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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 8, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm martine croxall. today at 2pm. a woman dies in severe flooding in the north of england — police say she was reportedly swept away by the water. schools are closed and people are warned not to leave their homes unless it's absolutely necessary. we are live in south yorkshire where the river don is expected to remain at dangerous levels for many hours to come. the snp seeks an alliance with other parties to lock the conservatives out of government — and promises to stop the nhs being privatised. we will fight tooth and nail any attempt to expose the national health service to a post—brexit trade deal with donald trump. the bbc announces plans for two prime time election debates —
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a head—to—head between borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn and one with all the main british parties. jail for an 18—year—old man who stabbed to death his teenage former girlfriend, ellie gould. coming up on afternoon live — all the sport with katie. england celebrating a pretty nice when in the t20? they certainly are and one man's name in lights is davitt malan as he makes history after hitting the fastest t20 century by an eggless batsman as a level the series against england, it is 2—2 with the decider in auckland on sunday. thanks katie and tomasz has all the weather — very difficult conditions for some. is it going to ease? the weather has dried out in terms of the fact it is not raining so thatis of the fact it is not raining so that is good news on the river levels will stay at pretty high for some time but the good news is as far as the weather goes, the worst is over. thank you.
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also coming up... the emotions of a 0—day veteran as he sees a memorial being built for his fallen friends. they had a job to do. all these fellas did a good job. all these men, these wonderful men. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. a woman has died after apparently being swept away by floodwater, as parts of the midlands and northern england were battered by a month's worth of rain in one day. six severe flood warnings are in place along the river don in doncaster — meaning there's a danger to life. some residents have been rescued from their homes. in sheffield, dozens of people spent the night stranded in a shopping centre because of flooded roads, while 35 homes in mansfield were evacuated after a mudslide.
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robert hall is in doncaster. just a list of some dangers of people have been facing? that is right and that danger persists, we are on st mary's bridge a quarter of are on st mary's bridge a quarter of a mile from the centre of doncaster and fire crews here are still on standby, they are being called to emergency calls around the area and thatis emergency calls around the area and that is because that is the river don, raging eastwards and it has been rising steadily through the morning and the environment agency, we will hear from them soon, reckon it has stabilised but it will remain at very dangerous levels and that means that it may yet over top flood defences which have in part been holding. looking across a bridge, using the shot from the other camera to help, you can see there is an industrial area beyond me completely flooded and a couple of feet of
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water down there, more misery for local businesses which, that misery to homeowners, is repeated across this part of south yorkshire. danny savage is down the road in bentley, one of the areas hardest hit. this is his report... in doncaster this morning, a frantic rush to get to safety and deal with the rising floodwater. anything and everything was deployed to help. yes, they were aware of the rain, but still caught by surprise. it came really quickly, to be honest. it has happened down here a couple of times, we had no warning from the council or anything, they should have been out last night giving out sandbags, we have had nothing. in nearby bentley, the main a19 was underwater and closed. in the houses here, they are looking out of the window anxiously because levels are rising. i took everything upstairs, a friend came over and help me take the furniture upstairs, we have lifted everything up, everything out of the kitchen
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cupboards, the kitchen is upside down, tried to raise everything as much as we can. for linda, this is not the first time she has been flooded, the timing could not be worse. i and here with the sale sign, sold, subject to survey. they are due to do the survey on monday. are you worried now? yes, i doubt anybody will want to go ahead and buy now. the water is not yet pouring into graham's house next door, but he has had to take some pretty dramatic measures. unfortunately the chickens can't swim, i have had to bring them in. how bad is the situation? terrible, it happened in 2007, it has happened again, ridiculous. could the authorities have done more? i think they could have done a lot more to stop it happening.
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from above, the extent of the flooding and south yorkshire can be seen for miles, stretching from sheffield to rotherham and onto doncaster, where the river don has its highest recorded level. almost 20 schools are closed, with widespread flood warnings. scores of people had to be rescued by boat in rotherham as emergency services responded to hundreds of calls. this is rotherham station last night, where the tracks should be has been replaced by a canal. in mansfield in nottinghamshire a cliff gave way, the landslide leading to 35 homes being evacuated, and it is not over get. there is a concern more places could flood as the water drains from the region. lots of people are following events on bbc news and radio and i promised you an update. adrian gill from the environment agency has hightailed it
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from the control centre. let us get to it, where are we with water levels ? to it, where are we with water levels? we are still in doncaster and we had a lot of rainfall across the catchment in the last 24 hours with high levels in sheffield moving down on the river levels are picking in doncaster but we expect them to stay very high for several hours. that is causing disruption and there is some overtopping as well which is causing risk to properties. this is not 2007 and defences, to be fair, have failed in a lot of areas. but we are seeing overtopping, it is escaping? it is. the rainfall in the last 24 hours has been similar to 2007, river levels had got close to then and it is a different event but we are seeing impacts, particularly in doncaster, were civil defences are overtopping and we see disruption to the road network and flooding to businesses and properties and that is something we need to keep an eye on in the coming hours. like 2007, this is a big area
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for you and the emergency services to monitor, it is a certain amount of rapid reaction to events as they arise? we obviously work closely with the met office to forecast what might happen in terms of flood work in close partnership with our emergency partners but we also react to feedback on the ground. what might be happening? we clearly respond as required. the sirens in the background, as they have been all day. we talk about red warnings. those are still in place so let us deal with the advice. people watching or they know people living in affected areas, what is that advice? at the moment in doncaster we have six of your flood warnings out, there is significant risk to life. that is because earlier this morning we were not sure how much the defences would overtop buy and what risk that poses to a number of communities. we have seen some communities. we have seen some communities are evacuated in doncaster and that was coordinated by the local authority. if people wa nt to
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by the local authority. if people want to find out more, they can contact the local authority and to find out whether they are at flood risk and what to do, they can visit the website, lots of information, and people have a concern about risk to safety, that is for the emergency services. adrian, thank you. this rain is not what anybody wanted, it will not help the situation. in a nutshell, it is stable but still dangerous and i think the message, if you live in this area or are worried or feel you are at risk, is stay in touch with local media and with the environment agency. back to you. thank you very much. robert holl in doncaster. phil mackie is in matlock in derbyshire close to where the body of a woman has been recovered from the floodwater. what more do we know about this woman death? she was swept away in the early hours of this morning, the river derwent is really swollen and fast flowing and i am not quite sure of the circumstances as to how this
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happened and her body was recovered a couple of miles north of your u pstrea m a couple of miles north of your upstream on the river derwent at about 10:40am upstream on the river derwent at about10:40am and upstream on the river derwent at about 10:40am and the announcement came through over one hour ago by throughout the morning, as robert described, sirens everywhere, ambulances and fire crews all over matlock and the surrounding areas. you can see down the road, a couple of minutes ago you can possibly see on the right of the screen, businesses have flooded and there is a marks and spencers and people say they heard a loud bang there, possibly an electric circuit getting flooded and exploding and the fire crews have suddenly come up and they have driven in. not much else going on andi have driven in. not much else going on and i understand marks and spencers was open until recently and it is now shut, like many businesses along her. we have been watching shopkeepers coming and going and a lot of them trying to prevent damage and matlock town council and the local authorities as well as the
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emergency services have been trying to help them. you can see sandbags moved in and we have seen the peak on the river derwent in matlock which was a couple of hours ago. things are not going down quickly. they will but not yet. as long as we can see this time of flood water at the moment, there is still that threat to properties and things are advised to stay out of the area. the temptation to walk through it sometimes is immense for people but you don't know what you are wading through? i know. i have seen people coming and going along the street, not as deep as it may look and the reason that we have seen people coming and going is mostly the business owners are trying to clear things out to prevent it being permanently damaged. they are almost doing this with the approval of the authorities because they know what they're doing and they know the area well and lots of other people coming along to take pictures and that is probably not helping the traffic situation. and of course, what will
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happen next is all of this water is flowing downstream rapidly towards places like derby, where there are flood warnings in place as well. you are not expecting any particularly bad rain today, it is spitting at the moment but there is a band of heavy rain to the north of us impacting on places on the other side, places that flow into the river don, and we hope they will not necessarily come to this side of the pics and flew into the river derwent, otherwise we might see another peak later on. thank you very much. the snp leader nicola sturgeon has put brexit at the centre of the party's election campaign. she said the party would try to form an alliance with other parties to lock the conservatives out of government after the election. the snp is also promising a bill that would protect the nhs from privatisation and future trade deals, saying the health service is ‘not for sale at any price'. 0ur scotland correspondent james shaw reports. nicola sturgeon launched her party's campaign with a warning.
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this was, she said, the most important election for generations to come. why? because it will determine the future of the united kingdom in or out of the european union and the future of scotland, in or out of the uk. and she looked ahead to a post—election landscape where it was possible that no party might have a majority. brexit, brexit. a vote for the snp, in contrast, is a vote to escape brexit. a vote for the snp is a vote to take scotland's future out of the hands of borisjohnson and a broken westminster system. there was a long list of demands to secure the snp‘s support for a minority labour government. control of immigration and drug and employment law, and an end to universal credit. but perhaps the most eye—catching demand was legislation to make sure that the nhs was not at risk
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of further privatisation as part of a future trade deal with the united states. we will fight tooth and nail any attempt to expose the national health service to a post—brexit trade deal with donald trump. that is why, after this election, snp mps will bring forward a new law, an nhs protection bill, to explicitly protect the nhs in all four countries of the uk from being a bargaining chip. so, the snp are making it clear that the nhs will be a top priority for them in this election campaign. but stopping brexit is also key to their campaigning efforts and, underlying it all, the drive towards a second independence referendum. the snp are not the only party to appreciate how much the nhs matters to voters. their idea for legislation to protect it is new,
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but will the other parties take it seriously, and will nicola sturgeon's party win enough votes to influence notjust the future of scotland but the future of the whole of the united kingdom? james shaw, bbc news, edinburgh. nicola sturgeon has been calling it the election of a lifetime. 0ur assistant political editor norman smith explains what she means by that. here's a funny thing. you wouldn't think that borisjohnson and nicola sturgeon have much in common but turns out they do have one thing in common and that is that this election is just about one thing and that is brexit. nicola sturgeon saying her clear aim at this election is to stop brexit dead in its tracks by any means possible. she doesn't really care, she doesn't mind if it's through securing another referendum or whether supporting moves to revoke article 50 orjoining up with anti—brexit parties at westminster or through securing scottish independence and at least
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keeping scotland in the eu. she is not fast but she knows her best route to achieving that is through a hung parliament. in other words, if this election is again inconclusive, because she knows in that circumstance it hugely increases the leverage of the snp. today, she gave her clearest indication so far that she would be prepared to helpjeremy corbyn into downing street as part of that attempt to stop brexit. but at a price. and that price would be the removal of nuclear weapons from scotland and above all, the granting of another independence referendum next year. and here's the second funny thing about today. that's probably not a message that borisjohnson is going to be too bothered about because what has been his core campaign message at this election, it has been vote labour and you'll get two more referendums, one on brexit and, yes, one on another scottish independence referendum.
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the bbc has announced two more debates ahead of this. helena wilkinson joins debates ahead of this. helena wilkinsonjoins us. intensive negotiations have been going on behind the scenes and these are the plans that the bbc has announced for these debates in the run—up ahead of december the 12th, which is voting day. the main one is the prime ministerial one, between boris johnson and jeremy corbyn. that will ta ke johnson and jeremy corbyn. that will take place in southampton and it will take place very close to december the 12th, six days before on the 6th of december. it will be a live event and both of them will face each other. borisjohnson has recently tweeted about that debate
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and he said i cannot wait to share with all of you our positive vision for britain. however, we had a statement from the lib dems and they we re statement from the lib dems and they were not happy about being excluded from that debate on the 6th of december and in a statement it is fairly lengthy, it says, the bbc are complicit in another establishment stitch up to shut down debate on the most important issue for generations. millions of people voted to remain in 2016 after three yea rs of voted to remain in 2016 after three years of chaos, the statement goes on to say, it is shocking that the liberal democrats, the strongest party of remain, are being denied the opportunity to challengejohnson and corbyn on brexit. the liberal democrats feel they should be included in that debate on the 6th of december. it is being broadcast live by the bbc and there will be another debate that will include seven different parties, there will bea
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seven different parties, there will be a platform and that will take place in cardiff. it is described as a multiparty debate were seven seniorfigures from major a multiparty debate were seven senior figures from major parties are going to be getting the opportunity to put their point across and also challenge each other. there will be a third event as well, a special question time, when the audience are going to be able to ask questions of those involved in that debate. what is important about these kind of debates in the run—up to the election, which have become an important fixture, is that the politicians are going to be under the lights, the cameras will be on and they will not only have to challenge each other in those debates, they will also have to face questions from the audience and that debate on the 6th of december, both jeremy corbyn and borisjohnson will be hoping they don't slip up, being so be hoping they don't slip up, being so close to polling day. briefly,
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what is the bbc‘s justification for having this debate between boris johnson and jeremy corbyn that the lib dems are so unhappy about? the bbc say these are main people, the two men who will potentially become the next prime minister and they are keen to point out that there will be other opportunities for the liberal democrats and also some of the other smaller parties to take part in other debates. they say there will be other debates separate —— separately in scotland and northern ireland but in particular, that debate were seven of the main political parties, the liberal democrats included, will be able to ta ke democrats included, will be able to take part. but the liberal democrats are not happy that they are not going to be allowed to take part in that main debate on the 6th of december. helena wilkinson, thank you. and as the main political parties hit the campaign trail — we'll be making sense
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of their policies and promises with our reality check correspondent, chris morris — that's coming up at half past two. you're watching afternoon live. these are our headlines... a woman dies in severe flooding in the north of england — police say she was reportedly swept away by the water. the snp seeks an alliance with other parties to lock the conservatives out of government and promises to stop the nhs being privatised. the bbc announces plans for two prime—time election debates — a head—to—head between borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn — and one with all the main british parties. in sport, a thrilling century from dafydd milan gives england the win against new zealand in the fourth t20 match. it is 2—2 with the decider on sunday. i worry for man city as the manager says goalkeeper anderson will miss the premier league match against leaders liverpool on sunday due to injury. while, manchester city's georgia stanway and gemma bonner have been called up to the england women's squad, ahead of their match against germany tomorrow.
