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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 11, 2019 6:00am-8:30am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: british steel saved — the company agrees a £70 million rescue deal with a chinese firm. the move will protect 4,000 jobs at its scunthorpe and teesside plants, and up to 20,000 in the supply chain. an raf helicopter and army engineers are sent in to help in yorkshire with more flooding expected this week. today we have rain moving from the west towards the east. that will clear and then heavy blustery showers with sunshine in between. the weather this week remains u nsettled.
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harry billinge‘s tribute to his fallen comrades — and this morning on armistice day, we're live at the national arboretum. i talk exclusively to three of tennis‘ biggest stars about life on tour, family and their future in the game. it is either all of us stop on that of a stop. i think i will be the first to go, come on. mike bows out of strictly in style — he may not have won the glitterball but he's done breakfast proud. it's monday the 11th of november. our top story. six months after the collapse of british steel, a chinese manufacturing giant is on the verge of agreeing a rescue deal for the firm — saving up to 4,000 jobs. the agreement will secure the future of the firm's flagship scunthorpe plant, but there's a warning that costs may have to be cut. ben's here with more details.
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0n the face of it, this is really good news. a significant move given the big questions over the future for british steel after its previous owner backed out blaming rex that uncertainty. what we know so far is that the group will play £70 million for it in this company is one that has operations right around the world. industrial and steel but also in things like tourism. british steel has been kept running by the government since may when it went into liquidation. so let's run through the detail we know so far full there are 4000 staff employed at the scunthorpe and teesside plans of dish steel. the majority of them in scunthorpe. of dish steel. the majority of them in scu nthorpe. what of dish steel. the majority of them in scunthorpe. what is significant is this 20,000 extra jobs in the supply chain. that of the smaller suppliers who work with these plans. those jobs are significant as well. jianye group, a chinese firm,
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thousands of employees around the world is a significant business and their investment will be valuable. the company is worth more than or in almost £4.5 billion. they have said there is a lot of work still to do it british steel. they want to increase production to make it more viable, they want to move about 3 million tons and that would make it commercially more interesting and attractive. nonetheless, there is a challenge to do that because already we know there is a lot of criticism that steel is being dumped from china on the european market and president trump in the united states very angry with what he sees as dumping in the us market. so it is a difficult business to make work and thatis difficult business to make work and that is why we saw the previous owners find it difficult to make steelwork. nonetheless, jianye say they can do it and it will certainly safeguard 4000 jobs over those two
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jobs that make sites. -- 4000 —— 4000 jobs over those two sites. more than two inches of rain could fall today in parts of northern england, where five severe flood warnings meaning there is a threat to life — are already in place. river levels are rising again. an raf helicopter has been strengthening flood defences in doncaster, after a months worth of rain fell in just 24 hours. and later we'll be live from one of the worst affected areas — fishlake — where residents have been told to leave their homes. two cannabis—based medicines, to treat epilepsy and multiple sclerosis, have been approved for use on the nhs for the first time. it follows new guidelines from the drugs advisory body nice. the move has been largely welcomed by medical charities, but some parents who pay thousands of pounds for certain cannabis medicines say they're unhappy that those products are still not available on the nhs. the conservatives and labour will mark armistice day by announcing new measures for the armed forces. the conservatives have pledged new protections to protect soldiers from legal action,
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while labour says it will improve military accommodation. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake is in our westminster studio. what more can you tell us? it is unusualfor what more can you tell us? it is unusual for armistice day to fall during an election campaign so the tories and labour are focusing on their commitments to the armed forces today. borisjohnson saying that as the country remembers those who pay the ultimate sacrifice it is right that we renew our commitment. the main pledge is a change in the law to protect armed forces veterans from unfair legal action, they would amend the human rights act so it did not apply to incidents that happened before the year 2000 when it came into force. that is largely to prevent claims against members of the armed forces involved in the troubles. they will also commit to tax breaks for employers
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taking on veterans and childcare for the beginning and end of the day for armed forces families. labour also focusing on the armed forces with a promise to improve pay and conditions. they point out that salaries for the most junior conditions. they point out that salaries for the mostjunior roles have been falling since 2010 so they will redress that and also promised to improve housing as well. there are the main focus today is a £845 million allowance for young people's mental health. labour promising to put a counsellor, a qualified counsellor in every secondary school in england, promising visits by counsellors to primary schools weekly and mental health hubs to improve access to counselling and psychiatric services for young people. this is clearly a priority forjeremy corbyn and he says our society is fuelling mental illness
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and their healthy young minds plan is an investment in young people in the country's mental health as a whole. the liberal democrats looking at adult education today with a promise for a £10,000 skills wallet, as they call it, and allowance of money available to adults at various stages throughout their life after the age of 25, to spend on training and adult education. that will be paid for, the party says, by restoring corporation tax to 20%. more details on the policies and how they plan to pay for them all, in they plan to pay for them all, in the manifestoes that we expect to be published in the next few weeks. thank you, jonathan. a state of emergency has been declared in areas of australia which are under threat from bushfires. the authorities in both new south wales and queensland have been struggling to control dozens of fires, which have killed three people — and destroyed scores of homes. firefighters say the weather conditions are getting worse and that the coming days are critical. police in hong kong have fired live
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ammunition at protesters, hitting at least one person. footage broadcast on social media appears to show an officer shooting a demonstrator in the chest at point blank range. he is reported to be in hospital now in radical condition. and it was mike's turn to face the music last night — as he became the latest contestant to waltz out of the strictly ballroom. he may not have won the glitterball, but he's done breakfast proud — and has to go down in history as the best last dance on strictly ever — even getting claudia and tess tojoin him in the conga. i have watched a lot of last dances andi i have watched a lot of last dances and i don't think i have ever seen the conga before. many people just hold each other and do a little lift or they cry uncontrollably. but i think it is great. i think he would
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have wa nted think it is great. i think he would have wanted to make it to blackpool but he said when it was his time to go it was his time to go and he is happy. he has loved it he has enjoyed it. what i loved about it was even though he is desperately sad to go it was not like floods of tea rs. sad to go it was not like floods of tears. he is not fully lost himself. he is not total show business, not yet. he does still answer my calls. we told him we need him back and he says he meet mrs us. he says he cannot wait to get back. we need him because there is a lot going on. i don't know where to start. we have an incredible story for you this morning, and exclusive with the three best tennis players ever. how many between them 7
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three best tennis players ever. how many between them? 55 grand slams between the three. between the three players we have coming up on the programme. i have never players we have coming up on the programme. i have never seen players we have coming up on the programme. i have never seen them together before and i have never seen together before and i have never seen them talk. they interviewed each other, which was great. liverpool are eight points clear at the top of the premier league after beating champions manchester city 3—1 at anfield. sadio mane rounded off the scoring at anfield — the win takes liverpool nine points clear of city and leicester are now the nearest title rivals. celtic and rangers are still only separated by goal difference at the top of the scottish premier league — both sides won 2—0 yesterday. celtic sit top. alex davies won a fourth gold medalfor great britain at the word para—athletics championships in dubai. he took the title in the f63 shot put. and roger federer was beaten on the first day of the season—ending atp finals at the o2 arena in london — the fifth seed dominic thiem won in straight sets. we'll be hearing a lot more
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from roger, and a few of his friends, later here on breakfast. what was that interview? it was because it was notjust them. we had the top eight who will all be playing. all of them on a boat? the joke was that if the boat went down, tennis would be in real trouble. joke was that if the boat went down, tennis would be in realtrouble. and we had them cornered. they could not get anywhere. sometimes when you get people like that, they have something else to go to. you cannot leave abode. they could —— you cannot leave a boat. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. in sheffield it has rained for much of the last week. and it does not look nice this morning. good morning to you both. we have seen a lot of rainfall and we have seen a lot of flooding as well and there is
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mooring to come this week. this picture from saturday of derbyshire sheffield as well which has seen a lot of rainfall. if we pick on sheffield, this autumn so far, 383 millimetres of rainfall has occurred and that is until this morning. 45% of the average annual rainfall, giving you an idea of the sort of deluge we have seen full as we go through the course of this week, the met office has further rain warnings out so that will exacerbate the situation. at the moment we have five severe flood warning. they are mostly across the river don and that means flood warnings and danger to life. take action. as well as that, flood warnings across england and wales. low pressure driving the weather and the weather front moving from west to east, taking rain with it lingering across the north—east of scotland. an array of isobars and it will be a blustery day with gusty
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wind, especially with exposure. rain pushes towards the east, clearing the east of england later. it hangs around the north—east of scotland and then we have a plethora of showers blown in on the gusty wind. some of them will be heavy with hail and as we have already seen through the night, above 200 metres, especially because the highlands, we will see further spells of snow. no great weight —— shakes for temperature. we are still in the mild conditions as we push down towards the south—west and the channel islands. in a heavy shower and would blast of a north—westerly please —— breeze it will feel cold. through the evening and overnight there is not a lot of change. we continue with the showers, merging four lovely spells of rain. in the sheltered glens with could see a touch of frost but genuinely it will be too breezy for most of us to have that issue. temperatures from 1—4d.
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those temperatures reflect what you can expect in towns and cities. tuesday, low pressure moves towards the north sea and anchors itself for a bit. tomorrow, once again, will be another unsettled day. with low pressure, everything around it moves in an anticlockwise direction so we have an array of showers coming our way. as is the way we showers, not all of us will catch one. you may get one, you may get a you may get none at all. in between there will be sunshine again above 200 metres in highland we are looking at snow. clinging onto the milder areas. 10 degrees in plymouth. here as well we are exposed to the north—westerly. as we move from wednesday into thursday, this next area of low pressure comes our way, sinking south position could change but at the moment what we think is that it will bring more rain where we do not
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wa nt will bring more rain where we do not want it across parts of northern england and parts of the midlands. that could exacerbate the problems further full of the met office has weather warnings out and you can see them on our website further spells of rain this week with some hill snow, often rainy and it will feel cold. let's take a look at today's papers. most papers show the queen at yesterday's remembrance sunday service, looking like she was shedding a tear as she watched the commemorations. the mail leads on a pledge by prime minister borisjohnson to change the law to protect northern ireland veterans. the daily mirror says labour will pledge £845 million to ensure every child has access to mental health support at school. the sun's front page shows mother talia keates with her baby boys, the world's tiniest twins, according to the paper. ashley and joe each weighed less than 1lb when they were born at 23 weeks, and they are now doing well.
