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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 8, 2019 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: around 100 flood warnings are in place across northern england after torrential rain caused flooding, mudslides and serious disruption to roads and rail services. in sheffield, a major incident has been declared. dozens of people spent the night stranded in a shopping centre. residents in rotherham have been urged not to leave their homes. in urged not to leave their homes. month's in urged not to leave their homes. months worth of i for in months worth of rain responsible for all of the flooding but there is good news across northern england as the rain continues to ease off over the rain continues to ease off over the next few hours. i will have your full forecast right here. in the general election, labour promises a full year of maternity pay, while
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the conservatives unveil a nhs visa to attract top medical talent to the uk. good morning. 20 years of pension savings, gone. a warning that scammers are targeting hundreds of victims, and no—one is immune. people are losing an average of more than £80,000. i'll have the details. it was a great night for the british clubs in the europa league. celtic qualify with a last—minute winner against lazio, as manchester united also reach the knockout stage. # let it go. # can't hold me back anymore. and if the cold never bothered you, we'll bring you reaction from the hollywood premiere of frozen 2 — the hotly awaited sequel to one of the biggest animations , the hotly awaited sequel to one of the biggest animations of all time. good morning. it's friday, 8th november. our top story: more than 110 flood warnings are in place across the north of england following hours of torrential rain. a major incident has been declared in sheffield, where the river don
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has burst its banks. in rotherham, residents have been told to only leave their homes if it's absolutely essential. tom ingall has this report. a violent flood, the river don brea ks a violent flood, the river don breaks its banks and surges through the heart of rotherham in the small hours. elsewhere in the town, abandoned cars that are empty roads. the council here advised people to stay at home. upstream, next to the meadowhall shopping centre, the new flood defences were tested and abetted by the seine river. a christmas event had to be cancelled at the centre as transport was seriously disrupted, staff and shoppers finding themselves boxed in by gridlocked traffic. my friend said she would give me a lift home so we said she would give me a lift home so we walked to the staff car park and it was so flooded, she could not get her car outs we have walked back again and my husband has gone to fetch us. i went to leave at 20 minutes to five and i went 100 yards
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out of the staff car park, back in, it'll be 1.5 hours to do so and i we nt it'll be 1.5 hours to do so and i went back into meadowhall. my concern is the children walking around in their pyjamas because i have come to the concert and have not been able to go home. well this is just not been able to go home. well this isjust one of not been able to go home. well this is just one of the roads that people might have used to get away from meadowhall shopping centre but you can see with the effect of hours of rain have been. and it is notjust here in sheffield. villages and towns across yorkshire and the north of england have also borne the brunt of england have also borne the brunt of this tremendous rainstorm. homeowners suffer of this tremendous rainstorm. homeowners suffer too. for some in the village of western, it was a heartbreaking repeat of the catastrophic south yorkshire floods of 2007. but there were no compulsory evacuations. however, when day breaks, it will be time to really assess the damage and keep a close eye on the river levels should worst be to come. tom ingall, bbc news, sheffield. 0ur reporter luxmy gopal is in rotherham for us this morning. what's the latest?
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we can see how fast the river is flooding. absolutely, charlie. you can hear the rushing sound of the torrent behind me and you probably also see just how high the level of the river don is and a bit further back, may be able to see that it is flooded the car park and the train station there, rotherham central, because the flooding has been absolutely immense here. now, the river don, it has been confirmed, it is not quite over top, it has not breached flood defences, but the water has gone over the top of it and that is because while it is not raining at the moment, for now, the raining at the moment, for now, the rain yesterday here was relentless and carried on into the night and there are 100 flood warnings in place across northern england. and as you saw in tom's report there, it has led to a huge amount of disruption in travel and blocking off certain areas such as the shopping centre so there are people
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who are stopping meadowhall shopping centre and here at rotherham at the shopping park, people are trapped there as well. and so, to give you a scale of what it is like, you heard tom mention that the flooding here backin tom mention that the flooding here back in 2007 was really severe. well, the authorities are saying that we may well see it become worse than that because back then, the river don got to about 6.5 metres and the authorities are preparing for it to get worse than that. and in terms of some travel advice, network rail are saying they have got disruption across lots of lines and northern rail are advising customers not to travel at all because while it is all right at the moment, the forecast could get worse and there are still, as i said, several flood warnings in place across the north of england. thank you very much for that. so the situation there in rotherham this morning. it is all about what happens in the next few hours and matt, you were
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listening and you will bring us up to date. morning. the problem has been the ground has been so saturated, thoroughly wet 0ctober been the ground has been so saturated, thoroughly wet october in these regions and in the last 2a hours, one month's these regions and in the last 2a hours, one months worth of rain in one day. good news in the forecast, rain is easing off, today will turn you have to remember though we could see 100 millimetres in the hills around sheffield, south yorkshire and the south pennines and that is still to run its way through some of the river so for some, even though the river so for some, even though the rain is easing, built river levels could rise for a few hours yet and levels could rise for a few hours yetand again, levels could rise for a few hours yet and again, the risk of flooding will continue. the full forecast will continue. the full forecast will be up in about 5—10 minutes time. thank you, matt, speak to you shortly. labour is promising to extend statutory maternity pay to a full year and improve flexible working if it wins the general election. the conservatives have outlined plans for a new nhs visa, making it easier for doctors and nurses from around the world to work in the uk. 0ur political correspondent jessica parker is in westminster. let's start with labour.
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they're targeting women in work with this announcement? the labour party introducing the idea of a raft of measures that they say would support women in work, provide a revolution for women in work going forward. worth saying i think a couple of these ideas have been around before so the idea of extending the maternity pay or shared parental leave from nine to 12 months was mentioned in their 2017 manifesto. they also want to extend the number of companies that would have to report their gender pay gap and provide more support for women in larger companies that are going through the menopause. you mentioned the tories are coming up with their own ideas, a nhs visa, the idea there, make it quicker and easier to get medical professionals, dock, nurses, over to easier to get medical professionals, dock, nurses, overto the easier to get medical professionals, dock, nurses, over to the uk in future. but before doctors. i think it gives us an idea about what a points —based brexit immigration
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thing may be based on that they have been some expectation that medical professionals would have had some kind of preferential treatment in a new system but again, showing nhs taking centre stage in this election campaign. and it will take centre stage at the snp's campaign launch in edinburgh today. they want to introduce what they call an nhs protection bill, the idea being they say the bill could safeguard the nhs, as they see it, is being used asa bargaining nhs, as they see it, is being used as a bargaining chip in future trade talks. the government has said time and again that the nhs will not be up and again that the nhs will not be upfor and again that the nhs will not be up for sale but again, the nhs will come up again time and time again during this election campaign and i think all of the parties are keen to be seen as protect is of the nhs, defenders of the nhs. so welcome today three of the election campaign. jessica, for the moment, thank you very much. we're always trying to speak to the people the centre of the political parties.
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at 6:50 this morning, we'll speak to labour's shami chakrabarti and at 7:30, priti patel from the conservative party willjoin us. all of those coming up throughout the morning this morning. it's not often you come across military hardware rolling up the high street. but one poppy seller from derbyshire has gone all—out for this year's appeal by converting his mobility scooter into a tank. william's name as well, our school. —— brilliant name as well, rascal. 85—year—old eddie wadsworth, whose fatherjohn was killed during the second world war, has always been keen to support the royal british legion's poppy appeal. he says he's "thrilled to bits" with the reaction, especially from young people. you would never guess how much this cost. he says the impressive re—fit only cost him about £7. £7! brilliant! in that vein, i should say as well later this morning, we're going to talk to harry baillinge, war veteran who we
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spoke to the d—day commemorations —— brillinge. he willjoin us and i am very excited to see him again. the impact that moment had, curry‘s character and the way it spread and the people who were engaged was remarkable —— harry's. a busy night for sport, as always. and we had drama for celtic you have qualified for the europa league. plenty of goals, three actually, fermented —— for manchester united. it is early days though. fermented —— for manchester united. it is early days thoughlj fermented —— for manchester united. it is early days though. i think the thing is that since they beat chelsea 4—0 at home on of the season they have not really scored one goal at home but if you think of their success , at home but if you think of their success, it is something that they are struggling to score as many as they are but a big moment for them nonetheless last night. it was four wins out of four for the british clubs in the europa league last night. celtic booked their place
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in the last 32 in dramatic style with this last—minute winner against lazio. their glasgow rivals rangers are on the brink ofjoining them after a 2—0 win against porto. manchester united are also into the last 32. marcus rashford scored the last in a 3—0 win over partizan belgrade. manager 0le gunnar solskjaer said his side provided a "template" for how they should play this season. england are on top after being put into bat in their latest twenty20 match against new zealand in napier. dawid malan and eoin morgan have both scored half centuries. england must win to keep the 5—match series alive. and great britain won their first gold at the world para athletics championships, paul blake taking victory in the t36 800 metres on the opening day in dubai. around a little worth of one week's action to come and i am sure they will be many more medals which we will be many more medals which we will bring you here on breakfast. we have a ready seen matt once this morning updating us on the rain
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situation and you were focusing on certain areas, obviously rotherham, what is happening for the rest of us? certain areas, obviously rotherham, what is happening for the rest of us? it will get better, can i dare say, compared to yesterday. plenty of rain yesterday. these were the scenes, almost a repeat of what we saw in 2007. let me show you, to put perspective on it, over the last 2a hours. notice sheffield and the rain band,it hours. notice sheffield and the rain band, it sat across the same areas for a full 2a hours, either side of it something a bit dry but its persistence there caused the issues and we have seen well over one month's worth of rainfall in sheffield, 82 millimetres, to take us sheffield, 82 millimetres, to take us up to the early hours of this morning and quite likely across areas of nottinghamshire and yorkshire, lincolnshire, we have had huge amounts of rainfall and that has led to the flood warnings, over 100 still in force, latest details on our website and don't forget the travel news is coming up on brea kfast travel news is coming up on breakfast in just a short while. but
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this morning, the other story of course is just how cold it is, something we will be dealing with, the frost, scotland, northern ireland, temperature below freezing for some, cost is anglia and the south—east, the area but does not have the frost is where you still have the frost is where you still have cloud and rain and it is easing away but the debt morning through the midlands and training across parts of lincolnshire for a while yet, the rain they will turn into showers and push its way towards the south—east later, shah was peppering eastern coast make of scotland and england but for many of you are dry day, bright day, particularly further west, lots of sunshine around but staying chilly after the cold start to single figure temperatures for the most part. into tonight, if you show is to begin with dummies, clear skies for many, mist and fog patches, ran into northern ireland later that lifting the temperatures but across much of the temperatures but across much of the uk, it is going to be a pretty cold one, the blue colours on the charter widespread frost taking is into saturday morning. frosty start, a foggy start for some as well, but it is going to be a day of change.
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when already very northern ireland to start your weekend, things brightening a touch, rain on the fringes into western scotland but rain spreading its way across wales, into a part of central and southern england, some snow on the hills of wales, the midlands, into the south pennines as well. the peak district. that will give us covering in places that could cause problems in itself and it may just that could cause problems in itself and it mayjust rent into the same sort of areas which are seeing them of the heaviest rain of today so please keep an eye on the forecast for tomorrow. scotland in east england will stay dry, raining into the evening across parts of the midlands in south east england as well as north wales. well as north midlands in south east england as well as north wales. that will be an important feature for some of you heading off to the big match between england and germany, a massive match there of course at wembley. as far as attendance figures are concerned. when at times, but the rain clears for sunday, most on remembrance sunday will have a dry day, some showers towards the south and east, they will clear but for most, a sunny day but it will be a fairly cold one. i will have more detail throughout the morning. back to you both. matt, thank you very much.
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let's take a look at today's papers. the guardian focuses on the election campaign, and announcements from the conservatives and labour, who have both pledged to spend billions if they get elected. the paper calls it a "public—spending bidding war". the picture is ofjeremy corbyn unveiling his battle bus in liverpool. the times also looks at the spending promises for its headline. the main picture is of movie starjames dean, his digital avatar will appear in a new film about the vietnam war, after a deal was reached with his family. the sun reports that a police officer has been charged with murder after the taser death of ex—aston villa footballer dalian atkinson. the paper says it's the first case of its kind in britain. and the floods in yorkshire are on the front page of the metro's website this morning. it reports that people were kept inside sheffield's meadowhall shopping centre last night after traffic chaos gridlocked the roads outside.