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but toni duggan is ruled out with injury. i'll be back with more on those stores after half—past. an 18—year—old man has been jailed for 12.5 years for the murder of his girlfriend ellie gould. thomas griffiths pleaded guilty to stabbing 17—year—old ellie in her home after she had ended their relationship. in an exclusive interview, ellie's mother told the bbc about the horror of the day ellie was killed. fiona lamdin reports. # nice to meet you, where you been? # i can show you incredible things. ..# her life was full and all the opportunities in front of her. yeah, she was the perfect daughter, really. ellie gould was just 17, studying for her a—levels, when she was murdered by thomas griffiths. the night before, she'd called off their three month relationship to concentrate on her schoolwork. we trusted him. we welcomed him into our home. he celebrated her 17th
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birthday with us. three months later, he murdered her. it's chilling. 0n the morning he killed her, thomas' mum took him to school, but he caught the bus straight home. despite not having a licence, he took the family car and drove to ellie's house. he knew she was at home alone, studying. he stabbed her at least 13 times in the neck before going back to school, pretending nothing had happened. three hours later, ellie's dad found her on the kitchen floor. and i never forget that phone call of matt, hysterical, saying, "carole, you need to drive home, ellie's had an accident. drive carefully, but ellie's had an accident." and then as i pulled round into our drive, nothing could prepare me for police cars abandoned everywhere, and an ambulance at the end of the drive and... and then mattjust stopping
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at the end of our drive. and ijust ran up to him, and a policeman said, "who are you?" and i said, "i'm her mother, what's happened?" at the same time, thomas griffiths was messaging friends about self harming, but we now know the scratches on his neck had come from ellie as she fought for her life. and we sat in the back of the police car, absolutely stunned. and then they said, "did she have a boyfriend?" and i said, "oh, she does, but he doted on her. he wouldn't harm her." pat, what does justice mean for you? i think he's evil. i don't believe he should be allowed to take another breath, quite frankly. he's dangerous. i don't think he should ever be let out of prison. i don't think he should ever be granted parole. he is a danger to society, he's a danger particularly to women. thejudge described it as an exceptionally grave crime. thomas griffiths has never explained why he murdered ellie.
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no mother should ever... ..hold their dead daughter's hand. it was just heartbreaking. go. 0k. every time i see teenage girls, and ijust look and i think, "0h, ellie." you know? it's just so heartbreaking. you are reminded constantly. i can't spend any time in her bedroom. i try and go in... ..sometimes, and look at the photographs on the wall of her and her friends, but i can't stay in for many minutes. it's too painful. fiona lamdin, bbc news. police have released the names of all 39 people who were found dead in a lorry in essex last month.
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the victims including two 15—year—old boys. essex police say it's been of paramount importance to ensure that each individual‘s next of kin were informed, and to bring answers to worried families. consultation is now underway with the vietnamese authorities over the repatriation of those who have died. we've been talking already about the flooding that has affected parts of the country and tomasz schafernaker is here. it is important to set this into context? in the first place. what sort of conditions have you been seeing already this autumn? what sort of conditions have you been seeing already this autumn7m has been pretty wet across some parts of the country already throughout autumn and i want to point out that northern england has been among the wettest places in the uk. those deep blue colours around yorkshire, that is around 200% of normal rainfall. this is for 0ctober. and the area that was flooded and still remains flooded has had up to 1.5 times the amount
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of rainfall for october so the ground is very wet and any rain that falls in a short space of time, at the rate it did, we'lljust find it that much harder, soaking into the ground. there is an element of bad luck there when it comes to what has been happening. this system that has been happening. this system that has been causing all of his problems, it has just been sitting there? been causing all of his problems, it hasjust been sitting there? that is right. when i say bad luck it is a fa ct right. when i say bad luck it is a fact the weather front and this is the radar... it shows a rainfall, looking at northern england you can see the weather front is basically stuck across the north and the rain does not even have to be that heavy. if it is just stuck there for ages, for 24 hours, and it keeps raining, it obviously falls over the pennines and the latter funnels through the valleys into the rivers and it takes time for the rivers to respond as well. eventually, the weatherfront moved away and i will play that once again. if you look at northern
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england, here it is, there isjust that conveyor belt of rain falling over and over the same time. and of parts of the country where there are big towns and cities? it is a very populated part of the uk and this is what happens when weather strikes a populated area. it makes the news. it is not the first time we have seen it is not the first time we have seen that amount of rainfall in a short space of time. within a day or so, they had around at least one months‘ worth of rainfall to sheffield, we recorded 84 millimetres, sheffield gets that in one month. we have had similar amounts of rainfall even last year, during the summer, christmas, i think christmas in 2015, a similar area got hit with thousands of people evacuated. these events do happen and it has just hit people evacuated. these events do happen and it hasjust hit in people evacuated. these events do happen and it has just hit in the wrong place and the weather front was stuck there for quite some time. what will happen with the river levels ? what will happen with the river levels? it takes time for the river
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levels? it takes time for the river levels to rise and sometimes a day or $0. levels to rise and sometimes a day or so. it is still raining but i wa nt to or so. it is still raining but i want to make the point that the rain thatis want to make the point that the rain that is falling right now because our heavy showers going through this tool will funnel into the rivers, that will be brief. if anybody is worried, though showers will be out of away but the river levels will stay high for quite some time because it was a lot of rainfall. the good news is the weather is improving. and finally, some sunshine. yes. and i think we are looking forward to some sunshine this weekend. you will do the weather forecast in a moment but firstly, i will talk to a woman who was stranded in the meadowhall shopping centre in sheffield until four o‘clock this morning. shopping centre in sheffield until four o'clock this morning. how did that happen? basically, what happened was i was meeting my sister in meadowhall, coming from london. and she said the bus was not running into rotherham so she could not get
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home so i said when i get to sheffield i will meet you at meadowhall so i met her and as soon asi meadowhall so i met her and as soon as i got there it turned out that no one was actually allowed to leave any more. this was that for pm yesterday. no one was allowed to leave due to the flooding in the traffic. and the gridlock. this is not the kind of birthday celebration resistor was hoping for? exactly, not at all! she had to celebrate in meadowhall, it earned 12 and i said happy birthday! luckily i had her gift with me so she got a present. you understand what you needed to stay but how well you looked after? we understood we could not leave but the problem was we did not really get any help until about one o‘clock in the morning. people were giving us in the morning. people were giving us advice but it was not until two o‘clock that there were giving out water and blankets and taking down names. from four until one o‘clock
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in the morning we did not get any help and no water or food or blankets. we had to buy the food our self at mcdonald‘s because that was luckily still open. but is it stop how many others were in the situation? some teenagers were stuck and they must have been pretty worried, like their parents? yes, there were about 100 people in total andi there were about 100 people in total and i was with five girls who were under the age of 18, they would about 13—15 and they had gone to see the christmas lights getting turned on. the christmas event got cancelled one hour before, about four o‘clock, just before we were not allowed to leave. so they did tell me their parents were actually so tell me their parents were actually so worried and they cannot get near the shopping centre. so... i hope they got out safely like you did. but you miss an exam? yes, i had an exa m but you miss an exam? yes, i had an exam in university today and university exams are a big thing. i
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was unable to get to it due to the transport and due to everything going on. i got home at four and if i wanted to get to buy exam i would have to leave at five o‘clock in the morning. and with the train delays i was not even going to make it. by then. what happens to that exam? i have to retake it injuly. next year. and it will be capped to only 40% so i will be unable to get higher than 40% because i missed at this year, unfortunately. really bad luck and not what you would expect asa luck and not what you would expect as a consequence of the weather. i‘m glad you got safely and a belated happy birthday to your sister! thank you so much. thank you very much. getting stuck at meadowhall shopping centre. let‘s find out what is coming ourway... this it is certainly going to dry out, that is for sure. let‘s look at some weather watcher pictures first.
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we will get there in just a second? no? maybe not. let‘s summarise the weather this weekend. it is looking a lot better. are we running the weather graphics at the moment? here weather graphics at the moment? here we are! let‘s just move on to the right spot. here we are. we are looking at the satellite image right now i believe, is that right? rainfall. please excuse these little gremlins, we will get there in chest a second —— just a second. here is the forecast for this afternoon and this evening, it is nippy. apologies for these problems, it happens now and then. the flood warnings are still in force but the good news is that the weather is drying out. we have clear skies tonight. they were the front approaching ireland which will bring rainfall by the early hours of saturday morning —— a
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weather front approaching. for most of us, it will be clear tonight with temperatures down to freezing. i believe we are back again! here we are. this is early hours of saturday morning. that frost developing here, temperatures down to freezing or so. belfast will get some rain by the end of the night. it will be a pretty soggy start for people early in the morning, around 5 or 6 but other than that, the weather is dry in the east on saturday morning. we get this next band of rain heading towards the west of the uk. there could be some snow across the welsh hills but the good news is that is the main thing, tomorrow, if we get much in the flooded areas, the rainfall, there won‘t be much rainfall, there won‘t be much rainfall at all. we are talking about a couple of millimetres, 50 to
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100 times less rainfall than we had a day ago. great news for remembrance sunday. a lot of dry weather around for the remembrance sunday services, it will be sunny and chilly with temperatures in single figures. a bit of rainfall heading our way later on sunday and next week. next week is looking pretty unsettled. apologies for those little gremlins earlier on. that‘s it.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines: a woman has died after being swept away by flood water as parts of england are hit with a month‘s worth of rain in one day. the snp launch their election campaign saying they would try to form an alliance with other parties to lock the conservatives out of power. the bbc announce plans for two election debates, one head to head between boris johnson and jeremy corbyn — and another with all the main british parties. an 18—year—old boy is jailed fora minimum of 12 and half years for the murder of his former girlfriend. sport now on afternoon live with katie. and quite a performance from the england cricket team in new zealand. it certainly was. and a day to rememberfor dawid it certainly was. and a day to remember for dawid malan who it certainly was. and a day to rememberfor dawid malan who has made history by scoring the quickest
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league quickest century by a batsman in twe nty20 league quickest century by a batsman in twenty20 to level the series with new zealand. malan hit an unbeaten century offjust 48 balls — as he shared a 182 run partnership with captain eoin morgan who nearly followed suit — 91 for him before he was dismissed as england posted their highest—ever total in t20s in a victory. mathew parkinson took four wickets when new zealand batted. they would come in 76 runs short. he‘s recently moved from middlesex to yorkshire in a bid to make a fresh start and his former team—mate steve finn paid tribute to him after the match. it's a brave move, what he's done, but he wants to further himself and pushed himself, which is impressive. in endings like this will definitely help him along the way. he came into this series not knowing whether he was going to play every game. —— an innings. to take the opportunity as he has done has been really good. so, can england pull off another exciting victory?
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well, the decider is in auckland on sunday. i‘m not supposed to say this because the purests would disagree but i like the illuminated bales that they use in t20. a big premier league game this weekend at security might be an issue? yes. manchester city travel to liverpool in a crucial premier league match on sunday, and they are hoping that there won‘t be a hostile reception. merseyside police have said they are aware of a poster on social media encouraging liverpool fans to "welcome" manchester city‘s bus ahead of their league match at anfield on sunday. the unofficial poster asks fans to "welcome" city‘s bus in the same manner as they did before last year‘s champions league quarter final first leg. this was when the coach was hit with missiles and was so badly damaged that a replacement was needed to take the players home. merseyside police said they had liaised with both clubs and supporter groups and had put a comprehensive and appropriate policing operation in place.
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if somebody at man city... i don't know if they are but if somebody is concerned, it is not our fault. we all didn't throw the bottle, or whatever it was, but it was one of us. whatever it was, but it was one of us. so that's why we are responsible for that and we have to make sure come all of us, have to make sure that something like this will never happen again. well, ahead of that big game, manchester city have confirmed that goalkeeper ederson will not be available. the brazlian suffered a injury during the 1—1 draw with atalanta. the normal number two, claudio bravo, is likely a bit worrying. to replace him a not kyle walker. to replace him and not kyle walker. manchester city‘s georgia sta nway and gemma bonner have been called up to the england women‘s squad, ahead of their international friendly against germany tomorrow at wembley. toni duggan though has withdrawn from the squad with a lower back injury. this it‘s going to be a sell—out at the 90,000 capacity stadium, which will be a record crowd
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for a lionesses‘ home match. on to golf — as tiger woods has been having a bit of fun. as he‘s named himself as one of his captain‘s picks for next month‘s presidents cup. that‘s against the international team in melbourne. woods has also chosen two rookies — the current us open champion, gary woodland and tony finau. woods is the first "playing captain" of a presidents cup team since 1994 and didn‘t hold back when announcing the team... as captain, i'm going to choose tiger woods as the last player on the team. he's made, what, nine cups? and he's played in australia twice. in the presidents cup stop this will be his third appearance there as a player. i am talking in the third person! i was just about to say, third person tiger is my favourite,
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let's see what we can do here. yeah, just having fun with it. all a bit of fun. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. back now to the election campaign. today, borisjohnson has said that after brexit there‘ll be no checks on goods between northern ireland and the rest of the united kingdom. let‘s have a listen. this is a great deal for this country. it is ready to go. it allows the whole of the uk to leave the eu. the checks that you need to do for tarriff purposes, goods that might be coming via northern ireland from gb into ireland, but the whole of the... northern ireland and the rest of gb are part of the uk customs territory, and there can be no checks between goods operating in one customs area. we are the uk. we will not be instituting such checks. and so the advantage of this deal is that we come out whole and entire. northern ireland, with the rest of the country, can take part in doing free trade deals. and it‘s a fantastic opportunity for us to go forward, together. now, what would be a real shame
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would be to waste a whole year in renegotiation, in another referendum, which is what i‘m afraid jeremy corbyn and the labour party are insisting must happen, and i think it would be divisive and toxic and pointless. joining me now to talk about that and what else has been happening on the campaign trail is our reality check correspondent chris morris. what do you make of what boris johnson said? it came after video emerged of him last night in northern ireland talking to a group of northern ireland businessmen. more video of that meeting has emerged in the last couple of hours in which mrjohnson says that for trade in the future, under his deal between northern ireland and great britain, he assures the assembled throng, if throng it was, no forms, no barriers of any kind, which is in
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direct contradiction of what his own brexit secretary has said and what his brexit agreement says. that while there will be minimal administrative procedures, we are not talking about blokes in pink caps standing by the side of the road, but we are talking about filling in some export declarations, a lot of people in northern ireland are concerned about that. because they say however minimal it is, that is breaking the promise of u nfettered is breaking the promise of unfettered access for northern ireland to the great britain market. what he said there is that there will be no forms, not what his brexit secretary told parliament a few weeks ago. that is one we have to look at and see how that goes. yes, how do you square that circle? the conservatives have also said today that they‘ll introduce an nhs visa — they say it will attract more nhs staff from abroad. clinical and medical staff. yes, we know, we have discussed this many times, they are cute staff shortages in the nhs. there are 43,000 nursing vacancies at the moment. the number
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of nurses coming from elsewhere in the eu has fallen quite sharply since the brexit referendum. we need to recruit people from elsewhere in the world. one of the things that is going to be done is the cost of the visa will be cut in half. currently, it‘s nearly £1000. under this proposal it will be £464. the way that newly recruited staff have to pay for their own health care, they have to pay an amount up front under this new tory proposal. it would be taken out of their salary as they earned. vacancies are so high, tens of thousands, people are saying why don‘t you just cut the cost of the bees altogether? there are a couple of other issues which you need to bearin of other issues which you need to bear in mind. —— cost of the visa. 0ne bear in mind. —— cost of the visa. one is bureaucracy. people are saying it is not so much the cost of the visa but it takes months and months to actually get through the system and if you are trying to employ people for example on a six month contract, it could take as long to get the visa as the length of the contract. that is not ideal. secondly, this proposal doesn‘t
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really cover social care. care workers, social workers, etc. the vacancies in that sector are also acute, 8% of the total, not far short of one in ten all of all the jobs in social care sector been vacant. this proposal for an jobs in social care sector been vacant. this proposalfor an nhs visa won‘t do anything about social care, which as we know, many people and families deeply concerned about, whether it is elderly relatives, young children with disabilities and so young children with disabilities and so forth. that is something which will be needed to be sorted out. labour have talked about an aspect of health care, in particular maternity leave. they have. they have put forward if you like a proposalfor more have put forward if you like a proposal for more rights have put forward if you like a proposalfor more rights in general for women in the workplace. 0ne proposalfor more rights in general for women in the workplace. one of them is for maternity leave. at the moment, new mums get 90% of their average weekly earnings for the first six weeks. and then they get just under 150 quid as a maximum amount up to nine months after a child is born. labour says they want to extend that to a 12 month period.