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and the huffington post is reporting on the well—known faces that are arriving down under, as they speculate who might be entering the jungle for the latest series of i'm a celebrity. caitlyn jenner and ian wright and both pictured. the full list is in quite a few papers. i haven't seen it. iwill run you through it later. what have you got for us, ben? good morning. this good morning to all three of you. i'm still here! good morning to you. i'm still here! good morning to you too. too late, ben. we are talking about the difficulty on the high street, another potential victim, clinton's. a suggestion they are trying to do a deal with our landlords to reduce how much they pay in rent. they have about 300 stores and wants to shift another 206 locations to rent deals tied with its performance, so rather than paying a fixed rent, if the store is
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not performing very well, it wants a cut in rent. no idea whether those landlords will agree, crunch time could be about ten days time, when there is a crucial meeting to find out whether it can do a with those landlords to cut how much it pays in rent, and that could determine its future on the but as we know, they are the latest retail to it is novemberand are the latest retail to it is november and already we are seeing managers in the premier league looking very, very stressed and tense. i want to show you this, after yesterday's match between liverpool and manchester city. pep guardiola, at the final whistle, you would have to say he reacted with a kind of... a very controlled rage. that is the only way i can describe it. he went around and he shook the hands of the officials, who had been involved in that much. he was clearly very unhappy with a couple of decisions they had made. you can see at this point that for him, and also for the joe 0fahengaue club, the opposing manager yesterday, the amount of pressure they take on. —— jurgen klopp. you could just see at
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that point yesterday, he was about to really, really lose it, and the other side of that coin, that angry face, as those happy faces on the front page of the guardian this morning. liverpool, who were dominant yesterday against manchester city, even though city would argue they had a couple of decisions go against them. really quickly, one quick picture here, another great picture of pep guardiola. that is the times, saying that he boils over. he is normally a very cool customer. i want to talk to you about alexa, other devices are available, i understand. the front page of the telegraph, the digital assistant could, as well as having ears, hearing you, and i say you because i don't have one, could have eyes as well. what? why would you want something like that in your house? it makes things a lot easier. we have got one in the house but it is only allowed in the kitchen, not anyone else. the idea is that it can
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potentially be built into all sorts of devices. what google and amazon and apple are doing with these devices is trying to harvest all the data, because clearly that is what they get from this, but the idea is that it makes our lives easier. so at the moment it can be pretty basic things like turning on music, play the radio, whatever. the whole idea is that it will be able to book a table at your favourite restaurant or order you a taxi, those sorts of things. set your laundry machine to come on. to make the house easier. but if you are a bit worried about what it is listening to, you can tell it to delete things. what it is listening to, you can tell it to delete thingslj what it is listening to, you can tell it to delete things. ijust don't want anything listening to me in my house. it has got to listen for its running words, which i don't wa nt for its running words, which i don't want to say it, because i will set them off around the country. have you not already done that? roll it into a sentence. i have got a friend called alexa. the guy behind it said he wanted nothing to become an active companion which intuitively understands the owners' needs, and encourages new behaviour, rather than serving as a passive assistant.
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so who is deciding on the new behaviour, and what it needs to be? the new behaviour is how we speak as well, you end up speaking in a certain language. you don't speak in full sentences, you start talking in robot voice. very curtailed sentences. it annoys me that you don't have to say pleased to get it to do anything. if you say thank you, she is grateful. i know, but still. kids just shouting stop at their things without saying please. i say they have to say please anyway, otherwise it won't work. i will pull the plug out! good parenting! james haskell is in it, and adele roberts. he will do well. caitlinjenner is the big name. and adele roberts. he will do well. caitlinjenner is the big namelj and adele roberts. he will do well. caitlin jenner is the big name. i am a liberty? yes. -- i'm a celebrity. francis rossi keeps saying no, as to what of other people. ian wright could be entertaining, i think. good morning, you are watching brea kfast good morning, you are watching breakfast from the bbc. since d—day veteran harry billinge
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was on the programme on friday, here are some of the lovely things you've been in touch with us to say, "a beautiful soul and an inspiration to us all," a "truly wonderful man who's and "a hero in every sense." thousands of you have been getting in contact, either on email or social media. harry was here to talk to naga and charlie about the normandy memorial he's helped to raise money for, something we were able to show him for the first time. this is yet. this is what you have been raising money towards, and you have never seen this before. no, never. how does it make you feel? because the work you have been doing, it is now concrete, it is tangible, it is there. you can touch it. marvellous. how does it feel, harry? 0k? it means so much, huh? i am all right.
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idid it, means so much, huh? i am all right. i did it, we had a job to do, all these fellas, did a good job. and while the queen led remembrance sunday events in central london yesterday, harry laid a wreath at st austell in cornwall, accompanied by his daughter margot. always a privilege to welcome my dad. that'll be the day! he's a very special man. everybody loves my dad. i love my dad more than anybody else. god bless you, harry. and god bless you too. very good blokes, the medics. we tried. looked after me. whatever i done, i done for my mates who never came back. i done it with my best step. all right! he's a
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hero, and his just my best step. all right! he's a hero, and hisjust a lovely man. what he's done for his charity is unbelievable. not many people do that. the market has made me one of the family. when i'm collecting for that memorial, i get a great calm in my that memorial, i get a great calm in d that memorial, i get a great calm in my body and my heart. thank you, darling! iam no i am no hero. all the heroes are dad. they are dead to the world, not to me. because these fellas have never died. to live in hearts we leave behind is not to die. they are still alive today, to me. i want
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people to remember me as a good old sapper who done his best, that's all. i should sapper who done his best, that's all. ishould never sapper who done his best, that's all. i should never have my name on the memorial, because they are all to do with the people who gave their lives. but i hope i still live in the hearts of people who won't forget harry, because i've done my best. that's all a man can do. whatsoever i have tried to do, do it with all thy might, because... with our goest. he has had such an impact on people. he has certainly done his best. a lovely man. this year marks 100 years since the first two—minute silence was observed, on armistice day on november the 11th 1919. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is at the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire. good morning to you, tim. so many
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people have been affected by this over the last few days, so many of our viewers have got in contact to say that his words, just his attitude, has really brought things together over the last few days? absolutely. i was lucky enough to meet him myself. he was an extraordinary man. he really kind of encompasses the emotion and the viewing and the sense of remembrance which we have today, which as you say is armistice day, difference to remembrance sunday. armistice day happens on 11/11, and at 11 o'clock this morning there will be a two silence observed here. 0bviously this morning there will be a two silence observed here. obviously it is dark at the moment. we have come inside to the national memorial arboretum, one of the exhibition spaces. i am arboretum, one of the exhibition spaces. iam having arboretum, one of the exhibition spaces. i am having a quick chat to philippa. you are in charge here and you will be taking part in the ceremony at 11 o'clock. how important is armistice day and how does it differ to remembrance sunday? armistice day, especially here at the national memorial arboretum, whether national focus is very important for us, we have a more intimate service, very
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privileged to have the duke of kent with us this morning, along with a numberof with us this morning, along with a number of veterans and those currently serving, who along with some invited guests and some members of the public will have a service on the top of the armed forces memorial, something that can only happen here. if we are very fortunate and the clouds part we will have a shaft of light coming through and joining us at 11 o'clock. fingers crossed. thank you, philippa. we will have a quick chat to major naveen mohammed, who formerly served in iraq and afghanistan, didn't you? how important is armistice day perform former servicemen and women such as yourself? armistice day is usually important because what it does is, it resets that camaraderie that we as an organisation are renowned for. and that connects us with those before us who fought during world wari, before us who fought during world war i, world war ii, who displayed the best of the british army's values and standards, courage, discipline and selflessness being just three of them. we will talk more a little later and we will go
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outside a little later and said the national memorial where that service will be taking place. it is really quite something. you look around here, such a sense of history, and on days like this it is a chance for so many people, notjust former vetera ns so many people, notjust former veterans but their families and many other current serving men and women as well to get together and remember those who lost their lives. thank you very much, tim. we will be with you very much, tim. we will be with you through the morning. you can email us at bbcbrea kfast@bbc. co. uk or share your thoughts with other viewers on our facebook page. and you can tweet about today's stories using the hashtag #bbcbrea kfast, or follow us for the latest from the programme. you have been flooding us with m essa g es you have been flooding us with messages about harry over the last few days. absolutely. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. transport for london has amassed almost £400 million in unclaimed 0yster ca rd almost £400 million in unclaimed 0yster card balances. around 66 million registered 0yster cards haven't been used in at least a
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year. half of that amount is tied up by the initial £5 deposit stop tfl ‘s as the money is invested to improve the network. an investigation has found a water leak caused to the ceiling to collapse at the piccadilly theatre last week, injuring several people. the incident forced the theatre to close for a week while safety checks were carried out. the theatre management has apologised and says the theatre is now safe. it will reopen for performances today. one of the most important artists and filmmakers working today, steve mcqueen, has a major exhibition opening at the tate britain today. he is bringing together school photos with a difference. 3000 of them, to be exact. the aim is to reflect london, and over the last year, 75,000 year 3 pupils across the capital have had their picture taken. the hollywood director explained what the children should take away from the experience. thus they are important.
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they are, you know, on the walls of tate britain. and that they are important. and they are notjust important. and they are notjust important within their school, they are important within the broader, wider environment of london. let's ta ke wider environment of london. let's take a look at the trouble for you. the piccadilly line is suspended between rain ‘s lane and uxbridge, down to significant leaf fall, we're told. 0n the trains, revised off—peak timetable running for south—eastern this week. on the roads in wandsworth, the a3 westhill is closed westbound at ba 205 roadworks. at the blackwall tunnel, the usual cues northbound from blackwall lane. in maida vale, the traffic lights are out at the junction with stjohn's wood road. let's ta ke junction with stjohn's wood road. let's take a look at the weather for you. he is kate. good morning. it is a rather wet, windy and cold monday morning, i'm afraid. we've had some
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rain overnight. it is gradually clearing away as we head through the morning. moving east and then later, drier and brighter with just one or two showers blowing through as well. then we have this quite brisk westerly, north—westerly wind. that will clear the first pound of rain through the morning, behind it, like isaid, the through the morning, behind it, like i said, the clouds will be breaking up. nice, sunny spells, blowing some showers through, that will make things feel rather chilly, between eight and 10 celsius maximum. 0vernight, still the chance of one or two showers and we hold onto the breeze. they will move through fairly quickly and we will get some clearer spells. temperatures dropping down into low single figures, one degree or two degrees in the suburbs. should remain frustrated because the air is moving around significantly thanks to that breeze which persists overnight. as we head into tuesday, perhaps a drier day, but we will see lots of cloud and those temperatures are still fairly chilly. it says rather u nsettled still fairly chilly. it says rather unsettled and cold through much of this week. i am back in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. for now, we pass you back to dan and louise.
