced because i think there would have been further attempts to stem from the position of deputy leader. there has been all talks of reforming the post. he is a man who has been at the forefront of the battle for two, three, four years. he was a man who tried to shift the party to a romaine position. that has to take its toll. —— romaine position. the question is whether his departure significantly weakens the lonely ban of moderates, if you wa nt to the lonely ban of moderates, if you want to call them that, on the labour backbenchers because if you look at the rest of the party it is pretty much corbynite through and through in terms of the party machinery, unions, and increasingly
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in terms of the parliamentary labour party and i expect that tom watson just thought that i don't really wa nt to just thought that i don't really want to go on doing this. it is a very distinctive choice for those who choose to vote labour or conservative because of the positions there's parties have adopted but oddly, on the economy and the question of investment, there is an awful lot of similarity. they properly wouldn't like a desert like that but that is how it is. they properly wouldn't like a desert like that but that is how it islj like that but that is how it is.” think what labour folk are patting themselves on the back about is that themselves on the back about is that the economic arguments, has moved lock stock and barrel onto their terrain so everyone now is talking about spending billions more on infrastructure. there is no mention on cuts and austerity which has gone out the window. it has become increasingly vague and that money can be borrowed and it is right to borrow the money now because interest rates are so low. that has a lwa ys interest rates are so low. that has always been mcdonnell‘s argument and
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sajid javid picked that up on today. the difference between them is the scale. there really is a gargantuan difference because what the government are talking about is tens of billions and labour are talking about hundreds of billions over the next ten years so there is a quantum lea p next ten years so there is a quantum leap in the scale of the spending promises being outlined. no post—war labour government has ever promised anything like this before but it chimes with what is at the heart of the corbyn manifesto in that he says he is promising real, once in a generation, change that the country has never seen before and this level of spending is part of that. norman smith, thank you. of today's other election news. britain's smaller pro—european political parties have announced a "remain" electoral alliance. the liberal democrats, plaid cymru and the green party will step aside for each other in 60 constituencies.
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they claimed the move was in the national interest. it is unprecedented, the scale of this arrangement between these three different political parties, but i think it speaks volumes about how high the stakes are, how important this is, that these parties, ourselves, the liberal democrats, with the green party and plaid cymru, have been able to put aside those narrow party interests to work together in the national interest, and that's how our politics should be done. around 1,500 voters in swindon have been mistakenly warned that they may not be able to vote in the general election. in a letter sent by swindon council, residents were told they would be removed from the electoral register as they were no longer entitled to be registered at their property. the council later tweeted asking residents to ignore the letter as it was sent "by mistake". it now appears it was sent to a total of almost 3000 voters.
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throughout the campaign, bbc news will be looking closely at the places where the election could be won and lost — visiting 10 parts of the uk where seats will be closely contested. today we're in leeds, and we can cross over now to christian fraser, who is there for us. yes, hello. it is very nice to be back in the city of leeds as i was a student some 26 years ago but let me tell you a bit about the city because there is an fascinating content that would be looking out over the course of the election. the city as a whole has eight constituencies, five are currently labour, three are controlled by the conservatives. the one we are in here is leeds central which has been in the hands of hilary benn since 1999. that is a safe seat but then it you look at
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molly and outward. if you are here in the city centre and you're going to look at the demographics you see that 80% of people are under the age of 50 because students want to live in the city centre but you go out was towards morley and it drops and when it comes to turn out that will make a difference especially in those tighter marginals. there has been quite a policy announcement today from labour, they would shift today from labour, they would shift to some significant investment from the south—east to the north of england. to coincide with that, you have front pages like this today here in the north of england. this is the yorkshire post. they're talking about details of a five point manifesto that has been put together by a cross—party group of leaders. they are calling for more devolution, they want to rebalance
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the economy and they want a dedicated transport budget for the north, more money spent on education and health. that sort of stuff is going to have to be incorporated into the manifestos when they are compiled and it is going to have to be taken by each party to the doorstep. still early days but yesterday we were on the first official day of the campaign. with winter coats, brollies, and sensible shoes, the volunteers are mustering. here in the west yorkshire drizzle the ground war is under way. labour is pouring on the resources, it isa labour is pouring on the resources, it is a big team bolstered by young faces. this
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constituency any student or former student from lead knows about the notorious pub crawl about the notorious pub crawl — the so—called 0tley run — 16 pubs into the city centre, and you know what, it's a bit like the election campaign. it's long, it requires great stamina, and no one really knows where it's going to end. at least, i didn't. but there's a serious point here. student turnout, the final thursday of term in the run—up to christmas — you'd better get them early. this is waterloo mount we're on now. in neighbouring pudsey turnout is also important for the conservatives. they are defending a majority from labour of just 331. what's the brexit message? the brexit message is we are here to get brexit done.
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it's not been the perfect start to the tory campaign. they just hope it's the prime minister's message, notjacob rees—mogg's, that is cutting through. does it make you angry, when you need every one of these votes? yeah, of course, it's very frustrating, but those things don't matter to people here in pudsey. i've never voted conservative. are you a labour supporter, of old? of old, yeah, but they are just fools, aren't they? and it's brexit that you will be voting on? yeah, definitely. i've been saying it's a toss—up between conservatives and brexit party. which is why back here in leeds north west the mood in the lib dem camp is as bright as their high vis jackets. over the last year it's been incredible seeing the change on the doorstep. people are now saying i voted labour in the past but i'm disillusioned withjeremy corbyn. i'm coming to you instead because of your stop brexit position. do you know all aboutjo swinson? no, not at all. they have five weeks to inform and change minds. it's humbling for the candidates. careers depend on these volunteers and in the depths of a yorkshire winter the early enthusiasm will be sorely tested.
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it sounds really obvious to say that when they are campaigning in the summer when they are campaigning in the summer there will be someone in the back garden, may be taking a dog for a walk, people out and about but last night what really struck me is that it last night what really struck me is thatitis last night what really struck me is that it is dark, people turning early, they pull the curtains, they don't want to open the door and it becomes really difficult for these teams to get face to face contact with the people they are going to win over so it is going to be difficult in the next five weeks to get out in the next few weeks. there's a chance of rain every day for the next week. so much to talk about in leeds. and with me is james vincent — political editor for bbc yorkshire. we have talked about pudsey and at molly and outward, but i want to checkin molly and outward, but i want to check in leeds west. labour have a majority that, when i was out there last night things seem to be shifting a bit. i was there in 2017 whenjeremy shifting a bit. i was there in 2017 when jeremy corbyn shifting a bit. i was there in 2017 whenjeremy corbyn made a surprise visit and it is a huge student area
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and there were students hanging out of windows, singing jeremy corbyn‘s name and it will be interesting to see what they students, different students, will say about it this time for stop whether they will stick with labour or whether that lib dem message is going through. the key seat for us along that m 62 corridor, is keighley. a labour gain last time around but only 239 votes in it so campaigning there will be tight. | in it so campaigning there will be tight. ijust in it so campaigning there will be tight. i just saw someone with a t—shirt saying, don't mess with yorkshire and that is what they are saying on the front of the papers here. they want to make sure yorkshire gets that funding.” here. they want to make sure yorkshire gets that funding. i want to talk about the concerns with the lib dems in a minute but what i noticed was you have pudsey and leeds north west next to each other. leeds north west next to each other. leeds north west is very studenty and remain. the candidates are
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su btly and remain. the candidates are subtly changing the method in adjacent constituencies. you have one mp saying we will get a new deal and we will definitely have a new vote so we can stop it whereas another mp is vote so we can stop it whereas anothermp is in vote so we can stop it whereas another mp is in saying something com pletely another mp is in saying something completely different. each candidate in the constituency would judge exactly what they want to be showing in the leaflets, which leaders that they want to campaign with them. stuart andrews who was the mp will be standing again. he will be making sure he backs borisjohnson to make sure he backs borisjohnson to make sure that brexit is done. in an area like leeds north west which has a lot of students, the labour message is going to have to be very clear about what labour's policies are to get students to vote for them again. pudsey only have a majority of 331
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there, they don't yet know if they have a brexit party candidate there 01’ have a brexit party candidate there or who it is going to be and when you have a majority of 331 at that could really shift the result. as with the brexit party earlier in the campaign and nigel farage was in derbyshire and they thought they could do really well and it was a constituency that voted 70% to leave the eu, they say they are going to stand in every seat in yorkshire so that will be a big threat to the conservatives on one hand but also ina conservatives on one hand but also in a really strong labour area. 70% leave but it has been a labour seat ever since it was created. the mp has been there since 19... ever since it was created. the mp has been there since 19. .. we will talk more throughout the course of the day. it is fascinating to see these parties coming together. the workers out, they suddenly descend,
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they don't have manifestos to go on but they are hugely enthusiastic despite the miserable weather that we have appear the north. it isa we have appear the north. it is a good job you are indoors, normally getting drenched in liverpool. don't forget — throughout the election campaign, we will be asking what questions you would like answered. send us your election question at hashtag bbc your questions, just hours before she died — the last moments of british backpacker grace millane, captured on cctv, have been shown to a new zealand jury. the images showed her going to bars with the 27—year—old man who's on trial for her murder. the suspect — who cannot be named for legal reasons — denies strangling ms millane and says she died when
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a sex game went wrong. phil mercer reports. these are grace millane's final hours. wearing a dark dress and white trainers, she's tracked on security cameras on her way to see the man who killed her. they'd met on the dating app tinder and arranged to meet in person outside auckland's sky city casino. the man, who we can't name, arrives. briefly, he stops, then turns away, before walking back towards the british university graduate. they hug. in court today, the 27—year—old, who denies grace's murder, looked on as the jury was shown a detailed chronology of that evening last december. the pair order cocktails at a bar and drink heavily during a night out around the city. they appear to enjoy each other‘s company, at some points
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kissing and embracing. during the evening ms millane sends messages on her phone to a university friend, whose statement was read in court. i sensed grace was having a good time and she seemed to be drunk and really enjoying herself. i do not think grace had any concerns for her safety when i was in contact with her. i did not receive a reply or hear anything further from grace. grace millane spent more than an hour at the bluestone room a bar that you can see behind me with the defendant. it was the last place they visited before they crossed the street to the man's apartment, that's on the third floor of this inner—city building. it's where grace millane died. what happened up there lies at the heart of this case. the prosecution says the backpacker was strangled deliberately. the defence is insisting she was killed accidentally when a consensual sex game went wrong.
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the final pieces of cctv footage seen by the jury show ms millane entering the lobby with the man and then travelling towards his room in the lift. it's the last time she was seen alive. phil mercer, bbc news, auckland. police have identified all those who died in the lorry trailer which travelled from zeebrugge in belgium to grays in essex. 39 people died in the lorry, essex police have been working with vietnamese police to verify the identity of those victims, and police say their families have been informed. a police officer has been charged with the murder of the former aston villa footballer dalian atkinson, who died after being tasered in shropshire in 2016. both offices, the one charged with murder and one charged with assault
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have just appeared in murder and one charged with assault havejust appeared in birmingham magistrates courts, a very short appoints appearance this morning. it all relates... a very well known and loved footballer was staying with his dad in telford. because of the incident he was tasered by these two officers, subsequently restrained and subsequently died. there was a very long investigation by the ipc who passed on theirfiles very long investigation by the ipc who passed on their files a year ago. we now know that one of those two officers, officer a, ago. we now know that one of those two officers, officera, has ago. we now know that one of those two officers, officer a, has been charged with murder. we have statements, both from the police and from his family, some who were in court to hear this first hearing and say that they welcome after such a
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long time that the case will go before a jury but they regret how long it has taken. later, we will find out more details. time now for a look at the weather. relatively calm over the uk at the moment but maybe not elsewhere? we are looking at these cyclones. these two blobs you can see. this one over here sounds a bit like christmas, bauble. these two systems are developing very differently. this one is just dying a death. you can see that as a strea k of dying a death. you can see that as a streak of high—powered being ripped across heading towards india and nepal but this system, bauble, is becoming more compact.
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even when i look at that i can see it has a threatening look. it is gaining strength, but why the difference? you would expect them both to retain the strength but actually, these are like hurricanes, they just called cyclones actually, these are like hurricanes, theyjust called cyclones in the indian ocean. 0ne theyjust called cyclones in the indian ocean. one thing this type of tropical system hates is strong winds, would you believe it. ifjohn anyjet winds, would you believe it. ifjohn any jet stream here, winds, would you believe it. ifjohn anyjet stream here, this little blue blob is getting closer to the jet stream, if your member on the satellite picture moment ago, it is the jet stream that is actually causing that to be ripped apart. it loses its intensity and it is not even forecast to cross the coastline. it is just a nothing, just a few thunderstorms now which is incredible. the jet just a few thunderstorms now which is incredible. thejet stream is a long way away from bauble. this one is different. this system is picking
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up is different. this system is picking up strength and the winds are approaching hundred miles an hour. we're not sure exactly where it will come in, it could be into bangladesh but it looks like either way it could bring some torrential rain and it could be a new story to keep an on. thank you. what about nearer to home? here in the uk, one thing i've been looking at is just how wet our autumn has been. i shaded in this area which encompasses most of the midlands and northern england. in the last two months, these areas have seen more rain than we would see in the whole of autumn. it has already been wetter than normal and that sets the scene for what we have got coming and why we are seeing problems today. let's get into the forecast. this is where the front is very slow moving and we have already had a lot of rain forced a bit is
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heaviest and most persistence on and to the east of the pennines. we have a met office and the weather warning in force, at 200 millimetres of rain in the forecast, even lower down, a0 to 60 millimetres of rain around and thatis to 60 millimetres of rain around and that is more than enough to cause and purpose. we already have a number of flood warnings in force, well over 20 at the moment and the majority of these focus on yorkshire, the flooding situation is likely to get worse before it gets better because this where the front ain't going nowhere fast. through the rest of this afternoon and perceiving it is just going to continue to rain. the main tent area and comes across north wales as well and comes across north wales as well and we will start to see it losing some of its intensity but elsewhere with clear spells, a cold night in store, cold enough for some patches of frost around as we start friday full stop friday, the low pressure responsible for this troublesome area of rain is actually moving away into france. the rain gets less intense but we will still have some damp weather as it swings back across east anglia, may be south—east england as well.