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it also wants to extend shared pa rental leave. it also wants to extend shared parental leave. at the moment, that is only available for nine months at labour would like to extend that to 12 months. —— and labour. the problem with shared parental leave, the take—up has been very low, partly because you‘ve just had a baby, you need to buy lots of new little clothes, people can‘t afford to be working on much smaller amounts of pay that statutory maternity pay gives you. in a country like germany, for example, you get ten months of maternity leave. but it‘s all on full pay. it's leave. but it‘s all on full pay. it‘s a rather different thing. the other thing about the labour proposal, if you like, it‘s part of a slightly more controversial package of flexible working. labour has been saying we would like people to have the ability, if you like, to set the terms of their own flexible working from day one in a newjob. businesses will have something to say about that. conservatives,
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hardly surprisingly, and the cbi have said there needs to be a bit more balance and it will be unaffordable for businesses if people can come in on day one of a newjob and say, i‘m only prepared to work hours in this kind of pattern. much to discuss. lots! always is. chris, thank you. earlier this year, a second world war veteran called harry billinge captured the hearts of millions of bbc viewers during commemorations for the anniversary of d day. harry, who‘s now 94, spoke to us about being in the first wave of troops to land in normandy when he was just 18 years of age. he said he could never forget his comrades who lost their lives — saying they were the heroes, not him. well, since then, harry has raised thousands of pounds for a new memorial to the dead in france. jon donnison reports thank you, darlin‘. in the remarkable life of harry billinge, this has been a remarkable year.
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there's about 35 quid there, harry. i‘m overwhelmed, really, with kindness. he's the best. you're the best. he's the hero. nobody else. i‘ll fill this tin by lunchtime. there you are. i saw you on the telly. it was an appearance on bbc breakfast telly on a normandy beach for the d—day 75th anniversary injune that saw harry go viral. don‘t say i‘m a hero. i‘m no hero. i was lucky. i‘m here. all the heroes are dead. and i‘ll neverforget them as long as i live. since that moment of modesty, harry‘s fund—raising in st austell in cornwall, towards building a memorial in france, has seen a surge. it‘s nearly 30,000 now, i believe. ijust put in another 2,000 last monday. thank god i‘m able to do what i want to do here and collect the money for that memorial, because by rights i shouldn‘t have been here. i should have been killed on the beach. i was saved, i believe, by the grace of god for this purpose.
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and tha‘s why i do it. i must do this. you're raising money for something and you can't see it? this morning, harry was back on bbc breakfast to see the memorial as it‘s being built, for the first time. clearly an emotional moment. 0k? yeah. idid it. ijust had a job to do. all these fellas did a good job. all these men, these wonderful men, young boys of 16. i‘m not a brave man. i‘m lucky. i owe my life to the boys that i loved and i‘ll never forget them. jon donnison, bbc news. in a moment, we will have
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the latest business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live. a woman dies in severe flooding in the north of england — police say she was reportedly swept away by the water. the snp seeks an alliance with other parties to lock out of government and promises to stop the nhs being privatised. the bbc announces plans for two prime—time election debates — a head to head between borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn — and one and one with all the main british parties. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. royal mail is seeking a high court injunction to stop a postal strike, which threatens to disrupt postal voting in the run—up to the general election as well as christmas post. more on that in just a moment. degree—educated savers are more at risk of losing their pension to fraudsters than those without the qualification — that‘s according to a survey by the financial conduct authority and the pensions regulator. fraudsters often target those with larger pension pots.
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crossrail — running from heathrow airport to the canary wharf — will not open until 2021. it was supposed to open in december 2018. the company cites delays in signing off all the safety aspects of the elizabeth line and says it is also taking more time than expected to test the signalling software. so royal mail is seeking a high court injunction to stop a potential postal strike? they have put in a formal application to stop this strike. in the formal statement they issued, they say the strike ballot had "potential irregularities and was unlawful and therefore null and void". the ballot of 100,000 royal mail staff was held overjob security and terms. 9796 97% voted in favour. they were doing so over 97% voted in favour. they were doing so overjob conditions and they say the company failed to adhere to
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employment deal they last year. royal mail refutes this. they say they have evidence that union members were put under pressure to vote yes in this ballot. the high court is due to hear royal mail‘s application for this injunction early next week. if the strike goes ahead, what would it mean for customers? no date has been set yet for potential strike action but you are right, the applications are two fold, we are in the run—up to christmas, implications for festive posting. but we are also in the run—up to this december 12 general election, potential implications for postal voting. let's look at the united states. another big name in the presidential race? billionaire businessman michael bloomberg is reported to be strongly considering entering the race for the us democratic presidential nomination. mr bloomberg was a wall street banker who went on to found
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the financial publishing empire that made him a billionaire 52 times over. he isa he is a force to be reckoned with. samira hussainjoins me now from the new york stock exchange with more on this. she is also a force to be reckoned with. she has more details. why is bloomberg considering a run? he is considering a run because of a few reasons. one of them has to do with sort of the changing dynamics here in the united states. this is not the first time that mr bloomberg has considered a presidential run. but what has changed is that in the past, he has always thought that the american people wouldn't want to vote for a billionaire. clearly times have changed! he feels that it is possible for a billionaire to win the white house. the other issue thatis the white house. the other issue that is getting him to really think about this is the current make—up of
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the democratic candidates that are leading the race to become the head of the democratic party. of those three, it seems that none of them really could mount a real campaign against donald trump. a recent poll has shown that they possibly wouldn't beat him. for him, what is really important is to try and win the white house back from president trump. why is that? took me to the demographic of some of the other candidates lining themselves up and how is wall street reacting to them? it is interesting to look at the wall street reaction to some of the frontrunners. two of them would of course be the senator... mr... mr bernie sanders. the other senator, elizabeth warren. if you look at those two candidates who are among the front runners, they are very left. and some of the policies they have been talking about have really caught the eye of people on wall street. for example, ms warren has
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been very clear about wanting a billionaire's tax. people who make 50 million or more would be taxed 2% higher at people who make $1 billion or more would be taxed 3% higher. some pretty big names in america have come out saying that they don't really like that idea! jamie dimon, the boss of jpmorgan, really like that idea! jamie dimon, the boss ofjpmorgan, the investment bank. the uncle of the men, another big—name invest in the united states has come out against some of the proposals you have seen. there is a bit of a concern that these candidates may be anti—business. thank you so much! interesting us presidential race, as we were last time. at least! thank you very much, we will see you next time. let‘s get more on the election — and political correspondent jonathan blake is travelling with the prime minister and they are idiots and they are currently in north wales.
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he is continuing a far—reaching tour of the uk over the next couple of days. he has visited a hospital and a school in the east midlands and we have travelled to deeside in north wales for the final stop of the prime minister‘s initial campaign tool. he began the day by talking about that new nhs visa programme, which you have been hearing about it earlier on, the aim being to cut the cost and make it more convenient for overseas nurses, doctors and other health care workers to come to the uk and work. he acknowledged the government needs to do more to combat the acute staff shortages the nhs is facing. as is often the case in election campaigns, doesn‘t a lwa ys in election campaigns, doesn‘t always go according to plan. the prime minister has seen his comments last night at an event in northern ireland dominate the discussion today. he was making a sales pitch effectively for his brexit deal and
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trying to allay the concerns that lots of businesses in northern ireland have about how easy it will be for them to export all ship goods from northern ireland to mainland great britain. the prime minister was there and saying they would be no checks on goods making the crossing. extra paperwork that might need to be done. he said it would be unnecessary. he describes somebody asking a question of whether they would need to fill in extra forms as... completely unnecessary. and he said if anybody asks you to do that, put them on to me and i would tell them to throw it in the bin. this has raised questions and has labour accusing the prime minister of making it up as he goes along in terms of the detail of his brexit deal. trying to clarify and allay people because my concerns about it but he has raised a few more
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questions than he has given answers. thank you very much. jonathan blake in north wales with the conservatives. now it‘s time for a look at the weather. the heaviest of the rain in northern england has finished. we have had a few heavy showers in the last hour. for many of us, the weekend is looking dry although there is some rain in the forecast. it will arrive later on tonight into northern ireland and just about nudging into scotland. and the far west of the uk and it will be a chilly start to saturday with a widespread frost in the first part of the morning. the rain tomorrow is here with the snow in the welsh hills. the rain will be in the welsh hills. the rain will be in the middle of the afternoon. but eastern and northern areas should have a dry day on saturday. and eventually saturday night into sunday, that weather front will just
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rain itself out. there won‘t be much in the way of rainfall across northern england. the good news is, some they will bring mostly sunny weather. remembrance sunday. you are up—to—date.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m martine croxall. today at 3pm. a woman dies in severe flooding in the north of england — police say she was reportedly swept away by the water. schools are closed and people are warned not to leave their homes unless it‘s absolutely necessary. the sirens have been going everywhere we have seen and ambulances and fire crews all over at matlock and the surrounding areas. snp leader nicola sturgeon launches her party‘s election campaign, saying she‘ll seek an alliance with other parties to lock the conservatives out of government and promising to stop the nhs being privatised. we will fight tooth and nail any attempt to expose the national health service to a post—brexit trade deal with donald trump. the bbc announces plans for two prime—time election debates — a head—to—head between borisjohnson
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and jeremy corbyn and one with all the main british parties. jail for an 18—year—old man who stabbed to death his teenage former girlfriend, ellie gould. coming up on afternoon live — all the sport with katie. an impressive performance by england cricket team in new zealand? and dawid malan was hitting sixes for fun. he has made history by recording the fastest t20 century by an england batsman to level the series with new zealand and the focus turns to the decider in auckland on sunday. thank you. thanks, katie — and tomasz has all the weather. so much rain and flooding, will things ease? it will take a while for river levels to ease off and drop but the good news is we are not expecting much in away of rainfall and actually northern england this weekend is looking mostly dry, if
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not sunny. great news there. also coming up... the emotions of a d—day veteran as he sees a memorial being built for his fallen friends. they had a job to do, all these fellows, they did a good job. all these men, these wonderful men. hello everyone — this is afternoon live. a woman has died after apparently being swept away by floodwater as parts of the midlands and northern england were battered by a month‘s worth of rain in one day. six severe flood warnings are in place along the river don in doncaster — meaning there‘s a danger to life. some residents have been rescued from their homes. in sheffield, dozens of people spent the night stranded in a shopping centre because of flooded roads, while 35 homes in mansfield were evacuated after a mudslide.