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john and nina are widows. the business section this morning are dominated expectjohn business section this morning are dominated expect john and business section this morning are dominated expectjohn and nina are with us. the business section this morning are dominated by the spending by the conservatives. they are hoping to take advantage of rock what rates. obviously what it will come down to, this though, get ready, learn how to be an expert. marks & spencer have thrown down the gaunt when it comes to christmas advertising. a signature shoulder roll move which will set dance floors alight. remember the beyonce single ladies video, they are using the same director to advertise their christmasjumpers the same director to advertise their christmas jumpers and are the same director to advertise their christmasjumpers and are using house of pain's jump christmasjumpers and are using house of pain'sjump around. how do
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you do the shoulder roll? it does describe it. we've got time anyway. i should have got my highlighter out. rollback your shoulder. and forward and back. without the newspaper, can you do it? you will have to put jump around newspaper, can you do it? you will have to putjump around on newspaper, can you do it? you will have to put jump around on while we do it. jump around! don't humiliate me. we will all be doing it. nina might be giving us a little demonstration on social media. we we re demonstration on social media. we were talking about the games last night. a huge game on sunday to come. liverpool, the league leaders. worries and concerns that we could see some disturbances that we witnessed last time when these two faced each other in the champions league last year. the bus was
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attacked, there are concerns that could be a repeat of that this weekend. some messages circulating on social media. seemingly to encourage some sections of supporters to create an atmosphere when the ice arrives so to try and negate that, try not to release the route the buses going to take to enfield on sunday to try and defend repeat — — prevent enfield on sunday to try and defend repeat —— prevent a repeat of what happened. which makes sense. this is from the times. not the first time that movies of change the way people look. the irishman, robert the niro is the star, how he actually looks, and what they've done is, in the film, he goes back to his 30—year—old self and so this is what they've managed to make him look like with the benefit of some digital wizardry. al pacino is also
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in it. they views the tricks of the trade. people are saying that actors and actresses can go on indefinitely, because you can put them in any era and just make them younger again. we could be dad, james dean. you need those the niro genes, he's got strong genes. he doesn't age, he just always looks great. who has seen rosen? i've never watched the whole thing. as soon as that song came, we would say, is going to be in our heads. collected go. you may think the secret would be repetition but in fa ct, secret would be repetition but in fact, what it is is, what it's the pleasure centres in your brain is the element of surprise and so
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80,000 calls from 750 songs have been analysed, including knowing me, knowing you. red red wine by ub40, and this one, i never get it right. 0bladi—0blada by the beatles. i thought there was a song that i a lwa ys thought there was a song that i always remember but ijust com pletely always remember but ijust completely forgot. agadoo, where does that sit in the great scheme of wings? it's the second time in a fortnight we talked about agadoo. what about rosen hitting the pleasure centres? terrible.
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back to the flooding in south yorkshire. 0vernight the fire service has dealt with more than 500 calls from members of the public. let's speak to assistant chief fire officer steve helps who is at their control centre in sheffield. what can you tell us in terms of what's happened ? what can you tell us in terms of what's happened? the south yorkshire fire service at 1030 last night, declared an emergency because of widespread flooding across sheffield and doncaster. many of which were people trapped within vehicles, i imagine you are expecting more calls this morning because people are waking up to the aftermath of the flooding. that's right, continued work throughout the evening. they've supported us by providing extra
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resources and national l —— national assets with ten rescue boats to support our work and we do anticipate there will be more activity when people start to wake up activity when people start to wake up and become more active. as people wa ke up and become more active. as people wake up, what is the message you are trying to get out of the area? we've been really stressing the dangers of water, either in the vehicle and cove rs water, either in the vehicle and covers to become dislodged and we wa nt to covers to become dislodged and we want to encourage people to keep away from the floods. we are also really grateful of people keeping away from fast flowing rivers and also being mindful of looking after the most vulnerable. where the critical areas, the ones you are most concerned about? in sheffield,
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as you mention, people have been stranded. we rescued 100 people from a shopping centre in neighbouring outlet and we are anticipating more activity and doncaster over the next few hours, and we are working in a multiagency approach with local authorities and the environment agency and reviewing those who are specifically vulnerable and hoping to mitigate the risks. when you say rescued more than 100 people from a retail park in rotherham, what happened? it was trapped by rising floodwater and it was a requirement to stand up base before we could get them out safely. we didn't want people going through floodwater so it was enabling us to get the teams in place to move them safely to dry land. you mentioned people had been
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trapped in vehicles. we are not reporting there are any injuries or loss of life this is obviously a concern. we've seen it all too often. people just don't appreciate the depth of water and also the dangers or drain covers may be becoming dislodged. we have had reports of people having to make their way onto the top of the vehicle and just puts extra strain on to people who are already busy at this time so we encourage people not to go through floodwaters. that is the key message, for sure. we've been showing pictures of people who have been driving on roads whether water is at high levels. if someone feels they do need to drive, what should they do, if they need to get somewhere in an emergency?” should they do, if they need to get somewhere in an emergency? i guess you must assess it at the time. if it's a small quantity of water, the advice is to go through really
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carefully at slow speed. we've seen people on many occasions driving through at high speed on the water then clearly causes a problem. but then clearly causes a problem. but the advice really is, we expect the water to recede and we would encourage people not to go through floodwaters at all. and just make the point as well, the impact will be felt by many homeowners and others for the next weeks and months to come. and planning with local authorities around extra assistant in supporting people overnight. thank you very much. we wish you and your colleagues well. obviously a busy day ahead in the south yorkshire fire service, bringing us up—to—date. we get the chance often
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to introduce you to some remarkable people. i'm sure you will remember i'm sure you will remember harry billinge. the 94—year—old war veteran who captured the hearts of millions when he appeared on breakfast earlier this year. he spoke about being in one of the first wave of troops at the d day landings, aged just 18. harry said he could never forget those who lost their lives — telling us they were ‘heroes' — and he has raised thousands of pounds for a memorial in france — to remember his fallen comrades. tim muffett has been to see him ahead of remembrance sunday. thank you, darling. even for such a remarkable man, it's been a remarkable man, it's been a remarkable year. there is about 35 quid there, harry. i'm overwhelmed with kindness. he is the best. you're the best. he's the hero, nobody else. the support you've had, as it surprise you following your appearance on request? yes, it has. iam no
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appearance on request? yes, it has. i am no hero, appearance on request? yes, it has. iam no hero, i appearance on request? yes, it has. i am no hero, i was lucky, i'm here. all the heroes are dead and i would never forget them as long as i live. words can't say how much i appreciate, everyone is so kind. that is harry here. all the time, people coming up to you, it's great. i feel this ten by lunchtime. people coming up to you, it's great. i feelthis ten by lunchtime. so people coming up to you, it's great. i feel this ten by lunchtime. so you on the telly. more than 22,000 british troops died so harry aimed to create a memorial. the donations kept coming. it's 30,000 now, i put another 2000 and last monday. collecting the money for that memorial. i shouldn't have been here, i should memorial. i shouldn't have been here, ishould have memorial. i shouldn't have been here, i should have been killed on the beach. i was saved. i believe, by the grace of god, for this purpose and that's why i've got to do it, i must do this. remembrance
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sunday is coming up. will it feel special? no tears from me. i do feel this. i get very upset. the poppy is a flower of remembrance and means lot to me. it is very important we don't forget, we don't forget the sacrifices these men made for us. where would we be without guys like that? it's like poetry and i always think about words were. as i allow my couch. bless upon my inward i am sanctify my solitude. all these fellows, you see all of them, tommy lemmon, paul lazenby. so many men. but died in the cause of freedom. tim muffett, bbc news, cornwall.
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harry such a passionate man in such a good speaker. i'm delighted we're going to be talking to him later. we won't want to stop talking to him today. just hearing his thoughts there, you know those things that put things in respect of, it's one of those times. we look forward to that a little later on. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. a murder investigations been launched a teenager was stabbed to death in hillington. it happened just after half past four yesterday afternoon outside the civic centre. a second teenager suffered a stab wound to the ear during the incident, while a a 17—year—old boy has been arrested on suspicion of murder. there's a call for more help for people without a fixed address, such as canal boat dwellers or sofa
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surfers, register to vote. statistics from the electoral commission show around 2 per cent of such people are on the electoral roll. an online campaign, called 0peration votey mcvoteface, wants to raise awareness. but some say it is easy enough to register. a new immersive exhibition is opening at the national gallery celebrating the artist leonardo da vinci. the gallery's teamed up with 59 productions — the video design company that worked on the opening ceremony of the london 2012 olympic games and the theatre show war horse. the creators hope visitors will get an insight into the mind of leonardo da vinci through the exhibition. it is representing the pasting so even the source material or even in this space, looking really close up the painting but also looking at the scientific work. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. traffic is building on the a13
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into barking from dagenham. there are anti clockwise delays on the m25 heading out of j28 , the a12 interchange for brentwood, that's following a five car collision northbound traffic is slow on the blackwall tunnel southern approach from the woolwich rd flyover water main work continues on the edgware road, with temporary lights to the north of the marylebone flyover now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, elizabeth rizzini. good morning. a rather chilly feeling hello, good morning. a rather chilly feeling day on the way for us today, temperature slipped below freezing last night so there is a touch of frost out there and also some patches of mist and fog two. temperatures are definitely going to struggle all day. not completely dry, there will be showers as we head through the afternoon but it is a dry start to the day and there is some early sunshine out there. especially in south—eastern areas of the capital. it's quickly going to cloud over and we will see showers come down that northerly breeze as
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the weather front pivots back towards us. a bit of windchill, top temperatures only eight or nine celsius. all the while feeling rather cold and we are in for a cold night tonight. the showers will pull away eastwards, clear skies, temperatures gained widely below freezing as we head into tomorrow morning and also patches of mist and fog once more, particularly out towards western home counties as we head into tomorrow morning. it's a dry start of the day, early sunshine but will cloud over and we will see outbreaks of rain as it lasts through the afternoon and evening, much nicer day on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. good morning to you. we'll bring you all the latest news
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and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning, remember harry the hero? the veteran has raised more than £20,000 for a memorial in normandy — that's a pound for every man who died on d—day. he'll be here to give us an update on his efforts to honour his former comrades. # let it go. # can't hold me back anymore. they couldn'tjust let it go. one of the biggest animated movies of all time has a sequel. we'll be on the red carpet at the world premiere of frozen 2. the boys from the script will be here. they've had a tough year with the loss of family members. they'll tell us how friendships helped pull them through and how it influenced their new album. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news.
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more than a hundred flood warnings are in place across the north of england. a major incident has been declared in sheffield, where the river don has burst its banks. in rotherham, residents have been told to only leave their homes if it's absolutely essential. the conservatives have unveiled plans for a new fast—track visa for doctors and nurses from other countries who want to work in the uk. under the scheme, applications from medical professionals would be given priority and the cost of a visa would be halved, to £1611. the policy reflects concern from within the nhs that it could struggle to attract the staff it needs after brexit, but the new visas would not apply to social care, where some of the worst shortages have been reported. labour says it will extend statutory maternity pay from nine months to a full year if it wins the general election. the party also wants to increase the entitlement to flexible working and create a new workers' protection agency. it could have powers to fine employers who fail to report or tackle their gender pay gaps. the conservatives have warned the proposals could lead to job losses. the scottish national party
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will launch its election campaign today with a pledge to protect the nhs from trade deals with foreign nations. speaking in edinburgh later, party leader nicola sturgeon is expected to say the snp will ensure the health service is not used as a "bargaining chip" in future negotiations. that brings you up to date with the news. now, let's talk about sport. and last—minute winners. i love a last—minute winner. and celebrations like that. celtic qualified for the europa league. and goals for manchester united who also qualified. a good night for the british sides in the europa league. a big win for celtic and goals for manchester united which have proved in short supply this season. there were victories for the two other british sides in action, as austin halewood reports. in rome, there is history wherever you look but for these fans, a first win on italian soil was priceless.