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elsewhere, after a cold unlikely frosty area. temperatures are six which is below normalfor the frosty area. temperatures are six which is below normal for the time of year. into friday night, clearing skies it will be a cold night with a widespread sharp around. temperatures in the towns and cities even getting down to —2 minus three degrees. in the countryside it will be even colder than that. into that cold air, we have a cold weather front moving in. the front itself making quite slow progress but we could see perhaps a little bit of snow for a time of the highest parts of wales, may be in later parts of the day over scotland too. for the most pa rt the day over scotland too. for the most part it is a cold day on saturday. the second half of the weekend looks a little bit cheerier. it does stay on the chilly side but it should be fairly dry. we are not finished with this wet weather yet. the rain will continue on monday but
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in the short—term the main concern is across northern england, particularly yorkshire and derbyshire where we might see some flooding issues are coming in the next few hours. this is bbc news. our latest headlines. labour promises an additional £150 billion of public investment, in what it calls an irreversible shift in wealth in favour of working people.
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the total transformation fund will begin the urgent task of preparing oui’ begin the urgent task of preparing our socialfabric begin the urgent task of preparing our social fabric that has been torn apart by the tories. but the tories say its fantasy economics and the country is safer in their hands. two former labour mps, ian austin and john woodcock are urging people to vote for borisjohnson at the general election saying the labour leader isn't fit to be prime minister. the jury in the trial of a man accused of murdering british backpacker, grace millane in new zealand are shown cctv footage of her last known moments. a police officer has been charged with the murder of retired footballer dalian atkinson who died after being tasered. the new streaming service created by the bbc and itv, britbox has been launched. it's hoping to compete with the likes of netflix by offering british comedy, drama and documentaries.
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sport now on afternoon live with katie sha na han. gareth southgate has named his squad for the upcoming euro 2020 qualifiers. he certainly has a named a 27 man squad for their euro 2020 qualifiers against montenegro and kosovo later this month. leicester city midfielderjames madison gets the nod. he had to pull out of the last set of matches due to illness, but he was then spotted in a casino during the international break, so southgate has given him a second chance while manchester city'sjohn stones returns as does alex 0xlade—chamberlain and callum hudson a doi, but no play sport dele alli 01’ a doi, but no play sport dele alli or everton defender michael keane, so or everton defender michael keane, so england just need a point to secure their place in next summers final. another story to tell you about. reports in germany suggesting that former arsenal boss arsene wenger is the favourite to be the
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new manager at bayern munich. he has not ruled out saying he would never refuse to talk to buy in munich. niko kovac was sacked at the weekend. wenger has just turned 70, and hasn't had a coaching job since leaving arsenal 18 months ago after 22 years in charge. would be quite a valedictory round, another coaching job and a former england rugby captain saying goodbye to his career and not really free choice. no, it wasn't through choice and we are talking about nicola adams retiring from boxing, and dyla n adams retiring from boxing, and dylan hartley has announced that he is stepping down from professional by. is stepping down from professional rugby. he is 33 and has not been able to recover from a knee rugby. he is 33 and has not been able to recoverfrom a knee injury which has kept him out of action throughout this year. he is
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england's second most capped player of all—time and northampton's longest serving player with 251 appearances over 1a years. in a statement he said that the last few months had been difficult physically and mentally and while his career was not perfect, he wouldn't have it any other way. let's look at the plus points. 97 caps, the second most capped england player andy took england on an astonishing run after the humiliation of the 2015 world cup where they went on an 18 match unbeaten run and they thrashed the wallabies awake 3—0 and a grand slam in the six nations title but before all that came the controversy, he missed a lions tour because he strayed on the wrong side of the line too many times. a controversial character but no doubt about it, the man that eddie jones character but no doubt about it, the man that eddiejones turned to when english rugby was in a crisis. staying with rugby union and the owner of saracens says the club won't have to sell any of its stars after being found to have breached premiership rugby‘s salary cap.
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nigel wray has admitted on the club's website that they did fail to report some things on time. but he remains adamant that they have not broken the rules, adding that "investment is not salary". meanwhile, scottish rugby have been fined £70,000 and ordered to apologise to world rugby. it's after their chief executive, mark dodson had hinted at legal action if their deciding pool match againjapan in the world cup had not gone ahead due to a typhoon. scotland narrowly lost 28 points to 21 to japan. the world para athletics championships starts today in dubai. and one person that is rather apprehensive this time around is the britan's paralympic gold medallist, kadeena cox. she's not competed in a major athletics competition for over two years due to mental health issues and injury. but admits she's looking forward to competing in the t38 200m and a00m.
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i'm actually really nervous. i'm a lwa ys i'm actually really nervous. i'm always nervous because any time i go over a00 metres, it's hard work, and i'm nervous but it's because i'm not really competed much in the last two yea rs really competed much in the last two years and have been out with injury and health issues and i've really struggled with my mental health, so being able to get back and get on the starting line is a challenge, so i'm excited to be there but i feel like i expect a lot from myself and i'm pretty sure other people expect me to come out and dominate, so i'm nervous. that's all the sport for now and i'll have more in the next hour. throughout the campaign, bbc news will be visiting 10 parts of the uk, the marginal constituences where seats will be closely contested. today we're in leeds, and we can cross over now to christian fraser, who is there for us. hello again. mercifully we are being well looked after in the trinity shopping centre in leeds which is a
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sort of outdoor and indoor shopping centre. it has stopped raining. let me show you the leaden skies outside. it's been absolutely pouring down in leeds today which won't be much fun for the people out canvassing on the streets but there's been a lot of people here in there's been a lot of people here in the shopping centre and may be has something to do with that giant christmas tree over my right shoulder, may i —— may be people starting their christmas shopping already. let me tell you a little bit about why we are in leeds and we will go to tender areas for the next five weeks, areas where there will be tight contests in this election and this is the first one in leeds, so and this is the first one in leeds, so let's focus on the constituencies. there are eight of them and five of them are in the hands of the labour party. three of them are currently under the control of the conservatives and there were some tight ones as well, pudsey, morley being closely for between labour and conservative. and the demographics will play a big part in all this. it is a student city with
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over 100,000 students in leeds, so looking at this constituency where i am, leeds central, you see 80% of people are under the age of 50 but it shifts if you go out to morley where it tends to get more suburban and then it is 60% of people under the age of 50. and we should also talk about ethnic diversity it's a city that has celebrated its ethnic culture for some time, and 1a% of the population is of black and ethnic heritage and in fact next year, in 2023 they will celebrate that diversity. they were down to try and become the european capital of culture but instead they will celebrate the ethnic diversity, so a lot of things going on and a lot of companies come here as well and we have channel for and sky moving into the city and burberry and the atm company link. mark goldstone is from the west and north yorkshire chamber
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of commerce. thanks for coming along. let's talk about the big news of the day, £150 billion is the policy that labour have set out today, an awful lot of money but for business leaders in the north, they would welcome that sort of commitment. absolutely and i wouldn't put it to a cost, this is an investment for the future and perhaps making up for some of the past inadequate investment we have had in the north. people in the north are playing a full part in this. it's a balance, because we don't want to break the economy and the conservatives would say it is reckless and we do need this. we are not talking about spending this in a single year. you might be getting train track today that is of the victorian era. i was trundling for four hours to go from york on one of the pacers, and it was quite chronic. indeed. the pacers, we are told, will go by december with new
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infrastructure coming next year and we are on a journey and we are playing catch up but i think the north has a massive role to play. let's talk about the trains a bit more and more from what i know about businesses in east lancashire, and what they are looking forward to is hs2 what they are looking forward to is hsz but what they are looking forward to is hs2 but because of the costs escalating there is a rumour they would cancel it from birmingham north, and that is the wrong way around, isn't it? absolutely h52 and the high—speed connection need to be built as a pair. they need to be built as a pair. they need to be built as a single network and need to connect into the existing network and in addition we also need an upgrade to the current system. if you travel to manchester it is 40 miles, and in the south east it is a standard commuter journey but miles, and in the south east it is a standard commuterjourney but it's incredibly hard to do it here on a day—to—day basis. incredibly hard to do it here on a day-to-day basis. how can you costing what it would mean to have a fast train link between liverpool and hull and to birmingham, manchester and leeds? we did our own
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research in terms of access to skills and we reckon if you put that in it would bring around 10 million people within working age within an hour commute of leeds city centre and that is game changing. interesting that you refer to the northern powerhouse which has been kicking around as a title since 201a but if you asked lots of these people down here if they feel the benefits of the northern powerhouse, what would they say? possibly they might not know what it is but ask them if they are northern. they would probably tell you they are from yorkshire or leeds. very gritty. a great part of the world. in this manifesto i've seen today they talk about a fourth industrial revolution. is that possible with the investment discussed? it's already happening and this region, we talk about leeds, and people perhaps know it as a centre for accountancy and legal services, and it is but it's a big centre for digital and manufacturing. this region is the largest concentration
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of manufacturing jobs in the country but it'sjust not that of manufacturing jobs in the country but it's just not that well— known and we don't necessarily have the jaguar land rover types but we have a huge amount of supply chain companies and they are incredibly diverse and we have a lot of innovation going on here and if you bring in the technical sector and the health sector as well, we are at the health sector as well, we are at the forefront of some of all of this. really good to speak to you today. i do realise, and anybody who knows me at the bbc, they know i am ina one—man knows me at the bbc, they know i am in a one—man mission to get rid of the pacer trains in the north of england. you have to put your warm coat on and refix your fillings. in december they have frost on the inside of the glass. if you put one of those trains on the rails in london there would be an absolute outcry. we have them down in parts of the west country and we are also being promised that they will be phased out. i am keeping my fingers crossed, as i'm sure you are and i know exactly what you mean, i've been on that so—called express across the pennines and i'm not convinced it has earned that title.
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maybe it's an optimistic thing to say. they used to have a train called thames link 2000 and they eventually dropped the 2000. the pm is heading to scotland on his first full day of the general election campaign. earlier he visited a tea factory on teeside in the key marginal constituency of stockton south. this afternoon he's expected to say a vote for the scottish conservatives will stop another independence referendum. first minister nicola sturgeon says "it is time" for scottish independence. let's cross to edinburgh and speak to the snp spokesperson tommy sheppard. thanks for taking time out of your own campaign to talk to us. let me ask you first, straightforwardly, is this snp election campaign really about the referendum, or is it about the future of the united kingdom? it's about both, in many ways. we have three main objectives in the election and one is to let boris johnson out of number ten in the
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second is to stop brexit by putting it back to the people, and the third is to demand respect for scottish public opinion and i'm not expecting borisjohnson to public opinion and i'm not expecting boris johnson to support public opinion and i'm not expecting borisjohnson to support independent or support a referendum, but if the scottish parliament votes by a majority to consult people about how they are governed, west insta would respect that are not trying frustrated and if he chooses that latter path, he willjust turbo—charge opinion here in favour of scottish independence. what you make of the suggestion from richard leonard made that the snp as yet does not have a mandate for a further referendum in scotland and it would have to prove that case, not ina it would have to prove that case, not in a general election but a uk wide poll on who ultimately will form the government at westminster, but ina form the government at westminster, but in a scottish parliamentary election i think he is on thin ice talking about mandates. back in 2016 we had a general election in scotla nd we had a general election in scotland on a proportional voting system to elect a parliament at
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holyrood on the snp failed to get a majority just put with holyrood on the snp failed to get a majorityjust put with the support of the green party it has the government in scotland and there is a clear majority of people who stood ona a clear majority of people who stood on a manifesto saying that there should be a further referendum on independence if circumstances change, and brexit is one hell of a change, and brexit is one hell of a change so that is why we think it is justified and i would have thought richard leonard should argue for people keeping their political promises, which is what we intend to do by having a further referendum next year. put simply then, if brexit does not happen and the remaining alliance is successful, the parties operating together, you would accept that the argument is not made for scottish independence. if brexit is the thing that changes it, the ardent of adding another referendum and i'm not saying you would renege on being in favour of it and that that is your political view, but your argument for another referendum in the next couple of yea rs referendum in the next couple of years would no longer apply. we would have to see what the outcome of the brexit debate is and talking
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about the remain alliance, we have 13 conservative seats and in every one of them the snp is the main challenger so if people want to unseat the conservatives in scotland they should certainly be voting snp which is why a number of people in recent days from the liberal democrats and the green party and labour party have said that they will be backing the snp candidates. just to be clear, the case for scottish independence does not rest on whether brexit happens or not. there is a compelling argument that says people here should take political control of their own affairs and if they do so, the country will be more prosperous and open to the world and able to play a fuller pa rt open to the world and able to play a fuller part in the world. the experience of the brexit debate and the way in which scottish independence and the parliament has been treated has led many people who did not vote for independence in 201a to reconsider their position and they are now open to debate and all we are saying is that they should have the opportunity to make that choice. this election in
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scotla nd that choice. this election in scotland is about the people who live here having the right to choose their own future. tommy sheppard in edinburgh, thank you. let's head to the other end of the united kingdom. the lib dem leaderjo swinson is visiting a school in somerset this afternoon. earlier — a general election pact was agreed between the party, the greens and plaid cymru that they won't stand against each other in dozens of seats. 0ur correspondent tom symonds is withjo swinson on her campaign trail today. good afternoon, tom and it looks like you're having a nicer weather than norman smith was facing in liverpool earlier. it's not so bad out here in somerset but it's been a long haul across the country to get jo swinson here in the battle bus to start campaigning today. as you say, she is at the forest school, the free rangers, which looks after preschool children and gives them a taste of education in the outdoors and currently she is upstairs talking to some of those parents and
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meeting children here at the school. the lib dems are stressing their environmental policies today and they are talking about their pledge to increase the amount of renewable energy to 80% of britain's total energy to 80% of britain's total energy supply by 2030 and they are also talking about insulating homes and they have promised to insulate a large number of homes by 2025 and they are going to spend £3 billion per year on that. all this is very interesting because coincidentally, they have done this deal with two parties, plaid cymru and the green party, to ensure that in 60 constituencies only one remain candidate stands for election. that isa candidate stands for election. that is a huge potentialfor impact candidate stands for election. that is a huge potential for impact on the campaign, certainly for the liberal democrats who say they want to use see a seismic change in the size of their vote. but to give you an idea of the numbers, 60 constituencies, which they believe
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they can win aa, the liberal democrats themselves are pulling out of 13 seats and getting a free run at a3 seats. so they are saying that that will make a big difference. and that will make a big difference. and that really is what the liberal democrat campaign is about. it says it right there on the bus, stop brexit. that is their big selling point and they are trying to be the anti brexit campaign and to avoid the vote being split. ifjo swinson can achieve that, she believes she can achieve that, she believes she can have a big impact on the outcome of the election. tom in somerset. good to speak to you. in a moment victoria fritz will bring us the latest business. at first, look at the headlines on afternoon light. labour sets out plans to borrow 150 billion pounds over five years to replace, update and expand schools, hospitals, housing and care homes. for the conservatives, the chancellor sajid javid also promises spending on infrastructure — but insists his priority is to control government borrowing.