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here‘s our correspondent, robert hall, in doncaster. we are on st mary‘s bridge about a quarter of a mile from the centre of doncaster and fire crews here are still on standby and they have been called to emergency calls around the area and that is because that is the river don. it is raging eastwards and it has been rising steadily through the morning. the environment agency, we will hear from them, reckon it stabilised but it is going to remain at very dangerous levels and that means that it may yet over top flood defences, which have in pa rt top flood defences, which have in part been holding. looking across the bridge, using the shot from the other camera to help, you can see there is an industrial area beyond me completely flooded out and a couple of photo water down there. more misery for local businesses, and that misery to homeowners as well, repeated across this part of
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south yorkshire. danny savage is down the road in bentley, which is one of the areas hardest hit. in doncaster this morning, it was a frantic rush to get to safety and deal with the rising floodwater. anything and everything was deployed to help. yes, they were aware of the rain, but they were still caught by surprise. it came really quickly, to be honest. it has happened down here a couple of times, but we had no warning from the council or anything. they should have been out last night giving out sandbags all that sort of stuff, but we have had nothing. in nearby bentley, the main a19 was underwater and closed. in the houses here, they are looking out of the window anxiously because levels are still rising. i took everything upstairs, a friend came over and she helped me take the furniture upstairs, we have lifted everything up, everything out of the kitchen cupboards, so the kitchen is upside down, just tried to raise everything as much as we can. for linda, this is not the first
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time she has been flooded, but the timing could not be worse. i am here, 26a with the sale... for sale sign sign, in fact sold, subject to survey. they are due to come out and do the survey on monday. are you worried now this has happened? i am very worried. i doubt anybody will want to go ahead and buy this now. the water is not yet pouring into graham‘s house next door, but he has had to take some pretty dramatic measures. unfortunately the chickens can‘t swim, so i have had to bring them in. how bad is the situation outside? terrible, it happened in 2007, it has happened again, just ridiculous. is it one of those things? or do you think the authorities could have done more to stop it happening? i think they could have done a lot more to stop it happening. from above, the extent of the flooding in south yorkshire can be seen for miles, stretching from sheffield to rotherham and on to doncaster,
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where the river don has recahed its highest recorded level. almost 20 schools are closed, with widespread flood warnings. scores of people had to be rescued by boat in rotherham as emergency services responded to hundreds of calls. this is rotherham station last night — where the tracks should be has been replaced by a canal. in mansfield in nottinghamshire a cliff gave way, the landslide leading to 35 homes being evacuated, and it is not over get. there is a concern more places could flood as the water drains from the region. danny savage, bbc news, doncaster. a lot of people following events on bbc news and local radio and i promise you an update. adrian gill from the environment agency has hightailed it from your control centre. let us deal with this, where are we with water levels? we are still in doncaster, we have had lots
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of rainfall across the catchment in the last 24 hours with high levels in sheffield moving down. the river levels are picking on doncaster but we are expecting them to stay very high for several hours and that is causing a lot of disruption and there is some overtopping as well which is causing some risk to properties. this is not 2007 and defences, to be fair, have failed in a lot of areas but we are seeing a certain amount of overtopping. it is escaping? it is. the rainfall in the last 24 hours is similar to 2007, river levels have got close to 2007 and it is a different event but we are seeing impacts, particularly in doncaster were some defences are overtopping and we have seen disruption to the road network and flooding to businesses and some properties and that is something we are still going to need to keep an eye on in the coming hours. like 2007 this is a big area for you and the emergency services to monitor, it isa the emergency services to monitor, it is a certain amount of rapid reaction to events as they arise? we
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obviously work very closely with the met office to forecast what might happen in terms of flood work and we work with emergency partners but at the same time we do react to feedback on the ground to what might be happening and we clearly respond to that as required. the sirens are in the background, as they have been all day, and we talk about red warnings and those are still in place. let‘s deal with advice for people watching this or they know people watching this or they know people living in affected areas. what is the advice? at the moment in doncaster we have six of your flood warning site which means there is significant risk to life. and that is because earlier this morning we we re is because earlier this morning we were not sure how much the defences with over top buy and what risk that would pose to a number of communities. we have seen some communities. we have seen some communities evacuated in doncaster and that has been coordinated by the local authority. if people want to find out more about that they can contact the local authority and if they want to find out whether they are at flood risk and what to do during the flood they can visit the website with lots of information
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there. if people have a concern about risk to safety, that is one for the emergency services. thanks very much indeed and this rain is not what anybody wanted. it is not going to have the situation, so in a nutshell, it is stable but still dangerous and so i think the message really if you live in this area or you are worried or feel you are at risk, stay in touch with local media and with the environment agency. 0ur correspondent, phil mackie, has spent the day in matlock in derbyshire — near where the body of a woman has been recovered from flood water. she was swept away in the early hours of this morning, the river derwent is really swollen and fast flowing and i am not quite sure of the circumstances as to how this happened and her body was recovered a couple of miles north of here upstream on the river derwent at about 10:40am and the announcement came through over one hour ago but throughout the morning, as robert described, sirens everywhere, ambulances and fire crews all over
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matlock and the surrounding areas. you can see down the road, a couple of minutes ago you can possibly see on the right of the screen, 20 businesses have flooded and there is a marks and spencers and people say they heard a loud bang there, possibly an electric circuit getting flooded and exploding and the fire crews have suddenly come up and they have driven in. not much else going on and i understand marks and spencers was open until recently and it is now shut, like many businesses along her. we have been watching shopkeepers coming and going and a lot of them trying to prevent damage and matlock town council and the local authorities as well as the emergency services have been trying to help them. you can see sandbags moved in and we have seen the peak on the river derwent in matlock which was a couple of hours ago. things are not going down quickly. they will, but not yet. as long as we can see this
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kind of flood water at the moment, there is still that threat to properties and people are advised to stay out of the area. the temptation to walk through it sometimes is immense for people but you don‘t know what you are wading through? i know. i have seen people coming and going along the street, not as deep as it may look and the reason that we have seen people coming and going is mostly the business owners are trying to clear things out to prevent it being permanently damaged. they are almost doing this with the approval of the authorities because they know what they‘re doing and they know the area well and lots of other people coming along to take pictures and that is probably not helping the traffic situation. and of course, what will happen next is all of this water is flowing downstream rapidly towards places like derby, where there are flood warnings in place as well. we were not expecting any particularly bad rain today, it is spitting at the moment but there is a band of heavy rain to the north of us
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impacting on places on the other side, places that flow into the river don, and we hope they will not necessarily come to this side of the peaks and flew into the river derwent, otherwise we might see another peak later on. the snp has launched its election campaign — with leader nicola sturgeon putting brexit at the centre of the party‘s message. she said the party would try to form an alliance with other parties to lock the conservatives out of government after the election. the snp is also promising a bill that would protect the nhs from privatisation and future trade deals, saying the health service is ‘not for sale at any price.‘ 0ur scotland correspondent james shaw reports. nicola sturgeon launched her party‘s campaign with a warning. this was, she said, the most important election for generations to come. why? because it will determine the future of the united kingdom in or out of the european union and the future of scotland, in or out of the uk. and she looked ahead to a post—election landscape
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where it was possible that no party might have a majority. brexit, brexit. a vote for the snp, in contrast, is a vote to escape brexit. a vote for the snp is a vote to take scotland‘s future out of the hands of borisjohnson and a broken westminster system. there was a long list of demands to secure the snp‘s support for a minority labour government. control of immigration and drug and employment law, and an end to universal credit. but perhaps the most eye—catching demand was legislation to make sure that the nhs was not at risk of further privatisation as part of a future trade deal with the united states. we will fight tooth and nail any attempt to expose the national health service to a post—brexit trade deal with donald trump. that is why, after this election,
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snp mps will bring forward a new law, an nhs protection bill, to explicitly protect the nhs in all four countries of the uk from being a bargaining chip. so, the snp are making it clear that the nhs will be a top priority for them in this election campaign. but stopping brexit is also key to their campaigning efforts and, underlying it all, the drive towards a second independence referendum. the snp are not the only party to appreciate how much the nhs matters to voters. their idea for legislation to protect it is new, but will the other parties take it seriously, and will nicola sturgeon‘s party win enough votes to influence notjust the future of scotland but the future of the whole of the united kingdom? james shaw, bbc news, edinburgh. nicola sturgeon
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has been calling it the election of a lifetime. 0ur assistant political editor, norman smith, explains what she means by that. here‘s a funny thing. you wouldn‘t think that borisjohnson and nicola sturgeon have much in common but turns out they do have one thing in common and that is that this election is just about one thing and that is brexit. nicola sturgeon saying her clear aim at this election is to stop brexit dead in its tracks by any means possible. she doesn‘t really care, she doesn‘t mind if it‘s through securing another referendum or whether supporting moves to revoke article 50 orjoining up with anti—brexit parties at westminster or through securing scottish independence and at least keeping scotland in the eu. she is not fast but she knows her best route to achieving that is through a hung parliament. in other words, if this election is again inconclusive, because she knows in that circumstance it hugely increases the leverage of the snp.
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today, she gave her clearest indication so far that she would be prepared to helpjeremy corbyn into downing street as part of that attempt to stop brexit. but at a price. and that price would be the removal of nuclear weapons from scotland and above all, the granting of another independence referendum next year. and here‘s the second funny thing about today. that‘s probably not a message that borisjohnson is going to be too bothered about because what has been his core campaign message at this election, it has been vote labour and you‘ll get two more referendums, one on brexit and, yes, one on another scottish independence referendum. norman smith. the bbc has announced two d e bates norman smith. the bbc has announced two debates in the run—up to the selection and helen wilkinson is at westminster for us. tell us more.
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what has the bbc announced? they have announced plans in the run—up to december the 12th in terms of how they plan to broadcast various debates. the main one, the one getting the most attention, is that head—to—head debate between boris johnson and jeremy corbyn and that will take place very close to polling day on the 6th of december. that will be a live event and that will take place in southampton. not eve ryo ne will take place in southampton. not everyone is happy that they have not been included in that. particularly the liberal democrats, the leader, jo swinson, has put out a statement saying that millions voted to remain in 2016 and after three years of chaosit in 2016 and after three years of chaos it is shocking liberal democrats, the strongest party of remain, are being denied the opportunity to challenge johnson remain, are being denied the opportunity to challengejohnson and corbyn on brexit. the bbc says that they look at the regulatory framework in terms of broadcasting these kind of events and they base
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this and related to different levels of electoral support. they say potential prime ministers can get more scrutiny than other party leaders but that judgment more scrutiny than other party leaders but thatjudgment is based on real votes cast and not speculation as to how people may vote. they say it is a complex and tricky process in terms of deciding who speaks at what debate but that main debate on the 6th of december, between boris johnson main debate on the 6th of december, between borisjohnson and main debate on the 6th of december, between boris johnson and jeremy corbyn, there will also be a seven way debate, some of the senior names from seven main political parties will take place in another debate, in cardiff on the 29th of november. and this will be an opportunity for the main political leaders to be exposed in front of the cameras, the lights and also, crucially, answering questions from audience members. thank you very much. helen wilkinson at westminster.
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you‘re watching afternoon live — these are our headlines. a woman dies in severe flooding in the north of england — police say she was reportedly swept away by the water. snp leader nicola sturgeon launches her party‘s election campaign, saying she‘ll seek an alliance with other parties to lock the conservatives out of government and promising to stop the nhs being privatised. the bbc announces plans for two prime—time election debates — a head—to—head between borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn and one with all the main british parties. and in sport, a thrilling century from dawid malan gives england victory against new zealand in their fourth t20 match, it is 2—2 with all to play for in the decider on sunday. and an injury blow for man city as manager pep guardiola says goalkeeper anderson is out of their premier league match against liverpool on sunday. and michael o‘neill liverpool on sunday. and michael 0‘neill has been appointed as stoke‘s new manager but he will
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still take charge of northern ireland in the remaining euro 2020 qualifiers and any potential play—off matches. i will be back with more on the stories that have passed out —— at half past. police have released the names of all 39 people who were found dead in a lorry in essex last month. the victims including two 15—year—old boys. essex police say it‘s been of paramount importance to ensure that each individual‘s next of kin were informed, and to bring answers to worried families. consultation is now underway with the vietnamese authorities over the repatriation of those who have died. 0ur correspondent, danny shaw, is here. what further details have been released? this identification of these bodies has taken about two weeks, it has been painstaking, as you can imagine and a grim process. it has involved an identification commission overseen by the coroner for essex and they have looked at
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dental records and dna, fingerprints and also distinctive body markings such as tatties and scars in order to come up with and confirm the names of all those who died. 39 victims. eight of them women. the majority who died were in their 20s and 30s. there were, however, 10 teenagers who died, including 215—year—old boys, the youngest victims. two victims were in their 40s, a man and woman, they were the oldest. so it is a process which has taken quite a long time but there will now be consultations about what to do with the bodies and repatriation. for people who want to see the names of all the victims, they can go to the bbc website and there are details of all the names and ages and were the victims were from. they were all from parts of vietnam in the central and northern regions of vietnam. in terms of the
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investigation, that continues. 0ne person has been charged, a 39—year—old maurice robinson, accused of 39 counts of manslaughter, extradition proceedings are under way against him and harrison. he is from the republic of ireland and two brothers from northern ireland, ronan and christopher hughes are being sought. there is a lot of police activity in vietnam and 11 arrests in relation to alleged offences of people smuggling so the inquiry continues but this phase, the identification process , but this phase, the identification process, has concluded. thank you very much. an 18—year—old man has been jailed for 12.5 years for the murder of the 17—year—old ellie gould. thomas griffiths pleaded guilty to stabbing ellie in her home after she had ended their relationship. in an exclusive interview, ellie‘s mother told the bbc about the horror of the day ellie was killed. fiona lamdin reports. # nice to meet you, where you been? # i can show you incredible things. ..#
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her life was full and all the opportunities in front of her. yeah, she was the perfect daughter, really. ellie gould was just 17, studying for her a—levels, when she was murdered by thomas griffiths. the night before, she‘d called off their three—month relationship to concentrate on her schoolwork. we trusted him. we welcomed him into our home. he celebrated her 17th birthday with us. three months later, he murdered her. it‘s chilling. 0n the morning he killed her, thomas‘ mum took him to school, but he caught the bus straight home. despite not having a licence, he took the family car and drove to ellie‘s house. he knew she was at home alone, studying. he stabbed her at least 13 times in the neck before going back to school, pretending nothing had happened.
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three hours later, ellie‘s dad found her on the kitchen floor. and i never forget that phone call of matt, hysterical, saying, "carole, you need to drive home, ellie‘s had an accident. drive carefully, but ellie‘s had an accident." and then as i pulled round into our drive, nothing could prepare me for police cars abandoned everywhere, and an ambulance at the end of the drive and... and then mattjust sobbing at the end of our drive. and ijust ran up to him, and a policeman said, "who are you?" and i said, "i‘m her mother, what‘s happened, what‘s happened?" at the same time, thomas griffiths was messaging friends about self harming, but we now know the scratches on his neck had come from ellie as she fought for her life. and we sat in the back of the police car, absolutely stunned. and then they said, "does she have a boyfriend?" and i said, "oh, she does, but he doted on her. he wouldn‘t harm her."
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pat, and what does justice mean for you? i think he's evil. i don't believe he should be allowed to take another breath, quite frankly. he's dangerous. i don‘t think he should never be let out of prison. i don‘t think he should ever be granted parole. he is a danger to society, he‘s a danger particularly to women. thejudge described it as an exceptionally grave crime. thomas griffiths has never explained why he murdered ellie. no mother should ever... ..hold their dead daughter‘s hand. it was just heartbreaking. go. 0k. every time i see teenage girls, and ijust look and i think, "0h, ellie." you know? it's just so heartbreaking. you are reminded constantly. i can‘t spend any time in her bedroom. i try and go in...
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..sometimes, and look at the photographs on the wall of her and her friends, but i can‘t stay in for many minutes. it‘s too painful. fiona lamdin, bbc news. let‘s return to our top story, and a woman has died after becoming submerged in floodwater as parts of england were deluged with a month‘s rain in a day. 0ur weather presenter, tomasz schafernaker, is here. setting this in context, the background as we had a very wet autumn already? and notjust in the north of the country but throughout much of the uk. this matter behind us much of the uk. this matter behind us shows the amount of rainfall that we have had and shows the percentage of what we had in october so some parts of yorkshire have had 200% and particularly the area flooded in the last day or so, it had something like1.5times the last day or so, it had something like 1.5 times the amount of rainfall we normally get an october
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and that is important because the ground is saturated so any rain, any new rain that falls finds it harder to soak into the ground. the weather system that brought this rain has got stuck, hasn‘t it? system that brought this rain has got stuck, hasn't it? and this is what happens, the rain does not necessarily have to be desperately heavy, it can be falling at the same place over and over again and the next graphic... this is the weather front and often what we‘re used to is weather front sweeping across the country carried by high winds and this was not the case in last 24 hours, the weather front was slow—moving. in fact, hours, the weather front was slow—moving. infact, it hours, the weather front was slow—moving. in fact, it was almost pivoting about a point on that point happened to be a very populated area of northern england and we have the pennines and all of that rain is falling onto the mountains and hills and funnelling down the valleys into the rivers on the river levels are pretty high at the moment. and with some warnings? and it takes a good
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day or so before river levels respond. these amounts of rainfall we had, 84 in sheffield, 84 millimetres, that is a little over one months‘ worth of rainfall in a day. and flood warnings are in force, those river levels will be dangerously high for a while yet and even with a chance through the weekend we will still see flooding. the ground is saturated, it will not go away immediately. but we are starting to turn a corner? there is still some showers, heavy ones, but they are moving swiftly through and there is some sunshine on away so some good news. the first weather watcher picture shows sunshine coming through. the weather is going to turn better this weekend, not a com pletely to turn better this weekend, not a completely dry weekend on away but at least there is some good news for northern parts of england and we will get some sunshine. you can see
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the sun is already out in a number of areas with lovely weather watcher pictures. i want to show you the first snow in the highlands. the first snow in the highlands. the first decent fall of snow, there is snow on away for parts of wales as well. the weekend, it is looking split. there is some rain in the forecast but again, i want to emphasise the point that this is not necessarily heading towards another england. this is where the weather front was, i showed you the radar, the blue blobs of rain falling across the north, that weather front is out of away and falling apart to the west of us and other weather front. that will bring rainfall but rather than getting stuck over us it is going to slide across the uk towards the south. this is what is happening in the here and now so a lot of clear weather out there, once a shower is cleared away from the north. we still have one or two around and it will be quite a chilly night, temperatures dipping away to
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freezing or below in many major towns and cities. you can see the blue colours indicating that frost across much of the country from the north to the south, blue colours. even in central london, around freezing or so. through the course of saturday morning we expect rainfall to get into northern ireland and a period of snow expected across mid and north wales and that will not last long. in that weather front, so the one we had in the last 24 hours got stuck, pivoting around northern england and this one will slide towards the south, out of away, and it doesn‘t look like it will particularly reach northern parts of england, if anything we will have a few dribs and drabs of rain. that is pretty much it. here is sunday. very important, remembrance sunday, the good news is for a lot of the surfaces the weather will be fine and it will be a nippy start with
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frost in the north but at least we have sunshine in the forecast for the second half of the weekend. the next weather front is heading our way, propelled by a powerfuljet strea m way, propelled by a powerfuljet stream next week and there is something cold the cold side of the jet stream and the warm side. this is the cold side, this is the warm side, next week we are on the cold side, next week we are on the cold side, which means it is going to stay on the cold side. goodbye. this is bbc news — our latest headlines. a woman has died after being swept
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away by flood water as parts of england are hit with a month‘s worth of rain in one day. the snp launch their election campaign saying they would try to form an alliance with other parties to lock the conservatives out of power. the bbc announce plans for two election debates, one head to head between boris johnson and jeremy corbyn — and another with all the main british parties. an 18—year—old boy is jailed for minimum of 12 and half years for the murder of his former girlfriend. sport now on afternoon live with katie. records tumbling in new zealand while we were sleeping last night. tell us how. it certainly did. it was dawid milan‘s name on everybody‘s lips. he was brilliant for england and made history by scoring the quickest century by
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batsmen in twenty20 internationals to level the series with new zealand. he hit an unbeaten century off just 48 balls zealand. he hit an unbeaten century offjust 48 balls as he shared a 182 run partnership with his captain. the eoin morgan, who almost followed suit. before he was dismissed as england posted their highest ever total in t20s, with a victory. mathew parkinson took four wickets when new zealand batted. they fell 76 runs short though. so, malan has recently moved from middlesex to yorkshire in a bid to make a fresh start. and his former team—mate, steve finn paid tribute to him it's a brave move, what he's done, but he wants to further himself and push himself, which is impressive. an innings like this will definitely help him along the way. he came into this series not knowing whether he was going to play every game, i think. to take the opportunity as he has done has been really good. so, can england pull off another exciting victory? well, it‘s currenlty 2—2 in the fifth match series, with the decider
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in auckland on sunday. the big match of the weekend as liverpool against manchester city. but why are we talking about the city bus? this has arrived today. well, you may remember manchester city received a really hostile reception before last year‘s champions league quarterfinal, first leg. the coach was hit with missiles, just take a look at this. the bus was so badly damaged that a replacement was needed to take the players home. well, merseyside police have said they are aware of a poster on social media encouraging liverpool fans to "welcome" city‘s bus ahead of their league match at anfield on sunday. the unofficial poster asks fans to "welcome" city‘s bus in the same manner that they did last year. merseyside police have said they‘ve liaised with both clubs and supporter groups and have put a comprehensive and appropriate policing operation in place.