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because celtic and rod are failing into the last 32. —— sailing. when you have never beaten an italian side on home soil before the last thing you need is to give them a lead. lazio with a head start on celtic off they came before a moment of magic from james forrest brought them back in it. the italians knew that rome could be conquered in 90 minutes. they just that rome could be conquered in 90 minutes. theyjust did not think about the 95th. the cutest of touches and the coolest of finishes. it is historicjob for us qualifying for you know the new year is concerned, we have a lot of work to do domestically, but it is an amazing note for the team. back home in glasgow, rangers were ready for all that porto could throw at them, the home side's backs against the wall but you always have a chance. ranges on the brink of the last 32. south of the border in manchester, the smile was almost back, they
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slipped into a gear they have really found so far this year, pace, precision and clinical finishing found so far this year, pace, precision and clinicalfinishing in front of goal, greenwood got the first but marshall got the pick of them. before rushford slammed in their third. united through with two games to spare. and walls are not far behind them, the wanderers almost into the knockout stage after human as's goal feel their win, memorable night for british football. austin halewood, bbc news. huge wins there. dawid malan's scored the quickest century by an england player in twenty20 internationals. england remember need to win their fourth twenty20 match against new zealand in napier to keep the 5—match series alive. they were put into bat and, despite losing jonny bairstow early on malan and eoin morgan have taken the new zealand attack apart, both raced to half centuries,
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and malan went on to reach his centruy off just 48 balls. england finished on 241—3. when you say that is the quickest century, is there a time record for the quickest? there would be. probably best balls. it is not timed? no, it is how many balls you ta ke timed? no, it is how many balls you take for the time to reach that century. which is not bad going. brilliant. do you say they need to try harder? to top that? you can a lwa ys try harder? to top that? you can always try harder. paralympic champion paul blake won great britain's first gold medal of the world para athletics championships and said it was the best of his career. blake won the t36 800 metres on day one in dubai in a season's best time to take his fourth world title. and he goes again later in the week in his main event, the 400 metres. 0h, oh, yeah, it was good fun. my coach told me to go through exactly what i went through, so i'm happy with that. normally i get too excited and i chewed off and die towards the end
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but it was not this case, i got my tactics right on the day and i came through with my first gold, which is a lwa ys through with my first gold, which is always nice. his preferred event is the 400 metres so he would chance to his —— fa ncy metres so he would chance to his —— fancy his chances of getting a medal in that event, too. all right, thank you. the scottish national party is launching its election campaign today with a pledge to protect the nhs from trade deals with foreign nations. party leader nicola sturgeon is expected to say the party will make sure the health service is not used as a "bargaining chip" in future post—brexit negotiations. we're joined from glasgow by the snp's ian blackford. very good morning to you and thank you for your this morning. good morning, charlie. front and centre in amongst a number of things for the snp is this an h bill. can you explain what it is? —— nhs protection bill. we know that boris
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johnson want to do a trade deal with donald trump and we need to be very clear with people that there is a real threat to the national health service, and the threat comes from the threat to services that could happen, the threat to the cost of medicines, the americans have already said that they want foreign countries to pay higher prices for medicines that come out of the us, and we need to make sure that we can fully protect our national service, the national health service, something which is so vital to all of us, we are proposing bringing forward a bill that will give parliament the opportunity to make sure that our national health service is not a bargaining chip and within all of it, to make sure that the devolved administration in edinburgh and belfast have oversight over it as well, that we cannot lose our rights to a public service, the national health service, through a trade deal that boris johnson national health service, through a trade deal that borisjohnson or anyone else made like to try to do. so clear it up for us, is their wording in the bill that precludes what, talks over the issue? 0ver us
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companies being involved in the nhs? how does it work in practice? this isa how does it work in practice? this is a subject that has been around for some time because there were talks with trade deals between the eu and the us and particularly the rights that investors would have to ride roughshod over the rules and regulations that exist in the united kingdom so it was not the nhs being sued, for example, to make sure that access is granted us corporations, which is something that should be in public hands, so making sure that the institution that we cherish so much that has delivered fantastic services to everyone over the course of the last 70 years cannot be attacked through anyjohnson— trump trade deal which is the situation we end up in. the conservatives, as you would be aware, have denied that the nhs is in anyway up for sale. but i think they have to get real because the americans have already talked about making sure that the passing on the cost of drugs to foreign
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countries and foreign governments, and the president has said that, the us health secretary has said that, soiam us health secretary has said that, so i am afraid the evidence is all there and the tories must not sleepwalk into a situation that we will all pay a price because that is the harsh reality of what the tories may try to do to all of us. linked subject matters today from the conservatives for example in relation to the nhs visa policy, and i wonder what your position is on these plans for the conservatives to half the cost of the visa in order to ensure that the right staff are able to work post brexit. we need to make sure that we have got open access to the national health service, to the professionals that we need, the real risk that we face is if the conservatives taketh out to the european union and of course we have no desire to be taken out of eu and the flawed labour that we already have from the european union and for those that work in a health services, doctors or nurses that come from the eu, that is the real threat that we face and i'm afraid
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this is really just threat that we face and i'm afraid this is reallyjust a smokescreen we see from the conservatives this morning. where within the snp's priorities going into this general election does the issue of independence like? it is very important because we were told, in the referendum in 2014 if scotland stayed in the european union that our rights as eu citizens would be respected and if we stayed in the uk we could not be dragged out of the eu and boris johnson we could not be dragged out of the eu and borisjohnson wants to take us eu and borisjohnson wants to take us out of europe and wants to deny us us out of europe and wants to deny us those rights that we have. it is clear it is a material change of circumstances and westminster must respect that the scottish national party won the election to the scottish parliament in 2016 and that was on a manifesto commitment if there was a change of circumstances that we wanted to have the referendum. we are saying to the people of scotland in this election campaign that this election is about scotland's right to choose. boris johnson or anyone else and the pin number ten, they must respect democracy and respect the right of the people of scotland, if they so choose to remain in the european
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union as an independent country, scotla nd union as an independent country, scotland becoming a destination in europe for investment... specifically about jeremy corbyn then, let me ask you what indications have you had, i mean, we have all heard his public statements which is it is a wait and see effectively, not ruling anything out in relation to offering a second referendum, so have you heard more than that? are there talks going on that it than that? are there talks going on thatitis than that? are there talks going on that it is offering more than that? because clearly, a labour win, a corbyn government is on the face of it, the snp's best route to getting a second referendum. but nobody whether it isjeremy corbyn or boris johnson, can stand in the face of the votes of the scottish people, and they should respect... technically, they can, that is the reality. i would simply say we won the election in 2016 and we won the election in 2017 to westminster and the european election and we have a triple mandate for an independent referendum and one thing you cannot do is to stand up in front of the people and say that your votes do
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not matter and whether it isjeremy corbyn or boris johnson, not matter and whether it isjeremy corbyn or borisjohnson, in the end they are going to have to accept the reality that it will be the people of scotla nd reality that it will be the people of scotland to determine their future and we cannot be bullied by a prime minister that seeks to stand in the face of democracy and the right of the people of scotland to choose their future. ian blackford from the scottish national party, thank you so much. this here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. picture got behind you, sheffield, with dean in rotherham as well, real concerns about budding. a horrendous 24 hours. weather watchers capturing some of the flooded scenes over the last 24 hours. why so wet? let me show you the rainfall radar chart. notice this rain band here, it sits across the same areas throughout the entire period because south of it, winds blowing in one direction and to the north, the other direction.
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northerly winds starting to push that rain band from affected areas but not before we've dropped over one month ‘s worth of rain in the space of 24 hours. sheffield, november, usually only 79 millimetres and that's all on top of what was a wetter than average of over. more rain on top. that's why we see the flooding problems at the moment and even though the rain is easing, continuing to rise through today. also on bbc local radio. 0ut there, things are starting to improve. a pretty cold start across the uk. away from our main area, foster cross parts of scotland, also towards the south—east. you notice temperatures not as low when we had the cloud and rain. lincolnshire, parts of the east midlands, parts of northern england,, parts of the east midlands, parts of northern england, , some parts of the east midlands, parts of northern england,, some showers
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spreading towards east anglia. a cold and sunny start. friday, not bad at all. many central and western areas, plenty of sunshine but it will be a chilly day and it's going to lead into a cold night, temperatures dropping rapidly, lifting later on, cloud and rain starting to spread in that much of scotland, england and wales, blue colours on the chart. an indication ofa colours on the chart. an indication of a widespread frost, cold and i tonight last night. temperatures in scotland, —5, —6. a bright start to many that rain in northern ireland, quickly spreading into scotland, the west of england. turning to snow even of a modest hills. eventually through parts of the midlands and the south and ines and peak district. the many, there will be rain. the heaviest sliding across southern counties of england. parts of scotland, north—east england will stay dry. the rainjust of scotland, north—east england will stay dry. the rain just fringing into parts of the same areas with scene flooding through today. that
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rain will hang around into the evening. if you are heading off to wembley, but a sell—out match between the lionesses in germany, ta ke between the lionesses in germany, take some water. it will be wet through the evening but sunday, only wa nted through the evening but sunday, only wanted to showers across central eastern areas. most places will have a dry and bright day after a cold start. we needed after that rain. women in work are at the centre of labour's election campaign today. the party says it will offer, "a boost in pay, increased flexibility and greater protections against harassment and discrimination at work", if they get into power. (pres)it‘s outlining its policy on maternity pay and the gender pay gap this morning. we're joined now from westminster by labour's shami chakrabarti. is labour going to change women's rights in the work base? i'm excited to say that we are going to have the
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greatest workplace revolution for women in 50 years. as you know, without equal pay law nearly 50 yea rs without equal pay law nearly 50 years in country but we are nowhere near equal pay. current projections say that with the current rate of progress, it will take 60 years. that is not good enough. women have been left to enforce the law for themselves, taking their bosses, even dare i say it, the bbc, to the tribunal. that is not fair. if we are serious about regulation in this country, whether it's on doodle medicines or health and safety or equal pay, the state has to stand by the side of these women. a new agency, the workers protection agency, the workers protection agency will look at people's books, with support from hmrc and if employers are refusing to pay men and women equally or equivalent work, the agency. in, not leaving it to women themselves. 0n maternity
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pay, as you've said, going to extend the period of statutory maternity pay to a full year. that's got to be good for both parents and four children. we're going dare i said,, improving work experience. and we will look at the practice. with employers taking responsibility for harassment of staff. very, very exciting package. i'm very proud we can offer this to the women of the united kingdom. thank you for that. the workers protection agency was announced, what's new about that?