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two ex—labour mps ian austin and john woodcock have urged people to vote for borisjohnson instead ofjeremy corbyn at the general election saying the labour leader isn't fit to be prime minister. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. the british pound falls in value after two people on the interest rate setting committee vote unexpectedly to cut rates. price cuts and new value ranges fail to boost sales at sainsburys, as they shrink again. sainsbury‘s has lowered prices on more than 1,000 lines since february. first—time buyers are shunning one—bedroom flats in favour of larger three—bed homes. research by the property search company zoopla says only 10% of first time buyers searched for one—bed homes this year, as buyers look to buy properties they can live in for longer. that goes against conventional wisdom that if you're lucky enough
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to buy in the first place, you think small and don't get too ambitious because you're going to have to keep moving. that's exactly it, you are right on the whole idea about getting on the housing ladder, the idea is that there are rungs and you spend some time on each rung, but the interesting thing here is you compare this to the 80s or 90s, for example, and transaction costs are now higher and it costs more to get your deposit in the rest of it but interest rates are generally lower and inflation is lower, so it means people are locking in terms of borrowing for much longer and the age of the people looking to buy first time has risen. the average age is now 33 and about a0% of first—time buyers are actually in a couple and have children, so they are not looking for this one bed flat, so it's quite interesting what is going on and it goes against conventional understanding of the housing market. there is another story we are covering which is an interesting one about what is going on in the us at the moment. two former employees of twitter have
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been charged in the us for spying on saudi arabia. samira hussainjoins us now from new york. what we know about these charges? this is really incredible because you have to consider that the us is a very close ally of saudi arabia. that said, what the department of justice is saying is that saudi arabians are using these twitter employees and grooming them to get them to spy on people in the us and elsewhere that were vocal critics of the saudi arabian government and they had access to some pretty sensitive information including phone numbers and ip addresses. remember that these addresses can give them the locations of where people are. what has twitter said
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about all of this? what has the response been? twitter say they are cooperating with the department of justice in all investigations and it says it has vetted those people who have access to this kind of private information, but clearly there was a lapse somewhere in terms of the betting —— lapse somewhere in terms of the betting — — vetting lapse somewhere in terms of the betting —— vetting process. and there is also a grooming aspect that happened, that one employee was groomed by these operatives linked to the saudi arabian government. that said, it really does highlight how social media companies are very vulnerable to this type of manipulation and interesting story. so good to see you. we will keep an eye on the pound for you and see what is going on and see how it is reacting to the news coming out from the bank of england today about what is going on with the growth forecast
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and what is going on with interest rates and inflation, all that kind of thing, so we will be back with more in an hour's time. thank you very much. let'sjoin more in an hour's time. thank you very much. let's join chris at the map. it is pouring down and will continue to pour down across northern england for quite some time yet. the radar picture picks up a band of rain that is not moving anywhere and it's really quite persistent and heavy rain across the pennines and into the east of the pennines, and it is here where the met office have issued an amber weather warning across parts of yorkshire and derbyshire for two millimetres —— 200 metres of rain. there are 31 flood warnings in force in the majority of these are in yorkshire and the flooding is likely to get worse before better because the rain will fall down. it's only during the second half of the night that we will see the rain easing away from the pennines and into central and southern england. while we keep clear spells, it will be a cold
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night with patchy frost developing in the coldest areas. weather—wise tomorrow it's a better picture and the cloud and rain will be with us and it's turning light and patch in south—east england as it starts to pull away but after a cold and frosty start, a cold day with temperatures between six and 10 degrees. that is the weather.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live. today at 3pm: labour sets out plans to borrow £150 billion over five years to replace, update and expand schools, hospitals, housing and care homes. social transformation fund will begin the urgent task of repairing our socialfabric which begin the urgent task of repairing our social fabric which has begin the urgent task of repairing our socialfabric which has been torn apart by the tories. for the conservatives, the chancellor sajid javid also promises spending on infrastructure but insists his priority is to control government borrowing. the former labour mp who's urging people to vote conservative. he saysjeremy corbyn is completely unfit to lead the country. a police officer has been charged with the murder of retired footballer dalian atkinson who died
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after being tasered. coming up on afternoon live all the sport. england manager, gareth southgate has named his 27 man squad for their euro 2020 qualifiers against montenegro and kosovo later this month. and chris has the weather. we will be taking a look at a couple of cyclones around india and taking a look about northern england as an amber warning is a look about northern england as an amberwarning is in a look about northern england as an amber warning is in force and we have other flooding warnings. i will have other flooding warnings. i will have a full forecast, particularly focusing on that. hello everyone, this is afternoon live. the election campaign has turned attention onto the economy with both labour and the conservatives setting
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out their spending priorities. and they‘ re planning a big spending spree. with the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell, setting out plans to borrow £150 billion over five years to replace, update and expand schools, hospitals, housing and care homes. mr mcdonnell said the investment would be on a scale never seen before outside of london and the south east. chancellor sajid javid says the conservatives would increase borrowing to pay for new infrastructure but he insists that controlling borrowing is a priority and that we must live within our means. this report from our economics correspondent andy verity. the man who wants to be the next chancellor of the exchequer has already promised £250 billion in extra spending in the next ten years. today, he promised another sizeable sum in half that time. social transformation fund will begin the urgent task of repairing our social fabric which has been torn apart by the tories.
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150 billion to replace and upgrade and expand our schools, our hospitals, care homes, and yes, council homes once again. another £150 billion over five years is roughly £30 billion a year. to give you an idea of how much that is, £1 billion will pay to run the nhs across the uk for three days. it is enough for a government to build up to 1a,000 new social homes, or to pay for 22,000 new secondary school teachers. but it will mean loosening the government's rules on spending. 0ur fiscal rule for next parliament will exclude borrowing from investment for borrowing targets. it will mandate us to deliver an improvement in the overall balance sheet by the end of the parliament. so that, when we invest in the infrastructure our country desperately needs, it is recognised on both as a cost but also as a benefit. beforejohn mcdonnell had even spoken, the existing chancellor
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was attacking his spending plans. you mention 150 billion. he might as well, mcdonnell, say a trillion, 2 trillion, 3 trillion because they are meaningless numbers and even if he tried to do what he said, if he tried to keep his word, he would crash the economy. but the conservatives too want to loosen the purse strings, known in the jargon as the fiscal rules. the aim for the last decade has been for debt to fall as a proportion of the economy and in recent years it has. today, both parties ditched that goal, saying that the government's debts can now rise. instead, they will have a will on the cost of servicing that debt. the conservatives say debt repayment shouldn't cost more than 6% of the government's revenue, labour said it shouldn't cost more cost more than 10%. some economists welcome those much looser purse strings.
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there need sto be investment in the country. there is a shipment of investment for the last ten or so years since the financial crisis and to some extent we are pleased that both parties are offering these spending plans. the thing that worries is greatly is that it is not being underpinned by a comprehensive spending review or indeed an assessment of the taxes that will be required to meet their spending plans and that is a great concern to us. labour's plans would more than double public spending on investment and even the conservatives new spending cap would allow the highest spending investment for a0 years. but what now seems affordable in this pre—christmas election may look less so in the new year, especially if, as some predict, the economy slows down. as labour tries to deal with the continuing fallout following the resignation of its deputy leader tom watson, there's a new headache as former labour mp ian austin said thatjeremy corbyn was "completely unfit" to be prime minister. mr austin advised people going to the polls to vote for borisjohnson. 0ur political correspondent chris mason reports.
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here he is, ian austin at the heart of the labour party, working for gordon brown 15 years ago. he has devoted his adult life to the party as a counsellor, an adviser, attending cabinet, but his disagreements withjeremy corbyn are not new. he sat as an independent mp since february. nonetheless, his intervention today is still astonishing. take a look at this. i thinkjeremy corbyn is completely unfit to lead our country. completely unfit to lead the labour party. after 3a years ijoined the labour party as a teenager, i worked for the labour party, in my 30s i was a government adviser, in my a0s i was an mp and a minister so it has really come to something when i tell decent traditional patriotic labour party voters that they should be voting for borisjohnson at this election. i can't believe it has come to this but this is where we are. yes, that is a former labour minister suggesting that you vote
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conservative. i had to leave the labour party, ifelt, but i could have kept it all quiet and got on with it all, disappeared back off to dudley, but i think you have to stand up and tell the truth. i think you have to stand up and tell the truth and if you're not going to do what is right on a fundamental question like racism, what are you going to do it on? and he wasn't done there. here he was in westminster hours later with another former labour mp, john woodcock, who says he will vote conservative. their views are clear. ian austin's dad was a jewish refugee, his aunt and his grandma were murdered by the nazis. he has long been deeply angry at what he sees asjeremy corbyn's failure to deal with allegations of anti—semitism. he says the party has been poisoned with anti—jewish racism. the labour leadership insist that they are doing everything they can to eradicate the problem. he added that the decision of labour's deputy leader
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tom watson, who has also had his disagreements with jeremy corbyn, to leave politics, was economically significant. although, mr watson says he will campaign for labour and wants to seejeremy corbyn win. it is a very personal decision, not a political one. i have been in front line labour politics for 35 years, i'm 52 years old, i have been on a health journey in recent years and i wanted to take the leap and do something new. so, what do labour make of what ian austin has said? the shadow chancellor made reference to an unpaid government role as an envoy to israel mr austin took on in the summer. he is now employed by the tories. what else do you expect him to do in an election campaign when you are employed by the tories, you speak on behalf of the tories. that is what this was about this morning. the conservatives had a bumpy start to this campaign, now it is labour's turn. let's get more on this now
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from our parliamentary correspondent sean curran. i still have vivid memories of him with gordon brown, how striking is his decision to say that he won't support labour but to go a step further and tell people to vote for borisjohnson? further and tell people to vote for boris johnson? as you say, ian austin has been at the heart of labour and the labour government for a very long time. lots of journalists here would have had phone calls from him, sometimes complaining because of things we have broadcast and written about gordon brown when he was the chancellor. even when he broke with labour earlier this year and started to sit as an independent, he still sat on the labour benches so he would be in the middle of labour mps and so now, at the very beginning of this campaign, for him to break
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ra nks this campaign, for him to break ranks with a party that he has worked with for so long, is quite a big moment and it is notjust that he is expressing doubts about labour, he is actively saying that people should vote conservative and i think you saw that as well, that angry reaction from john mcdonnell, the shadow chancellor, by suggesting that from taking this unpaid government role as a trade envoy to israel, he is already working for the tories. it shows what an uncertain time election campaigns can be. the tories had a rough 2a hours, labour is having a rough 2a hours, labour is having a rough 2a hours, i suppose where we get onto more substance that will matter in more substance that will matter in more day—to—day life is what they are offering on the economy. boris johnson is conservative leader is also not pushing that message just, he is talking about the future of the uk as a whole and how that can be insured after brexit, despite what we are hearing from the snp
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earlier that in scotland they will push us towards the door. that is an argument that the snp have been rehearsing for a long time. he is in north—east scotland today, visiting a distillery and his message was about independence and the future of the union. let us hear what he had to say. we are a party that is going to say. we are a party that is going to keep our uk together and it is only scottish conservatives that can prevent another referendum next year. jeremy corbyn has done a deal with the scottish national party because that is the only way he can see himself getting into power and is not only does he want a referendum on scottish independence but a referendum on the eu. come on, let's get brexit done, get this thing over the line and let's get on
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with bringing our country together and unleashing the potential of the whole of the uk. it is only scottish conservatives that can prevent that second referendum. of course, this is an argument that i suspect we are going to hear a lot from boris johnson over the next few weeks because, of course, the snp have made it perfectly clear that they would like to see another independence referendum next year. he says he is the minister for the unions, a title he gave himself, so he is trying to prove himself by going notjust he is trying to prove himself by going not just around he is trying to prove himself by going notjust around the uk, but i think downing street had said that he had been on the phone to donald trump to lift the tariffs that had been put on scottish whisky, i wonder if he will have any luck there. thank you. let's take a look at some of today's other election news.
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britain's smaller pro—european political parties have announced a "remain" electoral alliance. the liberal democrats, plaid cymru and the green party will step aside for each other in 60 constituencies. they claimed the move was in the national interest. it is unprecedented, the scale of this arrangement between these three different political parties, but i think it speaks volumes about how high the stakes are, how important this is, that these parties, ourselves, the liberal democrats, with the green party and plaid cymru, have been able to put aside those narrow party interests to work together in the national interest, and that's how our politics should be done. around 3,000 voters in swindon have been mistakenly warned that they may not be able to vote in the general election. in a letter sent by swindon council, residents were told they would be removed from the electoral register as they were no longer entitled to be registered at their property. the council later tweeted asking residents to ignore the letter as it was sent "by mistake".
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throughout the campaign, bbc news will be looking closely at the places where the election could be won and lost. we will be visiting 10 parts of the uk where seats will be closely contested. today we're in leeds to find out the questions and issues voters want to discuss. there are eight constituencies, five of which are held by the labour party and three by the we've been in leeds central, which has been held by the labour mp hilary benn since 199 but the two neighbouring seats of pudsey and morley & 0utwood are key battle grounds between the tories and labour. one other key fact for you, in the 2016 eu referendum, the city of leeds delivered a near 50—50 split, with the remain vote shading it by 50.3%, but all other parts of west yorkshire followed the national trend and backed brexit. my colleague chritain fraser has been following party activisits as they go on the campaign trail. with winter coats, brollies and sensible shoes, the volunteers are mustering.
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here in the west yorkshire drizzle the ground war is under way. leeds north west is one of the key labour marginals. they face a sizeable challenge here from the lib dems, so no room for any complacency. labour is pouring in the resources. it's a big team, bolstered by young faces. this constituency has one of the biggest student populations in the country. hang on, we've got to a0, ground floor, that is. no other party really matches labour's ground game, set times every day, 11am, 2pm, 40pm, 6pm. regimental. just committed, just enthusiastic. any student orformer student from leeds knows about the notorious pub crawl, the so—called 0tley run, 16 pubs into the city centre, and you know what, it's a bit like the election campaign. it's long, it requires great stamina, and no one really knows where it's going to end.