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if somebody at man city is... i don't know if they are, but if somebody is concerned, still, it is our fault. not that we did it after, again. we all didn't throw the bottle, or whatever it was, but it was one of us. so that's why we are responsible for that and we have to make sure, all of us have to make sure that something like this will never happen again. it will be an incredible game at anfield. for the premier it will be an incredible game at anfield. forthe premier league it will be an incredible game at anfield. for the premier league and all around the world. that is what we want. and, hopefully it's not going to happen the same that happened two seasons ago, when we arrived. it was more than one bottle. stoke have confirmed that northern ireland manager michael 0‘neill will take charge of the club. the irish fa gave permission to the championship side to approach 0‘neill. he‘s expected to take charge of stokes game charge of stoke‘s game against barnsley tomorrow.
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it‘s believed 0‘neill will then return to northern ireland to take charge of their final two euro 2020 qualifiers before moving to stoke on a full—time basis. stoke are currently bottom of the championship. of the championship. the draw has been made for the women‘s champions league quarterfinals with a tough game for arsenal as they‘ll be going head to head against paris st—germain. if the women‘s super league champions get past psg, then they could face lyon in the last four who have won the european title six times. while glasgow city will take on the two—time european champions wolfsburg. two time defending champion justin rose is just two shots off the lead at the halfway mark of the turkish 0pen. he birdied three of his last five holes in antalya to move to ten under par — two shots behind austria‘s mattius schwarbe. danny willett and ross fisher are the best placed brits — just one shot off the lead. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. thank you very much.
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more now on the news that a woman‘s died after apparently being swept away by floodwater — following the torrential rain that hit parts of the midlands and northern england yesterday. her body was pulled from the river derwent in derbyshire this morning. in south yorkshire, several severe flood warnings are in place meaning there‘s a danger to life. many homes and businesses are under water after the river don reached record levels. let‘s talk now to dr peter inness, he‘s a meteorologist at the university of reading. thank you forjoining us this afternoon. just talk us through what is bringing such persistent rain, if you would. it‘s a combination of different factors. before even the persistent rain, we had that very wet weather through the whole of 0ctober wet weather through the whole of october in exactly that part of the world. everything was wet already, the ground was wet, the reservoirs we re the ground was wet, the reservoirs were full, nowhere for the water to go and then we had a weather system sitting over us for about 24 hours
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or so with a frontal system across derbyshire, south yorkshire and into lincolnshire, which wasn‘t moving at all. it was stationary. the rain was all. it was stationary. the rain was a particularly heavy but so persistent over that 24—hour period, enough rain failed to cause flooding. what role does the jet strea m flooding. what role does the jet stream have? it is strong winds way out of the atlantic, seven or eight kilometres above the ocean. that generates weather systems all the time, sort of like a factory for weather systems. they move their way across the atlantic over the uk. the particular weather system that hit us particular weather system that hit us this week came right across the middle of the uk but usually they would be a bit further north. this week, thejet would be a bit further north. this week, the jet stream would be a bit further north. this week, thejet stream is would be a bit further north. this week, the jet stream is well south so the weather systems would be further south. instead of the heavy rain being in western scotland, it was in the midlands and south yorkshire. what are we expecting over coming days? the position of
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the jet stream being over coming days? the position of thejet stream being critical over coming days? the position of the jet stream being critical in what happens to this rain? that's absolutely correct, yeah. things aren‘t changing very much. we will have wetter days and drier days, just like we have been doing. there is no major change to the overall position of that jet stream. the weather systems will still be coming from the atlantic, it will still be waning across the uk. certainly, saturday lots more rain to come —— it will still be raining. a brief interlude on sunday and back into it for next week. how does what we are seeing at the moment compare with other autumns and other recent flooding and rainfall that we have had? we have had a number of autumn and winter flood events over the last few years. 2014 was a major one, with more flooding in the south of the uk. we have had some fairly heavy rain in the summer of 2012 at 2007 in particular in the same area of south yorkshire that has been suffering this time. this is of a
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par with those. it is not exceptional, but certainly troubling. but what can we do about it? i mean, if you are stuck underneath these weather systems, you‘ve just got to sit tight, haven‘t you? you‘ve just got to sit tight, haven't you? i guess, yeah. the ordinary person in the street can‘t do very much about it at all. but just heed the warnings. when the environment agency issued a severe flood warning, they really do mean that conditions could be severe and the idea of marseille, driving your car through flood water is something just to be avoided —— the idea of, say driving. for the advice and do what you‘re told. say driving. for the advice and do what you're told. thank you very much for talking to us. thank you. back now to the election campaign. today, borisjohnson has said that after brexit there‘ll be no checks on goods between northern ireland and the rest of the united kingdom. let‘s have a listen. this is a great deal for this country. it is ready to go. it allows the whole of the uk to leave the eu. the checks that you need to do for tarriff purposes, goods that might be coming
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via northern ireland from gb into ireland, but the whole of the... northern ireland and the rest of gb are part of the uk customs territory, and there can be no checks between goods operating in one customs area. we are the uk. we will not be instituting such checks. and so the advantage of this deal is that we come out whole and entire. northern ireland, with the rest of the country, can take part in doing free trade deals. and it‘s a fantastic opportunity for us to go forward, together. now, what would be a real shame would be to waste a whole year in renegotiation, in another referendum, which is what i‘m afraid jeremy corbyn and the labour party are insisting must happen, and i think it would be divisive and toxic and pointless. well, earlier, ispoke to our reality check
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correspondent, chris morris — and he gave a bit more context behind those comments from borisjohnson. it came after video emerged of him last night in northern ireland talking to a group of northern ireland businessmen. more video of that meeting has emerged in the last couple of hours in which mrjohnson says that for trade in the future, under his deal, between northern ireland and great britain, he assures the assembled throng, if throng it was, no forms, no checks, no barriers of any kind. that is in direct contradiction of what his own brexit secretary has said and what his brexit agreement says. that while there will be minimal administrative procedures, we are not talking about blokes in pink caps standing by the side of the road, but we are talking about filling in some export declarations, a lot of people in northern ireland are concerned about that. because they say however minimal it is, that is breaking the promise of unfettered access for northern ireland to the great britain market. what he said just there is that there will be no forms,
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not what his brexit secretary told parliament a few weeks ago. that is one we have to look at and see how that goes. yes, how do you square that circle? the conservatives have also said today that they‘ll introduce an nhs visa, that would help them attract clinical and medical staff from abroad. yes, we know, we have discussed this many times, there are cute staff shortages in the nhs. there are 43,000 nursing vacancies at the moment. the number of nurses coming from elsewhere in the eu has fallen quite sharply since the brexit referendum. we need to recruit people from elsewhere in the world. one of the things that‘s going to be done is the cost of the visa will be cut in half. currently, it‘s nearly £1,000. under this proposal, it will be £464. the way that newly—recruited staff have to pay for their own health care, at the moment, they have to pay an amount up front. under this new tory proposal, it would be taken out of their salary as they earned.
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the vacancies are so high, tens of thousands, some people are saying why don‘t you just cut the cost of the visas altogether? there are a couple of other issues which you need to bear in mind. one is bureaucracy. people are saying it is not so much the cost of the visa, but it takes months and months to actually get through the system and if you‘re trying to employ people for example on a six month contract, it could take as long to get the visa as the length of the contract. that is not ideal. secondly, this proposal doesn‘t really cover social care. care workers, social workers, etc. the vacancies in that sector are also acute, 8% of the total, not far short of one in ten of all the jobs in social care sector are vacant. this proposal for an nhs visa won‘t do anything about social care, which, as we know, many people and families deeply concerned about, whether it is elderly relatives, young children with disabilities and so forth. that is something which will be needed to be sorted out. labour have talked about an aspect of health care,
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in particular maternity leave. they have. they have put forward, if you like, a proposalfor more rights in generalfor women in the workplace. one of them is for maternity leave. at the moment, new mums get 90% of their average weekly earnings for the first six weeks. and then they getjust under 150 quid as a maximum amount for up to nine months after a child is born. labour says they want to extend that to a 12—month period. it also wants to extend shared parental leave. at the moment, that is only available for nine months, and labour would like to extend that to 12 months. the problem with shared parental leave — the take—up has been very low, partly because you‘ve just had a baby, you need to buy lots of new little clothes, people can‘t afford to be working on much smaller amounts of pay that statutory maternity pay gives you. in a country like germany, for example, you get ten months of maternity leave. but it‘s all on full pay.
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it‘s a rather different thing. the other thing about the labour proposal, if you like, it‘s part of a slightly more controversial package of flexible working. labour has been saying, "we would like people to have the ability, if you like, to set the terms of their own flexible working from day one in a newjob." businesses will have something to say about that! conservatives, hardly surprisingly, and the cbi have said there needs to be a bit more balance and it will be unaffordable for businesses if people can come in on day one of a newjob and say, "i‘m only prepared to work hours in this kind of pattern." much to discuss. earlier this year, a second world war veteran called harry billinge captured the hearts of millions of bbc viewers during commemorations for the anniversary of d day. harry, who‘s now 94, spoke to us about being in the first wave of troops to land in normandy when he was just 18 years of age. he said he could never forget his comrades
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who lost their lives — saying they were the heroes, not him. well, since then, harry has raised thousands of pounds for a new memorial to the dead in france. jon donnison reports thank you, darlin‘. in the remarkable life of harry billinge, this has been a remarkable year. there's about 35 quid there, harry. i‘m overwhelmed, really, with kindness. he's the best. you're the best. he's the hero. nobody else. i‘ll fill this tin by lunchtime. there you are. i saw you on the telly. it was an appearance on bbc breakfast telly on a normandy beach for the d—day 75th anniversary injune that saw harry go viral. don‘t say i‘m a hero. i‘m no hero. i was lucky. i‘m here. all the heroes are dead. and i‘ll neverforget them as long as i live. since that moment of modesty, harry‘s fund—raising in st austell in cornwall, towards building a memorial in france, has seen a surge.
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it‘s nearly 30,000 now, i believe. ijust put in another 2,000 last monday. thank god i‘m able to do what i want to do here and collect the money for that memorial, because by rights i shouldn‘t have been here. i should have been killed on the beach. i was saved, i believe, by the grace of god for this purpose. and tha‘s why i‘ve got to do it. i must do this. you're raising money for something and you can't see it? this morning, harry was back on bbc breakfast to see the memorial as it‘s being built, for the first time. clearly an emotional moment. 0k? yeah. idid it. ijust had a job to do. all these fellas did a good job. all these men, these wonderful men, young boys of 16. i‘m not a brave man. i‘m lucky. i owe my life to the boys that
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i loved and i‘ll never forget them. jon donnison, bbc news. scientists are planning a global mission to sequence the dna of all life on earth. the aim is to find new medicines for disease and new crops to resist climate change. £9.4 million in extra funding has just been announced for the uk part of the project, called tree of life. 0ur science correspondent richard westcott has been to see how some of the money will be spent at the earlham institute near norwich. so, now we are just taking a sample of water from the pond so we can see what living things are in there. even the most cutting—edge, global science can start with a pond and a selfie stick. i‘m assuming that‘s teeming with life because you can‘t see anything in it! absolutely, but once we look under the microscope, you will see. this is a tiny part of one of the most ambitious scientific projects ever — to read the dna of all
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non—human life on earth. that‘s every plant, animal, funghi and single—cell organism, including the ones in the pond where these guys work. it‘s really exciting. over the last ten years or so, a lot of techniques have been developed in bio—medical sciences for doing single—cell sequencing, so analysing the dna of individual cells from humans or mice. and what we are doing is adapting those technologies. so, there are things in here that don‘t have a name. let alone having their dna sequenced, they don‘t even have a name yet! it‘s entirely possible, yes. by studying dna from wild species, they hope to find answers to global problems, like how to breed crops to withstand disease and climate change. nature also holds clues to new medicines for humans. so, this is... this is basically malaria, is it? it is. and you were saying that one letter could be out here and that is why malaria would kill someone? yes. so, one letter in this sequence for this particular gene could make the difference between the parasite being resistant or susceptible
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to the drug, and, effectively, the difference between life and death. over the next decade, ten uk partners will decipher the genetic code of 66,000 species, part of a global effort to sequence 1.5 million living things, with the results free for all to use. well, it's huge excitement, really, because this is classic discovery science and it is very reminiscent of the explorers, such as darwin, who went out and collected species to describe them and then that led to theories which transformed biology. who knows? even the contents of their pond could potentially lead to life—changing discoveries. richard westcott, bbc news, norwich. ambitious stuff. in a moment, alice baxter will be here with latest business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live. a little later than usual. a woman dies in severe flooding in the north of england —
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police say she was reportedly swept away by the water. snp leader nicola sturgeon launches her party‘s election campaign — saying she‘ll seek an alliance with other parties to lock the conservatives out of government and promising to stop the nhs being privatised. the bbc announces plans for two prime—time election debates — a head to head between borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn and one with all the main british parties. here are your business headlines on afternoon live. mamas & papas has collapsed into administration with six store closures, just days after its rival mothercare went bust. the retailer has made 73 staff redundant and has put 54 further jobs at risk within its head office. bluegem capital, which has owned the business since 2014, has bought the company assets back through a pre—pack administration which will cut some
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of its financial liabilities. royal mail is seeking a high court injunction to stop a postal strike, which threatens to disrupt postal voting in the run—up to the general election as well as christmas post. more on that in just a moment. degree—educated savers are more at risk of losing their pension to fraudsters than those without the qualification — that‘s according to a survey by the financial conduct authority and the pensions regulator. fraudsters often target those with larger pension pots. you‘ve picked up on this fascinating story out of japan — that there have been reports of some firms there telling their female employees that they‘re not allowed to wear their glasses at work. why? why indeed? i would normally be wearing my glasses as well but i happen to have my contacts in. a really interesting story.