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what's new today is not the agency itself that this new obligation on the agency to enforce equal pay. how would you do that? a, find out or suspect that her mail colleagues are paying more. then taking the really difficult step. that's really, really ha rd. difficult step. that's really, really hard. that would not have to happen. instead, with food standards, society cares about. if there is a suspicion on the part of this agency,, or because of statutory pay audits. 0beying
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this agency,, or because of statutory pay audits. obeying the existing lawn equal pay, and the agency would be able to take enforcement. that seems to me maternity pay, statutory, nine months, to 12. how much will it cost? we will publish the full costings. with manifesto injust over a week. can you give me a rough idea? we seem to be scrambling around. we are one of the richest countries in the world. i think the other sixth richest country the world. we have some employers including those based offshore who are not paying their fair including those based offshore who are not paying theirfair share and if you invest in your workforce, and you make them comfortable and happy
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and able to enjoy their work, that will increase productivity companies. 0rdinary people, rather than millionaires. a points -based immigration system. who is of value into as of worth. and they don't usually treat migrants as human being. we don't need doctors in the nhs but we also need all sorts of working people and professionals including those who work, for example, in social care, which is less valued. we will look to value
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people on the basis of their skills and contribution and notjust in professions that the conservatives think of as elite. i'm so sorry. when it comes to social care, continuing on the same vein, social square —— social care, 100,000 nhs vacancies, what would the labour party propose? we have to fill these gaps in social care. we are facing a social care crisis, notjust for the elderly but other vulnerable people. if we need these posts to be filled, including by people from the european union or elsewhere, then the economy and the needs of our people must be a priority rather than dog whistle politics on immigration from which this country has suffered for too long. what does that mean because labour's annual conference urged jeremy corbyn to commit to the free movement of people in the manifesto. is that
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going to be included? there is going to have to be some movement and that means free movement than the conservatives are proposing. 0f course, we said that if and when britain leaves the eu, then free movement under eu law and is but they will have to be something to ta ke they will have to be something to take its place. notjust for the economy but also because our young people and all our people want to travel within the eu as well. so we are notan travel within the eu as well. so we are not an anti—immigration party. we noted movement of pupils benefits the economy but also benefits this country and our quality of life. have you been assured byjeremy corbyn that they will be some wording in the manifesto committed to that? i talk with jeremy and of course diane abbott all the time about these things. we want to stop the dog whistle politics on immigration that led to things like the windrush scandal. there has to
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be sensible controls, it is not going to be a close door, is going to be fairand going to be a close door, is going to be fair and open migration for the good of our people and our economy. so freedom of movement policy will be included in the ma nifesto ? policy will be included in the manifesto? it's not freedom of movement as it is at the moment under eu law, unless post referendum end up staying. if we end up leaving the eu under labour policy, it would nevertheless be with a very close relationship with those other countries and so there will be, one way or another, movement between britain and the eu. thank you very much for your time this morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. a murder investigation's been launched a teenager was stabbed to death in hillington. it happened just after 4:30 yesterday afternoon outside the civic centre. a second teenager suffered a stab wound to the ear during the incident, while a a 17—year—old boy has been arrested on suspicion of murder. there's a call for more help for people without a fixed address, such as canal boat dwellers or sofa surfers, register to vote. statistics from the electoral commission show around 2 per cent of such people are on the electoral roll. an online campaign, called 0peration votey mcvoteface, wants to raise awareness. but some say it is easy enough to register. a new immersive exhibition is opening at the national gallery celebrating the artist leonardo da vinci. the gallery's teamed up with 59 productions — the video design company that worked on the opening ceremony of the london 2012 olympic games and the theatre show war horse. the creators hope visitors will get an insight into the mind of leonardo
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da vinci through the exhibition. we wa nted we wanted to look at the painting from a number of different perspective gives and sort of each of the rooms is in some way a representation of the painting so either the source material in the first room or in this space, sort of look really close up the painting literally in some ways but also looking at the scientific work. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. there is disruption to east mid and strains up to the north—east from king's cross. that's following heavy flooding in the north of england. northbound traffic is slow on the blackwall tunnel. traffic is building from the 813 into barking. hello, good morning.
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a rather chilly feeling day on the way for us today, some of our temperatures slipped below freezing last night so there is a touch of frost out there and also some patches of mist and fog too. temperatures are generally going to struggle all day. not completely dry, there will be showers as we head through the afternoon but it is a dry start to the day and there's some early sunshine out there. it'll last longest towards south—eastern areas of the capital. it's quickly going to cloud over and we will see showers come down that northerly breeze as our weather front pivots back towards us. so some wet weather through the afternoon. a bit of windchill, top temperatures only 8 or 9 celsius. all the while feeling rather cold and we are in for a cold night tonight. the showers will pull away eastwards, as we head through the evening, clear skies, temperatures gained widely below freezing as we head into tomorrow morning and also patches of mist and fog once more, particularly out towards western home counties as we head towards tomorrow morning. it's a dry start to the day, early sunshine
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will last through the afternoon and evening, a much nicer day on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to naga and charlie. good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. 0ur headlines today: around 100 flood warnings are in place across northern england after torrential rain caused flooding, mudslides and serious disruption to roads and rail services. in sheffield, a major incident has been declared. dozens of people spent the night stranded in a shopping centre. residents in rotherham have been urged not to leave their homes. a urged not to leave their homes. month's worth of i of a month's worth of rain in the space of 24 hours. that is responsible for all of the flooding. but there is some good news in the forecast —
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make the rain is starting to ease. i will have all of the details in 15 minutes. in the general election, labour promises a full year of maternity pay while the conservatives unveil a nhs visa to attract top medical talent to the uk. good morning. 20 years of pension savings, gone. a warning that scammers are targeting hundreds of victims, and no—one is immune. people are losing an average of more than £80,000. i'll have all the details. it proved a great night for the british club in the europa league. celtic qualify with a last—minute winner against lazio as manchester united also reach the knockout stage. # let it go. # can't hold me back anymore. and if the cold never bothered you, you'll be as excited as these frozen fa natics' about the hollywood premiere of the hotly awaited sequel to one of the biggest animations of all time. it's friday 8th november. our top story:
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more than 100 flood warnings are in place across the north of england, following hours of torrential rain. a major incident has been declared in sheffield, where the river don has burst its banks. in rotherham, residents have been told to only leave their homes if it's absolutely essential. 10 rescue boats have been involved in the operation. emergency services say the focus has now moved to the doncaster area, where water levels are rising. tom ingall has this report. a violent flood. the river don breaks its banks and surges through the heart of rotherham in the small hours. elsewhere in the town, abandoned cars litter empty roads. the council here advised people to stay at home. upstream, next to the meadowhall shopping centre, the new flood defences were tested and bettered by the same river. a christmas event had to be cancelled at the centre as transport was seriously disrupted, staff and shoppers finding themselves boxed in by gridlocked traffic. my friend said she'd give me a lift home,
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so we've walked to the staff car park and it was so flooded, she just couldn't get her car out. so we've walked back again and my husband has gone — come in to fetch us. i went to leave at 4:40. i went 100 yards out of the staff car park, back into the staff car park, it took me 1.5 hours to do so, and i came back into meadowhall. my biggest concern is all the children that are stuck in there, walking around in pyjamas, because they've been — they've come to the concert and they've not been able to get home. well, this is just one of the roads that people might‘ve used to get away from meadowhall shopping centre but you can see what the effect of hours of rain have been. and it isn'tjust here in sheffield. villages and towns across yorkshire and the north of england have also borne the brunt of this tremendous rainstorm. homeowners suffer, too. for some in the village of whiston, it was a heartbreaking repeat of the catastrophic south yorkshire floods of 2007. but there were no compulsory evacuations. however, when day breaks, it will be time to really assess the damage and keep a close eye on the river levels,
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should worse be to come. tom ingall, bbc news, sheffield. 0ur reporter luxmy gopal is in rotherham for us this morning. that is the centre of many of the problems. we can see the speed of the water flowing behind you. bring us the water flowing behind you. bring us up to date with what has happened. that's right, charlie. have a look at it. it is the gushing torrent of the river gone behind me. you can see just how high the river level is at the moment. —— don. it has flooded the car park over rotherham central station behind it. it is just one of many areas in south of yorkshire that has seen major flooding after yesterday's torrential rainfall. as you mentioned, doncaster is another area that has been affected badly and to give you some context, some of these areas in south yorkshire is in the worst flooding in more than ten
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yea rs worst flooding in more than ten years and the river don at doncaster ten yea rs years and the river don at doncaster ten years ago in 200712 years ago? when it was really severe, the levels they are reached 6.3 metres. however, now, as it is now, they are 6.22 metres so you could see just how close they are getting the levels they were at over one decade ago so the authorities are preparing for that stop south yorkshire fire and rescue and south yorkshire police are preparing for it to be less tha n police are preparing for it to be less than it was. i have brought in extra high—volume pumps pump away water and extra boats to help carry out rescues because, as tom mentioned in his piece, people have had to be rescued by boat from one of the shopping complexes here, park date, and we have heard about the people who have been trapped at meadowhall shopping centre overnight. flood waters around their cause to that. in the past few minutes the environment agency has issued three severe flood warnings
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around the river don, in addition to the more than 100 flood warnings that are already in place across the north, so the situation here is still very severe and the river levels have not picked yet. thank you very much. the situation at rotherham and in a few minutes, we will catch up with someone who has been caught in a car and some of the rising floodwaters, so we will keep you up to date on that story this morning. labour is promising to extend statutory maternity pay to a full year and improve flexible working if it wins the general election. the conservatives have outlined plans for a new nhs visa, making it easier for doctors and nurses from around the world to work in the uk. we will be talking to the labour party, the conservatives and the snp this morning. 0ur political correspondent jessica parker is in westminster. we'll get you to run through them all separately, to make it clear what they are all saying, because i believe we will have many days like this ahead.
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let's start with labour. they're targeting women in work with this announcement? yes, they say they will be offering a revolution for women in the workplace with a raft of measures. it has to be said, as you pointed out in your interview, none of this is terribly new so, for example, the idea of extending maternity pay from nine to 12 months was mentioned in the 2017 manifesto. 0ther nine to 12 months was mentioned in the 2017 manifesto. other things that the labour party is talking about today, extending the number of companies that would have to report their gender pay gap and as well providing more support for women going through the menopause who work for larger companies as well. going to be talking to priti patel from the conservatives in about 25 minutes or so. an nhs visa? yes, i think the message from the conservatives today is they want to make it easier, cheaper as well, to bring over medical professionals to the uk, doctors, nurses, nhf starting resourcing is one of the
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major issues facing the health service —— nhs staffing. it gives us a flavour of what a future points based in —— hot points based immigration system may look like but it has to be said there would have already been an expectation that medical professionals would have got some kind of preferential treatment as they already do from non—eu countries at the moment. and the snp, we spoke to ian blackford earlier, also making announcements. the snp launching their general election campaign in edinburgh today andi election campaign in edinburgh today and i am sure they will be talking about scottish independence, as you would expect, talking about and nhs protection bill that they say protection bill that they say protect the nhs and safeguarded from being used to some of bargaining chip in future trade talks. of course, the conservatives and the government have stressed time and time again that the nhs would not be up time again that the nhs would not be upfor time again that the nhs would not be up for sale time again that the nhs would not be upforsale in time again that the nhs would not be up for sale in briggs a trade talks but i think a theme throughout this campaign will be the nhs —— post brexit trade talks. they want to be seen as defenders of the national
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health service. i have to ask, it looks lovely over there. it is like there? it is very beautiful but it is ever so slightly chilly. chilly. cold! 0k, get warm! which takes us rather nicely — did you plan that? — to our next story. six years after disney's frozen first hit cinemas, the stars of the blockbuster animation are back on the red carpet for its sequel. thousands of fans gathered in los angeles for the premiere of the highly anticipated frozen 2, starring kristen bell and idina menzel. the movie, featuring elsa, anna and 0laf the snowman is released here later in the month. i think you could tell i have never seen it because i did not realise it was about snow. a lot of people have and a lot of people love it and a lot of people would be very happy about that. do you want to see something fantastic? this is such a good thing! it is called rascal,
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dilatory hardware rolling up the high street. —— military hardware rolling up the high street. 0ne poppy seller from derbyshire has gone all—out for this year's appeal by converting his mobility scooter into a tank. 85—year—old eddie wadsworth, whose fatherjohn was killed during the second world war, has always been keen to support the royal british legion's poppy appeal. that is what it is all for. he says he's "thrilled to bits" with the reaction, especially from young people. he says the impressive re—fit only cost him about £7. that is a generational thing. i cannot imagine — and i am not knocking my generation — converting a mobility scooter into a tank for £7. a tight budget. well done. more on that later. and more on sport and we will keep you right up to date on all of the problems with the flooding because that is a breaking story this morning. helen mccourt was murdered 30 years
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ago, but her body has never been found. her mother marie is urging her killer to tell reveal where she is, and end her torture once and for all. despite campaigning for a new law which would keep the murderer behind bars, she's worried it may come too late, as he's due to speak at his latest parole hearing today. we'll talk to marie mccourt in a moment, but first abi smitton has the background to the case. helen mccourt was just 22 when she disappeared on her way home from work near st helens in 1988. ian simms was arrested and convicted of her murder and was handed a life sentence one year later. he has never revealed where helen polley bodies. her mum marie has been campaigning for helen's law, to stockill is getting out of prison if they do not say whether victims's bodies are. morning, love. the 1.5 million people find a petition