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at least, i didn't. but there's a serious point here. student turnout, the final thursday of term in the run—up to christmas, you'd better get them early. this is waterloo mount we're on now. in neighbouring pudsey, turnout is also important for the conservatives. they are defending a majority from labour of just 331. what's the brexit message? the brexit message is we are here to get brexit done. it's not been the perfect start to the tory campaign. in pudsey, theyjust hope it's the prime minister's message, notjacob rees—mogg's, that is cutting through. does it make you angry, when you need every one of these votes? yeah, of course, it's very frustrating, but those things don't matter to people here in pudsey. i've never voted conservative. are you a labour supporter, of old? of old, yeah, but they are just fools, aren't they? and it's brexit that you will be voting on? yeah, definitely. i've just been saying it's a toss—up between conservatives and brexit party.
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which is why, back here in leeds north west, the mood the lib dem camp is as bright as their high vis jackets. over the last year it's been incredible seeing the change on the doorstep. people are now saying, i voted labour in the past but i'm disillusioned withjeremy corbyn. i'm coming to you instead because of your stop brexit position. do you know all aboutjo swinson? no, not at all. they have five weeks to inform and change minds. it's humbling for the candidates. careers depend on these volunteers and in the depths of a yorkshire winter the early enthusiasm will be sorely tested. don't forget, throughout the election campaign, we will be asking what questions you would like answered. send us your election question at hashtag bbc your questions, or via your questions on our website. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines labour sets out plans to borrow 150 billion pounds over five years to replace, update and expand schools, hospitals, housing and care homes.
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for the conservatives, the chancellor sajid javid also promises spending on infrastructure — but insists his priority is to control government borrowing. two ex—labour mps ian austin and john woodcock have urged people to vote for borisjohnson instead ofjeremy corbyn at the general election saying the labour leader isn't fit to be prime minister. and in sport: a controversial casino visit meant leicester city's james maddison missed out on an appearance for england last time round, but he has been included today in gareth southgate's latest squad the former arsenal manager, arsene wenger, hasn't ruled himself out of contention to be the next bayern munich manager. reports in germany have linked him with a move to the club. and the former england captain, dylan hartley, calls time on his rugby career after failing to recover from a long—term knee injury. i'll be back with more on those stories after half—past.
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police have identified all those who died in the lorry trailer which travelled from zeebrugge in belgium to grays in essex. 39 people died in the lorry , essex police have been working with vietnamese police to verify the identity of those victims , and police say their families have been informed. a police officer has been charged with the murder of the former aston villa footballer dalian atkinson who died after being tasered in shropshire in 2016. phil mackie sent us this update from birmingham. both offices, the one who has been charged with murder and one who has been charged with assault have just been charged with assault have just been on birmingham magistrates‘ court this morning, a very brief appearance and they are due to come to birmingham crown court this afternoon. this all relates to an incident back in 2016. dalian
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atkinson, a well—known footballer was staying with his dad in telford. because of the incident, he was tasered by these two officers, subsequently restrained and subsequently restrained and subsequently died. there was a long investigation by the ipc who passed on theirfiles a investigation by the ipc who passed on their files a year ago. today, we now know that one of those two officers, 0fficer now know that one of those two officers, officer a, has now know that one of those two officers, 0fficera, has been charged with murder. we have had statements, both from the police, and perhaps more importantly from dalian atkinson‘s family, some who we re dalian atkinson‘s family, some who were in the magistrates‘ court this morning to hear this first hearing and they say that they welcome that after such a long time the case will go before a jury but they regret how long it has taken. we were here, later on, perhaps more details.
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a new streaming service backed by the bbc, itv, channel a and channel 5 launches today. costing £5.99 per month , britbox will feature classic series such as original doctor who episodes, downton abbey and gavin and stacey as well as some original content. it‘s to rival the likes of netflix and amazon prime but the new service isn‘t without its critics, as our media editor amol rajan explains. welcome to britbox. it‘s often said that we‘re living in a golden age for television, but the dominant products today have tended to be from american companies. until now. and jump through all your favourites. britbox is the first streaming service allowing viewers to watch what they want when they want that combines shows from the bbc, itv, channel a and channel 5. its targeted at people who are sort of already into streaming. they're probably looking for the next thing that they want to add, they really love that way of watching. and we think it offers something really distinctive, because no one else is doing british in such a kind of broad and comprehensive way. i am billy kimber!
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the bbc‘s main offer to consumers will still be the iplayer, where most of its recent hit shows like peaky blinders can be found. i was born in another time, another world. but on britbox, the bbc will provide a selection of back catalogues for some classic shows such as doctor who. what should we call each other? itv is the main commercial and editorial force behind the new service, with shows such as downton abbey, broadchurch and love island available. channels a and 5 came on board more recently. at £5.99 a month, britbox is the same price as the basic offer from netflix and amazon prime. this launch comes a full decade after a similar proposal from british broadcasters was blocked by regulators. in retrospect, that was a naive and damaging decision, allowing american giants like disney, netflix and amazon to steal a march on the british competitors. the big unanswered question is not whether or not britbox offers value for money, but whether subscription fatigue is beginning to set
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in for consumers facing an avalanche of choice. in a recent interview, the boss of disney, who are launching their own streaming service in the uk next year, says this is an untested market. well, i don‘t think we know how large the global market is for these products yet. so i think one question is, are there more potential subscribers in the world or not? and if so, how many are there? so i don‘t know if you call it a risk, but it‘s an unknown. welcome to britbox! the vast majority of content on britbox will be repeats. british broadcasters are betting that the convenience of a one—stop shop for their programmes persuades punters to pay up. amol rajan, bbc news. i don‘t know if any great moments from weather forecast past will be there, maybe we could see your younger self? how are things are
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looking for now and in the immediate future? here in the uk we are keeping a close eye on what is happening in northern england and we will take a closer look at that in a moment. first of all we will take a look at what is going on in india. we have two cyclonic storms around india. this one sounds a bit christmassy and is called bauble. you can see this one out in the arabian sea has just about vanished, ultimately, as it just arabian sea has just about vanished, ultimately, as itjust works into the north—west of india it is dying a death. it isjust a the north—west of india it is dying a death. it is just a few thunderstorms, there is nothing strong about this but this one in the bay of bengal, this strength is —— this storm is strengthening. the main difference between those two is down to the winds. the things with hurricanes, typhoons, cyclones, that
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kind of thing is that they hate the strong winds so when they come in to areas of strong winds, those areas that disrupt the circulation and it ripped them apart. you get a little sense of that with this one as it works close to the jet stream. look at all that cloud, it is just being pulled apart by those in strong winds whereas the one down here, thatis winds whereas the one down here, that is away from the strong winds. how long the estimate it will be before this one makes landfall? this one will probably make landfall about sunday, monday, it depends on the exact track it will take and at the exact track it will take and at the moment it is working northwards and picking up strength because there are no strong winds around it was it is a happy storm. not for the people around it. yes it would be less ha p py people around it. yes it would be less happy if that landed on you. whether it makes landfall in west bengal here in the north—east of india or bangladesh, we are not
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quite sure yet because there is still a little bit of uncertainty with the steering currents about where exactly that ghost was top is it particularly uncommon for this time of year or it particularly uncommon for this time of yearorare it particularly uncommon for this time of year or are the canes and cyclones pretty routine. ? it has been a very active season as well in the north indian ocean and that is another point i would make. the main threat i think is the threat of some flooding problems with the torrential rain, especially if it becomes a slow moving which looks like it might be. talking about torrential rain, i know it is very different in india to what we have here but our country are still not very well designed for it. i've been crunching figures from the met 0ffice crunching figures from the met office and across this area that i have shaded end, we have already seen more have shaded end, we have already seen more rainfall than we have in the whole of autumn, that stretches through september october and the
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whole of november so it doesn‘t include the rain we have already seen include the rain we have already seen at this month but it is really this that sets the scene of why we are seeing problems with flooding full stop we have more rain on the way. so we have a look at that? we have this slow—moving weather front thatis have this slow—moving weather front that is across northern anger. it is particularly heavy persistent rain across the pennines and just to the east of the pennines, blended by the prevailing winds. the met office haveissued prevailing winds. the met office have issued this amber warning for up have issued this amber warning for up 200 millimetres of rain across parts of yorkshire and down into parts of yorkshire and down into parts of yorkshire and down into parts of derbyshire as well. we are already seeing some flood warnings being issued, the number of flood warnings keep up hour after hour, at the moment we have 31 in force and the moment we have 31 in force and the majority are for the yorkshire region. it is likely that we will see more of those issues throughout the rest of the afternoon. this weather front remains very slow moving, it is going nowhere fast, it is only rarely during the second pa rt is only rarely during the second part of the night that we will see the rain easing across the pennines as the locals it across to
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south—east england. where we have some clear spells it will be a cold night with patches of frost, —2 in edinburgh, colder than that in the countryside for scotland, northern ireland and the far west of england as well. for friday macro picture, this weather system will slowly begin to lose its intensity so it would become a little bit lighter and patchy. maybe stretching into south—east england but becoming drier across those western areas and the pennines. after a cold start elsewhere it will stay chilly despite the sunshine. friday night isa despite the sunshine. friday night is a very cold night with arguably the most widespread fast we have seen s0 the most widespread fast we have seen so far this autumn. —2 and three in the cities and in the countryside colder than that. for many on saturday it will be a bright start the day, however, you see the stripe of blue moving in and it will be putting a band rain in. heavy across the south—west and we could
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see a few flakes of snow falling across the high ground, in the pennines and into scotland on saturday night. in the second half of the weekend it is a drier prospect but still chilly for the time of year. temperatures below par, 69 celsius. we are not done with this unsettled weather and we do have more rain on the wait for monday. in the short term, the main concern for this afternoon and this evening as the torrential persistent rain and the threat of flooding, particularly across yorkshire, derbyshire and elsewhere in northern england where we can season problems. —— see some problems.
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this is bbc news. our latest headlines. labour promises an additional £150 billion of public investment in what it calls an irreversible shift in wealth in favour of working people.
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the social transformation fund will begin the urgent task of preparing our social fabric that has been torn apart by the tories. but the tories say its fantasy economics and the country is safer in their hands. two former labour mps, ian austin and john woodcock are urging people to vote for borisjohnson at the general election saying the labour leader isn‘t fit to be prime minister. a police officer has been charged with the murder of retired footballer dalian atkinson who died after being tasered. the new streaming service created by the bbc and itv, britbox has been launched. it‘s hoping to compete with the likes of netflix by offering british comedy, drama and documentaries. breaking news, and there are verdicts in the case at the old paley in the case of 17—year—old
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jody paley in the case of 17—year—old jody chesney who collapsed in her boyfriends arms after being stabbed ina park boyfriends arms after being stabbed in a park in east london. let‘s talk to dan johnson who in a park in east london. let‘s talk to danjohnson who is at the court now. dan? yes, in the last couple of minutes to young men have been found guilty ofjodie chesney‘s murder, 119—year—old and his co—defendant, who was 17 ——19—year—old. there we re who was 17 ——19—year—old. there were four defendants in total in the trial which has lasted over eight weeks at the old bailey and there have been 32 days of evidence about the involvement of those for young men but in the last few minutes here, 120—year—old man, who was accused of driving the other three to the park wherejodie was stabbed —— a 20—year—old man. he has been cleared of murder along with the 16—year—old defendant he was in the car. two of the men who got out of the car and walked across that park
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have been found guilty of murdering jodie chesney in the last few minutes. the question that the jury has been considering not exactly who was present, but what their intent was present, but what their intent was at the time. did the two who we re was at the time. did the two who were in the car, did they know what was about to happen? that is the question thejury had was about to happen? that is the question the jury had to weigh up and it seems they‘ve decided that the two men who stayed in the car did not know what was planned and perhaps were not even aware afterwards thatjodie chesney had been stabbed, but in relation to the others, the 20—year—old and 17—year—old co—defendant, the jury have decided that they are guilty of murder and their defence was that each of them said the other had done it and both denied having stabbed jodie chesney and said the other one did it. thejury has concluded jodie chesney and said the other one did it. the jury has concluded that that does not matter and they both had the intent that somebody should be heard in the park that night. everyone agrees thatjodie was an
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innocent victim, essentially caught up innocent victim, essentially caught up in innocent victim, essentially caught upina innocent victim, essentially caught up in a case of mistaken identity, and we don‘t really know what the true motivation for the attack might have been and there have been different theories that the prosecution put forward and never had a clear vision. there has been a long background to the case which sta rts long background to the case which starts with tributes to jodie‘s family. i know parents say this about their children, but there really wasn't a bad bone in her body. not one. she was a wonderful girl. very loving and caring. and she would do anything for anyone. the worst thing that can ever happen to somebody is to lose a child, especially in this manner. i terribly miss being able to ask jodie to play the piano for me. i miss everything about her. the
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family photos sparkle with youthful innocence and ambition. jodie was bright, caring and kind. hard work volunteer and her high recognition and her killing stunned a nation, already fearful knife crime is out of control and claiming more young lives. the last time i saw jodie she popped lives. the last time i saw jodie she popped her head around the stairs and said happy birthday, dad. i said thanks, love, gave hera kiss and we nt thanks, love, gave hera kiss and went to work. it was her dad's birthday, and as he celebrated that evening, this was the last image of jodie, heading to the park with friends to listen to music and smoke cannabis. cctv later caught two figures crossing the field towards the group. this was an attack which came from our darkest nightmares, two hooded men walking silently over to the play area. the prosecution said they crept up onjodie and her friends. and her boyfriend described how one hopped this fence on the other came through this gate, and
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without a word being said, they walked straight up tojodie and she was stabbed in the back. then, as quickly as they came, the two men disappeared back into the night. the car that had dropped them off moved down the road, where there was just a glimpse of their shadows before they drove away. the desperate effort to save jodie they drove away. the desperate effort to savejodie ended here when the ambulance met a team of doctors who attempted open—hea rt the ambulance met a team of doctors who attempted open—heart surgery. the police were going to take us to the hospital wherejodie was and then i heard over the radio for them to re—route to my house, because jodie had gone. so i heard it in the police van. just coping from day to day, living day to best we can. you know? only two of the four young men in the carare know? only two of the four young men in the car are old enough to be shown, but they were all accused of murder. the driver was a drug dealer
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selling cannabis and cocaine and claimed he expected to pick up drugs and did not know anything violent was planned. another man also sold cannabis around harold hill and admitted he was in the park but claimed he went there to do a drug deal. when he was asked to stabbed jodie, he named his 17—year—old co—defendant. in return, he said it was the other who killed them. the jury was the other who killed them. the jury were shown footage proving that they met earlier that day before heading off to do drug deals. they also saw one man leaving home wearing clothes matching the description given by some ofjodie‘s friends. when it came back the next day, he was wearing a different out. it was admitted they brought a change of clone but they turned out to be to short —— close. change of clone but they turned out to be to short -- close. when you add the circumstances together it showed a compelling case. it was only because of the weight of the evidence that it forced all four defendants to be being present at the car, present at the scene and in
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terms of the actual motive, i don‘t thing we will ever know because only the four people in that car know why they went to that park. what happened here that night pierced the thin veil of reassurance that knife crime happen somewhere else, to other people and this trial has laid bare just how fractured some of the lives here were, built around drugs, gangs, weapons and violence and fuelled by respect and revenge.” will never spend my life hating and ido will never spend my life hating and i do know that from other parents and they said to me, don‘t spend your life here —— hating because it will eat you up inside. i don‘t want to do that. and i knowjodie wouldn‘t want me to do that. to do that. and i knowjodie wouldn't want me to do that. so, just to reiterate the verdicts that have been delivered by the jury in the last five or ten minutes. 0ne
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20—year—old man has been found guilty of the murder ofjodie chesney along with a 17—year—old defendant in this case, also guilty of murder but the two other defendants in the case, a 20—year—old and his 16—year—old co—defendant, they were both cleared of murder and manslaughter, so both will be walking away from this court later today we expect having been held in custody since the murder at the start of march. we have had some reaction from inside the court and a p pa re ntly reaction from inside the court and apparently her family cheered as the guilty verdict of two murder counts we re guilty verdict of two murder counts were delivered by the jury and jodie‘s family has just left court in the last minute or two and it has been a really upsetting trial for them and a really difficult process over the last eight weeks, listening to the harrowing details of exactly what happened to her that night when she was stabbed out of the darkness and the sudden instant in front of her friends without them even really realising what had happened to her until they heard screams and saw how
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badly she was bleeding. there were desperate attempts to save her life by the paramedic and the team of doctors who set off out of london and ended up performing emergency surgery on a and ended up performing emergency surgery on a petrol station forecourt. then there was a difficultjob of piecing together exactly what happened and what might have been behind this attack because even though it was witnessed by the friends ofjodie, the darkness in the park and the speed at which the attack happened in the fact that these were hooded figures meant that witnesses could give the police very little in terms of a description to start with and the police had very little to go on at the start of the investigation and they have pieced together a lot of different evidence from mobile phones, coordinating who was where at what times and the m essa g es was where at what times and the messages exchanged between the defendants and then corroborating that with different pieces of cctv. that has really been the key to cracking this case because there was no murder weapon ever found that could be conclusively linked to the case, no dna evidence of any real importance and in fact the
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defendants were arrested by the police all refused to give any a nswe rs police all refused to give any answers in police interviews and it was only when they were confronted with bits of cctv evidence and footage showing where they were at the time and then the messages they had exchanged through that day, and then the mobile phone evidence that plotted a route they took that night. all four of them went to that part, that was admitted, they drove there that night. the car was the one that took them to the park in harold hill, but he and his 16—year—old co—defendant stayed in the car and they‘ve been cleared of all the charges they face, even though they admitted driving the other to that park, jury agrees that they did not know what was planned that night whereas the two other defendants were both found guilty of murder, both having intended to have at least seriously harmed someone who was in the park that night, even if that was never intended to be jodie chesney. we have heard it may have been a row over drugs or a dispute over different drug dealers about what territory they control.