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several local news outlets said some companies had "banned" eyewear for female employees. various reasons cited including some retail chains safety in the airline industry, women in the beauty industry, you can‘t see things you are advertising clearly. but another reason cited saying that glasses wearing shop assista nts saying that glasses wearing shop assistants give off a "cold impression". lots of different reasons given. it makes me want to not only reach full glasses but to pounce on the end of my nose. what has the reaction been injapan? heated! it has sparked this huge online media backlash. the hashtag glassesareforbidden has been trending. it has triggered a larger
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debate about women in the workplace injapan and debate about women in the workplace in japan and workplace debate about women in the workplace injapan and workplace practices and it is not just injapan and workplace practices and it is notjust about injapan and workplace practices and it is not just about the injapan and workplace practices and it is notjust about the glasses will stop it has echoes of a discussion that went viral injapan a few months ago about high heels. a minister injapan a few months ago about high heels. a minister in japan was a few months ago about high heels. a minister injapan was quoted as saying it‘s necessary for companies in the country to maintain high heels as a dress code. and many japanese women, who were campaigning on the issue, say they remember being told it was obligatory when they applied for a job to wear high heels. both of these discussions open upa heels. both of these discussions open up a wider chat, is it ever appropriate for a workplace dress code, like television? some is down to individual preference but some is down to thejob to individual preference but some is down to the job you are doing. i look a total scrap when i‘m not at work but i wouldn‘t turn up in my dog walking kit when i‘m on the tv —— i look like a total sruff. there needs to be some personal preference involved. absolutely. a top-down
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directive... let talk to eric musgrave, a fashion industry commentator and glasses wearer! good to talk to you about this. why has there been a media backlash about this issue in japan there been a media backlash about this issue injapan right now? it's a very weird one. i was very surprised when i received the news story from you. obviously, it was very interesting to know why is it just women who have been told they can't wear glasses? i would be employable if i couldn't wear my glasses. i've never had any interest in wearing contact lenses. —— i would not be employable. they are pa rt of would not be employable. they are part of my personality. the interesting thing, one can make fun, but the interesting thing is that it's another example of women being told to look a certain way, presumably, namely, to please men. interesting, isn‘t it, to pick and glasses? for many people, wearing glasses? for many people, wearing glasses isn‘t a choice. it‘s not a fashion choice or accessory, something you have to wear because
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otherwise you can‘t see where you‘re going or what you‘re supposed to be doing. indeed. is this also culturally specific? can you think of instances here in the uk or in europe where there has also been issues over a dress code, particularly affecting women in the workplace? it virtually always affects women when it is negative. if we recall, about four years ago, there was a young woman called nicola thorpe, a temporary office worker, who was sent home from a division of pwc, the finance company, because she turned up in flat shoes and their rules are that women had to wear between two inches and four inches heels. can you imagine the rule being that men had to turn up in cowboy or boots or heels? there was also the case in this year that virgin atlantic had announced, rather grandly, that henceforward their announced, rather grandly, that henceforwa rd their female announced, rather grandly, that henceforward their female cabin staff would not have to wear make up
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and also they would be issuing trousers as standard option for their uniforms. the most interesting thing about that was the fact that they had to say that they have now changed the rules and the rules seem so changed the rules and the rules seem so archaic. interesting indeed. we could talk and talk about this but we must leave it there. many thanks, thatis we must leave it there. many thanks, that is the business use. thank you. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with thomasz. the weekend is almost upon us. a bit mixed on the weather front with some rain on away on saturday. a bit mixed on the weather front with some rain on the way on saturday. mostly across western and southern areas of the uk. your best bet for sunshine is sunday. in the short term, clearer skies with a few showers here and there. it is going to be a nippy night and early on saturday morning temperatures throughout the country will be around freezing or below inland. coastal areas not quite so cold. then rain for a time in northern ireland, south—west scotland and these western areas. there could be a bit of snow
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across the welsh hills as well. but eastern areas and northern england staying just about dry on saturday. and then saturday night, that weather front that brings the rain actually fizzles out as we go through the early hours of sunday, so good news for northern england. we are not expecting much in the way of rainfall. sunday itself is going to bring some bright if not sunny weather.
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this is afternoon light. the headlines... a woman dies in severe flooding in the north of england — police say she was reportedly swept away by the water. schools are closed and people are warned not to leave their homes unless it‘s absolutely necessary. the sirens have been going everywhere we have seen and ambulances and fire crews all over at matlock and the surrounding areas. snp leader nicola sturgeon launches her party‘s election campaign, saying she‘ll seek an alliance with other parties to lock the conservatives out of government and promising to stop the nhs being privatised. we will fight tooth and nail any attempt to expose the national health service to a post—brexit trade deal with donald trump. the bbc announces plans for two prime—time election debates —
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a head—to—head between borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn and one with all the main british parties. jail for an 18—year—old man who stabbed to death his former girlfriend, ellie gould. coming up on afternoon live — all the sport. add a new record set by england plasma cricketers? even eoin morgan says england put in one of their best ever t20 batting performances as they levelled the series with new zealand so dawid malan was in sparkling form, securing the fastest century by an english batsman in t20 history. thanks, and we‘ll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past. tomasz has all the weather. it will take a while for the floodwaters to subside but the good news is that across northern england, at least, the weather this weekend is looking mostly dry, even sonny on sunday. also coming up — it‘s one week
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until children and need. we‘ll be speaking to look north‘s peter levy about how he‘s been raising money. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. a woman has died after apparently being swept away by floodwater as parts of the midlands and northern england were battered by a month‘s worth of rain in one day. six severe flood warnings are in place along the river don in doncaster — meaning there‘s a danger to life. some residents have been rescued from their homes. in sheffield, dozens of people spent the night stranded in a shopping centre because of flooded roads, while 35 homes in mansfield were evacuated after a mudslide. here‘s our correspondent, robert hall, in doncaster. we are on st mary‘s bridge about a quarter of a mile from the centre of doncaster and fire crews here are
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still on standby and they have been called to emergency calls around the area and that is because that is the river don. it is raging eastwards and it has been rising steadily through the morning. the environment agency, we will hear from them, reckon it stabilised but it is going to remain at very dangerous levels and that means that it may yet over top flood defences, which have in part been holding. looking across the bridge, using the shot from the other camera to help, you can see there is an industrial area beyond me completely flooded out and water down there. more misery for local businesses, and that misery to homeowners as well, repeated across this part of south yorkshire. danny savage is down the road in bentley, which is one of the areas hardest hit. in doncaster this morning, it was a frantic rush to get to safety and deal with the rising floodwater.
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anything and everything was deployed to help. yes, they were aware of the rain, but they were still caught by surprise. it came really quickly, to be honest. it has happened down here a couple of times, but we had no warning from the council or anything. they should have been out last night giving out sandbags all that sort of stuff, but we have had nothing. in nearby bentley, the main a19 was underwater and closed. in the houses here, they are looking out of the window anxiously because levels are still rising. i took everything upstairs, a friend came over and she helped me take the furniture upstairs, we have lifted everything up, everything out of the kitchen cupboards, so the kitchen is upside down, just tried to raise everything as much as we can. for linda, this is not the first time she has been flooded, but the timing could not be worse. i am here, 26a with the sale... for sale sign sign, in fact sold, subject to survey.
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they are due to come out and do the survey on monday. are you worried now this has happened? i am very worried. i doubt anybody will want to go ahead and buy this now. the water is not yet pouring into graham‘s house next door, but he has had to take some pretty dramatic measures. unfortunately the chickens can‘t swim, so i have had to bring them in. how bad is the situation outside? terrible, it happened in 2007, it has happened again, just ridiculous. is it one of those things? or do you think the authorities could have done more to stop it happening? i think they could have done a lot more to stop it happening. from above, the extent of the flooding in south yorkshire can be seen for miles, stretching from sheffield to rotherham and on to doncaster, where the river don has recahed its highest recorded level. almost 20 schools are closed, with widespread flood warnings.
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scores of people had to be rescued by boat in rotherham as emergency services responded to hundreds of calls. this is rotherham station last night — where the tracks should be has been replaced by a canal. in mansfield in nottinghamshire a cliff gave way, the landslide leading to 35 homes being evacuated, and it is not over get. there is a concern more places could flood as the water drains from the region. danny savage, bbc news, doncaster. a lot of people following events on bbc news and local radio and i promised you an update. adrian gill from the environment agency has hightailed it from your control centre. let us deal with this, where are we with water levels? we are still in doncaster, we have had lots of rainfall across the catchment in the last 24 hours with high levels in sheffield moving down. the river levels are peaking on doncaster but we are expecting them to stay very high for several hours and that is causing a lot of disruption and
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there is some overtopping as well which is causing some risk to properties. this is not 2007 and defences, to be fair, have failed in , held ina lot of areas but we are seeing a certain amount of overtopping. it is escaping? it is. the rainfall in the last 24 hours is similar to 2007, river levels have got close to 2007 and it is a different event but we are seeing impacts, particularly in doncaster were some defences are overtopping and we have seen disruption to the road network and flooding to businesses and some properties and that is something we are still going to need to keep an eye on in the coming hours. like 2007 this is a big area for you and the emergency services to monitor, it is a certain amount of rapid reaction to events as they arise? we obviously work very closely with the met office to forecast what might happen in terms of flood work and we work with emergency partners but at the same time we do react to feedback on the ground to what might be happening and we clearly respond to that as required.
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the sirens are in the background, as they have been all day, and we talk about red warnings and those are still in place. let‘s deal with advice for people watching this or they know people living in affected areas. what is the advice? at the moment in doncaster we have six of your flood warnings out which means there is significant risk to life. and that is because earlier this morning we were not sure how much the defences would over top buy and what risk that would pose to a number of communities. we have seen some communities evacuated in doncaster and that has been coordinated by the local authority. if people want to find out more about that they can contact the local authority and if they want to find out whether they are at flood risk and what to do during the flood they can visit the website with lots of information there. if people have a concern about risk to safety, that is one for the emergency services. thanks very much indeed and this rain is not what anybody wanted.
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it is not going to help the situation, so in a nutshell, it is stable but still dangerous and so i think the message really if you live in this area or you are worried or feel you are at risk, stay in touch with local media and with the environment agency. let‘s get more with alexjohnson. alexjohnson, let‘s get more with alexjohnson. alex johnson, what are the let‘s get more with alexjohnson. alexjohnson, what are the main problems? the main problems are people still travelling into flooded areas in cars and getting stuck. we areas in cars and getting stuck. we are obviously spending a lot of time rescuing people from those cars but also sometimes helping rescue people from properties. more often because they cannot actually get to a place of safety because the water is too deep so we are spending a lot of time coordinating that with local authorities. how many dangerous canopy to set off on foot or in a car in floodwater? with floodwater,
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it only needs to be one foot deep and it can knock you off your feet and it can knock you off your feet and 18 inches, two feet deep, a fast flowing can of a car. you don‘t want to head into any roads that look like they are flooded. if you cannot see the road itself. why do people do this? i think they can get through it and they are better drivers and the car has more capabilities than it has but if you cannot see the curb you should not go through the waters. what is your advice to people who might be stuck in their homes and really feel they need to leave and go somewhere to safety? if they cannot leave and get to safety, they can try the local authority first, the local council, who will offer advice. then they can ring 999 if they if they feel they need rescuing and if they are unable to escape themselves. we will come out. what we are focusing on is the most vulnerable, elderly and people
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with disabilities, because any greater help than others. get things off the ground, i your electrics so what does not get into electrical items, take things upstairs if you can. this type of flooding will subside but it will take time and we cannot do anything to move this until the rain stops and the flooding stops. people are expressing worry about their pets or livestock if they are farmers. how do you help that? we will help if we can‘t. i have got pets myself but you must remember that we must prioritise people so if you have pets and their keep them upstairs with yourselves. if they are outside, lift them up, another touches, etc, lift them out of the water, you will be surprised how resilient animals are. think ahead so they don‘t get water into them before you have moved them to safety. alex johnson, thank you very
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much for talking to us. the snp have launched their election campaign with leader nicola sturgeon putting brexit at the centre of the party‘s message. she said the party would try to form an alliance with other parties to lock the conservatives out of government after the election. the snp is also promising a bill that would protect the nhs from privatisation and future trade deals, saying the health service is ‘not for sale at any price‘. our scotland correspondent james shaw reports. nicola sturgeon launched her party‘s campaign with a warning. this was, she said, the most important election for generations to come. why? because it will determine the future of the united kingdom in or out of the european union and the future of scotland, in or out of the uk. and she looked ahead to a post—election landscape where it was possible that no party might have a majority. brexit, brexit. a vote for the snp, in contrast, is a vote to escape brexit.
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a vote for the snp is a vote to take scotland‘s future out of the hands of borisjohnson and a broken westminster system. there was a long list of demands to secure the snp‘s support for a minority labour government. control of immigration and drug and employment law, and an end to universal credit. but perhaps the most eye—catching demand was legislation to make sure that the nhs was not at risk of further privatisation as part of a future trade deal with the united states. we will fight tooth and nail any attempt to expose the national health service to a post—brexit trade deal with donald trump. that is why, after this election, snp mps will bring forward a new law, an nhs protection bill, to explicitly protect the nhs in all four countries of the uk
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from being a bargaining chip. so, the snp are making it clear that the nhs will be a top priority for them in this election campaign. but stopping brexit is also key to their campaigning efforts and, underlying it all, the drive towards a second independence referendum. the snp are not the only party to appreciate how much the nhs matters to voters. their idea for legislation to protect it is new, but will the other parties take it seriously, and will nicola sturgeon‘s party win enough votes to influence notjust the future of scotland but the future of the whole of the united kingdom? james shaw, bbc news, edinburgh. our political correspondent jonathan blake is travelling with the prime minister and they are currently in north wales. what are the main themes today? how
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have things moved on since i talk of whether they would be checks of goods going between here and northern ireland ? goods going between here and northern ireland? we can pick up from the snp campaign launch which you heard about because boris johnson dismissed the scottish national party‘s call for legislation to protect the nhs in any future trade deal with the us after brexit as, in his words, loch ness monster, bermuda triangle —type stuff and that is one of the thing isa stuff and that is one of the thing is a prime minister had to say in an interview earlier where he sought to clarify his comments last night that there will be no checks on goods crossing from northern ireland to great britain. if he is able to get his deal through parliament, if the conservatives win a majority. in this stop here on teesside is another busy day for the prime minister, having visited the north—east, northern ireland on the east midlands and now north wales.