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hello this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. roger, rafa, and novak. we've got three of the biggest stars in world tennis on the programme. you can see sally's chat with them in the next hour. with more rain forecast for flooded parts of south yorkshire, we'll be live in fishlake later, where people have been urged to leave their homes. and on armistice day, we're live at the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. british steel is set to announce a rescue deal with chinese investors which could save up to 4,000 jobs. the 70 million pound agreement will secure the future of the firm's flagship scu nthorpe plant, but there's a warning that costs may have to be cut.
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british steel has been kept running by the government since may, when the company went into liquidation. two cannabis—based medicines, to treat epilepsy and multiple sclerosis, have been approved for use on the nhs for the first time. it follows new guidelines from the drugs advisory body nice. the move has been largely welcomed by medical charities, but some parents who pay thousands of pounds for certain cannabis medicines say they're unhappy that those products are still not available on the nhs. the conservatives and labour will mark armistice day by announcing new measures for the armed forces. the conservatives have pledged new protections to protect soldiers from legal action, against accusations of wrongdoing on the battlefield. labour says it will increase pay for the armed forces and improve accommodation. the liberal democrats have announced a 10,000 pounds ‘skills wallet‘ for adult training. police in hong kong have fired live
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ammunition at protesters, hitting at least one person. footage broadcast on social media appears to show an officer shooting a demonstrator in the chest at point blank range. 0ur correspondent stephen mcdonell is in hong kong. thank mcdonell is in hong kong. you for coming on the programme thank you for coming on the programme today. what have you seen there? this is the pedestrian crossing were a few hours ago a protester was shot. he is the third protester was shot. he is the third protester to have been shot in with a live round during this crisis and we are told he is currently in a critical condition. but this was filmed. the protester coming across had a scuffle with police officer and then he was shot, went down. he can be seen being pinned to the ground by police. briefly he was unconscious but then was taken away in an ambulance. i will weakly show you, people have been building
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barricades here in this cross section four hours. as the police come in they are being abused by angry bystanders. all these rocks and bricks on the ground are in preparation for a fight with the police. and there have been scuffle is not only here but in various parts of the city today including the central business district. and i think we have time to show you down here, this is an initial barricade and beyond that, underneath the flyover, more activist are building more barricades. they are certainly preparing for a fight over this. there has been a lot of concern and people are quite upset that this activist has been shot and it follows a pattern of things becoming increasingly ugly. we had several stabbings last week and the police say that today heavy objects had thrown down at them from flyover is
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to the one behind me. they say petrol—bombs had been thrown and thatis petrol—bombs had been thrown and that is why they have responded with tear gas and rubber bullets. and we will see a lot of in hong kong today. stay safe. thank you for talking to us. sally is here because we‘re talking about a wonderful interview you have had. a fantastic opportunity. we have been working on it for quite a while. clever people here have been trying to get the best tennis players all in one place for us to talk to. and we have been working on it for years and it happened last friday. is it bring your games to work day? ijust friday. is it bring your games to work day? i just thought that i am in control now and taking responsibility for the rest of the programme. i know both of you have nothing to do now. sit there and play this for a bit. and we have hungry hippos outside. we wanted to
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see if the best three tennis players... we spoke to the best eight tennis players in the world and we wanted to see who had the stu rd iest and we wanted to see who had the sturdiest hand. had i co—ordination, try that bit there. he has only had three beeps. buzz. so close! so close. tell me when this gets annoying. was buzz buzz buzz buzz much more about buzz hand and the tennis players... buzz off. it is called buzz off. you did enjoy saying that. liverpool are way out in front in the race for the premier league title.
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they beat last year‘s title winner manchester city 3—1 at anfield to go nine points ahead of them in the table. joe lynskey reports. around and feel the feeling grows that this could be the season and he could be the man. we have a lead on the champions and an eight cushion on the top. this match turned their way ina on the top. this match turned their way in a moment here manchester city may have had a penalty and the lead but the handball was not given. then 21 seconds later, liverpool did this. a great shot. a wonderful goal! his protests werejust starting. andrew robertson‘s brilliant cross found mohammed ford to nil. city thought he were offside. vai said no. perhaps the keeper was more to blame for the third. he was their second choice. he stayed on his line and saw the game slip away. the champions got
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one back with 12 minutes to go. 0ne more would have really changed things. so when the ball struck an arm for the second time in the box, guardiola made sure everyone knew. at full—time the fury became irony. thank you so much he said to the officials. congratulations to liverpool. so... the boys were com pletely liverpool. so... the boys were completely focused and concentrated. it was just so good. the only way that we can be city. liverpool have lost only one league match in 18 months. it may still be november but right now they are so far ahead and it feels like this season has a name on it. well the premier league takes a fortnight pause now for the last international break of the year. manchester united will be in the top half when it resumes — they climbed up to seventh with a 3—1victory over brighton.
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it‘s united‘s fifth win in six games, it was watched by a smiling sir alex ferguson, and their current manager thinks things are, finally, coming together. sunday‘s other premier league match saw wolves beat aston villa 2—1 in the west midlands derby. wolves go up to eighth, while villa are slipping down the table and are just above the relegation zone. well if liverpool are running away with the premier league it might be the scottish premiership that gives us an enthralling title battle this year. celtic and rangers are still neck and neck on points 12 games in. steven gerrard‘s side won 2—0 at livingston, while celtic were winners by the same scoreline at motherwell. celtic top the table on goal difference. following on from hannah cockcroft‘s gold at the world para—athletics championships in dubai. aled davies won a fourth gold medalfor great britain in the f63 shot put. after the arrival of his baby girl just seven weeks ago, davies says he‘s found a new inspiration
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i have always kind of struggled for motivation because i have won everything. but, to be honest, it is not about me anymore. it is about this little dude. and if i can show her what i do on the big stage i cannot retire a happy man. let‘s hope that this is the start of a few more titles to come. what a beautiful and well—behaved baby. calm as you like. just a few weeks old. we will hear more from the players at the seizing ending atp to a finals players at the seizing ending atp to afinals in players at the seizing ending atp to a finals in london in a moment first let‘s take a look at some in a moment of the action and there was a big upset in roger federer‘s first match. he was beaten in straight sets by the fifth seed dominic thiem. earlier novak djokovic won his match as he goes for a record sixth title here. federer and djokovic meet in the pool stage later in the tournament.
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now, we‘ve got a real treat for you this morning. i‘ve been speaking exclusively to roger federer, rafa nadal and novak djokovic ahead of the atp finals — we‘ll hear from them after 7. but first i wanted to test how well they do under real pressure. i want to know whether you really get on. you don‘t know what this is? i don‘t know. get on. you don‘t know what this is? i don't know. kids play this game. i wa nt to i don't know. kids play this game. i want to know if you are friends or competitive about everything. so what you need to do is this. you have to take it all the way around. buzz! without making the noise. he won't pass the thumb. this will take a while. buzz! here you go. do it.
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is it normal to already have sweaty palms? i think i have to have the group, the right group from the get go. buzz! you could not even get to the pinky! 0h, go. buzz! you could not even get to the pinky! oh, my gosh. buzz! buzz! 0h, the pinky! oh, my gosh. buzz! buzz! oh, no. i think i was the best one so far. that is very funny. i got a little competitive there. starting with the thumb isa competitive there. starting with the thumb is a good technique. and while we we re thumb is a good technique. and while we were watching that, louise beat everybody. you got to the middle finger. i think she got further. were you in competition mode? yes, focus, focus. not rafael nadal plays left—handed tennis but does everything else right—handed.