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perhaps it was another sequence in this tit for tat sequence of attacks which happened and we‘ve seen cctv other attacks that one of the defendants had been part of and he himself had been stabbed in the past, so we got a picture during the trial of the sort of lifestyle that these characters were leading. all four of them have admitted in different ways to being involved in drug dealing in harold hill in the east end of london towards romford. they have all admitted different levels of criminality during the trial in terms of drug dealing and motor offences, theft, all sorts of other offences and there were previous convictions —— convictions related to drug so it depicts the sort of lawless lifestyle that these young men were living in the prosecutor made the point that he thought the key to the case was the careless attitude they took towards the carrying of knives and the jury has decided that at least two of them were not implicated in this murder, not seriously enough to be found guilty, and that is why they have been cleared and we can just see the members ofjodie chesney‘s
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family coming back to court, may be needing to step away. that is jodie‘s dad peter and her grandma and she is getting a hug as well. they are going back into court to consult with the legal team or talk with police officers who have guided them through what has been an absolutely harrowing case for them. they‘ve been really upset at times, especially at the opening of the trial where the details of exactly what happened that night were laid bare in front of the jury, and some of the cctv footage was shown. we did not use the full recording of that cctv -- cctv did not use the full recording of that cctv —— cctv footage because you can hear on the recording the screams that were coming from that park as it was played to the jury, that was a very upsetting moment for eve ryo ne that was a very upsetting moment for everyone involved in the case and hearing what essentially were the last moment forjodie as she struggled to survive after being stabbed. we heard how deep the wound was and how that in effect the knife nearly went straight through her body. it was a large knife plunged straight in her back without anything even being said by the two hooded figures who came over to her
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and we now know that those were these figures who killed her. and these figures who killed her. and thejudges —— these figures who killed her. and the judges —— the judge these figures who killed her. and thejudges —— thejudge had said they will not give sentences today and we will have to wait until the 18th of november and it looks like that‘ll be the date for sentencing. she wants to take time to consider these verdicts and to consider the background reports that will to be done on the two guilty parties to work out exactly what the appropriate sentence should be for the murder convictions they have received here today. danjohnson at the old bailey. a terrible story there, the death ofjodie chesney as two men are convicted of her murder at the crown court there at the old bailey. and moving testimony there that we had in that report from dan from jodie‘s family. now throughout the election we‘ll be taking an in—depth look at the numbers behind the politicians‘ speeches.
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and today has been a numbers heavy day with both labour and the conservatives setting out their spending priorities. 0ur economics correspondent andy verityjoins me now. a lot of numbers to get our heads round. in numbers with a lot of noughts on the end which makes it difficult for me. try and help us with ice. the big number labour came out with is that they will spend an additional £150 billion so try and put that in perspective. 0ver additional £150 billion so try and put that in perspective. over five yea rs, put that in perspective. over five years, that‘s £30 billion per year, £1 billion, that might get you 22,000 extra teachers, for example or by around 17,000 extra homes but they had already pledged £250 billion which is their green transformation plan over ten years, so if you add them up, over the next five years you‘re talking about an additional 55 billion a year to spend and put that in perspective, the total budget of the government
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is about £8a0 billion per year, so against that it doesn‘t look so vast, but it is still by far the biggest increase to spending that any party entering a general election has made for the last 15 or 20 years. what about the conservatives? they are also promising this after many years of austerity. we remember them saying there was no magic money tree but suddenly they found a way to come up with one. suddenly it is like magic, the ten years worrying about austerity, we don‘t have to worry any more. they have new fiscal rules, for which so much has been sacrificed, and it was originally for getting the deficit, the overspend down to nothing, to eliminate it altogether. now they are saying it‘s the current budget and it‘s only the day—to—day spending that counts and if you like it is like bus fares and petrol and males. but if you buy a new car you can spend what you like on that. on hp, and a lot of this will be on hp,
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and the argument is that it is very cheap for the government to buy things on tick because they can issue ious and they will get paid as little as 0.75%, pay as little as that, so it‘s very cheap for the government to borrow and that is the justification for ditching another fiscal rule, which is the idea that debt would not rise and would be coming down as a proportion of gdp, now both parties have ditched that and are saying, for example, that the conservatives are saying they can borrow up to 3% of the value of the economy for investment purposes, for buying the car. when we talk about rules, to be clear, these are rules they have written themselves. there is no objective handbook, the book of economics that says that this is how government should operate and they have to convince us that these are responsible rules for now, even though they are different from the responsible rules for the last five or ten years. that‘s right and it‘s ironic that after ten years
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of struggling to get back down to average in terms of what we spend on deficits and debt it‘s like a man on a diet. he has fought like hell to the last ten years to get into that last belt notch and decides to buy a whole new belt because it will give him a bit more wiggle room. my option is to get them to punch a couple of extra holes in.” option is to get them to punch a couple of extra holes in. i am with you on that. and i have more need of it than you. if you look at the difference now there would be a debt servicing rule and what makes sense is to see what debts they can afford, so it‘s a bit like your mortgage. it doesn‘t matter if your mortgage. it doesn‘t matter if your mortgage is large, if the interest rates are low enough you can manage the repayments, that is fine. the conservative site they don‘t want it to be any more than 6% of government revenue that is spent on debt repayment and labour says no more than 10%. in essence, to sum it up, we‘re talking about a position where both are promising to spend a lot of money and both are promising to borrow that money and both say that they are more responsible at what they are more responsible at what they would do with it than the other guys? that's right. labour are
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outbidding on the amount they will spend the conservatives say we are still spending more than anyone for ten yea rs still spending more than anyone for ten years but we are more responsible. andy, thank you very much. well, throughout the general election campaign, we will be asking what questions you would like answered. send us your election question at #bbcyourquestions. thousands in already and lots of you have been asking about student voting. leeds is home to five universities and in some constituencies in the city a high student turn out could affect the outcome. chi chi izundu has been to meet some students to help provide some answers. leeds, home to more than 70,000 students, most of whom who are eligible to vote. polling day is right at the end of the term for many. we are at emma‘s student house. do you want to come in? lots of universities encourage students to register to vote when they enrolled at the start of the academic year, but emma is
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not stopping there. i am trying to get all of my friends to register to vote and it‘s incredibly important that they get involved and they should not waste that opportunity. it‘s super easy to register to vote and it takes four or five minutes and you only need a few bits of information, you need your name, national insurance number, your nationality, your address and date of birth. and that‘s it. i think my mate alec might have a question. let me find him. historically, younger voters are less likely to vote than older voters. my term ends the day after the election, so can i vote in leeds and at home in cambridgeshire? you have to decide which one you want to vote in and cast it there. if you do it twice and you are caught, you could face a hefty fine. i think my friend eve has a question. in the last general election it was suggested 70% of students cast their vote in the home constituency. if i‘m here on election day, can i still vote?
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you have two options. there is postal voting but you have to apply for the process and there is a deadline and the deadline is the 26th of november if you live england, scotland and wales. the other option is a proxy vote, but you have to give a reason as to why you cannot cast it to yourself and the deadline for that is the ath of december 2019. if you‘re in northern ireland, the deadline for proxy voting and postal voting is earlier so you have to make your application by the 21st of november 2019. thank you. do you want to get a cup of tea? but in some constituencies, like this one in leeds, it is the student vote which could determine who wins. ina in a moment victoria will bring us
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the latest business news. two teenagers are found guilty of the murder ofjodie chesney in a park in east london labour sets out plans to borrow 150 billion pounds over five years to replace, update and expand schools, hospitals, housing and care homes. the conservatives describe it as fa ntasy the conservatives describe it as fantasy economics. two ex—labour mps ian austin and john woodcock have urged people to vote for borisjohnson instead ofjeremy corbyn at the general election saying the labour leader isn‘t fit to be prime minister. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. the pound falls in value, after two people on the interest rate setting committee vote unexpectedly to cut rates. price cuts and new value ranges fail to boost sales at sainsburys, as they shrink again. sainsbury‘s has lowered prices on more than 1,000 lines since february. first—time buyers are shunning one—bedroom flats in favour
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of larger three—bed homes. research by the property search company zoopla says only 10% of first time buyers searched for one—bed homes this year — as buyers look to buy properties they can live in for longer. that is the property situation, which is more or less a reflection of the fact people are waiting and some don‘t have a choice that they have to wait. the average age for first—time buyers has crept up, it‘s 33 and you‘re more likely to be in a couple or have children, so a one bed flat is not going to cut it, doesn‘t cut the mustard whatsoever. so people are waiting and trying to buy something, their first home, where they can put the kids in and stay for some time. people‘s time horizon has changed. people are looking to spend ten or 12 years in the first property, as opposed to
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the first property, as opposed to the four or five that was more common a few years ago. one of the things i remember from common a few years ago. one of the things i rememberfrom buying my first home is that you suddenly realise how much you can afford to do things less, like going out in the evening, but there is something to cheer you up about that if you‘re going to be stuck in front of the telly, perhaps. isee going to be stuck in front of the telly, perhaps. i see what you have done there. very good. a new streaming service backed by the bbc, itv, channel a and channel 5 launches today. you can get all the major television channels all on one platform, so we are talking channel a, channel five and of course the bbc as well. they are fighting back against the big quys are fighting back against the big guys like netflix. they are. everybody is getting into this. apple have launched apple tv plus and disney are looking at a similar thing, so there is a proliferation of streaming services out there but the big question is, who will buy all of this but will you have one or two.
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scott bryan, tv critic and co—host of the must watch podcast(0s) will this be a much —— must watch? i‘ve been trying for a while to let people have a go and i‘ve been pleasa ntly people have a go and i‘ve been pleasantly surprised. i see it quite a different position in the market because it‘s primarily therefore archive material, dating back decades but also different stars you are familiar with like 0livia colman, so it‘s providing something a bit different and it‘s whether people will be happy enough to pay for what they watch, and until recently you could have watched a lot of the shows on netflix under what will be happening in the next few weeks and months that shows you are watching elsewhere will be taken off elsewhere and will be available only with britbox. we are talking people who are fans of may be dad‘s army, downton abbey, the classics, all that kind of stuff? they will be
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able to get it at britbox and not elsewhere. are people really going to wa nt elsewhere. are people really going to want to do that, are they going to want to do that, are they going to wa nt to want to do that, are they going to want to do that, are they going to want to pay £5.99 to get access to want to pay £5.99 to get access to all of this stuff or is it because it is easy and you sit back and watch it and let it wash over you. if you ask a lot of people they will ask where there is a state there is too much tv and i‘m with them, because there is too much, but them, because there is too much, but the way that it‘s going to be as people sign up to the services, apple tv plus, which launched with the morning show and people will be signing up to the free trial but i think in about six or seven months‘ time people will be looking at their phone bill and their bank balance and they will be wondering which of these streaming platforms are the one they are not giving time to and thatis one they are not giving time to and that is when there will be a fight on our hands, because at the end of the day most people will only spend maybe 30 or £a0 at the most in all of these and all of the existing providers such as netflix to fight
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back against the investment that they spent on their shows are upping their price slowly but surely so you will start to get to a point where people will not be happy to be committing for ever to pay more and more. i think that's right. it's not just about getting people to get onto the service in the first place, it‘s about keeping them there and that retention will be crucial. retention will be crucial and it will be really hard for netflix and they have been pumping out more and more original programmes, so to cover the shortfall in shows from elsewhere that are going off to rivals, but the issue is those shows have to be compelling and interesting from the off and we have had hype shows like stranger things and the crown, but a lot of netflix shows this year have not been at all compelling and it will be harder and harderfor compelling and it will be harder and harder for them compelling and it will be harder and harderfor them to get compelling and it will be harder and harder for them to get the growth they need if they‘re not going to have the shows that are not good enoughin have the shows that are not good enough in the first place. thank you very much, scott, ever compelling.