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supporting its introduction and in 2016 mp5 supporting its introduction and in 2016 mps voted in favour of her campaign, but it did not receive government support until this year, and then david gauke said the law should be introduced as soon as possible but because parliament has been dissolved ahead of the general election, it means the bill has installed. marie mccourtjoins us now. very good morning to you. good morning, charlie. just yesterday, you gave evidence at ian simms' parole hearing. tell us about that. having to go along, it was a late date for me, you know. i did not have that much time. buti you know. i did not have that much time. but i had to go this time to ca nary time. but i had to go this time to canary wharf, which was unusual, but i believe that is how they are doing it these days. and all that i can do, the only thing i can do in their is say how this crime has affected me. can you give us a sense of what he said? well, i've told them, i
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read them parts of my statement, i think i can say about this, because it is my statement, was that, you know, helen — helen was very reliable, very considerate and happy girland she reliable, very considerate and happy girl and she would never, ever, she would never ever, in all of her life, 22 years, caused me one minute's worry. except that night, coming home from work, she had rang three times that day within an hour, saying mum, you will have my tea ready, for such a time, because one of her friends, her girlfriend, coming to have a chat about that girl's wedding, and it was 90 miles an hour gale force winds and then, at 20 minutes to six when she was not in between quarter past five and half pa st not in between quarter past five and half past five, i started looking at the clock and thinking your tea is in the microwave and then i heard on the radio that the trains from liverpool to lime street were
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delayed because a tree had blown onto the line. sol delayed because a tree had blown onto the line. so i did not panic then until later. so, in my — to do it- then until later. so, in my — to do it - this then until later. so, in my — to do it — this is basically what i have, is that helen never, ever, caused me a moment's worry, i knew who she was with and how this man with all the evidence against him now stands at 1.1 billion, it has grown, it is grown. 1.1 billion? the forensics we nt grown. 1.1 billion? the forensics went day and night won't go above that and this is what i have been told, you know, it could have been told, you know, it could have been to billion but they will only go as high as1.1 to billion but they will only go as high as 1.1 billion because that means he is the killer. marie, when you were talking in court, it was obviously time sensitive as well because you are concerned, aren't you, that helen's law will not come into effect before this man is
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released on, or given the opportunity, to be released on parole. when you ask to give your statement, did you talk about the impact, where you are now in life?|j never ‘ impact, where you are now in life?|j never — i didn't talk about helen's law so much, i had a part in it where i had started helen's law but — and where i had started helen's law but —and| where i had started helen's law but — and i think i am ok saying this — pa role — and i think i am ok saying this — parole judge said, told me he had read helen's law right through. and, so read helen's law right through. and, so i'm hoping that he will sort of, because it was nearly, it should have been on the statute book by september, and, but of course, parliament was prorogued, wasn't it, so we parliament was prorogued, wasn't it, so we didn't go there. a lot of people can only imagine what it is like for you, even after all of this time, going into that environment
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and having to talk about these things. it is still completely dominating your life. in a very practical sense and i know amongst other things, you still look, don't you? today and am really grateful because he is an expert. really the equipment, go over the ground, he is an expert. really the equipment, go overthe ground, and can send up equipment, go overthe ground, and can send up messages so to equipment, go overthe ground, and can send up messages so to speak, to say that this ground has never been disturbed because it's all good and he is really good. he is coming down when he can obviously. he has a lot of work. he does it internationally. he goes abroad. i do know that he has found bodies because i've seen some of his work that is done. why do you think the killer hasn't four
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—— told you where helen's body is? there are two reasons why i think and now, for the last few years, i believe that we know within the village that he threatened people, that he could kill them, he could get rid of their body, and it would never be found and never traced back to him. i only heard of this a numberof to him. i only heard of this a number of years after helen's death. the mansour bragg outcome you know. that's the kind of thing he would do, to try and frighten people. younger lads in that. he went in his pub. sol younger lads in that. he went in his pub. so i never paid much attention to it whereas all these years have gone on in the letter i wrote and pleaded with him, just tell me where we can find helen's remains and you
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will never hear anything from me again. i will leave you to get on with your sentence, and in other words, i wouldn't try and stop him from being released. ithink 31 years, almost 32 years, i now begin to question and think is this the reason he can't say where helen's body is. has he done this before and if he has, and he's put helen's body with the remains of somebody else, who isjust a missing person,, he's going to be right back on another murder charge. that is your personal speculation? it comes down to those most basic things, giving you are a parent, you want to be able to have some form of closure. it's a dreadful word to use in these
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situations. i need to get my daughter a little part, to know that she is addressed, know that we can go she is addressed, know that we can go and we can put some flowers there for her. tidy us up. it'sjust the little church by us. i can't bring her back to life. no—one can do that but i can at least know where her remains are. and not out in some horrible area, some grotty area when no—one would go. horrible area, some grotty area when no-one would go. people would be well aware how upsetting this is for you but it's also important, you wa nt to you but it's also important, you want to come and talk to people like us want to come and talk to people like us and talk about this as well. thank you. i do think that now, too
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many missing persons that turn to murder, and they are being found guilty because of dna and they need to think about what you are doing. thank you very much. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. within talking a lot about the flooding. rotherham, sheffield, lancaster. i know you are going to cover that but tell us what is in store for the rest of the country. good morning. loading the big story across parts of northern england, the midlands. this is the radar chart, with the rain has been falling for 24 hours. notice how that rain band sat in the same areas. one direction in the north of it, nothing to push it on. we are starting to see north—easterly winds develop. clearing it away. forward
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seen over one month ‘s worth of rain. we've seen over that, in the south pennines, some spots now recording over 100 millimetres of rain but even though that rain has now stopped easing away. severe flood warnings. of course with your regional update here on breakfast in the next 15 minutes. it's notjust about this morning, it's a pretty chilly site —— start, even where we have a rain band, foster cross scotland. these areas have a sunshine to begin with but rain falling across parts of lincolnshire. pushing towards east anglia and the south—east. a few showers down to eastern areas but for many, central and western parts, it's going to be a dry day, sunshine all the way through, chile, though.
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temperatures 6— 10 degrees but for many, a big improvement. still some showers into the evening. rain tonight spreads its way into northern ireland, lifting temperatures later. we could see frost for a time. scotland, england and wales, an indication as we going to the start of the weekend, a colder night than it was last night, temperatures can be as low as —5, —6 in some parts of scotland. lots of sunshine for many. the rainjust inches into the south and west of scotland, doesn't get much farther but it pushes across wales. north—west england also wet it again and across the hills of wales, the south pennines, pick district in pa rt south pennines, pick district in part of the midlands, expect some snow. temperatures struggling to get much above freezing. a cold day for many. sunshine remains across scotla nd many. sunshine remains across scotland and north—east england but the rain is never too far away from the rain is never too far away from the areas have i flood. if you are
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off to the big match of the lionesses against germany, take something waterproof, there will be rain around through tomorrow afternoon and evening. it all clears into remembrance sunday, the good news is, a respite, wanted to showers, maybe to the likes of the channel islands, and eastern coastal counties but the most, it will be sunny with some sunshine. a chilly start on sunday morning. picking up on cold, thanks very much. more so than usual. the movie "frozen" was a phenomenon. one of the most successful animations of all time, breaking records at the box office and scooping up all sorts of awards. now anna, elsa and 0laf the snowman are back, but can the sequel possibly live up to the success of its predecessor? 0ur correspondent sophie long reports from the premiere in la.
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you're not feeling the chill all around us? i'm seeing it now. embrace the magic, charlie. it was the story of sisterly love that became an eye watering commercial success in a cultural phenomenon that had young and old singing... let it go, let it go can't hold it back anymore. but that was six years ago, right? well... just when you thought frozen fever might finally be subsiding its back and some of the fans. this is hollywood boulevard and these people are frozen fanatics. let it go, let it go, can't hold it back anymore. let it go, let it go, turn away... hours before superfa ns let it go, let it go, turn away... hours before superfans got to see the sequel, the excitement was in
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plentiful supply. i have, like, butterflies in my belly because i'm so excited. how do you feel about seeing goes into? i'm so excited to go. the new characters and costumes, but they are going to be so exciting. it looks like it is going to be up there with frozen for me. it looks amazing. if you love something that much and you are about to see something you think you're going to do, do you get nervous? i feel extremely nervous, honestly. i might need an ambulance. iam honestly. i might need an ambulance. i am excited. go north, across the enchanted lands, and into the
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unknown. excitement has been building since long before the trailer released. some are saying frozen is the best disney animated film of the modern era. frozen to has a lot to live up to. no pressure, then. ithink has a lot to live up to. no pressure, then. i think i'm the only one who doesn't feel the pressure. mainly because i am like anna, i'm an eternal optimist and i'm also logical, i'm a firm believer that if you bake a kick on monday and you bake a kick with the same recipe on tuesday, chances are it's going to be delicious. and everyone was involved, we had the same creative input, it was incredibly collaborative and i just trust these people. the music is out of this world in this movie. in frozen to, the season they have changed but there will be continuity on the theme of empowerment. there will be continuity on the theme of empowermentlj there will be continuity on the theme of empowerment. i hope they will continue to cs as they did in the first that whatever it is that makes them special and unique is the thing that will make them exceptional and they need to harness that and celebrate that. what many
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people loved most about rosen was how progressive it was, just to strong female leaves —— leads but a modern man unafraid of powerful women. in a way disney did what disney done —— does best. the deserts to dream. will frozen to be even more fearless? that song will be in your head all day. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. a murder investigation has been launched after a teenager was stabbed to death in council offices in hillingdon. it happened just after 4.30 yesterday afternoon at the civic centre. a second teenager suffered a stab wound during the incident. a 17—year—old boy has been arrested on suspicion of murder. there's a call for more help for people without a fixed address, such as canal boat owners or sofa
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surfers to register to vote. statistics from the electoral commission show around 2 per cent of such people are curently on the electoral roll. an online campaign, called 0peration votey mcvoteface, wants to raise awareness. a new immersive exhibition is opening at the national gallery celebrating the artist leonardo da vinci. the gallery's teamed up with 59 productions — the video design company that worked on the opening ceremony of the london 2012 olympic games. the creators hope visitors will get an insight into the mind of leonardo da vinci through the exhibition. we wanted to look at the painting from a number of different perspectives and sort of each of the rooms is in some way a representation of the painting so either the source material in the first room or in this space, a sort of look really close up at the painting both literally in some ways but also looking at the scientific work. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service
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on the tubes this morning. there's disruption for east midlands and lner trains up to the north east from kings cross as well as delays to virgin trains to the north west from euston. that's following heavy flooding in the north of england. northbound traffic is slow on the blackwall tunnel southern approach from the woolwich road flyover. there's queues of three miles on the a1 southbound towards junction 6 welwyn garden city after an accident. (pres 3) now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. —— now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. a rather chilly feeling day on the way for us today, some of our temperatures slipped below freezing last night a touch of frost out there and also some patches of mist and fog too. temperatures are generally going to struggle all day. not completely dry, there will be showers as we head through the afternoon but it is a dry start to the day and there's some early sunshine out there. it'll last longest towards
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south—eastern areas of the capital. eventually we will see showers come down that northerly breeze as our weather front pivots back towards us. so some wet weather through the afternoon. a bit of wind chill, top temperatures only 8 or 9 celsius. all the while feeling rather cold and we are in for a cold night tonight. the showers will pull away eastwards as we head through the evening, clear skies, temperatures again widely below freezing as we head into tomorrow morning and there'll also be some patches of mist and fog once more, particularly out towards western home counties as we head towards tomorrow morning. it's a dry start to the day, early sunshine but will cloud over and we will see outbreaks of rain that will last through the afternoon and into the evening. a much nicer day on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt.
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here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. there are three severe flood warnings in south yorkshire after hours of torrential rain. that level of warning means a potential danger to life. the focus has moved to doncaster after the river don burst its banks. earlier, a major incident has been declared in sheffield, and a number of homes have been evacuated in the nottinghamshire town of worksop. in rotherham, residents have been told to only leave their homes if it's absolutely essential. 0ur reporter luxmy gopal is there for us this morning. tell us a little more about, as we have seen more and more light as we come through throughout the morning, we are getting more of a sense of the problems there. absolutely, charlie. now unlike when you came to me earlier, it is light enough to see just how high and fast, fast flowing, the river on is behind me. you can hear it is a gushing torrent
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and actually behind it and not far from it it is actually flooded the car park next to the rotherham central train station and it is just one of the many areas across the area that have been affected by the severe flooding after yesterday's to rental downpours —— river don. it rained all through the night. it seems the right at the moment but it is feeling the effects of how much rainfall fell over the past 24 hours —— torrential. 0ver100 warnings still in place and there are three extreme flood warnings that have been issued in the past half hour and infact been issued in the past half hour and in fact the environment agency has just updated the river levels at the river don at doncaster and they are at 6.25 metres, and give you an idea, in 2007 when it was the worst floods that have been since then, it was at 6.3 metres so we are very close to it being even worse than the flooding situation that happened in 2007. thank you very much.