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left—handed tennis but does everything else right-handed. that is so typical of you to notice that. but i for detail. he is a left—handed tennis player. but i for detail. he is a left—handed tennis playerlj mentioned that to him. i said it would be hard because he is left—handed and he said he was not. he has magic in both hands? exactly. we will hear all about plans for retirement, what it is like being on the road with the kids, later on in the road with the kids, later on in the programme. i am a leftie. yes. all the best people are. neither of us are all the best people are. neither of us are left—handed, never mind.“ you were a politician i would ask you were a politician i would ask you for your proof of that. carol! carol, how is it going this morning? this weekend we had a deluge of rain in some parts of the country. you can see this picture of derbyshire on saturday was some flooding but it was not just a on saturday was some flooding but it was notjust a fissure we had flooding further north as well. sheffield, for example, has so far
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seen 383 millimetres of rain. that is 45% of the average annual rainfall that we would expect. that does put it into perspective. today, still severe flood warnings in force and they are all along the river don. but we also have a plethora of flood warnings so keep tuned to the weather forecast if you are in any way concerned about maureen coming your way stop we saw rain crossing towards the east over the night and that rain is still with us. as you can see from the isobars it is fairly blustery today. so when we say goodbye to the rain from eastern areas that will linger, it is replaced by many showers coming in on gusty wind, particularly gusty around the showers which are to be heavy and salary with hail. above about 200 metres, particularly in the highlands, we will see some snow
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full up the wind gusty. these are sustained winds but with exposure in the hills and coasts it will be more than that. as a result it will feel cold today, especially in the showers and with exposure to the wind. temperatures five, 11 so for most of us about one also degrees degrees below average. we are holding on to the milder conditions and in comparison. through the evening and overnight we have a lot of showers and still is easy and low pressure is still dominating our weather. as is the way we showers, not all of us will see them and in sheltered land, if you are sheltered from the breeze you could see a touch of frost in the morning. but it will be cold overnight, temperatures falling between five and eight degrees. as we head on through tuesday, low pressure is now anchored in the north sea and you can see that weather front wrapped around it. so that keen breeze is still quite gusty as well and the
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showers are moving in an anticlockwise direction around the location. it does mean not all of us will catch one that you could see a lot or you could see just a few. 0nce lot or you could see just a few. once again above 200 metres, particularly in the highlands where you will see some snow. 5— 10 degrees. through wednesday and thursday we have a new weather of low pressure coming our way. this is a tract we think or take. more rain on current thinking to be brought across northern england and the midlands, exactly where we do not wa nt midlands, exactly where we do not want it. also as well. but the position of that low pressure could still change and that will have an impact on exactly where we do see the rain. currently, the met office has two yellow weather warnings out for the rain. 0ne has two yellow weather warnings out for the rain. one from today through to tomorrow midday and another one for thursday. you can see details of that on our website but in short this week looking at more rain, hill snow above 200 metres and if you are exposed to all of that it will feel
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cold. gosh. we will need a big code. carol, you have a big outside broadcast tomorrow don‘t you? carol, you have a big outside broadcast tomorrow don't you?” carol, you have a big outside broadcast tomorrow don't you? i have been trying to buy supplies for us but have failed so far, carol. i will keep trying. fantastic, that means we will get a good array of chocolate.” fantastic, that means we will get a good array of chocolate. i will have to change my snacks! over 200,000 workers will get a pay rise from today, with the annual increase in the real living wage. it isa it is a little bit complicated, this, sometimes. there is the living wage, the national living wage and the real living wage. today we are talking about the real living wage, the rate paid by a number of employers which is higher than the statutory minimum. to give you a
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sense of what changes today, it is an hourly rate is going to go up to £9.30 for most people, but if you‘re in the capital, it rises to £10 75 p. about 6000 organisations have signed up to this, now the so—called accredited living wage employers. some big employers, you can see some of them there. as we said, it is volu nta ry. of them there. as we said, it is voluntary. they sign up to pay more to their workers. it includes some big firms but also some little ones. we pay the real living wage because we see how hard our staff work and we see how hard our staff work and we know there is a value to it. it's just means it is peace of mind, i'm not having to struggle and worry about more money, to —— £2000 a year extra is massive to somebody like me. i don't live in a big fancy house. it is brilliant that i can support my family and children. don't get me wrong, it has its challenges, but you will find the benefits are still there. there are financial benefits and staff
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retention, better quality of workmanship, and actually, when you see how hard your staff works, you know, they have to feel valued and i think it is important your staff feel valued. i am think it is important your staff feelvalued. i am sure i am not the only one, but the difference between the real living wage under the national living wage, what is that? it is really complicated, and there isa it is really complicated, and there is a bit of fudging. essentially, you would imagine that a living wage is something we all need to live on. but they are separate things. the real living wage, that is the one we‘re talking about today. that is the sort of voluntary one. the national living wage is mandatory. that is what the government sets and all employers have to pay, if you are above the age of 25. so just to be clear, the minimum wages paid to anybody under the age of 25, or two apprentices. that is the minimum, according to where you work, how old you are, what sort of work you do. since 2016 there has been a slightly
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higher rate which is cold a national living wage. that is £8 21 p. applicable to everybody above the age of 25, legally enforceable. the pay rise we are talking about today is the extra one comedy bit on top of that which some employers have signed up to. it is a really politically contentious issue as well. let me run you through what the main parties are saying. the conservative party conference, chancellor sajid javid pledged to raise the national living wage to £10.50 it wants to do that in the next five years. earlier this yearjeremy corbyn had pledged to raise the national living wage to £10 next year if labour gets into office. the liberal democrats say they‘ll set up an independent review of the living wage if they get into office. so there is a focus on how much people are being paid, whether they can people are being paid, whether they ca n afford people are being paid, whether they can afford to meet their everyday expenses. the parties all have different policies on this, but nonetheless, as we said, if you are
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somebody who receives the real living wage from today, you can get a pay rise. thank you, ben. we will see you later. it is difficult to explain, but you did a magnificent job, thank you. residents around sydney, australia‘s largest city, are being warned of the threat of catastrophic bushfires, which are burning across two states. at least three people are dead and thousands have had to move from their homes. let‘s talk now to megan stiffler, from queensland fire service. good morning to you, and thank you for joining good morning to you, and thank you forjoining us. tell us how large this fire is at the moment and what it is affecting? in queensland we have declared a state of fire emergency for the first time since 1994. that gives the scope of the conditions we are up against. we have got severe fire danger whether expected tomorrow on wednesday. that reaches over 500 kilometres of our coastline. we have currently got several fires we are monitoring today that will cause us problems is that whether deteriorates tomorrow
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and on wednesday, and they are generallyjust and on wednesday, and they are generally just north of and on wednesday, and they are generallyjust north of rockhampton around the western scenic rim, as well as the lockyer valley, at a place called gymnah. just give us an idea of how many people have been affected by it, how many houses are in danger, for example? we currently have 59 fires throughout queensland. it affects many communities within ourland. we are it affects many communities within our land. we are expecting some areas that will be evacuated tomorrow. we are talking hundreds of houses, there are no major centres that are under pressure tomorrow. however, our main focus will be on the preservation of life, and should communities need to move, we will give them plenty of notice to move out of the way of these coming fires. we are watching pictures of firefighters working. are you trying to just firefighters working. are you trying tojust contain firefighters working. are you trying to just contain these fires? is
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there any hope of actually being able to put them out at this stage? we are getting lulls in the fire weather of only two days at a time, so what we‘re finding is we can make some inroads in those quieter days, but every third or fourth day we are picking up into that severe weather. what we are trying to do is work really ha rd what we are trying to do is work really hard with our air assets and our boots on the ground to make sure that containment lines are rarely secured when we can get them. our firefighters are extremely tired. we have been fighting fires here in queensland since the beginning of august. we have just queensland since the beginning of august. we havejust got queensland since the beginning of august. we have just got support coming in from the northern territory, victoria, tasmania and new zealand, and that will be really important to give our local firefighters a little bit of reprieve so they can keep going through this long, hot summer. megan, we appreciate your time, a very busy time for you as well, from the queensland fire service, thank you very much indeed and best of
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luck to you. and it was mike‘s turn to face the music last night as he became the latest contestant to waltz out of the strictly ballroom. he‘s done breakfast proud, and has to go down in history as the best last dance on strictly ever — the conga. mike sent us a lovely little message to thank all of those who‘ve been lending him their support. hello, everybody at bbc breakfast. all my friends there, at work on the sofa, behind the scenes, all the people watching at home. thanks so much for all the love and support you have given me on my strictly journey. it has been so special, and life changing, completely. i hope it shows how good dancing is for you, physically and mentally. ifeel sharper, able to handle the pressure much more. i loved every second of it. it was a real honour to do it. it's it. it was a real honour to do it. it‘s really made me believe in what is possible with dance, a bit like what i‘ve been doing on saturday
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mornings over the last ten years or so. i want to show people, never be worried about being rubbish, or embarrassed about doing something new. don‘t think you can‘t do it, just believe, have fun, go along, have a laugh with your mates. i wa nted have a laugh with your mates. i wanted to go out on a high last night because i felt it has been such a great journey. night because i felt it has been such a greatjourney. i didn‘t let myself down, katya actually said my last dance was my best dance. and she is thejudge. i wanted to go last dance was my best dance. and she is the judge. i wanted to go out celebrating. that is why i tried one of the lifts from the previous weeks, although i forgot how long her dress was. i said to chris before, let‘s do something fun, let‘s do the conger or something, get thejudges
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let‘s do the conger or something, get the judges up, let‘s do the conger or something, get thejudges up, get let‘s do the conger or something, get the judges up, get claudia let‘s do the conger or something, get thejudges up, get claudia up, i did check with katya to make sure she would be upset. she loved it, she would be upset. she loved it, she was really proud of it. it was just a real celebration. i have been approached by seven people in the last week or so saying they have started dancing in their 40s or 50s because of this. they are working on their posture, men are working on their posture, men are working on their posture, men are working on their posture, and people have gone along to dance classes to try to jive or salsa for the first time. so for me, job done, it is a win — win. i love that he did the congo, that isjust brilliant. i love that he did the congo, that is just brilliant. proper i love that he did the congo, that isjust brilliant. proper bushell, that. i also love the fact that he got his head katya's dress. you could see she didn‘t want to do that! he looked very tired, as well. we will have him live on the programme tomorrow.” we will have him live on the programme tomorrow. i think he is too tired to talk to us today. all but to look forward to this week. sadly, he is no longer in strictly. time now to get the news, travel and weather wherever you are watching.
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good morning from bbc london, i‘m alpa patel. almost £400 million of unclaimed money is lying residence and can be are being offered reassurance by essex police after a spate of racist and homophobic graffiti appeared on cars and homes over the weekend. 0fficers spent part of yesterday visiting around 250 homes, offering advice to residents after eight incidents. canveyis residents after eight incidents. canvey is a town known for its jewish links, with many 0rthodox communities creating a home there in the past few years. almost £400 million of unclaimed money is lying on unused 0yster cards, according to transport for london. around 66 million registered 0yster cards haven‘t been used in at least a year. half of that amount is tied up by the initial £5 deposit. tfl says the money is invested to improve the network. an investigation has found a water leak caused the ceiling to collapse at the picadilly theatre last week, injuring several people. the incident forced the theatre to close for a week
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whilst safety checks were carried out. the theatre management has apologised and says the theatre is now safe. it will reopen for performances today. one of the most important artists and filmmakers, working today, steve mcqueen has a major exhibition opening at the tate britain today. he‘s bringing together school photos with a difference — 3,000 of them to be exact. the aim is to reflect london and over the last year 75,000 year 3 pupils across the capital have had their picture taken. the hollywood director explained what the children should take away from the experience. that they‘re important. they are, you know, on the walls of tate britain. and that they are important. and they‘re notjust important within their school, they‘re important within the broader, wider environment of london. let‘s take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, problems on the picadilly line, which is suspended between rayners lane and uxbridge which is down to significant leaf fall. 0n the trains, there is a revised off peak timetable for southeastern this week.