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and victoria, thank you s0 very much, scott, ever compelling. and victoria, thank you so much. the weather viewers might be thinking they have paid so much for this for they have paid so much for this for the licence fee because they have to pay for tv advertising on mtv elsewhere. time for a look at the weather. —— on itv. likely to see problems with flooding across parts of northern england particular and the troublemaker is a slow—moving weather front that will bring persistent outbreaks of rain, particularly over into the east of the pennines and the met office have already issued an amber weather warning with up to 100 mil metres of rain forecast in parts of yorkshire and derbyshire and its these counties that are likely to have the worst of the effects, and we are seeing flood warnings being issued, particularly so in yorkshire where the flooding situation is likely to get worse before it gets better. the rain will still be with us through the rest of the afternoon even into the rest of the afternoon even into the night time, affecting the same sorts of areas before slowly pulling away eastwards and southwards later in the night. where the sky is
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clear, we are looking at a cold night with patches of rust developing and that takes us into friday and the weather front will turn light and patria across east anglia it might stay damp —— patria. it will be damp, but plenty of sunshine.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. today at apm: two teenagers are found guilty of murdering the teenager jodie chesney in a park in east london. two other men have been cleared. labour sets out plans to borrow £150 billion over five years to replace, update and expand schools, hospitals, housing and care homes. this transformation will begin the urgent task of repairing our social fabric that has been torn apart by the tories. for the conservatives, the chancellor sajid javid also promises spending on infrastructure, but insists his priority is to control government borrowing. two former labour mps urge people to vote conservative saying jeremy corbyn is completely unfit to lead the country. a police officer charged
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with the murder of retired footballer dalian atkinson, who died after being tasered, has been granted bail. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. leicester city‘s james maddison has been given a second chance by gareth southgate after a controversial casino visit as he‘s been included in the england squad for their euro 2020 qualifiers later this month. and it‘s been a wet autumn, chris has the weather. a met office amber weather warning is in force across parts of northern england, now a number of flood warnings enforce. the full forecast coming up later on. also in the next hour, which you
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pay £5.99 a month to watch old tv? hello, everyone, this is afternoon live. two teenagers have been found guilty of murdering the girl scoutjodie chesney, who was stabbed in an east london park in march. svenson 0ng—a—kwie, who‘s 19, and a 17—year—old who can‘t be named have been convicted at the old bailey. two other men were cleared of murder. 0ur correspondent dan johnson is at the old bailey. this must have been a very harrowing trial for those who were listening and, of course, for dirty‘s family, who are attending? indeed, yes. her family were here almost every day at the start of this trial, and some of the start of this trial, and some of the evidence at the beginning was very upsetting, because there were
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some very very upsetting, because there were some very horrible detail about her last moments in that park in east london in march this year. the way she was sat there, just enjoying a friday night with friends, when suddenly, out of the darkness, she was taken suddenly, out of the darkness, she was ta ken completely suddenly, out of the darkness, she was taken completely by surprise by two hooded figures who crossed that park and drove a knife into her back without her friends really realising what had happened, until she started screaming, and then they realised how badly she was bleeding. it was an attack that came completely out of the darkness with apparently no motive whatsoever. that‘s been one of the hardest things her family to deal with, how their innocent daughter could be caught up in something so horrible and have her life taken. they have been celebrating in the last few minutes on court, because two young men have been found guilty of that matter, svenson 0ng—a—kwie, 19, found guilty of murder, along with a 17—year—old who was with him and went across that park. their defence in this case was that the other one did it.
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they both admitted to being there and crossing that park towards the group, but they‘re both claiming that their intention in that park that their intention in that park that night was only to deal drugs. when asked who had stabbed jodie, who was responsible for her death, they both said the other one. the jury they both said the other one. the jury haven‘t taken that on board and decided it did not matter who actually stabbed jodie, that they we re actually stabbed jodie, that they were both guilty of murder. here‘s more in the background of this case, starting with tributes from jodie‘s family. i know parents say this about their children, but there was not a bad bonein children, but there was not a bad bone in her body, not one. jodie is a wonderful girl, very loving and caring. she'd do anything for anyone. the worse and that can happen to somebody is to lose a child, especially in this manner. it's horrible, not been able to study to play piano for me. i miss
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everything about her. the szczesny family photo sparkle with youthful innocence and ambition. jodie was bright, caring and kind. volunteering earned her the highest recce mission. are killing stunned a nation, already fearful that nikon was out of control, claiming more young lives. the last time i saw jodie, she came downstairs and set happy birthday, dad. i gave her a kiss and went to work. it was her dance‘s birther. as he celebrated that evening, this was the last image ofjodie, heading to the park with friends to listen to music and smoke cannabis. cctv later caught two figures crossing the field towards the group. this was an attack that came from our darkest nightmares. the two hooded men walked silently over to the play area. the prosecution said they
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crept up on jodie area. the prosecution said they crept up onjodie and her friends and her boyfriend described how one hopes this fence on the other came through the gate. and without a word being said, they walked straight up tojodie being said, they walked straight up to jodie and she being said, they walked straight up tojodie and she was stabbed in the back. then, as quickly as they came, the two men disappeared back into the two men disappeared back into the night. the coral to the drop them off move down the road, but there was just a glimpse of the shadows before they drove away. the desperate effort to save itjodie entered here, when the ambulance met a team of doctors who attempted open—heart surgery. a team of doctors who attempted open-heart surgery. the police were going to take us to the hospital when itjodie going to take us to the hospital when it jodie was already there. then i heard on the radio for them to go to my house, because jodie was gone. so i heard it in the police van. just coping from day to day, living day to day as we can. only
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two to four young men in that car are old enough to be shown, but they all accused of murdering. the driver was a drug dealer, selling cannabis and cocaine. he said he expected to pick up drugs and did not know anything violent was planch. svenson 0ng—a—kwie are also sold cannabis around harold hill. he admitted he was in the park, but claimed he went there to do a drug deal. when he was asked who stabbed jodie, he named his 17—year—old co—defendant. and returned, he said it was svenson who killed her. the jury returned, he said it was svenson who killed her. thejury were returned, he said it was svenson who killed her. the jury were shown footage, proving the three of them met up earlier that day before heading off to do drug deal they also saw spencer leaving home wearing clothes matching the description given by some ofjodie‘s friends. when he came back the next day, he was wearing a different outfit. the driver admitted he brought svenson a change of clothes, that turned out to be too short. svenson said he burned the others. when you put it all together, chose
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a compelling case, it was the weight of evidence that force the defendants to admit they were being present in the car and at the scene. in terms of the motive, i don‘t think we‘ll ever actually know, because only the four people in that car really know why they went up there. what happened that night appears the thin veil of reassurance that knife crime happen somewhere else, to other people. this trial has laid barejust else, to other people. this trial has laid bare just how fractured some of the lives here really work, built around drugs and gangs, weapons and violence, fuelled by respect, revenge. i never spent my life hating. i've no doubt from other parents that i've makes, don't spend your life hating, it will eat you up inside. i don't know to go might want to do that. and i know jodie would not want that either.
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jodie‘s dad peter has emerged from the courtroom and given a brief statement to the media. he said he was over the only two men had been guilty of her murder and the family have now left the court, presumably to go and speed together and to reflect on exactly what they‘ve been through here. over at the last two months that this trial has been set m, months that this trial has been set in, they have heard evidence from many of the witnesses that saw what happened to jodie that many of the witnesses that saw what happened tojodie that night and the experts the police have brought in to piece together the movements of all four of these defendants in the days ahead of her murder and what they were doing afterwards. to reiterate, the two who have been found guilty ofjodie‘s murder are svenson 0ng—a—kwie, 19, and his 17—year—old defendant cannot be named. the other defendants, the driver who‘s 20, admitted driving them to the park that night, it was his car that was used to drive to
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and from the murder scene. his defence was that he didn‘t know anything violent was planned that evening, he did not expect anyone to come to harm and did not even realise afterwards that anyone had been stabbed. the 16—year—old defendant, also in the car, did not give evidence in his defence, but essentially it was the same case that was put on his behalf, he didn‘t know what was happening that evening, he was not part of it. the jury evening, he was not part of it. the jury has decided the two other young men who cross that field were responsible forjodie‘s merger, regardless of which of them actually stabbed her. we‘ve had reaction from the metropolitan police, who investigated, they say thatjodie‘s matter was a tragedy that shocked the nation. they said it could have been anyone‘s daughter. she was a very nice girl, she had a small circle of friends, did well at school, worked in the community, it was in the scouts, had even been to downing street. he said she was the girl next door, just an ordinary
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girl, and that was the tragedy. he said an ordinary girl going about her ordinary business and had fallen foul of these people. he said they had gone there purposefully to stab somebody and did not care who they stabbed. they stabbed a 17—year—old girl in the back for absolutely no reason. 0ne girl in the back for absolutely no reason. one of the investigators who worked on this case i spoke to a couple days ago said we may never know what the true motive was behind this attack, what are they actually intended do that night. we‘ve heard evidence about a tit—for—tat feud between drug dealers and that may have been a part of that sequence, something went horribly wrong, but it shocked the nation that an innocent 17—year—old girl could lose her life in this way. now, two men will be sentenced for murder on the 18th of november. the election campaign has turned attention on to the economy, with both labour and the conservatives setting
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out their spending priorities. and they‘re planning a big spending spree, with the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell setting out plans to borrow £150 billion over five years to replace, update and expand schools, hospitals, housing and care homes. mr mcdonnell said the investment would be on a scale never seen before outside of london and the south east. chancellor sajid javid says the conservatives would increase borrowing to pay for new infrastructure, but he insists that controlling borrowing is a priority and that we must live within our means. this report from our economics correspondent, andy verity. the man who wants to be the next chancellor of the exchequer has already promised £250 billion in extra spending in the next ten years. today, he promised another sizeable sum in half that time. social transformation fund will begin the urgent task of repairing our social fabric which has been torn apart by the tories. 150 billion to replace and upgrade and expand our schools,
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our hospitals, care homes, and yes, council homes once again. another £150 billion over five years is roughly £30 billion a year. to give you an idea of how much that is, £1 billion will pay to run the nhs across the uk for three days. it is enough for a government to build up to 1a,000 new social homes, or to pay for 22,000 new secondary school teachers. but it will mean loosening the government‘s rules on spending. 0ur fiscal rule for next parliament will exclude borrowing from investment for borrowing targets. it will mandate us to deliver an improvement in the overall balance sheet by the end of the parliament. so that, when we invest in the infrastructure our country desperately needs, it is recognised on both as a cost but also as a benefit. beforejohn mcdonnell had even spoken, the existing chancellor was attacking his spending plans.