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the town of worksop in nottinghamshire has been particularly badly hit by flooding overnight. councillor kevin greaves is there. thank you very much for talking to us on breakfast this morning. what is the situation there? good morning. yet, it was absolutely horrendous last night. the people — worksop was dreading the 2007 floods and the river was racing at the very fast rate —— rising at a very fast rate and the authorities where there to attend and to make contingency plans, ready for evacuation of the residence. the residence there in
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worksop were buying their own sandbags to block the water coming into the residence's homes but actually, the water was flowing upwards, over the wall into (unintelligible) the houses and fire crews we re (unintelligible) the houses and fire crews were there, were trying to evacuate people from being told you're at the worksop cricket club so it was absolutely horrendous night. i'm going to finish it there because we are having a few problems with sound and we managed to get most of what is going on but obviously people in the town of worksop are very conscious of flooding with the river very close by. to bring you up to date on the 100 flood warnings in place across the north of england, some severe
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flood warnings as well, major incident declared in sheffield and we saw earlier the river don bursting its banks there. it has risen too close to 120 now. —— risen to close to. we'll keep you up —— risen to close to. we'll keep you up to date. with100,000 vacancies in the nhs, attracting the best health care professionals from around the world is a priority for all parties in the run up to the election. the conservatives have announced plans for an nhs visa, which it says will fast—track applicants and address concerns within the health service that it will struggle to attract the staff it needs after brexit. we're joined now by conservative priti patel. very good morning to you and thank you for your time. good morning. could you outline what this nhs visa is? this would be a new fast track fees are for nhs workers from around the world that can come to the united kingdom and effectively, this
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will guarantee them through this fast track process the chance to work in the nhs, be sponsored by the nhs, that would be doctors, nurses and allied healthca re nhs, that would be doctors, nurses and allied healthcare professionals, and allied healthcare professionals, and they would be able to come over and they would be able to come over and work on any aspect of the nhs the united kingdom. what would they have to do to qualify for this special these are? firstly, they would need to be a qualified healthcare professional, so nurse, doctors or a specific professional, and they will apply, as they would already through the home office, through uk vi, for a visa which will be backed up through the nhs so it would be tied into work to the nhs and effectively, they would be guaranteed that place through their qualifications through the new points —based immigration system that would be looking to introduce ones of course we got the brexit deal through parliament with a new function in parliament and they would then be able to come and work for the nhs would then be able to come and work forthe nhs in
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would then be able to come and work for the nhs in any part of the united kingdom. what would it cost? in terms of costs of a visa, we're going to look to reduce the cost, half the cost from over £900 to around £400 but of course this would bea around £400 but of course this would be a sponsored route through the nhs so it would be tied employment specifically for the nhs because of course doctors, nurses and healthcare professionals would be joining an aspect of the nhs in any pa rt joining an aspect of the nhs in any part of the uk. in principle, working, getting people to work to the nhs from outside of our borders post brexit, it will be harder than before honour is that true? —— than before? is that true? we are creating this fast tracked new route either option for people from across the world so this is notjust from the world so this is notjust from the eu but outside of the eu. we wa nt to the eu but outside of the eu. we want to balance immigration and we wa nt to want to balance immigration and we want to bring the best and brightest to the uk. people that want to
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contribute actually both to our economy but to our public services so actually, i think this will, as we are already seeing, we have currently six times more people from the rest of world and from the eu coming into work into our nhs and we wa nt to coming into work into our nhs and we want to streamline the process, fast track the process, make it simpler, more efficient and less costly for them to come and join our nhs and make a great contribution that people do already from outside of the uk to work in our nhs and in a public services. one of the very real issues, this appears not to address, is the 100,000jobs real issues, this appears not to address, is the 100,000 jobs quoted is within the nhs directly, doctors, nurses and other qualified staff but there are other huge gaps in care more generally, social care for example. will this project also be extended to those who work in social care? who would be qualified people working in social care? we have been very clear and as home secretary
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i've already outlined as well that we wa nt i've already outlined as well that we want to introduce a —based immigration system, an australian— style points —based system, but to do it obviously we have to get brexit done and we have to bring the legislation through into parliament andi legislation through into parliament and i have already commissioned the migration advisory committee to look at this and we will be making further decisions that will influence the workings of the points —based system once the committee reports in january 2020, —based system once the committee reports injanuary 2020, so it would be early next year, and of course they would be providing the evidence base bring the detail forward and of course that will cover a range of sectors that will then help to create the points—based system. sectors that will then help to create the points-based system. the thing here is you are addressing, because it is a major concern to people, the nhs, specific to these visas and a lot of people will say that alongside that very much connected is the issue of social care. so the logic would be to apply the same principles in connection
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with these special visas to the other part, if you like, of the health network which is the social ca re health network which is the social care element, which is also crying out for staff at the moment. why not do it for both if you think this system would work, why not address social care at the same time? well first of all, i have been very clear that through an australian points—based system, we want the skilled people, skilled people coming to the uk which is the right approach and that is fair and balanced and at the same time it allows the government to be in control of its immigration policy in terms of the skills of people bringing to the united kingdom and work across the whole of the country. i have already commissioned the mac and the mac are looking at certain sectors and when it comes to social care it will also be a sector that has been considered by them so we are not ruling anything out and we're looking at it and we have to look at this from an evidence—based perspective and of course we want people that are going to contribute to our economy and to the skills
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shortages that we have in our labour market that is the right approach and these other principles that we will be applying going forward with the system. the reality in a hospital of courses there are doctors and nurses but an awful lot of other people who are absolutely essential to the smooth running and the effective running of a hospital, would be a cook, clean up. why are those groups of people not going to be included in the same category? i've already made it quite clear that this is a specific visa for the nhs, so this a new fast track route. so, sorry, i'm going to try to interrupt you if i may and i know sometimes it is difficult because you are down the line but specific to the nhs. if a hospital has a whole number of vacancies which are not medical staff, which is 12 cleaners, a porter, do thosejobs fall within the category you are talking about because these are jobs that are within the nhs? so i've already been very clear that this
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nhs visa route is for skilled doctors and nurses and healthcare professionals and when it comes to the other sectors that you are speaking about in terms of employment and vacancies, within the nhs it is quite clear that within our own labour market we can fill many of those posting positions but... will be cannot, can we, because there is 100,000 jobs outstanding? well we are speaking right now about skilled positions, doctors and nurses and healthcare professionals, and let's be clear, we do need to do more to bring in and train at the same time more people to work in the nhs and we're already seeing it and doing it and we have new medical schools training people in the kingdom work in the nhs but at the same time, we have commissioned the mac, the migration advisory committee, to look at this in terms of the skills base that we need for our labour market so this is just need for our labour market so this isjust one part need for our labour market so this is just one part of the... need for our labour market so this isjust one part of the. .. ok, you have already said that. if i may.
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points—based system. have already said that. if i may. points—based systemlj have already said that. if i may. points-based system. i don't want to go over things you have already said so can! go over things you have already said so can i ask a straightforward question, which is post brexit, under your plans, under conservative plans, will there be more people from overseas working in the uk than there are now? welll from overseas working in the uk than there are now? well i think the fact of the matter is we have been very clear that we want to balanced and fair approach to immigration and that means we want a system where we have the best and the brightest with the skills that our country needs. so it could be more, that is what you are saying, the answer you are giving me suggest, sorry, it suggests there could be more, the a nswer to suggests there could be more, the answer to that question, given what is such a, this topic is such consequence during the brexit campaign itself, you seem to be saying to me this morning that there could be more people from overseas working in the uk under conservative plans? if you let me finish, under a
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points—based system we would have controlled immigration. and that is the fundamental difference with the immigration system and the approach that we have right now. i think it is fairto that we have right now. i think it is fair to emphasise that during the referendum campaign and the brexit referendum campaign and the brexit referendum campaign, the public voted for immigration control. they wa nt to voted for immigration control. they want to know that they have a government that will control immigration while at the same time have a balanced and fair approach around migration. people that come to our country will be contributing, unlike what we see with the labour party which is unlimited and uncontrolled immigration. we want a system that is fair, a system that is balanced but we also want a system at the british government is in control of. thank you very much for your time this morning, priti patel, speaking to us from a slightly noisy high street. thank you for bearing with us. i not quite nice, weatherwise. not the minibus across the country. we've been reporting on the floods, coming up to 120 flood warnings in place. mostly in yorkshire. matt is
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taking a look at the weather for the rest of the country as well. people are going to be very concerned about whether there is going to be more rain and seeing more river levels rising. some good news in the forecast. a much drier day for many. all the rain is falling across parts of northern england. the radar chart, notice the same areas, just moving around. it didn't go anywhere. to the south of it, wind coming from the west. and because they are opposing each other, that's why the rain band set there. the rain pushing that weather southward so things will gradually improve. the rain has stopped falling across those one—hit areas. not before dropping well over an entire november ‘s worth of rain. sheffield usually sees around 79 millimetres of rain. 84 during the last 24 hours. it feels like 110 millimetres
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in one or two spots. even though the rain has stopped easing, it has to go down through the river system. we have five severe mud warnings at risk and danger to property and life. the bbc weather website has the details of those mornings on line. bbc local radio will keep you up—to—date. the weather itself is starting to improve. a cold start out there. northern england and parts of northern ireland and into scotland. in between, the rain continuing to fizzle. lincolnshire, now starting to ease away. claudia here this afternoon with a few showers around. continuing on eastern coastal counties. a drive friday install, plenty of sunshine in western areas but after that chilly start, cool day. chapter 6-9d. chilly start, cool day. chapter 6—9d. showers in the south—east
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corner, rain arrives into northern ireland later in the night. before it arrives, could be a touch of trust. the blue colours on the charts, quite widely shows it will bea charts, quite widely shows it will be a cold night tonight. widespread frost across the country. temperatures as low as —5 or —60 start your saturday but it's been bright, long patches around, but stay with it. while the sunshine will be there, rain initially northern ireland spreads across parts of wales, western england, southern counties of england. could linger across parts of the midlands through the afternoon. it could be a covering of snow, with temperatures barely above freezing. the rain continues, fizzling out. it could linger in the south—east corner. an impact for those of you heading to wembley. take some waterproofs,
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there will be rain around. into remembrance sunday, plenty of sunshine around, want to showers may be to the south and east most of you will stay dry with sunshine into the afternoon. it stays pretty chilly out there. it certainly is going to be chilly, feeling it. hundreds of thousands of pounds are being lost each year to scammers targeting pension savers. nina's looking into this one today. what exactly are we talking about here? about pensions? that they need to be secure. but you have a story about scams. this is horrible. these are people who have saved for decades and have had up to £80,000 taken from them. people are approached, cold call, text it. with somebody saying they will review their pension pot and often they will encourage them to invest in a scheme is too risky for the money disappears completely. so this is happening more and more in the
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amount of money on average is £80,000. how big is the problem altogether? the government has tried to deal with the public by banning cold calling but it's not working. on average — someone nearing retirement age has a pension pot that stands atjust over £100,000. recently the government made changes that allowed people to access these funds after their 55th birthday and to have more of a say on where the cash is invested. since those changes — £28 billion has been withdrawn by people. so you can see why scammers have sought to take advantage of all that cash. according to action fraud — which investigates this — there were 180 pension scams reported to them last year. on average victims reported losing over £82,000 each. that adds up to about 20 years of pension savings. but all the authorities involved in this think that's actually a tiny proportion of the total, because people rarely report what's happened to them. what's the advice to avoid this?
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you've alluded to it already. people watch us and consumer programmes and they think they kind of could spot a scan and that's why they are so ashamed and they feel humiliated when this happens to them. devastated. we can't stress how important this advices. what is clear in this research is it can happen to anybody. i wouldn't forfeit this game. but the advice never think that you know at all because everybody can fall victim to it. we know the age group 40 5—65 are particularly vulnerable and are likely to be targeted. they are the ones the scammers will have in mind because they will be thinking about what to do in retirement and thinking about accessing the pension spot. they are probably the ones we re spot. they are probably the ones were more vulnerable to things like office of high returns on the money or some unusual investments. if things are too good to be true by
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the sounds, it usually is. if it seems too good to be true, it operably is. if you are cold approached, look was getting in touch with you. make sure it is somebody reputable. there is a really good website, called pension wise. it's a government website. if it sounds fishy, give them a bell. just talk to a mate. have you heard of anything like this? sometimes, that helps. a quarter of people make their minds up in 24 hours. you probably think to need a little bit think a little bit longer. maybe people who don't have people around them. interestingly, it's people who don't have people around them. interestingly, its people with degrees in further education, it can be any background. we are all vulnerable in a way.