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choose on the north circular from the clubhouse interchange to brownlow road. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it‘s a rather wet, windy and cold monday morning, i‘m afraid. we‘ve had some rain overnight. it‘s gradually clearing away as we head through the morning. moving east and then later, drier and brighter with just one or two showers blowing through as well. then we have this quite brisk westerly, north—westerly wind. that‘ll clear the first band of rain through the morning, behind it, like i said, the clouds will be breaking up. nice, sunny spells, blowing some showers through, that will make things feel rather chilly, between 8 and 10 celsius maximum. 0vernight, still the chance of one or two showers and we hold onto the breeze. they will move through fairly quickly and we will get some clearer spells. temperatures dropping down into low single figures, one degree or two degrees in the suburbs. should remain frost—free because the air is moving around significantly thanks to that breeze which persists overnight. as we head into tuesday, perhaps a drier day,
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but we will see lots of cloud and those temperatures are still fairly chilly. it stays rather unsettled and cold through much of this week. well, if you are heading out, do have a lovely morning. if not, i am backin have a lovely morning. if not, i am back in half—an—hour. good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today: british steel saved — the company is set to announce a £70 million rescue deal with a chinese firm. the move would protect 4,000 jobs at its scunthorpe and teesside plants, and up to 20,000 in the supply chain. an raf helicopter is sent in to help in yorkshire with more flooding expected — we‘re live in a village that‘s been cut off for days.
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rain has been crossing from west to east over the night. behind the blustery showers and sunshine but the weekend weather is looking u nsettled. harry billinge‘s tribute to his fallen comrades — and this morning on armistice day — we‘re live at the national arboretum. we talk exclusively to the top three tennis players in the world. federer, djockovic and nadal together as you have never seen them before. it is either all of us stop or none of us stop. i think i will be the first to go, come on. mike bows out of strictly in style — he may not have won the glitterball but he‘s done breakfast proud. it‘s monday the 11th of november. our top story. six months after the collapse of british steel, a chinese manufacturing giant is on the verge of agreeing a rescue deal for the firm — saving up to 4,000 jobs.
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british steel has been kept running by the government since may, when the company went into liquidation. the agreement will secure the future of the firm‘s flagship scunthorpe plant, but there‘s a warning that costs may have to be cut. ben‘s here with more details. 0n the face of it it is good news. good news because it safeguards jobs. and what we know so far is that this group has agreed to pay £70 million for it. you are right to point out the cost cuts will have to come into the equation somewhere because it is a difficult market stop let me tell you what we know so far. it is being run by the government since collapsing earlier this year. 4000 people were employed at the plans, the majority of them in scunthorpe. at the plans, the majority of them in scu nthorpe. that at the plans, the majority of them in scunthorpe. that is the 4000 directly affected, an extra 20,000 in the supply chain, all the firms in the supply chain, all the firms in the local area who provide parts,
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equipment, servicing to those plans. a significant number of jobs equipment, servicing to those plans. a significant number ofjobs there. what we know aboutjianye is that they are a chinese firm involved in many different industries. they have over 23,000 employees and are worth £4 billion a company. so their involvement is significant. they have since specific plans about raising production to try and make this more viable. they want to raise production from 2.5 million tons to 3 million tons. that would mean they have more to sell. as we have discussed, it is a difficult industry to be in because, rightly, at the moment, there are so much concern about where it still is coming from and whether it is being dumped, chinese still dump in europe and president trump has been critical of this as well. so what they are trying to do is make this a viable and to sell it cheap enough to compete with the stuff that is made in china. the good news, as you said, for thejobs there made in china. the good news, as you said, for the jobs there directly. 4000 in gun for and teesside ——
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scunthorpe. more than two inches of rain could fall today in parts of northern england, where five severe flood warnings — meaning there is a threat to life — are already in place. an raf helicopter has been brought in to strengthen flood defences. 0ur reporter luxmy gopaljoins us now from one of the worst affected areas, fishla ke. good morning to you. what is it like for residents? this is the village of fishlake where hundreds of people have had to leave their homes because of severe loading. if you look, here is one of the houses that has been flooded and you can see whether water levels are. they have dropped because they were up to where the water market is just below the window. levels have fallen but residents have been told that it is unlikely they can return home for at least another day or so. i am now joined by some of those residents. a tea m joined by some of those residents. a team of localfarmers. joined by some of those residents. a team of local farmers. firstly, let‘s start with you, robert robinson. how have you been affected
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estimate my farm is covered in water. the animals are suffering because of the water and we cannot get in and out without a tractor at the moment. and how do you feel about how the authorities have handled this? we need the river to be dredged and clean out. it is not doing itsjob of be dredged and clean out. it is not doing its job of transporting water correctly. billy, what do you think, in practical terms, what do you think could be done and you would like to see done to stop this being as bad? this is devastating and we cannot let it happen again. we had a warning in 2007 but no work was carried out so it is important that it is carried out this time. the river needs dredging and clearing the water on its way. thank you. as you can see there are some concerns about how this has been handled. 0f course, there is more rainfall expected. it is lucky we are dry at the moment. there are five severe weather warning still in place along
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with dozens of other floodlights across this part of the country with the forecast expected to worsen in terms of rain in the next few days. thank you very much. in the next ten minutes or so we will speak to someone from the environment agency. a flood manager and we will put those points to him. two cannabis—based medicines, to treat epilepsy and multiple sclerosis, have been approved for use on the nhs for the first time. it follows new guidelines from the drugs advisory body nice. the move has been largely welcomed by medical charities, but some parents who pay thousands of pounds for certain cannabis medicines say they‘re unhappy that those products are still not available on the nhs. and we will speak to a mother who has led a long campaign for cannabis based drugs to be available on the nhs. the conservatives and labour will mark armistice day by announcing new measures for the armed forces. the conservatives have pledged new protections to protect soldiers from legal action, while labour says it will improve military accommodation. 0ur political correspondent
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jonathan blake is in our westminster studio. you have been looking through some of these promises. unusualfor armistice day to fall in the run—up toa armistice day to fall in the run—up to a general election but the campaign continues and the parties making promises in terms of their commitments to the armed forces. as you say, for the conservatives, the main pledge is a the law to stop what see as unfair prosecutions against serving and former members of the armed forces. they do that by amending the human rights act so it could not apply to incidents that happened in northern ireland before it came into force in the year 2000. conflicts in afghanistan and elsewhere also. easier said than done. successive conservative defence secretaries of trade to change the law to protect members of the armed forces in this way and so far they have failed. aside from that, the tories also promise going tojob interviews for that, the tories also promise going to job interviews for public sector roles for armed forces veterans and
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better childcare at the end of the day forfamilies. better childcare at the end of the day for families. for labour, better childcare at the end of the day forfamilies. for labour, they say removing the public sector the pay would help the lowest paid members who they say have seen salaries fall in real terms since 2010. they also promise to improve housing for military families. the big announcement today is around mental health and young people. a big chunk of money, £845 million going towards what labour calls its wealthy young minds fund paying for counsellors in every secondary school in england and visits from counsellors to primary schools on a weekly baseless. jeremy weekly basis. jeremy corbyn says modern life is feeling mental health on a large scale. liberal democrats are focusing on adult education. an allowa nce focusing on adult education. an allowance of money that people have access to from the age of 25 and
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above through their adult life to spend on skills and training to improve their career prospects. the lib dems will pay for that, they say, by restoring corporation tax to 20%. more details on these policies and on other parties will pay for them, coming out in the manifestoes over the next few weeks. a state of emergency has been declared in areas of australia which are under threat from bushfires. the authorities in both new south wales and queensland have been struggling to control dozens of fires, which have killed three people — and destroyed scores of homes. 0ur correspondent phil mercer joins us from sydney. good morning to you and thank you for joining good morning to you and thank you forjoining us. tell us about the scale of the fire. parts of sydney are in danger, we understand. so far more than 120 fires are burning across the states of new south wales and queensland. last friday there we re and queensland. last friday there were 17 emergency bushfire alerts, that was unprecedented and the
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authorities fear that tomorrow, tuesday, could be even worse. for the very first time, the greater syd ney the very first time, the greater sydney area, also the illawarra region to the south of the city and the hunter to the north have been warned that there could well be catastrophic fire dangers over the course of the next 24 hours. this is the first time since the new rating system, since the new warning system was introduced ten years ago, that the city of sydney has been warned to expect these catastrophic conditions. what that means his hot temperatures, about 38 celsius, strong wind, low humidity on top of all of that and a long—standing drought has made the ground beneath your feet into dry. a state of emergency has been declared here in new south wales over the weekend. a state of emergency was declared in queensland as well. this crisis spans queensland as well. this crisis s pa ns two queensland as well. this crisis spans two states here in eastern australia. thank you.
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police in hong kong have fired live ammunition at protesters, hitting at least one person. footage broadcast on social media appears to show an officer shooting a demonstrator in the chest at point blank range. a hospital authorities spokesman told the bbc that the person who was shot is currently undergoing surgery and is in critical condition. and it was mike‘s turn to face the music last night — as he became the latest contestant to waltz out of the strictly ballroom. he may not have won the glitterball, but he‘s done breakfast proud — and has to go down in history as the best last dance on strictly ever — even getting claudia and tess tojoin him in the conga. he nearly lost test as well. she nearly fell. it is hard dance to do wearing heels. returning now to one of our main stories. when eight—year—old alfie dingley
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started taking a cannabis—based medication to help control his epilepsy, his mother saw an improvement in his condition. as we‘ve been hearing, two medicines containing cannabis are today being recommended for use on the nhs, for the first time. alfie‘s mum hannah deacon is with us now. lovely to see you again and thank you for coming in. what was your initial reaction? i know these drugs are quite specific. what was your initial reaction? initially, my lung these guidelines do not go far enough at all. there is some good news for people with specificity with ms there is a 50—50 cbd spray and for children with analgesics, to very specific conditions. a cbd only product will be available. so the product will be available. so the product my son is taking, the only difference is some minor cannabinoids, it is still mostly
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cbd, it will not be available. my point would be that cbd cbd cbd. just because it has a brand—name does not make a difference. so if you look at the guidelines, they took the whole way through of this product being say. so if it is safe we should see all products were cbd, being available to children like mine because it restricts us, thousands of children up and down the country, with severe epilepsy will have no access. at all. and thatis will have no access. at all. and that is utterly disgraceful. and for people, you are clearly an export and you know exactly the comp hounds in these medicines. for other people, this will bring hope to them won‘t it? perhaps this is a first step to greater access. it's the first step, absolutely. but if we‘re going to go the road of randomised controlled trials for the cannabis plant, and it does not lend itself to that. randomised controlled
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trials are about a single compound. the cannabis plant is made of hundreds of compounds and it works using an effect that is well known by most people within the cannabis industry. we know that stuff that was found by a doctor in israel 20 yea rs was found by a doctor in israel 20 years ago. we know about the entourage effect. what this is about as isolating cannabinoids and making drugs from them and that is not the best thing for patients. there is no evidence that pain will be helped by cannabis based medicines. that is simply not true. the national agency for medicine and science released a report in 2017 saying there is conclusive evidence that pain is help. it drops opioid use by 25%, death by 25%. the chief medical 0fficer did a report to say there was good evidence and that is why the law was changed. now we are seeing a rollback of what the law was changed for, which was to help patients access these products. we have been looking at pictures of
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your son while you were speaking. what difference has the medication made to him was to make it is not a cure. they must be said. my son has a non— inherited severe genetic epilepsy that affects nine boys in the world. he will never be cured. it is about reducing seizures and giving quality of life, about the fa ct giving quality of life, about the fact that he can attend school for more than he used to. and i could not sit on the sofa three years ago. i was not sit on the sofa three years ago. iwasa not sit on the sofa three years ago. i was a full—time carer for six yea rs i was a full—time carer for six years where i could not leave the house. i was completely isolated and could not interact. so there is a reduction in seizure? not a complete reduction, he does still have seizures but a massive reduction and an improvement in quality of life and cognitive development. doctor should be careful about prescribing cannabis to babies and children because of the possible impact on the developing structure of the brain. there is no evidence in the whole world that cannabis affects the development of your brain.