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you mentioned 150 billion. he might as well, mcdonnell, say a trillion, 2 trillion, 3 trillion, because they are meaningless numbers and even if he tried to do what he said, if he tried to keep his word, he would crash the economy. but the conservatives too want to loosen the purse strings, known in the jargon as the fiscal rules. the aim for the last decade has been for debt to fall as a proportion of the economy and in recent years it has. today, both parties ditched that goal, saying that the government‘s debts can now rise. instead, they will have a will on the cost of servicing that debt. the conservatives say debt repayment shouldn‘t cost more than 6% of the government‘s revenue, labour said it shouldn‘t cost more than 10%. some economists welcome those much looser purse strings. there needs to be investment in the country. there is a shortage of investment for the last ten or so years since the financial crisis and to some extent we are pleased that both parties are offering
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these spending plans. the thing that worries us greatly is that it is not being underpinned by a comprehensive spending review or indeed an assessment of the taxes that will be required to meet their spending plans and that is a great concern to us. labour‘s plans would more than double public spending on investment and even the conservatives‘ new spending cap would allow the highest spending investment for a0 years. but what now seems affordable in this pre—christmas election may look less so in the new year, especially if, as some predict, the economy slows down. as labour tries to deal with the continuing fallout following the resignation of its deputy leader tom watson, there‘s a new headache as two former labour mps, john woodcock and ian austin, have come out in support of the conservatives. 0ur political correspondent chris mason reports. here he is, ian austin, at the heart of the labour party. working for gordon brown 15 years ago. he‘s devoted his adult life
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to the party as a counsellor, an adviser, attending cabinet. but his disagreements withjeremy corbyn are not new. he‘s sat as independent mp since february, but nonetheless, his intervention today is still astonishing. take a look at this. i thinkjeremy corbyn is completely unfit to lead our country, completely unfit to lead the labour party and after 3a years, since a teenager, i worked for labour party, in my 30s, i was a government adviser, my a0s, an administrator, but for decent labour voters, they should vote for borisjohnson in the selection. i can‘t believe it‘s come to this but that‘s where we are. yes, that‘s a former labour minister suggesting you vote conservative. i had to leave the labour party, ifelt, but i could have capital
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kept it quiet and gone along with it all, disappeared back off to dudley, but i think you‘ve got to stand up and tell the truth. i think you gotta stand up and tell the truth and if you‘re not going to do what‘s right a fundamental question like racism, what are you going to do? and he wasn‘t done there. here he was in westminster, hours later with another former labour mp john woodcock, who says he will vote conservative, their views are clear. ian austin michael‘s dad was a jewish refugee, his aunts and grandma were murdered by the nazis. he‘s long been deeply angry at what he sees as jeremy corbyn‘s failure to deal with allegations of anti—semitism. he says the party has been poisoned with anti—jewish racism. the labour leadership insist they are doing everything they can to eradicate the problem. he added that the decision of labour deputy leader tom watson, who has also had does disagreements withjeremy corbyn, to leave politics, was enormously significant. although mr watson maintains he will still campaign for labour and wants to seejeremy corbyn win. it‘s a very personal decision,
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not a political one, i‘ve been in labour politics for 35 years, i‘m 52 years old, i‘ve been on a health journey in recent years and i want to take a leap and do something new. so what do labour make off what ian austin said today? the shadow chancellor made a reference to an unpaid government role as an envoy to israel that mr austin took on in the summer. he is now employed by the tories. what else do expect him to do in election campaigns, where you are employed by the tories, you speak on behalf of the tories. that's what this was about this morning. the conservatives had a bumpy start to this campaign. now it is labour‘s turn. let‘s get more on this now from our parliamentary correspondent, sean curran. will tuck you will have watched both john woodcock and ian austin for many years from the gallery, and indeed tom watson. what do you make
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of the decision of these three men have made, in their different ways, in the case of two of them, notjust to leave parliament but effectively say vote for the other party, and in the case of tom watson, say i don‘t see my future westminster?” the case of tom watson, say i don‘t see my future westminster? i think ian austin and john woodcock were disaffected with the labour party underjeremy corbyn, but it is still quite a move to say that people should consider voting conservative, particularly when they have been sitting next to labour mps even as independent. but tom watson has been at the heart of the labour party as deputy leader and seen by many in the labour party are someone who could moderate what they saw as some of the moves to the left. his decision to leave, notjust as the deputy leader but also to leave as an mp, as a bigger blow to the labour party, because that‘s a headline on a morning when they are
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seeking to launch their economic policies. that will be seen as a big distraction. in terms of the conservatives, they had a difficult day yesterday. they also had the question of boris johnson day yesterday. they also had the question of borisjohnson touring the uk, promoting in scotland as minister for the the uk, promoting in scotland as ministerfor the union. the uk, promoting in scotland as minister for the union. but the uk, promoting in scotland as ministerfor the union. but the big question today is about money? the big argument looks like it will be on the economy and who will spend more. but you‘re right, boris johnson has been in scotland today, where the conservatives are seeking to defend 13 seats, and he was focusing a message there on scottish voters at a distillery. we're the party that's going to keep our fantastic united kingdom together. and actually, it's it's only scottish conservatives who can prevent another referendum next year under jeremy corbyn, who will have done a deal with the scottish national party,
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because that's the only way he can see getting into power. not only would he have a referendum on scottish independence, but he wants to have a second referendum on the eu. so we're the party that's saying, come on, let's get together as the whole uk, let's get brexit done, get this thing over the line, then get on with bringing our great country together and unleashing the potential of the whole uk. it's only scottish conservatives that can prevent that second referendum. that‘s a message i think we can expect to hear more also be the next five weeks. the snp say they don‘t wa nt five weeks. the snp say they don‘t want the descent to be boris johnson‘s, they say scottish voters should have a chance to have their say about the future of the country and another referendum. thank you. let‘s take a look at some of today‘s other election news. britain‘s smaller, pro—european political parties have announced a remain electoral alliance. the liberal democrats, plaid cymru and the green party will step aside for each other
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in 60 constituencies. they claimed the move was in the national interest. it is unprecedented, the scale of this arrangement between these three different political parties, but i think it speaks volumes about how high the stakes are, how important this is, that these parties, ourselves, the liberal democrats, with the green party and plaid cymru, have been able to put aside those narrow party interests to work together in the national interest, and that‘s how our politics should be done. around 3000 voters in swindon have been mistakenly warned that they may not be able to vote in the general election. in letter sent by swindon council, residents were told they would be removed from the electoral register as they were no longer entitled to be registered at their property. the council later tweeted asking residents to ignore the letter as it was sent by mistake. dan 0‘brien is bbc swindon‘s political reporter.
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this is a cock—up rather than conspiracy, but the timing is pretty dreadful. so close to election day, in a town that is often such a close race. 3000 people who have been sent a letter from swindon borough council, mistakenly saying that they are going to be removed from the electoral register where they live. in other words, that they may not be able to vote. now, the fact the council send out letters like this isn‘t, in itself, unusual. they all have to keep a check on who is registered at each address, to keep an eye on voterfraud. but what appears to have happened in this case is the council‘s printers have sent the letters to the wrong distribution list. in other words, they sent the letters to the wrong people. now, the advice for anyone who has got one of these letters from swindon council, that is dated the ath of november, is to ignore it. you‘re gonna get another letter, explaining the situation and apologising. and you will still get your polling card. but there is much anger and frustration among candidates and political campaigners across the spectrum in swindon,
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in this town which is expected to be such a key battle ground for the south of england in this election. throughout the campaign, bbc news will be looking closely at the places where the election could be won and lost, visiting ten parts of the uk where seats will be closely contested. today we‘re in leeds, and we can cross over now to christian fraser, who is there for us.. were checked or get off and on, we‘re on leg one of ourjourney around the uk in leeds epicentre, —— leeds city centre, where people are shouting from the inclement weather. it's shouting from the inclement weather. it‘s for 20 apm, it‘s already dark, we have the drizzle falling —— it‘s
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for 20 apm, this is what it will look like in the campaign here. when we‘re looking at the results, we will know election was won and lost here in the north of england and perhaps also the west midlands. conservatives will have to do better than they did back in 2017, because he actually picked up six labour leave seats. but when it comes to leeds, i think the two tooth —— two parties will be happy with what they can pick up. there it can such as here, five at the hands of labour, and three of them are currently under the control of the conservatives from. we‘re here in leeds central, which is being held by the labour mp hilary ben since 1999. but the two neighbouring seats of poncy and morley and 0utwood are key battle grounds between the
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tories and labour. and 0utwood, that is the one andrea jenkins picked up from ed balls back in 2015, one of the shock results of the 2015 election. another key fact for you is that in the 2016 referendum, leeds was a near 5050 splits, just shading towards remain by 50.3 percentage. but really under oasis here in the north, all other parts of the west yorkshire backed brexit. that is the picture in leeds today, but as sean was telling you, labour announced a policy today about shifting investment from the south east to the north of england. that coincides with the front page we haveit coincides with the front page we have it tonight in the yorkshire post, carrying details of a five—point manifesto written by a cross— party five—point manifesto written by a cross—party group of business leaders and what they‘re calling for is more devolution here in the
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north. they want a dedicated transport budget for the north, they wa nt transport budget for the north, they want the treasury to rebalance the economy, they want more spending for education and health. so a lot of this is going to be incorporated, you would expect, into the campaign literature yet be written. it is also a message that many of these parties are going to want to take to the doorstep. yesterday was the first day official of the campaign, and we were with the campaign teams. with winter coats, brollies and sensible shoes, the volunteers are mustering. here in the west yorkshire drizzle, the ground war is under way. leeds north west is one of the key labour marginals. they face a sizeable challenge here from the lib dems, so no room for any complacency. labour is pouring in the resources. it‘s a big team, bolstered by young faces. this constituency has one of the biggest student populations in the country. hang on, we‘ve got to a0, ground floor, that is.
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no other party really matches labour's ground game, set times every day, 11am, 2pm, aom, 6pm. regimental. just committed, just enthusiastic. any student orformer student from leeds knows about the notorious pub crawl — the so—called 0tley run — 16 pubs into the city centre, and you know what, it‘s a bit like the election campaign. it‘s long, it requires great stamina, and no one really knows where it‘s going to end. at least, i didn‘t. but there‘s a serious point here. student turnout, the final thursday of term in the run—up to christmas — you‘d better get them early. this is waterloo mount we‘re on now. in neighbouring pudsey, turnout is also important for the conservatives. they‘re defending a majority from labour of just 331. what‘s the brexit message? the brexit message is we are here to get brexit done. it‘s not been the perfect start to the tory campaign. in pudsey, theyjust hope it‘s
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the prime minister‘s message, notjacob rees—mogg‘s, that is cutting through. does it make you angry, when you need every one of these votes? yeah, of course, it‘s very frustrating, but those things don‘t matter to people here in pudsey. i've never voted conservative. are you a labour supporter, of old? of old, yeah, but they're just fools, aren't they? and it‘s brexit that you will be voting on? yeah, definitely. i've been saying, it's a toss—up between conservatives and brexit party. which is why, back here in leeds north west, the mood the lib dem camp is as bright as their high—vis jackets. over the last year, it‘s been incredible seeing the change on the doorstep. people are now saying, i voted labour in the past but i‘m disillusioned withjeremy corbyn. i‘m coming to you instead because of your stop brexit position. do you know all aboutjo swinson? no, not at all. hmm. they have five weeks to inform and change minds. it‘s humbling for the candidates, careers depend on these volunteers
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and in the depths of a yorkshire winter, the early enthusiasm will be sorely tested. i talked about the two very tight marginals between labour and the conservatives here, but also in that last one of leeds north west, because although labour have a majority of a000, it‘s very much predominantly a student area, they‘re very focused on remain and they‘re very focused on remain and the lib dems and they have a sizeable team and think they can pick up that seat. i noticed christian will prevail over his own performance on the pub run. he‘s smiling and saying nothing! don‘t forget, throughout the election campaign, we will be asking what questions you would like answered. send us your election question at #bbcyourquestions, or via your questions at bbc.co.uk. i noticed christian will prevail over his own performance on the pub a police constable, charged with murdering the former aston villa footballer dalian atkinson, has been granted bail. mr atkinson, who was a8, died after being tasered
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in shropshire in 2016. a second officer is accused of assault causing actual bodily harm. 0ur correspondent phil mackie is in birmingham for us now. people will remember dalian atkinson‘ for his spells with ipswich town, and at aston villa. in august 2016, he was at his father‘s house, there was an incident, during which two lease officers tasered him. that led to a three—year investigation. in the past year, this morning, they decided to charge both officers. they appeared a short distance away at birmingham magistrates‘ court and this afternoon at birmingham crown court. we cannot name either of the officers. that is really unusual.
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thejudge said it officers. that is really unusual. the judge said it was almost unprecedented. the reason being that defence lawyers have argued that if either of those two officers are identified, their lives could be put at risk. they offered no evidence to support those claims but a judge has adjourned a hearing on whether or not to decide whether we can name them until next wednesday. the case itself, the charge of murder and the charge of assault has been adjourned. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. hello there. likely to see problems of flooding, particularly across northern england. the reason, this slow—moving weather front which will bring persistent outbreaks of rain, particularly over to the east of the pennines. the met office has issued an amberwarning pennines. the met office has issued an amber warning without to 100 millimetres of rain forecast across parts of yorkshire and derbyshire.
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these counties are likely to have the worst of the effects. indeed we are seeing flood warnings start to be issued. particularly in yorkshire, the flooding situation is likely to get worse before it gets better. the rain will still be with us through the afternoon. into this night, the same kind of areas will be affected before slowly pulling away east and south later in the night. where the sky is clear we will get a cold night with patches of frost developing. that takes centre friday and this will continue to push east, rain turning more light and patchy across parts of east anglia. 0therwise light and patchy across parts of east anglia. otherwise a cold start, plenty of sunshine. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: two teenagers are found guilty of the murder ofjodie chesney, in a park in east london. two others have been cleared. labour promises an
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additional £150 billion of public investment, in what it calls an irreversible shift in wealth, in favour of working people. social transformation will begin the urgent task of repairing our social fabric that has been torn apart by the tories. two former labour mps, ian austin and john woodcock, are urging people to vote for borisjohnson at the general election, saying the labour leader isn‘t fit to be prime minister. but the tories say it‘s fantasy economics and the country is safer in their hands. a police officer has been charged with the murder of retired footballer dalian atkinson, who died after being tasered. and been granted bail. sport now on afternoon live, with katie shanahan and england manager, gareth southgate, has named his squad for the upcoming euro 2020 qualifiers. good afternoon. yes, so he‘s named 27 players in his squad for their matches against montenegro
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and kosovo this month. leicester city midfielder, james maddison gets the nod. now, he had to pull out of their last set of matches, due to illness, but then he was then spotted in a casino during the international break. so, southgate has decided to give him another chance. while, manchester city‘s john stones also returns. so does, alex 0xlade—chamberlain and chelsea‘s callum hudson—0doi. but, there is no place for tottenham‘s dele alli or everton defender, michael keane. this squad announcement is actually the first time we‘ve heard from gareth southgate since bulgaria were told that they had to play one game behind closed doors. it follows the racial abuse that the england players suffered during their qualifying match. well, here‘s what he had to say. still very proud of the players and the way they dealt still very proud of the players and the way they dealt with still very proud of the players and the way they dealt with all still very proud of the players and the way they dealt with all of still very proud of the players and the way they dealt with all of that. and the ongoing issue is one of education across the world, really. i have spoken about that probably
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more than i should have needed to over the last few years, but that is a situation we are still in sadly. soi a situation we are still in sadly. so i think we still have work to do, and we have to work that —— start that work here ahead of anywhere else. now england just need a point to secure to book their place at next years euros. the end of a career we was not expecting miss. andre gomes looked absolutely awful. apparently surgery to repair his dislocated fracture has gone really well. and marco silva has said today that he could pulling on that everton shirt before the end of the season. gomes was hurt after a challenge by tottenham forward heung—min son during their 1—1 draw in the premier
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league. it also left son really affected after seeing what had happened, so i‘m sure he‘ll be relieved to also see andre gomes back on the pitch. another football story catching our eye today, is that the former arsenal boss, arsene wenger hasn‘t ruled out being the new manager of bayern munich. wenger himself says he hasn‘t spoken to the club, but has been quite coy about the links being made saying that he would "never refuse to talk" to bayern. niko kovac was sacked as manager of the german side last weekend. as for wenger, he‘s just turned 70, and hasn‘t had a coaching job since leaving arsenal. now, the former england and northampton hooker dylan hartley has announced that he‘s stepping down from professional rugby. hartley hasn‘t been able to recover from the knee injury, which has kept him out of action throughout this year. he‘s england‘s second most capped player of all time and northampton‘s
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longest serving player with 251 appearances after 1a years. in a statement hartley said the last few months have been difficult "physically and mentally" and while his career wasn‘t "perfect he wouldn‘t have had it any other way". let us look at the plus points first of all. he is england second most capped player and took england on the astonishing run after the humiliation of the 2015 world cup where they went on and on it and run of 18 matches. —— an unbeaten run. then 16 weeks of bands, he missed a tour because he has chaired the wrong side of the line to many times. controversial but the man that people turn to when england was ina that people turn to when england was in a crisis. that‘s all from me. bye for now.