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he is about to arrive. you can see him... we might try to get a question to him as he arrives. he will meet workers at this food factory. continuing what has been a whistle—stop tour of the united kingdom in the first couple of days of the campaign. closely choreographed with no voters or brushes with the public. prime minister, can i ask for the government response to the flooding? i will be talking later on. there we go! that was not very helpful? not particularly helpful. he will talk about the flooding later. but the nhs is an issue as well, labour and the snp talking about that. but the nhs these ares, what is a response from other parties to the suggestion
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from other parties to the suggestion from the conservatives acknowledging we have a 43,000 vacancies for nurses? that is right and that was the main message is the prime minister was hoping to talk about today. he did so on that visit to the hospital in the east midlands this morning. and the aim is to cut the cost and make it more convenient and easierfor the cost and make it more convenient and easier for nhs workers, the cost and make it more convenient and easierfor nhs workers, doctors and easierfor nhs workers, doctors and nurses and others coming from outside the uk overseas to work in the nhs but as you suggest, it was criticised not just by the nhs but as you suggest, it was criticised notjust by other political parties who you might expect but nurses unions and medical groups and others who say this is ok as far as it goes but if the government is to address that staffing shortage, which runs into the tens of thousands, then more widespread action is needed. some suggest that really the cost of theseis suggest that really the cost of these is should be cut altogether if these is should be cut altogether if the government is serious about attracting talent from overseas in to the uk. the pie minister defended
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his policy and he said that given as far as it goes, it does not address the shortage in social care, the government will put forward plans and the conservative party will put forward plans in the coming weeks to address pacific needs for workers in social care. that is part of the prime minister‘s message as he continues this tour of the uk in the early days of the campaign, trying to keep the focus very much on that 2—pronged attack of the conservative campaign, in the first instance, as the slogan goes, getting brexit done and after that, allowing the uk to flourish with investment and extra funding for public services. as we have seen today, with that destruction of the talk of the detail of borisjohnson‘s destruction of the talk of the detail of boris johnson‘s brexit deal and how it will work and concerns that firms in northern ireland will lose out does not a lwa ys ireland will lose out does not always go according to plan and there is only so far they can control the message. we will let you follow him inside and see what he is up follow him inside and see what he is up to. for the moment, thank you
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very much. jonathan blake in north wales. the liberal democrat leaderjo swinson has been campaigning in fife in scotland this afternoon — she‘s just been speaking — let‘s hear some of what she had to say we are clear we want to stop brexit andi we are clear we want to stop brexit and i have been working with people and i have been working with people and other parties on the people‘s vote campaign and trying to stop brexit in recent years and that has included people from the labour party and the conservative party and the snp, with the greens and independents. i will always work in a cross—party genuine basis to try to achieve our goals. that is very different from formal government arrangements. if i look at boris johnson and jeremy corbyn, neither one of them is fit to be pie minister and frankly i‘m confident i could do a betterjob as prime minister than either of them. jo swinson, the liberal democrat leader. joining me now from our edinburgh studio is christine jardine, the liberal democrat spokesperson for home affairs. thank you very much forjoining us.
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given how well established the snp‘s anti brexit message is, in scotland, how do the liberal democrats make themselves more appealing to the remaining voters? the snp anti brexit message is not as established as they would have you believe. for example, did you know that they spent less on the remain campaign in scotla nd spent less on the remain campaign in scotland than they did on an u nsuccessful scotland than they did on an unsuccessful by—election campaign in shetland earlier this year? stop brexit is not their slogan, it is ours, they came very late to the people‘s vote campaign so the snp, the only message they have, that they are interested in and that they generally promote in scotland is independence. and the people of scotla nd independence. and the people of scotland know that and rejected that in 2014 and don‘t want to have to go through that chaos again. the argument is if you want to stay in the eu, as a lot of those voters do, the eu, as a lot of those voters do, the way to do that is to be an
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independent scotland kwez yellow it is not! jo swinson says the liberal democrats would work with other parties to stop brexit. why are we not seeing a commitment to a very clear alliance with the snp in scotland? because the snp don't want anything more than independence. they are not prepared to take independence of the table and so we are not prepared to talk to them because we are clearly and com pletely because we are clearly and completely a party that believes in the united kingdom. the snp do not. every single thing they do is designed to achieve independence in one way or another. they were not committed to remain until it won, they had people campaigning for both sides. in scotland. they had people campaigning on both sides because their ultimate aim is to do whatever furthers the argument for independence. i am afraid they are not a party of remain, they are a
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party for leaving. we are a party of remaining in the uk and they want to leave the uk and that is what is important to the people of scotland. jo swinson might come under pressure in the aftermath of the selection stop who will she put her party with? who would she form a coalition with? who would she form a coalition with if she holds the balance of power on december 13? with if she holds the balance of power on december13? we are not talking about coalitions or the balance of power or this supply and confidence, we are talking about the general election and the fact that the british political system needs to change, it need seismic change, it need someone other than either borisjohnson orjeremy corbyn, neither of whom are fit to be pie minister. jo swinson is the alternative. we‘re not talking about other than the number of seats but we went in this general election. we won the european election, beating both the labour party and the conservative party for the first time in100 conservative party for the first time in 100 years. and we also had
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fantastic results in the local elections in england earlier in the year. what we are looking at is changing british politics, offering a brighterfuture, changing british politics, offering a brighter future, offering something different to the british people. an alternative that they have not really hard for a very long time. given the liberal democrats or not the main opposition, why is your party is so vexed about the bbc holding a debate that is just between boris johnson holding a debate that is just between borisjohnson and holding a debate that is just between boris johnson and jeremy corbyn? that is a debate between two old—fashioned brexiteers from the old—fashioned brexiteers from the old system who want the old way of doing things. you are not offering viewers an alternative. jo swinson is the alternative to that. and the liberal democrats, they offer the chance to remain in the european union. neither of those parties do. they have talked aboutjobs first,
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brags —— no—deal brexit, all kinds of brexit, we talk about remaining and that should be put to the viewers. not only are we vexed as a party, as someone who worked for the bbc for a huge part of their career, iam bbc for a huge part of their career, i am puzzled by why the bbc has taken this i am puzzled by why the bbc has ta ken this stance i am puzzled by why the bbc has taken this stance and is not offering the viewers the choice. how likely is it your party will take legal action against the bbc over this in the way they are doing against itv? with itv we dealt with that situation and i would not want to commit the party to one thing or another but i think we just have to look at the situation and think, it is exactly the same as with itv. they have excluded a choice from the british public and i think it is odd that if you talk about chocolate or whatever else in the bbc you must use the phrase, other types of chocolate are available. you are not doing that when it comes to the debate, not with the biggest choice this country has faced in my
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lifetime and many people‘s lifetimes. that does not fit with what the british public expect from the bbc. christine jardine, thank you very much. get a mac you‘re very welcome. an 18—year—old man has been jailed for 12.5 years for the murder of the 17—year—old ellie gould. thomas griffiths pleaded guilty to stabbing ellie in her home after she had ended their relationship. in an exclusive interview, ellie‘s mother told the bbc about the horror of the day ellie was killed. fiona lamdin reports. # nice to meet you, where you been? # i can show you incredible things. ..# her life was full and all the opportunities in front of her. yeah, she was the perfect daughter, really. ellie gould was just 17, studying for her a—levels, when she was murdered by thomas griffiths. the night before, she‘d called off their three—month relationship to concentrate on her schoolwork.
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we trusted him. we welcomed him into our home. he celebrated her 17th birthday with us. three months later, he murdered her. it‘s chilling. on the morning he killed her, thomas‘ mum took him to school, but he caught the bus straight home. despite not having a licence, he took the family car and drove to ellie‘s house. he knew she was at home alone, studying. he stabbed her at least 13 times in the neck before going back to school, pretending nothing had happened. three hours later, ellie‘s dad found her on the kitchen floor. and i never forget that phone call of matt, hysterical, saying, "carole, you need to drive home, ellie‘s had an accident. drive carefully, but ellie‘s had an accident." and then as i pulled round into our drive, nothing could prepare me for police cars abandoned everywhere,
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and an ambulance at the end of the drive and... and then mattjust sobbing at the end of our drive. and ijust ran up to him, and a policeman said, "who are you?" and i said, "i‘m her mother, what‘s happened, what‘s happened?" at the same time, thomas griffiths was messaging friends about self harming, but we now know the scratches on his neck had come from ellie as she fought for her life. and we sat in the back of the police car, absolutely stunned. and then they said, "does she have a boyfriend?" and i said, "oh, she does, but he doted on her. he wouldn‘t harm her." pat, and what does justice mean for you? i think he's evil. i don't believe he should be allowed to take another breath, quite frankly. he's dangerous. i don‘t think he should ever be let out of prison. i don‘t think he should ever be granted parole. he is a danger to society, he‘s a danger particularly to women.
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thejudge described it as an exceptionally grave crime. thomas griffiths has never explained why he murdered ellie. no mother should ever... ..hold their dead daughter‘s hand. it was just heartbreaking. go. 0k. every time i see teenage girls, and ijust look and i think, "oh, ellie." you know? it's just so heartbreaking. you are reminded constantly. i can‘t spend any time in her bedroom. i try and go in... ..sometimes, and look at the photographs on the wall of her and her friends, but i can‘t stay in for many minutes. it‘s too painful. fiona lamdin, bbc news. police have released the names of all 39 people who were found dead in a lorry in essex last month.
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the victims included two 15—year—old boys. essex police say it‘s been of paramount importance to ensure that each individual‘s next of kin were informed and to bring answers to worried families. consultation is now underway with the vietnamese authorities over the repatriation of those who have died. now it‘s time for a look at the weather. the weekend is almost upon us. a bit mixed on the weather front with some rain on away on saturday. tomorrow. mostly across western and southern areas of the uk. your best bet for sunshine is sunday. in the short term, clearer skies with a few showers here and there. it is going to be a nippy night and early on saturday morning temperatures throughout the country will be around freezing or below inland. coastal areas not quite so cold. then rain for a time in northern ireland, south—west scotland and these western areas. there could be a bit of snow across the welsh hills as well.
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but eastern areas and northern england staying just about dry on saturday. and then saturday night, that weather front that brings the rain actually fizzles out as we go through the early hours of sunday so good news for northern england. we are not expecting much in the way of rainfall. sunday itself is going to bring some bright if not sunny weather.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines: i woman has died after being swept away by flood water after parts of england are hit by a months worth of rain in one day. the snp launch their election campaign saying they would try to form an alliance with other parties to lock the conservatives out of power. the bbc announce plans for two election debates, one head to head between boris johnson and jeremy corbyn — and another with all the main british parties. an 18 year old boy is jailed for minimum of 12 and half years for the murder of his former girlfriend. sport now on afternoon live with katie. liverpool and manchester city meet this weekend, which could have an extra edge to it before a ball is even kicked. yes, tensions are high before sunday‘s game because you may
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remember that manchester city received a really hostile reception before last year‘s champions‘ league quarter final first leg. this sunday‘s game will be a blockbuster anyway. the coach was hit with missiles. the bus was so badly damaged that a replacement was needed to take the players home. take a look at this. well, merseyside police have said they are aware of a poster on social media encouraging liverpool fans to "welcome" city‘s bus in the same manner ahead of their league match at anfield on sunday. but added that they have put a comprehensive and appropriate policing operation in place. it will be an incredible game at anfield for the premier league and all around the world. that is what we want. and, hopefully it's not going to happen the same that happened two seasons ago, when we arrived. it was more than one bottle. well, ahead of that big game, manchester city have confirmed that goalkeeper ederson will not be available. the brazlian suffered
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a injury during the 1—1 draw with atalanta. the normal number two, claudio bravo, is likely to replace him. not kyle walker, despite a short surprise stint in goal. liverpool are currently six points clear at the top of the premier league with city on their heels in second. but as the title came down to just one point last season, both teams will want to make their mark for the title in the blockbuster tie this weekend. northern ireland‘s manager heading to the midlands? stoke have confirmed that northern ireland manager michael o‘neill will take charge of the club. the irish fa gave permission to the championship side to approach o‘neill. he‘s expected to take charge of stokes game against barnsley tomorrow. it‘s believed o‘neill will then return to northern ireland to take charge of their final two euro 2020 qualifiers before moving to stoke on a full—time basis. stoke are currently bottom of the championship.
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i think ithink in i think in this day and age, as a british coach, you typically have to manage your team into the premier league and this is a club i think certainly has the potential to go back to that type of level, albeit at the minute, our media to situation obviously is about making sure we climb up the championship table. —— our immediate situation. arsenal‘s former captain granit xhaka will once again miss out for this weekend‘s game against leicester. after reacting angrily to supporters at a home game last month, the midfielder was stripped of the club captaincy and after being left out of their europa league game on wednesday, unai emery has confirmed xhaka is not being considered for tomorrow evening‘s trip to the king power stadium. i spoke with him. i spoke with him. on tuesday. for how he‘s feeling now and his mind. because he is working well, he‘s training well, but he
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said to me... enough at the moment to play. and we are going to wait. manchester city‘s georgia sta nway and gemma bonner have been called up to the england women‘s squad, ahead of their international friendly against germany tomorrow at wembley. toni duggan though has withdrawn from the squad with a lower back injury. it‘s going to be a sell—out at the 90,000 capacity stadium, which will be a record crowd for a lionesses‘ home match. dawid malan‘s name was on everyone lips as he was absolutely brilliant for england. he actually made history by scoring the quickest century by an english batsman in twenty20 internationals, to level the series with new zealand. malan hit an unbeaten century offjust 48 balls — as he shared a 182 run partnership with captain eoin morgan who nearly followed suit — 91 for him. before he was dismissed as england posted their highest ever total in t20s, with a victory. mathew parkinson took four wickets when new zealand batted. they fell
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76 runs short though. that‘s all the sport for now. there are of course more stories on the bbc sport website. bye for now. now on afternoon live — let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. simon ward, from east midlands today, is in mansfield, talking about the landslip which saw residents evacuated. we‘ll be hearing more from him injust a moment. peter levy is in hull, where he and the team at look north have been gearing up for this year‘s children in need. you‘ve got to wonder about what some of my colleagues get up to some yea rs. but first, some extraordinary pictures we‘ve seen of this landslip in mansfield, simon.