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benzodiazepines, absolutely. it is just not true. lots of people will be watching this and be thinking, we have to be careful when drugs are prescribed as they have to go through rigourous testing... of course. but not with randomised controlled trials. 0bservational trials. they are absolutely releva nt, trials. they are absolutely relevant, if you look at denmark, denmark have rolled out a national survey in cannabis based medicine as an observational trial. that is what i want to see. i am not saying it is a free for all, let everyone have it. iam a free for all, let everyone have it. i am saying we must understand which cannabinoids are right for which cannabinoids are right for which symptoms, we must understand what people respond to best, but we all have an individual cannabinoids system and will respond differently. we need an observational trial so people can use different amounts of compounds and collect that data. if we are going to push this down the
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pharmaceutical rct road, what will happen is that families will be paying thousands of pounds a month on subscriptions or people will be criminalised. people grow their own or go to the dealer down the street. that is what these guidelines will do, they will push people to criminalise themselves, some of the most vulnerable people in our society. an utter disgrace. thank you very much. you are going to see us you very much. you are going to see us again. i am glad things are a bit better. we won't give up. i can tell. we know you won't. and good on you for doing it. thank you for coming and speaking to us this morning. we did ask for a statement from nhs england but they didn‘t wa nt to from nhs england but they didn‘t want to comment or give us a statement on that, and we also ask from the department of health and social care, they also didn‘t want to give us a statement.” social care, they also didn‘t want to give us a statement. i think it is difficult for them in the midst ofan is difficult for them in the midst of an election campaign. i am sure the fight will continue. it certainly will. thank you. here‘s carol with a look at this morning‘s weather. good morning, everyone. we saw a deluge of rain over the weekend, leading to flooding as you have seen in the news. this one is actually taken in double check on saturday.
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feels flooded there. sheffield also saw a deluge of rain. in fact, this autumn so far, in sheffield there has been 383 millimetres of rainfall. that is 45% of their average annual rainfall. that‘s just shows how much there has been. hardly surprising, then, thatjaffe has a lot of flood warnings out across parts of england and wales. —— defra. there are currently five severe flood warnings out on the river don. a severe flood warning means danger to life, and take immediate action. so what we have todayis immediate action. so what we have today is a weather front which has been moving from the west towards the east. it will clear into the north sea but linger across the north—east of scotland. these isobars close together tell you it isobars close together tell you it is going to be gusty. the wind today is going to be gusty. the wind today is coming from a chilly north or north—westerly direction. blowing the rain over into the north sea, in the rain over into the north sea, in the north—east of scotland, we have lots of showers already coming in right behind, and some of them will be having a tundra, with hail.
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0vernight, some settling slow above 200 metres in the highlands. in the heavier showers you are likely to see more of that today. these white circles with the numbers indicate sustained wind speeds. gusts, of course, will be much more than that. coming from a chilly direction, it will make it feel cooler than these temperatures are just, and these temperatures are just, and these temperatures are just, and these temperatures are generally about one degree also below where they should be at this stage in november. mild air across the south—west of england and the channel islands. through this evening and overnight, the low pressure is still very much driving up pressure is still very much driving up to. we still have lots of showers rotating around it. there will be clear spells as well, and if you are away from the breeze and out of the showers, in some sheltered glands, for example, we could well see some frost. 0nce for example, we could well see some frost. once again, in the heavier showers, about —— above about 200 metres, we are likely to see settling snow. tomorrow our low pressure d rifts into settling snow. tomorrow our low pressure drifts into the north sea. we still have weather front strapped around it and we still have this north—westerly breeze. tomorrow, once again, we‘re looking quite a
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lot of showers. basically rotating around this area of low pressure. so thatis around this area of low pressure. so that is hit and miss, where you will catch one, but you could be in an area that sees lots of showers, may be just area that sees lots of showers, may bejust one, or area that sees lots of showers, may be just one, or none at all. in between them, it will be sunny skies, and we are also looking at once again, snow above 200 metres. we have got a straight northerly coming down the north sea, so that will make it feel cooler than those temperatures are suggesting. wednesday into thursday, this next area of low pressure comes our way. this is the direction we think it is going to take, so as you can see, it is likely to bring more rain across areas where we really don‘t want it. so across northern england and the midlands, with some hill snow. the met office has a couple of weather warnings out this week, one that is valid today, into lunchtime tomorrow, about midday, for rain and the same on thursday, four areas like the north of england and the midlands. —— for areas. like the north of england and the midlands. —— forareas. if like the north of england and the midlands. —— for areas. if you are concerned about further flooding issues, keep in touch with the weather forecast. in summery, further spells of rain, some hill
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snow, often windy and cold, especially if you are in the rain and exposed to the wind. it is one of those days where you really have to pay attention to the weather today, and this is what carol was saying, for certain parts of the country. some parts of yorkshire and the midlands saw a month‘s worth of rain injust 24 hours this weekend, and severe weather warnings are still in place. one of those warnings is for fishlake in doncaster, which was badly flooded after the river don burst. let‘s talk to adrian gill from the environment agency, he‘s in fishlake this morning. good morning to you, and we can clearly see there are big issues there for residents. how many people are affected? well, we have seen quite a lot of impact right across the north of england, the midlands and yorkshire. certainly now we are looking at impacting the lower don, the fish lake area and doncaster. —— fishlake. lots the fish lake area and doncaster. —— fishla ke. lots of the fish lake area and doncaster. —— fishlake. lots of people have been affected by flood water. can you give me an idea of how many
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households? so, at the moment, we believe across the north of england about 400 properties are flooded. the majority of those are in the doncaster area. but that is still a very evolving picture, we‘re still getting information back about the exact number of properties that have flooded. i also believe over 1200 properties have been evacuated, and again, this is still an ongoing situation. right, what are you doing for residents who are clearly affected behind you ? for residents who are clearly affected behind you? what are you doing to help them? so at the moment we are still managing this incident. it isa we are still managing this incident. it is a live incident and it is a multiagency response. we have evacuation out in place for some communities. we are working with doncaster council and the emergency services to keep people safe. we are asking people to keep up—to—date with messages, to look out for vulnerable friends and neighbours. to ta ke vulnerable friends and neighbours. to take the advice that emergency services are giving. there has been quite a lot of criticism of what has been going on, specifically that, for example, a local counsellor said to the environment agency put out a
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message at five o‘clock on friday saying, standdown, you are not going to flood and homes will not be flooded. they were flooded. so why we re flooded. they were flooded. so why were incorrect messages sent out? so i think one of the biggest challenges we always have an incident is giving people accurate timely and clear information about what is happening in what can be quite a difficult and changing situation. we have been monitoring the weather that came in at the end of last week, for a number of days. we had flood warnings and flood alerts out across many catchments, and for doncaster, in the early hours of friday. at that point, we we re hours of friday. at that point, we were not sure of all of the impacts were not sure of all of the impacts we would see and we have continued to update those messages. but as i said, this has been a big incident, it has been a complicated one, we have a lot of floodwater around now and a lot of assets operating at full capacity. and we have tried to keep people as up—to—date as possible through our website, through media outlets, and through our partners. so what went wrong?