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back to the election campaign and in the past half hour jeremy corbyn has been speaking to reporters in liverpool. he was asked for his reaction to tom watson‘s decision to stand—down as his deputy and to leave front line politics. i had ihada i had a long chat with tom last week and we had a further conversation on monday. we get along personally very well, we always have. and we chat about a lot of things. he told me he wa nted about a lot of things. he told me he wanted to step down because he wanted, she is carrying on as leader catchment deputy leader until the election is over and he‘s going to be out campaigning with us throughout this campaign. tom has made an enormous contribution to our party and well in the future. he has a great deal to try and regulate online gambling and done a great deal to dry and bring some of the media under some form of responsible
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control so we do not have excesses in the way in which individuals sometimes handled by the popular press. tom has done a greatjob and we chat together regularly. you have said you well not comment on your low approval ratings, your own low approval ratings, but this morning to labour mps have said you are not fit to stand and are asking as people to vote tory. do you accept that your leadership may have consequences for damaging labour's prospects and what is your response event this morning? when someone is low elected on a labour mp and a labour manifesto i will expect them to be honest enough with the people that voted for them to remain in the labour party and continue on the programme which they were elected, they have chosen to walk away and call for people to vote tory, to vote for austerity and vote for all the inequality that this tory government has brought to britain.
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0ur party is big, our party is very determined to win this election, bringing social justice determined to win this election, bringing socialjustice and equality to the people of this country. we have had not strongly worded editorial in the jewish chronicle today where the jewish community is calling on non—dues—word—mack not to vote for you because they an anti—semite. do you consider it a personal failure that the jewish community feel that you as prime minister would be a danger for them? they don't feel safe with you as prime minister. anti-semitism is a poison and evil in our society. any form of racism is. i have spent my whole life fighting against racism, i will die whole life fighting against racism, iwilldie and whole life fighting against racism, i will die and anti—racist. i want every community to feel safe and supported in this country. jewish community, muslim community, hindu
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community, muslim community, hindu community, any other community from any faith or community, any other community from anyfaith orany community, any other community from any faith or any other part of the world. and our party has confronted theissue, world. and our party has confronted the issue, we have suspended or expeued the issue, we have suspended or expelled members, we have an education programme and all of that hasn‘t set up since i became the leader of this party. and we will carry on doing exactly that. there are manyjewish people in this country who are members of the labour party, supporters of the labour party, supporters of the labour party, supporters of the labour party, work with the labour party. and they do not share the views that have been put forward on the front page of the jewish chronicle. i regret thejewish chronicle. i regret thejewish chronicle has chosen to print that but i simply say to everyone community is stronger when people work together. when we recognise the danger and the poison that anti—semitism is. we will be a stronger community when we defeat all forms of racism. and i will be pa rt all forms of racism. and i will be part of that campaign to eradicate racism in any form.
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now on afternoon live, let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. in salford, north west tonight‘s nina warhurst with the political an interesting time for political parties across the country. plenty of big—name political visitors. a busy few days in the north west with visits from labour leader and shadow chancellorjeremy corbyn and john mcdonnell and also chancellor sajid javid. if you think back to the run—up of when the election was called, all the talk was about whether or not the talk was about whether or not the conservatives could win over
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those labour voters in heartlands that where leave areas. jeremy corbyn tried to get off the box first, he was in crewe yesterday with a margin ofjust a8 when macclesfield, manchester today. carpet bombing the northwest. the reason is he wants to get the narrative across to where he is co mforta ble. narrative across to where he is comfortable. talking about the nhs, talking about social care, talking about looking after council houses. poverty, these are the issues he used to address the crowd in crewe yesterday. and an even bigger room in liverpool today. the problem as he has spent an hour yesterday preaching to the converted in crewe and did not leave much time to knock on doors and speak to people face—to—face and what i found when i spoke to people in crewe and when i happened to people in marginal seats like barry and blackpool is people are not necessarily aware that this is happening, and also feel extremely despondent with politics.
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and some of them are planning not to turn up at all because they don‘t feel the labour message on brexit is clear. that said, when we look back to 2017, since they managed to when it was on bread and butter issues. down to local campaigning, talking about the nhs, talking about things which were important to family and as not just which were important to family and as notjust theresa may try which were important to family and as not just theresa may try to which were important to family and as notjust theresa may try to bring it back to brexit, she failed and labourdid it back to brexit, she failed and labour did very well two years ago. in terms of the opposition parties, we have heard talk about a remain alliance announced today, the liberal democrats and the greens particularly coming together. what is likely to be the impact, if any on the north west of england?” think it be interesting. the greens have stood aside in hazel grove, in cheadle, in southport, warrington, which is tim farron‘s seat. areas which is tim farron‘s seat. areas which before the coalition which turned out to be a catastrophe in the region for the liberal
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democrats, these are areas the liberal democrats would have expected to win. and so with the remain voting ticket at the moment and these being areas that voted remain in 2016 they should be feeling fairly confident. but again, a slight fly in the ointment. when i have been to these seats, the labour message on the second referendum is starting to cut through in those areas. as is the message on public services. again, we could see the remain vote split between labour and the liberal democrats because they are not part of that alliance so it will be very interesting. the same when it comes to some of the marginal label labour seats. the brexit party have not launched properly in those areas. we expect they will do pretty well and some of them and could damage the conservatives. stay with us for now. and felicity in cardiff. the big parties affected by this is
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plaid cymru. is that really what lies bind this decision? net i think you are absolutely bang on. it was packed by—election which did help to get the liberal democrat candidate over the winning line in the summer. that encouraged the remain parties to think about replicating it for the general election. it remains to be seen what sort of impact that will have in wales in terms of results. 11 seats out of a0 in wales are part of this remain packs between the nationalist plaid cymru and liberal democrats and the greens. but on 2017 voting figures in the seats in question it does not necessarily look as if it will make that much of a difference. however, the big caveat is the unusual thing about 2017 was voters magnetised to the conservatives and labour. certainly everything we are seeing in the selection climate looks as if there is much more volatility among
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there is much more volatility among the electorate. there is much more fragmentation, smaller parties could play a more big role so i would not rule it out but it is not a dead cert. the big story in wales has undoubtedly been about the resignation of alun cairns. remind us of that and why it has the potential to have such significance for this general election?‘ potential to have such significance for this general election? a former aide to alun cairns gave evidence in aide to alun cairns gave evidence in a rape trial in april last year. his testimony derailed the trial and the trialjudge accused him of deliberately sabotaging the trial and threw him out of court. eight months later, the welsh conservatives selected him to be a candidate for the welsh assembly elections in 2021 and alun cairns endorsed him as a colleague and friend. mr cairns said he had not
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known about the collapse of the trial until some considerable time after and had no lot knowledge of his role in it. we discovered that an e—mail had been sent by alun cairns special adviser to alun cairns special adviser to alun cairns discussing the candidate‘s role, four months before his selection and endorsement by alun cairns. alun cairns resigned in government, he said he has done nothing wrong, but he is continuing to stand as a candidate in the general election. 0bviously to stand as a candidate in the general election. obviously this is a terrible start to the welsh campaignfor a terrible start to the welsh campaign for the conservatives. more on wales today, tonight at 6.30. thank you both for taking us nationwide.
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a new streaming service backed by the bbc, itv, channel a and channel 5 launches today. costing £5.99 per month, britbox will feature classic series such as original doctor who episodes, downton abbey and gavin and stacey, as well as some original content. it‘s to rival the likes of netflix and amazon prime — but the new service isn‘t without its critics, as our media editor amol rajan explains. welcome to britbox. it‘s often said that we‘re living in a golden age for television, but the dominant products today have tended to be from american companies. until now. and jump through all your favourites. britbox is the first streaming service allowing viewers to watch what they want, when they want that, combines shows from the bbc, itv, channel a and channel 5. it's targeted at people who are sort of already into streaming. they're probably looking
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for the next thing that they want to add, they really love that way of watching. and we think it offers something really distinctive, because no one else is doing british, in such a kind of broad and comprehensive way. i am billy kimber! the bbc‘s main offer to consumers will still be the iplayer, where most of its recent hit shows, like peaky blinders, can be found. i was born in another time, another world. but on britbox, the bbc will provide a selection of back catalogues for some classic shows, such as doctor who. what should we call each other? itv is the main commercial and editorial force behind the new service, with shows such as downton abbey, broadchurch and love island available. channels a and 5 came on board more recently. at £5.99 a month, britbox is the same price as the basic offer from netflix and amazon prime. this launch comes a full decade after a similar proposal from british broadcasters was blocked by regulators. in retrospect, that was a naive and damaging decision, allowing american giants
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like disney, netflix and amazon to steal a march on the british competitors. the big unanswered question is not whether or not britbox offers value for money, but whether subscription fatigue is beginning to set in for consumers facing an avalanche of choice. in a recent interview, the boss of disney, who are launching their own streaming service in the uk next year, says this is an untested market. well, i don‘t think we know how large the global market is for these products yet. so i think one question is, are there more potential subscribers in the world or not? and if so, how many are there? so i don‘t know if you call it a risk, but it‘s an unknown. welcome to britbox! the vast majority of content on britbox will be repeats. a british broadcasters are betting that the convenience of a one—stop shop for their programmes persuades punters to pay up.
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in a moment the latest business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. two teenagers are found guilty of the murder ofjodie chesney in a park in east london. labour sets out plans to borrow 150 billion pounds over five years to replace, update and expand schools, hospitals, housing and care homes. the conservatives say its fantasy economics. two former labour mps ian austin and john woodcock have urged people to vote for borisjohnson instead ofjeremy corbyn at the general election. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. the pound falls in value, after two people on the interest rate setting committee vote unexpectedly to cut rates. price cuts and new value ranges fail to boost sales at sainsburys, as they shrink again. sainsbury‘s has lowered prices on more than 1,000 lines since february.
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first—time buyers are shunning one—bedroom flats, in favour of larger three—bed homes. research by the property search company, zoopla, says only 10% of first time buyers searched for 1 bed homes this year, as buyers look to buy properties they can live in for longer. a man whose word is listened to with great reverence is the governor of bank of england. has he said anything to rattle politicians?” don‘t know if rattled per is he but certainly some of the things he said we re certainly some of the things he said were quite interesting. in terms of predictions for the economy for the uk. the idea is the economy is not going to grow as fast as they first thought. there are two reasons. the global picture is still rocky, but there are hopes it will improve, fingers crossed. the second is the trade barriers created by the brexit
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deal will hit the uk economy. the bank is also to suggested any trade deal is going to take years of. one silver lining in all of this is that for once this is the very first time they had a central scenario which they had a central scenario which the government brexit deal on which to base some forecasting. since then it has been speculative versions that might or might not... exactly, no fewer than 15. including an no deal exit which is of course i huge amount of uncertainty which has had business investment amongst other things. we have seen some change in the value of the pound today. lets speak to craig erlam from the foreign exhange company 0anda. what moves have we seen in the pound today? it has dropped off a little but not too considerably. he has spoken about the forecasts and yes they have a bit more information but i think analysts are looking at this
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and thinking they may have more information but the there is still a huge motive uncertainty. what government will be in parliament in a few months‘ time. what brexiteer well they pursue, well they have the numbers in parliament to get it through and when they get to that point, is the world going to be headed towards a recession? they may have narrowed it down from 15 different scenarios but i imagine there is still quite a few they are contending with at this moment and inafew contending with at this moment and in a few months they may have a bit more idea on exactly what they are basing these forecasts on. sainsburys, the british supermarket, has seen its shares rebound from a 30—year low, how have investors responded to news of profits falling? still difficult time for sainsbury‘s. we are still narrowing down the business, closing some stores and bringing some argos outlets within these mega superstores. that is taking it still on the bottom line ultimately. they are so optimistic but the tie—up with asda which fell apart earlier this year does not make things easy
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for them. thank you very much craig. let‘s show you the markets as they stand at the end of the european session. the ftse pretty much flat, up session. the ftse pretty much flat, up nine points is pretty much at that level below 7500 for some time. there is the pound versus the dollar. back before the referendum we looked at 1.50 five,” dollar. back before the referendum we looked at 1.50 five, i felt the difference just two weeks ago. these levels are a real impact for the workers we have had here who come over from different countries and are working and sending money away, sending money home. so the fact the pound has been suppressed versus the euro and dollar for so pound has been suppressed versus the euro and dollarfor so much pound has been suppressed versus the euro and dollar for so much time pound has been suppressed versus the euro and dollarfor so much time is hurting a lot of workers here and also people here as well. there we go. sainsbury share pretty much flat at the end of trade although we have seen at the end of trade although we have seen sales decline and have seen profits down 15%. itv because of
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britbox. which is what my colleague was talking about before i came on to do markets. britbox, this whole new idea of streaming services, for once we have everyone together on one service. will people buy into it? will be hamstring fatigue? who knows. —— will there be streaming fatigue? that‘s all the business news. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. likely to see some problems with flooding today across parts of northern england in particular. the troublemaker is a slow—moving weather front which will bring persistent outbreaks, particularly east of the pennines. the met office haveissued east of the pennines. the met office have issued a weather warning with up have issued a weather warning with up to 100 millimetres of rain forecast across parts of yorkshire and derbyshire. it is these counties which are likely to have the worst
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of the effects and we are seeing flood warnings start to be issued. particularly in yorkshire. the flooding situation likely to get worse before it gets better. the rain will still be with us through the afternoon and into the night time, affecting the same kind of areas before slowly pulling away east and south later on in the night. where the sky is clear, we‘re looking at a cold drink with patches of frost developing, taking us into friday, this weather front will continue to push eastwards, rain turning lighter and patcher across parts of east anglia where it may stay damp, otherwise damp start with plenty of sunshine.
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today at five — the cheque books are out, as the election campaigns turn to the economy, with promises of billions of pounds of extra spending. the shadow chancellor sets up plans to borrow £150 million over five yea rs to borrow £150 million over five years to replace, update and expand schools, hospitals, housing and care homes. the transformation fun will begin the urgent task of bringing together the urgent task of bringing together the fabric that has been torn about by the tories. setting out his party‘s plans, chancellor sajid javid also promised spending on infrastructure — but insisted his priority is control of government borrowing. there will be new hospitals, schools, railways, better broadband, new connections and opportunities for every part of our great nation. this election could be won or lost

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