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it's been a huge year for women's football. england's lionesses finished fourth at this summer's world cup, and their match against germany tomorrow is set to be played before a record—breaking crowd. but despite progress, there's still a long way to go for it to be treated equally to the men's game. 13—year—old olivia wants girls to be treated the same as boys when it comes to football. she's been telling newsround about her own experiences on the pitch. iam i am 0livia, i'm age 13 and i believe girls have the same opportunities as boys and football. playing football as a girl, it's kind of difficult because boys don't treat you equally. they think football is made for boys, like it's a boy sport. when i went to a holiday camp and i was younger. there were 15 boys and one girl which was me playing ball and when i was picked, the boys on the other tea m was picked, the boys on the other team were laughing, because they had a girl on theirteam team were laughing, because they had a girl on their team and for ten minutes, i wouldn't get the ball
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past me so i went to get the ball myself and when i tackled a boy, the boys on the team laughed and said, there was a girl tacking —— tackling you. at the end, when the ref blew the whistle is, boys pull down their sleeves because they didn't want to get girl germs. i was punched by a boy playing for all as he didn't like a boy playing for all as he didn't likea girl boy playing for all as he didn't like a girl being better than him and also when i was doing research, i found and also when i was doing research, ifound some and also when i was doing research, i found some girls were being kicked and spat out which wasn't really there. girls need to be playing equally on an equal playing field. olivia hancock, mascot today, she is 13. she was bullied by a boy when playing junior football. she wrote to the fa. a lot of the lionesses have been in contact with her. lovely to see her. so i got a tweet
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from uefa saying if i wanted to do a speech on girls football. i did a speech on girls football. i did a speech in front of hundreds of people about girls input alljust before the women's champions league final. i said something about stepping stones, seven years ago, there was no girls teams and girls like me. now can play for two teams ona like me. now can play for two teams on a saturday and sunday and i com plete on a saturday and sunday and i complete playing in the same stadiums as men. my messages, or you girls who want to play ball, believe in yourself. we've already had new zealand, australia, norway. the spectacle of
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an entirely full stadium. a sign of how things have changed. just want to keep you up—to—date with something that's been developing overnight. the total of flood warnings that are in place, approaching about 120. we have been in rather him this morning where we've been seeing the river there. thanks rotherham. blowing very strongly. —— rotherham. there is advice to many people around the country. don't travel unless absolutely necessary and by no means, try to drive to any floodwater. three severe warnings in place. 0ver100 but warnings, a lot of people affected by this. we're trying to keep an eye on things. the
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fire service talking about people being rescued from the rising waters. more on that coming up in the next hour. rotherham council advising people to stay at home u nless advising people to stay at home unless they are asked to leave by emergency services. 0n the roads are closed in doncaster as well. keep a cross that will all of what's happening, news, travel, and weather wherever you are. local radio and of course, the bbc news website. it's all coming upa course, the bbc news website. it's all coming up a bit later on. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. a murder investigation has been launched after a teenager was stabbed to death in council offices in hillingdon. another teenager has been arrested on suspicion of murder.
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greg mckenzie has sent us this update. called here after reports of an incident. they discovered an 18—year—old suffering serious stab wounds. he was rushed to hospital but he was pronounced dead a short time later. another boy, a 17—year—old was stabbed in the ear. he is recovering in hospital. a 17—year—old has been arrested on suspicion of murder. there's a call for more help for people without a fixed address, such as canal boat owners or sofa surfers to register to vote. statistics from the electoral commission show around 2 per cent of such people are curently on the electoral roll. an online campaign, called 0peration votey mcvoteface, wants to raise awareness. a new immersive exhibition is opening at the national gallery celebrating the artist leonardo da vinci.(00v) the gallery's teamed up with 59 productions — the video design company that worked on the opening ceremony of the london 2012 olympic games.
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the creators hope visitors will get an insight into the mind of leonardo da vinci through the exhibition. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there are minor delays on the central line, otherwise it's a good service. there's disruption for east midlands and lner trains up to the north east from kings cross as well as delays to virgin trains to the north west from euston. that's following heavy flooding in the north of england. northbound traffic is slow on the blackwall tunnel southern approach from the woolwich road flyover. the m25 is slow clockwise from junction 29 towards the dartford river crossing after an earlier breakdown. finally the a1 is also slow southbound towards junction 6 for welwyn garden city — after an earlier incident. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. a rather chilly feeling day on the way for us today. some of our temperatures slipped below freezing last night so there's a touch of frost out there and also some patches of mist and fog too and temperatures are generally going to struggle all day. not completely dry, there will be showers as we head through the afternoon but it is a dry start to the day
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and there's some early sunshine out there. it'll last longest towards south—eastern areas of the capital. because it's quickly going to cloud over, eventually we will see showers come down that northerly breeze as our weather front pivots back towards us. so some wet weather through the afternoon. a bit of wind chill, top temperatures only 8 or 9 degrees celsius. all the while feeling rather cold and we are in for a cold night tonight. the showers will pull away eastwards as we head through the evening, clear skies, temperatures again widely below freezing as we head into tomorrow morning and there'll also be some patches of mist and fog once more, particularly out towards western home counties as we head towards tomorrow morning. it's a dry start to the day, early sunshine but will cloud over and we will see outbreaks of rain that will last through the afternoon and into the evening. a much nicer day on sunday. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour. bye for now.
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good morning, and welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. 0ur headlines today: there are five severe weather warnings are in place across northern england after torrential rain caused flooding, mudslides and serious disruption to roads and rail services. in sheffield, a major incident has been declared. dozens of people spent the night stranded in a shopping centre. residents in rotherham have been urged not to leave their homes. we saw well over one month's rainfall in 24 hours, the good news is the rain is starting to ease but
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river levels may continue to rise for a while yet. i will have the full forecast right here. in the general election, labour promises a full year of maternity pay, while the conservatives unveil a nhs visa to attract top medical talent to the uk. royal mail tries to stop a christmas strike. the company takes legal action against the union which has planned a walk—out next month. royal mail say the ballot may have been illegal and argues that election postal votes could be affected. it proved a great night for the british clubs in the europa league. celtic qualify with a last—minute winner against lazio, as manchester united also reach the knockout stage. # let it go, let it go... # and if the cold never bothered you, you'll be as excited as these frozen fanatics about the hollywood premiere of the hotly—awaited sequel to one of the biggest animations of all time. it's friday the 8th november, our top story.
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more than 100 flood warnings are in place across the north of england, following hours of torrential rain. five of the warnings are severe, which means a potential danger to life, after the river don burst its banks near doncaster. earlier, a major incident was declared in sheffield, and homes in the town of worksop have been evacuated. in rotherham, residents have been told to only leave their homes if it's absolutely essential. 0ur reporter luxmy gopal is there. rotherham clearly at the centre of the problems there, and people can get a sense of the water flowing through there. that is right, charlie, you can probably see blue sky behind me, which is very deceptive, because you just need to see the river levels there in the river don and how fast flowing it is to getan
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river don and how fast flowing it is to get an idea of how much rainfall affected this area in the past 24 hours, and the area behind the river as well, the car park and the train station is also completely flooded, and as you said, more than 100 flood warnings are in place now, and seriously affected people were in the shopping centre, stranded there overnight, and there were people who had to be rescued by boat from a nearby shopping complex as well. but in the past hour, the situation has worsened in doncaster. the river don there causing some serious flooding with five severe flood warnings in place issued by the environment agency for an area just in north doncaster there. and that is not the only plays as well, we have seen both sheffield and rotherham affected by it. and what we have seen as well as the fact that with the fork being as it is, the river levels haven't quite peaked yet. we are expecting that they may peak within the next half—hour, but that remains to be seen. what we do now is that current river levels of the
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river don are doncaster are very close to the way they were back in 2007 when the flooding was severe, really serious, so it is looking like it might reach and exceed that, and authorities here are preparing for that to be exceeded with south yorkshire fire and rescue service having brought in extra resources, deploying extra boats and high—volume pumps to help pump out the water. it has obviously affected train travel, with northern rail telling passengers not to travel if they can avoid it. so it is really affecting not just travel they can avoid it. so it is really affecting notjust travel but they can avoid it. so it is really affecting not just travel but also the situation in the shopping centres and around here as well, and the message is to be cautious, because the river levels haven't peaked, and we have got the environment agency with there was to warnings in doncaster, where the rescue operation will be concentrated, that is where authorities will be focusing their efforts. luxmy, a situation changing by the hour, as the amount of water
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is changing by the hour — looking at rotherham council have said, advising some people to stay at home, unless they are asked to leave by emergency services, clearly a really difficult situation they are facing. absolutely, i mean, we have had people who have spent the night in that shopping centre, people who have had to be sheltered in the town hall because they had to be rescued from the shopping complex here, so it isa from the shopping complex here, so it is a bit worrying, people have been told to stay in their homes, and because of the people here, in these areas, a lot of people have strong memories of how bad things we re strong memories of how bad things were back in 2007, there was severe flooding then, and they worry is that things are going to reach that sort of level, because as you heard in the forecast, while the rain may have eased, that doesn't mean that the river level is going to start subsiding. the river levels are
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continuing to rise, because they haven't reached their peak yet, so it is going to be a worrying time for people who feel like they have got to be trapped in their homes, they are not certain whether they can leave or travel yet, and a really worrying time for people in that area of doncaster where five severe weather warnings have been issued by the environment agency, including at a caravan site. that is really where the efforts are going to be focusing on how to keep people safe in those areas there. luxmy, thank you very much. of course, we will keep you up to date with all the developments in connection with those flood warnings. six minutes past eight is the time. let's go to the general election. labour is promising to extend statutory maternity pay to a full year and improve flexible working if it wins the general election. the conservatives have outlined plans for a new nhs visa, making it easier for doctors and nurses from around the world to work in the uk. 0ur political correspondent jessica parker is in westminster.