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tonight at least 28 homes here... you can see the police tape and fire service tape where people won‘t be able to live in their homes tonight. there has been concern about this area, which is an old sand quarry, since 2011 when the homes were built. people were worried if anything would happen and there has been concern. people are being allowed to gather a few possessions very briefly from their homes. they won‘t be allowed to stay here tonight and they have to stay with families as they did last night. 2011 these homes were built. the council removed trees and did drone surveys. you might be able to hear over the back of these homes, the council is removing some of the trees high on the headland above this quarry as they continue their survey. last night, the landslip did happen but thankfully nobody was hurt. what are people who have had to leave their homes been saying —— what have people. people have been very frustrated through much of the
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day. the council hasn‘t been releasing many statements until later on this afternoon but i spoke to natalie who is one of the residents and she told me what happened. last night, me and my daughter was in the living room, we heard a loud noise, we thought something was happening in the garden and we looked out and we realised the sand was coming away from the cliff and all of a sudden, it all came down. and when we came out of the house, we we re and when we came out of the house, we were greeted with fire engines and police. so you rushed out of the house when you saw it coming down? yeah. my first instinct was, how would we get everybody out? things like this don't happen around here. it is the scariest thing i have ever seen. it is the scariest thing i have ever seen. at the moment, people aren't allowed in their homes and you had to spend the night away, what were you able to organise? we were put... we managed to get a hotel last night. we are all very tired because we had to get the kids up for school. a total nightmare, because
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we had to grab what we can and go. later on this afternoon, mansfield district council released a statement saying they are supporting residents here and offering accommodation if they want that. many people staying with friends and family. they will be carrying out further study and any remedial work that needs to be done but the land ownership is complex. we have people with varying sized gardens. some of those perhaps include a bit of the cliff side with the rest being owned by the council. the council has been locked in meetings with its lawyers all day. they have been advising homeowners to contact their insurance companies as soon as possible. but also thanking people for their patients. at this stage, we don‘t know when people will be allowed to move back into their affected homes. simon, thank you very much. children in need has been a week —— is only a week away. you we re a week —— is only a week away. you were ina
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a week —— is only a week away. you were in a boxing ring. have you taken were in a boxing ring. have you ta ke n leave were in a boxing ring. have you ta ken leave of were in a boxing ring. have you taken leave of your senses?” were in a boxing ring. have you taken leave of your senses? i am not sure how it happened but during the interview on air, he challenged me toa interview on air, he challenged me to a fight. i said, no thank you, but he said it is for children in need. a few days ago, for children in need, it happened. why are we in this position? well, you offered me out and i'm a man with pride and no matter how big the challenge is, i back down. but do you think... you think i‘m joking, don‘t you? you think i‘m joking, don‘t you? you think i‘m joking, don‘t you? you think i‘m not taking this seriously. i think it started that way, yeah. i started to think that it was a joke and then! started to think that it was a joke and then i realised how good you are. now i'm getting a little bit nervous.
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as an opponent, have you got any tips for me? what? for you to... ? knock you out. just close your eyes and swing. don't laugh at me! no! you were laughing at me!|j and swing. don't laugh at me! no! you were laughing at me! i was sneezing! are you confident? yes, i'm very confident. so am i! well, that's going to make a great fight. bring it on! close your eyes and swing, that‘s good advice to all of us. this is not the only daft thing you‘ve been doing for children in the. there was a bit more of that, which you can see later on look north and on iplayer. i was challenged to go in a large wheelie bin full of water in
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the summer. this was after we had a news story of a guy sitting in a wheelie bin to cool down when it was hot weather. that is what happened and the mayor even made a large donation and provided the wheelie bin. and i ended up in there. soaked to the skin and under the water. they were quite cruel. i have to tell you, that‘s the bit... that the dodgy bit, there! i have to tell you, there is some pressure pressure at the moment here for me to do it again, live on children in need next friday, but it‘s not going to happen. i would put money on it actually happening! that's the worrying thing! what about simon mccoy, challenge him to do it!|j wish i had thought of that!|j mccoy, challenge him to do it!|j wish i had thought of that! i can extend the invitation. remember when you said years ago i want to be a journalist? look what it‘s come to! yeah! are you doing anything? not if
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ican yeah! are you doing anything? not if i can help it, no, but don‘t say anything! i'll get a train ticket booked to hull for you next friday. i think booked to hull for you next friday. ithink i‘m booked to hull for you next friday. i think i‘m washing my hair! booked to hull for you next friday. i think i'm washing my hair!” booked to hull for you next friday. i think i'm washing my hair! i bet you are! more on that of course and what look north have got planned for children in the next week. you can see more on that report at 6:30pm. and more on simon‘s report about the mansfield landslip at 6:30pm. thank you for taking us around nationwide this afternoon. let‘s get back to the launch of the snp‘s election campaign — with leader nicola sturgeon putting opposition to brexit at the centre of the party‘s message. she said the party would try to form an alliance with other parties to lock the conservatives out of government after the election. the snp is also promising a bill that would protect the nhs
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from privatisation and future trade deals, saying the health service is "not for sale at any price." joining me now from our studio in dundee is stephen gethins, the europe spokesman for the scottish national party. how many takers have you had for this idea of an alliance against the conservatives? something has already been happening, to be fair. i‘ve worked across party with colleagues in different political parties and i was one of the co—authors and co—sponsors of the benn act and letwi n co—sponsors of the benn act and letwin amendment and we were able to ta ke letwin amendment and we were able to take no deal off the table. the snp's take no deal off the table. the snp‘s worked in a progressive way with colleagues in the labour party, the liberal democrats, plaid cymru and the green party already. the liberal democrats, plaid cymru and the green party alreadym the liberal democrats, plaid cymru and the green party already. it is already happening. but we were speaking to christine jardine, the liberal democrats‘ home affairs spokesperson not so long ago and she
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pointed out that the snp were very late to the people‘s boat campaign and that some of your colleagues voted to leave in the 2016 referendum —— people‘s vote campaign to stop anything that gets you a scottish referendum in her view is what you will back. sorry, festival, look, i don‘t want to pick a fight with billable democrats, we work closely with them —— first of we are working closely with them to look at the tourist —— with the liberal democrats. every single member of the snp group voted against triggering article 50. we voted against leaving the european union every single member. and let‘s not forget you had the liberal democrat mp losing the whip because that person was back in brexit. they were split as a grip on that. i‘m sorry, but let‘s... —— split as a group. the liberal democrats, like some others, won‘t let facts getting in the way of a good debate. the snp are the most united and strongest
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remain party in westminster and i hope that will remain so after the election. some people have described us as an effective opposition to the conservative party. we are determined to work with others to lock out the tories and stop brexit. let‘s look at a financial fact. the snp are the most united and strongest remain party in westminster and i hope that will remain so after the election. some people have described us as effective opposition to the conservative party. we are determined to work with others to lock out the tories and stop brexit. let‘s look at a financial fact. the snp is saying that leaving the european union will knock £9 billion off the scottish outfit and the claims being made by the snp is that that will cost each person in scotla nd that will cost each person in scotland £1600. that‘s not quite so. it means that gdp per person would be £1600 lower than it would have otherwise been in 11 years. that is not the same as it costing an individual £1600. you are taking liberties with these statistics.” don‘t think we are. liberties with these statistics.” don't think we are. they are not the same thing! we are quantifying the statistics. what you are saying is not the same thing. look, everybody knows every single bit of analysis, including this tory government‘s own
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analysis, tells us just how damaging brexit will be to public services, jobs, the economy. every single bit of analysis. i can‘t help it if the uk government refuses to publish its own analysis, because it shows just how damaging it is. but if you look at those statistics and those from fraser valley under institute and a whole range of others, about how damaging that will be, the snp is right to highlight the grave damage the tories are going to do for generations. despite our differences, that is why we will work with others to lock out the tories of power. it is the best thing we can do to protect public services and stop brexit.” thing we can do to protect public services and stop brexit. i suppose a lot of voters would find it helpful if the statistics they are presented with are accurate. they are accurate! i‘m sorry, but look... i‘m sorry, this would be hugely damaging to leave the european union, we need to quantify that and people need to know. there is no analysis that shows us benefiting from leaving the eu and the uk government has put together its own
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analysis and has done so at the taxpayers expense and won‘t even have the courage to publish that. 0k, we will move on and just, finally, if you found yourself in coalition with labour, after the election, what would you be demanding from them? everything about the snp, clue in the name, seems that all you are really concerned about is having this next referendum on scottish independence. firstly, the scottish national party, you know, is the fact that we area party, you know, is the fact that we are a party for everybody in scotland. we have also not said anything about coalitions. in the scottish parliament, the snp has led a minority administration twice. in that time, we have passed world leading climate change legislation, protected education, the nhs, and other public services. that has won support across scotland. we know that being a progressive government means we need to also engage with the opposition to get things done. instead of collapsing in a heap, as
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the tory government has done under minority administration, you have had full terms of snp government, budgets being passed, but that means working with other parties. we are the most experienced party, in terms of running a minority administration, working with others. we have done it with the scottish parliament and we started doing it in westminster and i would encourage other party to catch up with us. it is the only way you are going to get things done in westminster. that is trying to work across party, find common ground. we have our objectives, we want to stop brexit, stop tories and we believe in independence for scotland, but it hasn‘t stopped me working with other collea g u es hasn‘t stopped me working with other colleagues and making progress over the last four and a half years and it won‘t stop me in the future. i will continue to work with other parties if it is in the best interests of my constituents. thank you forjoining us. in a moment, alice is going to bring us the latest business news. first, a look at the headlines
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on afternoon live. a woman dies in severe flooding in the north of england — police say she was reportedly swept away by the water. snp leader nicola sturgeon launches her party‘s election campaign — saying she‘ll seek an alliance with other parties to lock the conservatives out of government and promising to stop the nhs being privatised. the bbc announces plans for two prime—time election debates — a head to head between borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn — and one with all the main british parties. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. mamas & papas has collapsed into administration with six store closures, just days after its rival mothercare went bust. the retailer has made 73 staff redundant and has put 54 further jobs at risk within its head office. royal mail is seeking a high court injunction to stop a postal strike — which threatens to disrupt postal voting in the run—up to the general election as well as christmas post. more on that in just a moment. degree—educated savers are more at risk of losing their pension to fraudsters than those
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without the qualification — that‘s according to a survey by the financial conduct authority and the pensions regulator. fraudsters often target those with larger pension pots. it's it‘s a bad week for maternity retailers. absolutely. mothercare, i sta lwa rt retailers. absolutely. mothercare, i stalwart of the british high street has launched a huge sale because early in the week they announced they were falling into administration and closing all its remaining stores across the uk. everything in store dramatically reduced. today, just a couple of hours ago, we had a similar announcement from mama & papas. they have announced they are also in hot water with plans to close unprofitable stores in aberdeen, preston, milton keynes, lincoln, lemington and pharaoh. it has 20 stores in total and three concessions. the remaining stores will continue to run as usual but a
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really bad week for maternity retailers. perhaps more of a sign of the problem is the high street is facing at the moment. james bevan, chief investment officer at ccla investment managementjoins us. we were just discussing the troubles that mothercare and mama & papas have experienced. but it is not all doom and gloom on the high street because it has been a really good week for games workshop, the biggest riser on the ftse 250. indeed. if we we re riser on the ftse 250. indeed. if we were to begin with the mothercare and mama & papas story, there is a subtle but very significant difference between the two. mothercare has difference between the two. motherca re has unequivocally collapsed, it is closing, the stores are closing and as you have identified, there is a fire sale but mama & papas on the other hand, management have entered into a so—called pre—pack administration, which means that they can rise, phoenix —like from the ashes, with
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21 of the 27 stores they have been running. jettison the ones they think will be a real challenges. management at mama & papas is very committed to a successful future for what remains. with mothercare out of the way, mama & papas have a better time ahead than they have had in re ce nt time ahead than they have had in recent months. games workshop, has demonstrated how important it is to have a proposition that people really want. lots of people are buying very small model soldiers and creatures and it is allowing them not only to be very successful in the uk but now talk about overseas expansion. yes, again, also indicative of just how expansion. yes, again, also indicative ofjust how huge the gaming industry is to the uk economy. on the topic of retail as well, ikea also reported a profit rise. it is a nuanced picture we are getting out of the retail sector today. sticking with that, the italian fashion house prada and the
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german sportswear giant adidas today announced they are joining forces to produce a limited edition train and sailing show. is that a natural partnership? absolutely fun the li fascinating. -- trainer and. they had collaborations with stella mccartney in the past, adidas and they wanted to stretch their brand more into leisurewear, where margins are greater because the number of purchases is greater than in specialist sports. this is relatively unusual for prada, they wa nt relatively unusual for prada, they want to stretch their brand into a new area of leisure. i am getting excited to see how this goes. let's turn our attention to how markets and sterling has performed today and over the course of the week. the ftse100 snapping that winning strea k the ftse100 snapping that winning streak it has enjoyed. we began the week with considerable market optimism that the global economy was on the turn. central bankers and companies were coming to the table
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better than expected results generally. and there was some possibility we would get a breakthrough on the china us trade deal. the more recent news is that maybe we were a bit optimistic on the china— us trade deal and markets deciding this is the right moment to catch a breath and take prices down and see what happens. 0k, good thoughts, james, always good to talk to you. james set us up nicely. to talk through what is happening on the markets. we are seeing a softening on the markets. the ftse100 snapping this five—day winning strea k snapping this five—day winning streak that it has enjoyed. a sentiment experience across to european markets generally come a softening we are seeing. —— experienced across. better news for sterling coming out of a two week
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rout, stabilising against the dollar and the euro. it hit a particular low yesterday against the dollar and it has recovered somewhat today. markets are softer going to the end of the week. alice, good to see you, thank you very much. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with thomasz. it‘s chilly out there. a chilly weekend on the way and some rain in the forecast, too. i want to make the point that we are not expecting anywhere near as much rainfall as we had in the last day or so across northern england. so that‘s some good news there. this is the weather front that brought all of that trouble in northern england. you can see in the last few hours or so it has pushed out into the north sea, it has fizzled away with a gap in the weather with some sunshine and then this next weather front to the west of our neighbourhood is heading our way. that will bring rainfall to northern ireland and some western areas of the uk tonight and into tomorrow. but the weather front that did bring the rainfall yesterday is still causing problems. we have flood warnings in force.
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it obviously takes a while for some of that flood water to actually go back into the rivers. the rivers rise and that can take a day or so. the problems are still not over yet but the good news is at least the weather has dried out. in fact, clear skies tonight. that will lead to a widespread frost. it was very nippy this morning. this coming night is going to be chilly as well and you can see the widespread frost for northern scotland, all the way down to the south coast, and many major towns and cities will be around freezing or below. the rainfall heading our way... it approaches belfast, certainly wet very early in the morning. but sunshine in the east of the country. i think the west will get the most of the wet weather. there is a period of snow on the way early in the morning and afternoon in wales. and this is about as far east as that weather front is going to get. probably around about birmingham orso. as we go through the course of saturday night into sunday, that weather front slows down.
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it rains itself out and sinks towards the south. it is out in the channel here on remembrance sunday. for remembrance sunday, the good news is the weather is looking fine. it is going to be a nippy start for some of us but at least the sun should be out. maybe a couple of showers on the north sea coast but that is pretty much it. however, next week weather fronts are heading our way. it‘s a pretty powerfuljet stream out there blowing in our direction and that will send weather fronts our way. the weather will be unsettled. look at that blue colour over us, that means it will remain on the cold side next week. bye— bye.
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today at 5pm, a woman has died after being swept away by floodwater as much of northern england is hit by a month‘s worth of rain in one day. severe warnings meaning a danger to life are in place along the river don around doncaster. it happened in 2007, and it‘s happened again and... it‘s just ridiculous. people have been evacuated from their homes, and there is travel disruption on the roads and the rail network. we are live in doncaster where the environment agency have warned that the river don will remain at dangerous levels for many hours yet. we‘ll have the latest from the worst affected areas. the other main stories on bbc news at 5pm... the scottish national party launches its election campaign

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