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you just didn‘t know it was going to flood or you won‘t able to tell people? -- won't able. i am not sure it isa people? -- won't able. i am not sure it is a question of things going wrong. we try to keep people as informed as we can. i think we a lwa ys informed as we can. i think we always try to learn lessons and look at how we can do things better. and it isn‘t always easy to get across exactly what might be happening in a certain place, and for everyone to hear and understand the same message. so i completely understand we may have got some things, or we may want to improve how we communicate in the future, and there may be lessons we can learn from this incident. but at the moment we are very this incident. but at the moment we are very much focused on what is still happening on the ground and the further rain that might come. we have heard from people in the programme, who live there, or around there this morning, as far as they are concerned the problem is that it has not been dredged, and that is why it is flooded. what is your response to that? right across the country we use a response to that? right across the country we use a range response to that? right across the country we use a range of response to that? right across the country we use a range of measures to manage flood risk. we are investing £2.6 billion in this six—year spending period. stretching
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is something that we use, but if we use it on a case—by—case basis, we only use it where it is the right thing to do. one of the issues with dredging is quite often that material comes back and it needs to be constantly removed from a river. so quite often, other measures such as flood embankments, flood walls, and in this part of the world, pumping stations and flood storage areas, are more effective at managing the flood risk. so in this area we do not currently dredge the river, because we do not think that is the right thing to do. will you be looking at that again? how much you use dredging? as i have said, dredging is something we do, it is something we review on a case—by—case basis. when we are looking at investing money, dredging something that we can do, and obviously, as we always do, we review what is happening in this event, we will talk to our partners, look at our investment plans, and see what more we might need to do in the future. just briefly, from what
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you know, when will people be able to return to their homes? when will that want to be effectively gone, do you think? as i am hearing fishlake now we‘re looking at pumping plants to help draw the water down but there is a lot of water around and a lot of water in the systems as well, with further rain in the next couple of days and more rain again at the end of the week. so it is very difficult to say when the floodwaters will be fully cleared and when it will be safe for people to return, but we will be with the multiagency partners putting m essa g es multiagency partners putting messages out when we believe it is safe to come back. we will let you get on with your work. thank you very much. it is 7:26am. you are watching breakfast on armistice day, and we‘re at the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire this morning. it isa it is a bit ofa it is a bit of a cloudy morning down there, but an incredible day to be there. we have got tim muffett, we have been speaking to harry billinge
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as well over the weekend, after is it that his appearance 0n breakfast on friday, he was a memorial over the weekend. we will be reflecting on armistice day throughout the morning on bbc breakfast. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i‘m alpa patel. residents in canvey island are being offered reassurance by essex police after a spate of racist and homophobic graffiti appeared on cars and homes over the weekend. 0fficers spent part of yesterday visiting around 250 homes offering advice to residents after eight incidents were reported. dozens of 0rthodox jewish families from north london moved to the island in recent years. almost £400 million of unclaimed money is lying on unused 0yster cards according to transport for london. around 66 million registered 0yster cards haven‘t been used in at least a year.
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tfl says the money is invested to improve the network. an investigation has found a water leak caused the ceiling to collapse at the picadilly theatre last week, injuring several people. an exhibition by one of the most important artists and filmmakers working today, steve mcqueen, opens later at tate britain. he‘s been collating photos of school children — 3,000 of them to be exact. over the last year 75,000 year three pupils across the capital have had their picture taken. the hollywood director explained what the children should take away from the experience. that they‘re important. they‘re on the walls of tate britain, and that they‘re important. and they‘re notjust important within their school, they‘re important within the broader, wider environment of london. let‘s take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, problems on the picadilly line, which is suspended between rayners lane and uxbridge, which is down to significant leaf fall. there significant leaf fall. are minor problems on the central there are minor problems on the central line. on the victoria line,
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no service between warren street and brixton, and severe delays on the rest of the line while the emergency services deal with a casualty on the track. 0n the roads, queues on the north circular, westbound through the roadworks from the clockhouse interchange to brownlow road. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it‘s a rather wet, windy and cold monday morning, i‘m afraid. we‘ve had some rain overnight. it‘s gradually clearing away as we head through the morning. moving east and then later, drier and brighter with just one or two showers blowing through as well. then we have this quite brisk westerly, north—westerly wind. that‘ll clear the first band of rain through the morning, behind it, like i said, the clouds will be breaking up. nice, sunny spells, blowing
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some showers through, that will make things feel rather chilly, between 8 and 10 celsius maximum. 0vernight, still the chance of one or two showers and we hold onto the breeze. they will move through fairly quickly and we will get some clearer spells. temperatures dropping down into low single figures, one degree or two degrees in the suburbs. should remain frost—free because the air is moving around significantly thanks to that breeze which persists overnight. as we head into tuesday, perhaps a drier day, but we will see lots of cloud and those temperatures are still fairly chilly. it stays rather unsettled and cold through much of this week. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. here‘s a summary of this morning‘s main stories from bbc news. british steel is set to announce a rescue deal with chinese investors which could save up to 4000 jobs. the 70 million pound agreement will secure the future of the firm‘s flagship scu nthorpe plant, but there‘s a warning that costs may have to be cut.
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british steel has been kept running by the government since may, when the company went into liquidation. two cannabis—based medicines, to treat epilepsy and multiple sclerosis, have been approved for use on the nhs for the first time. it follows new guidelines from the drugs advisory body nice. the move has been largely welcomed by medical charities, but some parents who pay thousands of pounds for certain cannabis medicines say they‘re unhappy that those products are still not available on the nhs. the conservatives and labour will mark armistice day by announcing new measures for the armed forces. the conservatives have pledged new protections to protect soldiers from legal action, against accusations of wrongdoing on the battlefield. labour says it will increase pay for the armed forces and improve accommodation. the liberal democrats have announced a 10,000 pound ‘skills wallet‘ for adult training. a state of emergency has been declared in areas of australia
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which are under threat from bushfires. the authorities in both new south wales and queensland have been struggling to control dozens of fires, which have killed three people — and destroyed scores of homes. firefighters say the weather conditions are getting worse and that the coming days are critical. we have declared a state of fire emergency in queensland for the first time since 1994 so they give you with the scope of the conditions we are up you with the scope of the conditions we are up against full we have severe fire danger it weather expected tomorrow and wednesday reaching over 500 kilometres up our coastline. police in hong kong have fired live ammunition at protesters, hitting at least one person. footage broadcast on social media appears to show an officer shooting a demonstrator in the chest at point blank range. 0ur correspondent stephen mcdonell is in hong kong. we can see what has been going on behind you. talk us through what you have seen today. here at the
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cross—section where this young activist was shot it has been very tense, as you can see the riot police have been here and every time they come, they come and go come and go. whenever they come, you see them backing off now, swing around and you can see the crowd behind them has been hurling abuse at the police. protesters have been building barricades like this here and setting it on fire. but then every time the police leave, the barricades just every time the police leave, the barricadesjust go back every time the police leave, the barricades just go back up again and the police return and they are abused again by bystanders. you can tell how tense things are becoming here. there has been a lot of anger that this activist was shot. police have not given a detailed
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explanation for why, why he was shot that you can see the whole thing that you can see the whole thing that was filmed. they were trying to tell people to come down because, they say, from over passes like that heavy objects have been thrown down on the police. they say petrol—bombs are being used and they respond with tear gas and rubber bullets. this is why we are thinking that for the rest of today there will be many clashes. and that they will keep going throughout, i am told.“ clashes. and that they will keep going throughout, i am told. it is incredible to be live there with you this morning. thank you very much for your detail and if there are any developments we shall return to him. sally is here to talk about a great tennis interview coming up after the rest of the sport. just a couple of minutes away, the big three tennis players talking exclusively to us. liverpool are way out in front in the race for the premier league title. they beat last year‘s title winner
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manchester city 3—1 at anfield to go nine points ahead of them in the table. joe lynskey reports. around anfield the feeling grows that this could be the season and he could be the man. they have a lead on the champions and an eight point cushion on the top. this match turned their way in a moment. here manchester city may have had a penalty and the lead but the handball was not given. then 21 seconds later, liverpool did this. a great shot. a wonderful goal! his protests were just starting. andrew robertson‘s brilliant cross found mo salah. 2-0. city thought he were offside. var said no. perhaps the keeper was more to blame for the third. he was their second choice. he stayed on his line and saw the game slip away. the champions got one back with 12 minutes to go.
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one more would have really changed things. so when the ball struck an arm for the second time in the box, guardiola made sure everyone knew. at full—time the fury became irony. "thank you so much" he said to the officials. congratulations to liverpool. so they scored three goals and we scored one. so... the boys were completely focused and concentrated. it was just so good. the only way that we can be city. liverpool have lost only one league match in 18 months. it may still be november but right now they are so far ahead and it feels like this season has their name on it. well the premier league takes a fortnight pause now for the last international break of the year. manchester united will be in the top half when it resumes — they climbed up to seventh with a 3—1victory over brighton. it‘s united‘s fifth win in six games, it was watched by a smiling
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sir alex ferguson, and their current manager thinks things are, finally, coming together. in sunday‘s other premier league match wolves beat aston villa 2—1 in the west midlands derby. well, if liverpool are running away with the premier league it might be the scottish premiership that gives us an enthralling title battle this year. celtic and rangers are still neck and neck on points 12 games in. steven gerrard‘s side won 2—0 at livingston, while celtic were winners by the same scoreline at motherwell. celtic top the table on goal difference. we will hear a lot more from some tennis players injust a moment who are at the season—ending atp finals in london. but first, let‘s look at the action on the first day. and there was a big upset in roger federer‘s first match. he was beaten in straight sets by the fifth seed dominic thiem. earlier novak djokovic won his match as he goes for a record
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sixth title here. federer and djokovic meet in the pool stage later in the tournament. and that will be an almighty match. now, we‘ve got a real treat for you this morning. i‘ve been speaking exclusively to roger federer, rafa nadal and novak djokovic ahead of the atp finals in london. what an incredible interview to get. the three best players in the world together. we have been trying for a long time and it finally happened. i spoke to them about life on the road, what it takes to be the best, and if they‘ll ever call it a day. let‘s take a look. welcome to bbc breakfast. we are used to seeing you at wimbledon rather than cruising on the river. this looks quite friendly. are you friends? thanks for putting us on the spot! rivals or? isn't this
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casual boat ride telling you enough? we have been on the tour for many years. i see these guys more than my parents. you travel with your family with you? it is a lot of work. but thatis with you? it is a lot of work. but that is what it is. it is the only way i can see it working for me. the children need to be happy on the road, however. we have four children and it is a busy household with busy nights. do you get up in the night? 0ne nights. do you get up in the night? one of my kids wasn‘t feeling well but she was apologising to me. i told her don‘t worry, that is why you have parents. if you don‘t feel well we wa ke you have parents. if you don‘t feel well we wake up as well. it is difficult however before a game against one of my big rivals. any advice for the newly wed! good luck.