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good morning dew, gorgeous day behind you, it looks like! and a busy one, where shall we start with labour? yeah, the labour party offering, as they see it, a revolution for women in the workplace, outlining a number of measures today, some of them not entirely new, it has to be said, so the idea of extending eternity pay from nine months to 12 months was mentioned in the 2017 manifesto, but they are also talking about more support for women going through the menopause in larger workplaces, making more companies report their gender pay gap as well. interestingly, i think business leaders pointing to some of the measures being outlined, for example in flexible working, raising concerns about the possible cost to businesses, bureaucracy as well. labour saying they want to work with businesses but saying that to achieve equality you need to get the state involved. jessica, we have spoken to the conservatives earlier, to priti patel. yeah, the
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conservatives are announcing today their plans for an nhs freezer. i think they are trying to address concerns that there is a staffing issue in hospitals and gp practices, so they want to make it easier under a future visa system to bring over doctors and nurses, make it easier and cheaper. as you say, you have been speaking to priti patel this morning. through an australian points—based system, we want skilled people coming to the united kingdom, thatis people coming to the united kingdom, that is the right approach that is fairand that is the right approach that is fair and balanced, that is the right approach that is fairand balanced, and that is the right approach that is fair and balanced, and at the same time it allows the government to be in control of its immigration policy and terms of the skills that people bring to our country. we are going to look at this from an evidence—based perspective, and of course we want people who are going to contribute to our economy and the skills shortages that we have in the labour market. that is the right approach, and that is the principles we will be applying. and of course, jessica, we spoke to ian blackford
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of the snp launching its campaign. yes, the general election launch for the snp in edinburgh later this morning, they are talking about bringing in an nhs protection bill, so the nhs coming up again and again asa so the nhs coming up again and again as a general election issue. they say that would be designed to stop the nhs being used, as they would see it, in future trade talks as a bargaining chip. the conservative party have said again and again that the nhs want to be up for sale but expect to hear more about this issue as the campaign goes on. and expect you to keep breaking it down as well! jessica, thanks very much. see you soon. royal mail is launching legal action against the union behind a strike which could disrupt deliveries over christmas. the company will seek a high court injunction against the communication workers union later, saying the ballot may have been invalid. royal mail says it's acting because it's worried about problems over the festive period but also because of potential over the festive period but also because of potential issues with postal votes during the general election. six years after disney's frozen
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first hit cinemas, the stars of the blockbuster animation are back on the red carpet for its sequel. thousands of fans gathered in los angeles for the premiere of the highly—anticipated frozen 2, starring kristen bell and idina menzel. the movie, featuring elsa, anna and 0laf the snowman is released here later in the month. let's go back to our main story, and the problems with flooding in the north of england. the town of worksop in nottinghamshire has been particularly badly hit by flooding overnight, with residents moved to a local leisure centre. councillor simon greaves is there. 90 very much for your time, just bring us up to date with what has been happening overnight and during the early hours. —— thank you very much. during the course of the afternoon, myself and officers and
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collea g u es afternoon, myself and officers and colleagues have been out in the town centre, recognising the amount of rainfall and, quite frankly, very concerned about a repetition of 2007. we made repeated demands to agencies to step up to the mark, and ourselves demanded that emergency measures were invoked. the emergency services responded to that excellently, and the authority has opened its leisure centre in worksop as, basically, an evacuation point for people to stay safe, warm and dry. i was down there during the course of the night, i could see the amount of rainfall, i could see the amount of rainfall, i could see the amount of rainfall, i could see the amount of devastation. we have been very mindful about the amount of water in the town centre, and it is because of that that there were repeated demands for the canal and river trust to open a further sluice gate down in this area which has
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lots of historical connotations with water and water management in the town centre. so that is now open, that was at about 11pm last night, and following on from there, a major incident has been declared for the town. flooding is more thanjust in the town centre, though, there is an estate further to the north of where iam now estate further to the north of where i am now that has been heavily flooded also, and i know that the emergency services have been on site during the night in order to try and manage the water levels. simon, mr g reaves, manage the water levels. simon, mr greaves, can i just manage the water levels. simon, mr greaves, can ijust interrupt for a second? you greaves, can ijust interrupt for a second ? you have greaves, can ijust interrupt for a second? you have been speaking to people in the leisure centre, not able to get back to their homes, are the individual stories there, what has been happening?” the individual stories there, what has been happening? i have not been able to speak to them individually. what we have done is that people have been taken, some bad bout, literally, in order to get them to
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the leisure centre. —— some by boat. i know that some families were relu cta nt to i know that some families were reluctant to move, i can understand that, but i am pleased that some have, and i know that there were door to door efforts being made by police, by the authority, by the fire and rescue service, to ask people to leave, and i know now that there is going to buy stock take on there is going to buy stock take on the situation this morning, and i know that this is only a temporary arrangement, literally for people to get out of their flooded homes, and i know that efforts are going to be made to get people to friends, family, other accommodation, for the next stages of this. because there is, i'm afraid the river level did go higher than it did in 2007. the question i have got myself this morning is whether we have a situation where the level of devastation is at the same level, andi devastation is at the same level, and i am really hoping it's not. ok, simon greaves from worksop council
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bringing us up to date with some of the problems they are facing. of the problems they are facing. of ice and of course matt will bring us up to date with the weather in a short while. i'm sure you will remember harry billinge, the 94—year—old war veteran who captured the hearts of millions when he appeared on breakfast earlier this year. he spoke about being among the first wave of troops at the d—day landings, aged just 18. harry said he could never forget his comrades who lost their lives, telling us they were heroes. his emotional comments won him admirers all over the world. since then, he's raised thousands of pounds for a memorial in france. tim muffett has been to see him ahead of remembrance sunday. thank you, darling! even for such a remarkable man, it's been a remarkable year. there's about 35 quid there, harry. i'm overwhelmed with kindness.
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he is the best. you're the best. he's the hero, nobody else. the support you've had, has it surprised you, following your appearance on breakfast? yes, it has. lam no hero, iwas lucky, i'm here. all the heroes are dead, and i will never forget them as long as i live. words can't say how much i appreciate, everyone is so kind. i have got his photograph, i am going to have it signed. all the time, people coming up to you, it's great. more than 22,000 british troops died in normandy, so harry aimed to create a memorial. at this market, the donations kept coming. it's 30,000 now, i put another 2,000 in last monday. thank god i have been able to do
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what i want to do here, collecting money for that memorial, because by rights i shouldn't have been here, i should have been killed on the beach. i was saved, i should have been killed on the beach. iwas saved, i believe by should have been killed on the beach. i was saved, i believe by the grace of god, for this purpose, and that's why i've got to do it, i must do this! remembrance sunday is coming up, will this yearfeel extra special given the amount of money you have raised and the support you have had? i get very upset, the poppy have had? i get very upset, the poppyis have had? i get very upset, the poppy is a flow of remembrance, and it means a lot to me. it is very important we don't forget it and we don't forget the sacrifices these men made for us. out like poetry, andl men made for us. out like poetry, and i always think about words
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wordsworth. bless upon my inward i am sanctify my solitude. all these fellows, you see all of them, tommy lemmon, paul lazenby. so many men. that died in the cause of freedom. tim muffett, bbc news, cornwall. absolutely delight to say that harry is with us this morning. hello. how are you? is with us this morning. hello. how are you ? otherwise is with us this morning. hello. how are you? otherwise i am very well, so nice to see you again. everybody loves you since we met in normandy. everybody loves you. that is a very good thing for a memorial. you have campaigned tirelessly, and you continue to do so, to make sure that it is not forgotten, and that the menu fought along who died alongside you are not forgotten. well, what a waste of life, really. i was deeply
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moved when they sent me the brochure for this marvellous memorial on gold —— gold beach, where i landed, and i told my wife, i must get some money, so i'm doing it, doing it in the market in st austell, and it is a privilege for me to do it. and you know, when i am doing this collection, i get a wonderful calm comes over me, because i collection, i get a wonderful calm comes over me, because i am collection, i get a wonderful calm comes over me, because i am doing something for the boys that never came back. what a terrible waste of life! young men, 18, oh, all taught bya life! young men, 18, oh, all taught by a lovely country how to kill people. and when you have done that, you have got to live with it. now, i couldn't do that. i couldn't stay in london, i had to get out of london, too much noise, and i had to go down
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the west country, where i have been treated lovely, everybody loves me in st austell, and they have been very generous to me. there is no words to describe that. i would like to thank today, because i might not get another opportunity, i want to thank 24 commando in chippenham, royal engineers, soldiers, not royal marines, soldier commandos, and i'd like to thank my mate dan newbold, who took me all around in his bentley, lovely heated seats, he treated me like a lord! and the young bloke lee, who took me all the way down in his car from normandy to st austell. been down to see me several times since and took me out
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for a weekend with these lovely men. another fella i want to thank, because i thank him every day, he is called andrew duff, and he comes in his car, he picks me up every time i go his car, he picks me up every time i go to the market, he takes me there. lunchtime, he brings me a mail, and he takes me home at 3:30pm, and he spends an hour with me in my house having a cup of tea. wonderful fella. and never made a penny out of it. always free, freely and happily received. when i was a child, about 40 years old, i used to go to a sunday school, and the lady that used to teach there was called miss thomson, that is over 90 years ago! and i used to sing a little chorus,
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and it was that when we landed on the beach, from sinking sand, he lifted me, take the hand, he lifted me, from the phase of night two loads of light, he lifted me. now, i've never forgotten that, and it is a very apt thing for me to remember. ifi a very apt thing for me to remember. if i read something, it is there, i never forget, i am unable to forget, i can't forget. can i ask you a question, harry? so many people will see your spirit and, you know, everything that drives you now. when you first came in here just a moment ago, and! you first came in here just a moment ago, and i am thinking back to when you met naga on the beach, the first and you said to herjust now, i owe you an apology. i do. why did you say that? well, she is a lovely person, she is very kind, a very
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good golfer! she is lovely. and i am very sensitive, and i could see she got a bit upset when i told her. nobody can ever describe d—day, i know there is a lot... that is what is true, nobody was there, pressing up is true, nobody was there, pressing up the sand with mines, the sas blokes were there, get off the beach, get off the beach! no—one was on the beach that could help, and the fellas that was wounded, they got up and out of it. sol the fellas that was wounded, they got up and out of it. so i am not a brave man, i am lucky! got up and out of it. so i am not a brave man, lam lucky! i got up and out of it. so i am not a brave man, i am lucky! i own my life to the boys who i loved, all normandy veterans love one another, beyond the love of women. you cannot describe it. i love them all. and
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i'll never forget them. i am going to see an old boy next week, he is called des, he is about the only bloke still living, and he was our bloke still living, and he was our bloke are used to get all the gear from 21 group, the normandy veterans, of which i was proud to be chairman. harry... you have been, after we had that interview on the beach, so many people watched that interview, it went viral on social media, and you have had lots of attention to help you with raising the money. you have wanted to do that for this memorial, to contribute to this memorial, and you began raising with a target of 22,442. that is £1 for every blog that died on d—day. 22,442. that is £1 for every blog that died on d-day. and you reached the target, brilliant, you are well on your way, but what you have been contributing to is a bigger
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memorial, isn't it, so all the names of those who died could be... and the extra money is for education for youngsters. i want to show you something, because it is difficult, isn't it, when you are raising for money and you can't see it. if you look on this big screen over here, we can show you what has been done so far. in northern ireland, i believe? in normandy, this is it, this is what you have been raising money towards, and you have never seen this before. no, never. how does it make you feel? the work you have been doing, it is concrete, it is tangible, you can touch it. marvellous. how does it feel, harry?
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0k? ok? yeah. 0k? yeah. it ok? yeah. it means so much. i am all right. take a moment, harry. people will be watching this, watch a new, full of respect for what you have done. yeah, well... i did it, i had a job to done. yeah, well... i did it, i had ajob to do, done. yeah, well... i did it, i had a job to do, all these fellas, they did a good job. all these men, these wonderful men. young boys of 16, like jack, buried in jerusalem cemetery, 16! durham light infantry. 48 blokes buried there injerusalem, and they wanted to take them up and put them with 5000 other blogs, but
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they left them in the field. —— blokes. believe it or not, every day somebody says you want to go to jerusalem, harry? oh, yes, and it is the people to take me there, and i lay a cross on all those graves, not every day, but the first time i put a reef on the crosses there. harry, one of the things you mentioned when we spoke about this memorial is education, how important it is that it is not forgotten. if you were to give a message to young people today, when it comes to making sure they know history, but also the lessons learnt, what would you say? well, there is a lot of youngsters come up to me and give me money for the memorial. but they don't... beyond all comprehension about the d—day, i hope that they will learn to love one another. there is a lot
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of hate in the world, a lot of greed, and a lot of nonsense. don't worry about that! when king george vi, my sovereign that i served under, george vi, he was a wonderful man, george vi was a kind man, an understanding man, and he used to have a day of prayer. it is a pity, really, we don't have a month of prayer, because we have got so much to thank god for! i don't think we shall ever come round, turned back, old man, falls where live foolish ways, we have been stupid, we are so clever we could blow one another up, but you don't love one another, that is the strongest thing on earth, love is stronger than death, and
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it's coming back. our lord jesus said he would be back, and he will, and it says it in revocation, i saw and it says it in revocation, i saw a new heaven and a new oath, and i believe it. —— revelation. the church of england has mucked about with all the services... the nicene creed, that statement of faith, 325 ad, the council of nicaea, it is therefore called the nicene creed, it starts off with i believe... harry. they have altered the pattern now with we believe! we have run out of time! i might get arrested, they say to me, you want to be careful! harry, it has been a pleasure and an honour to have you with us once again. such a pleasure. and you, darling, my mate david, he is in
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love with you, he would take you out in his bentley! we will have a chat about that later! thank you so much, harry, thank you for coming in.” hope i didn't upset you this time. you didn't, you have been perfect. stay there, we will take a little break and have you off set, time for what is happening where you are.
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this is worklife from bbc news, with victoria fritz and maryam moshiri. feeling the force. disney is turbocharged by a record run at the box office. live from london, that's our top story on friday it's the 8th of november. it's a blockbuster three months for disney after its mega—takeover of fox. we'll ask where the launch of its streaming service could take the entertainment giant next? from star wars to trade wars, is there light at the end of the tunnel?

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