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i will need it. i always thought that i would start my tennis —— stop my tennis career in my 305. that i would start my tennis —— stop my tennis career in my 30s. come on, then. but now! don't my tennis career in my 30s. come on, then. but now i don't know. you never know when the time to stop is. so how much longer can you three keep playing? it is either all of us stop or none of us stop.” keep playing? it is either all of us stop or none of us stop. i will be the first to go. i am by far the old est the first to go. i am by far the oldest here. it will be interesting. we don‘t know how much there is left but the great thing here is that we all enjoy ourselves generally on the tour and it is a privilege we are still healthy in doing so well and still healthy in doing so well and still so successful. how mentally difficult is it to keep going? it's
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an individual sport so you cannot rely on anyone on the court. you have to take the responsibility to be able to sustain the wear and tear on the body and on the mind. andy murray. can you believe he is even back on the court and what is your message to him? what he is showing is his passion and love for the game. after all that he went through he is able to win again. and you play that well. i think very soon it will be a strong message for the kids. here we have the next generation. who would you choose from the three of us as a coach? what can you learn from the wiser men of tennis? last year i didn't
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even dream of this sol men of tennis? last year i didn't even dream of this so i am glad to be here and in the future, maybe i can do something like this for younger players. to be sitting here at the age of over 30, looking back at the age of over 30, looking back at ourselves, did we inspire anybody? can we help like you guys do for us right now? is this your favourite interview ever? absolutely. that is incredible access. we were on the boat and it was noisy but it is great to see the rest of the players coming through. that was actually the top eight around that
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table. the best eight tennis players in the world. and the one who put his hand up straightaway, that was dominic whojust his hand up straightaway, that was dominic who just defeated roger federer last night. looking at that group of players who do you think, quietly, would have gone to the table and put everything away?“ quietly, would have gone to the table and put everything away? is it roger federer? roger. he tidied up after us because he isjust roger federer? roger. he tidied up after us because he is just that kind of guy. you hear about him a lot and you have interviewed him but he was as lovely and down—to—earth, talking about his children, i don‘t think it was in the piece but he actually said i will only keep playing as long as much kids are happy. playing as long as much kids are happy- i playing as long as much kids are happy. i can only be happy if they are on the road, and as long as it works for them then it works for me. as soon as that stops, i stop. there are many people veryjealous of you
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today. what a dream lunch date.” will never have to top that. i may have to retire now. all you needed to add to that was carol. but then i would not have got a look in because everybody loves carol. but do you have any good weather to tell us about? bless you all, if only that were true. what we have this morning as rain once again. this is a weather watchers picture from derbyshire on friday saturday. you can see the flooding as we have seen the pictures on the news and breakfast this morning it is still flooding. in sheffield, since the beginning of autumn we have had 383 millimetres of rainfall. in context that is 45% of rainfall. in context that is 45% of the average annual rainfall, not the monthly, the annual. so quite a deluge. it has been over the course of the night so we still have five
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severe flood warnings on the river don stop a severe flood warning means imminent danger to life as well and take action. as well as the severe flood warnings there are 48 flood warnings in their own right. so maureen on the cards today. we have a weather front moving from the west to the east taking rain with it and behind it coming in a blustery westerly wind a lot of showers. first thing this morning we have rain falling through parts of yorkshire down towards east anglia, kent and the surrey and london area. it will linger across north—east scotla nd it will linger across north—east scotland and then right behind it there are some showers and some of there are some showers and some of the showers are heavy and thundery with baleful top the white circles indicate the sustained wind speeds, the gusts will be more than that and above about 200 metres. 0vernight we have already seen some settling snow in the highlands and we will see more of that as we get the course of
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the day. with all of that happening, however you look at it it will feel cold with temperatures ranging from five degrees in the north to a mild 11 in the south—west with temperatures about a degree also lower than they should be at this stage of november. through the evening and overnight we continue with a lot of showers where we have clear skies and not much breeze and parts of the highlands we could see some frost don‘t forget in the heavy showers above 200 metres, once again we will see settling snow. these are temperature values, between one and five degrees. something a little milder if you can call a degrees mild, in the channel islands. we start that tomorrow. low pressure anchored in the north sea, a weather front wrapped around it and the spacing and the isobars tells you that tomorrow will be breezy. the showers will rotate around the low pressure in an anticlockwise direction which is what they do so the showers are going to be hit and miss. could see many of them, just a few or none at all. and if you are
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in the position of seeing none at all then you are likely to have bright and sunny spells. temperatures between five and 10 degrees but not wind direction, down the east coast. that is a straight northerly so it will feel cold if you are exposed to it. by the time we reach thursday, this next area of low pressure coming our way, this is where we think it will take position and we are looking at more spells of rain in areas where we do not want them across northern england and the midlands. so if you are heading out and you are concerned about the weather this week, keep in touch with the forecast. you can see the met office weather warnings on our website but in summery, some hill snow, spots of rain, often windy and cold. 7:47 a.m., monday morning. if you didn‘t catch up with strictly last night, and if you don‘t know when you haven‘t watched it yet, close
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your ears, but it was mike‘s turned to face the music last night as he became the latest contestant to wa ltz became the latest contestant to waltz away from the strictly ballroom. he did not waltz, hit congo. —— conga‘ed. let‘s have a look back at some of his best moments. #do # do you love me? # do you love me? #do # do you love me? # do you love me? # do you love me? like # do you love me? like an # do you love me? like an like an overwhelmed # do you love me? like an overwhelmed tin toy, darling. you we re off, overwhelmed tin toy, darling. you were off, like a madman! sex! -- six! like a psychotic cliffhanger. is it going to be now, it going to be the next left? i love to watch
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how you enter dancing. it is special. it is nice. but it is so fun to watch. # come on, eileen... you keep getting better and better and better. you are aiming very, very high. and you succeeded. well done. you should be so proud of yourself. nine! eight! is this a dream? let's
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do it together one time. the first couple who must compete in the dance off. it is mike and katya.” couple who must compete in the dance off. it is mike and katya. i can tell you how put in 100%, and as with a few others, you are improving every week. well done. stronger technical skills for me, cleaner and polished. i‘m going to say mike and katya. you were a musical comedy man, and that proves it. i really loved it. thank you! mike and katya, come and join me. come on. you know how it goes. 0h, dear. i'm sorry. it doesn't get any
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easier, does it? mike, despite all the odds that go on, you come out weekend, week out, and i have to say, first of all, you give 150%. based on data dance off alone, i am about to ask each of you the name of the couple that you think deserves to stay, and why. the couple who have really performed to the highest standard, and to me, that couple is michelle and johaness. this is not an advert for dancing. a guy in his 50s, mentally sharper, ifeelable to deal with pressure situations thanks to the dance offs. it has changed me completely. and honestly, i‘m not going to stop dancing. what a larder. what a lovely closing speech, as well. great speech, no tears. all positive. he held it together. he is going to be with us tomorrow on the programme to run us through his... don‘t sayjourney.
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his strictly time. it was lovely. i love to thing. particularly the conga that is how to end a party well, with a conga. bushell knows how to arrive, he knows how to leave. by getting his head wedged in a rather uncomfortable position, if you saw it. some that has been hard, hasn‘t it? particularly his wife, emily, as well, she spoke about some of the abuse he received and how ha rd of the abuse he received and how hard that has been to deal with, and i think that has been quite difficult for him. but also, he has that right from the start, when it is time to go, it is time to go. and he was in four dance offs, and he is happy he had a great experience, as he told us tomorrow —— will tell us tomorrow, but he will look back on it fondly, somebody who has never done this before. and the good news is, he will be back on breakfast soon. i said to him the other week, we miss you, we need you back.” wonder if we will still have thin mike forever. he lost over a stone and a half. incredible.
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and they news this morning, which is good news, rescue dealfor and they news this morning, which is good news, rescue deal for british steel could save more than 4000 jobs but isn‘t quite a done deal. steel could save more than 4000 jobs but isn't quite a done deal. what is going on? a really interesting one, this. the government has effectively been running it before the other owners pulled out. the others pulled out because it was too difficult to make steelwork in this country. there are all sorts of reasons why, the previous owners suggested it was to do with brexit. that was one of the big concerns, sales and import duties and that sort of thing. there has also been a lot of criticism of chinese manufacturer‘s selling to europe and the united states. president trump has been very critical about how much has been so—called dumped, sold very cheaply, undercutting domestic prices. let me run you through what we know about the numbers so far. these plants that are affected here are the 4000
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employed directly at scunthorpe and teesside. the majority are in scunthorpe. the teesside. the majority are in scu nthorpe. the crucial teesside. the majority are in scunthorpe. the crucial number is the 20,000 jobs in the supply chain. up the 20,000 jobs in the supply chain. up to 25,000 jobs potentially at sta ke, up to 25,000 jobs potentially at stake, if a deal can be done. i‘m joined now by gareth stace, director of uk steel that represents uk steel producers. good morning to you. i want first of all, your reaction to this deal? as we said, a deal that is being done, but not quite a done deal?” we said, a deal that is being done, but not quite a done deal? i think thatis but not quite a done deal? i think that is the important point. while we all think that there might be something happening today or later in the week, you know, jingye hasn‘t made a formal announcement yet. that doesn‘t mean today can‘t be good news for the sector. what we want to see as an investor likejingye put in that investment and significant investment into british steel. not just today and tomorrow, but the longer term, because we could easily be back here in three years or five yea rs,
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be back here in three years or five years, saying it has happened again, looking for a new buyer. no, no, what we need to see as an investor -- is what we need to see as an investor —— is an investor who is in it for the long—term, and from what i understand, jingyejust the long—term, and from what i understand, jingye just that company. that is what i wanted to ask you, what makes this deal different? because we have been here before, other owners have said, we just cannot make steelmaking in this country work. well, exactly. there area country work. well, exactly. there are a couple of reasons. one is that that company does need significant investment. hundreds of millions of pounds of ongoing investment. it is very capital intensive —— intensive, steelmaking. but we can make steelwork, in terms of making steel in the uk work, going forward. what do we need? we need the next government to stand back a bit from this, and look at the sector as a whole. and say, is it competitive? why isn‘t it, well, if it wasn‘t, government policy. electricity prices, business rates, procurement in terms of the amount of steel from the uk that the government buys in its major projects, and r&d funding
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as well. we need government to share our vision for the future, which is a growing sector, and notjust leave us with high energy prices, which means we are uncompetitive and we are trying to operate on a global market with prices set globally, with one hand tied behind our backs. give us a sense of the significance of teesside in scunthorpe, we talked about the 4000 directjobs, but the 20,000 in the supply chain, that is the real big number? exactly. scunthorpe the real big number? exactly. scu nthorpe makes one the real big number? exactly. scunthorpe makes one third of the steel but the uk makes. it is massively significant. it is critical, not just to massively significant. it is critical, notjust to that massively significant. it is critical, not just to that area, massively significant. it is critical, notjust to that area, as you say, but also actually do the whole of the manufacturing sector in the uk, i believe, and ultimately to the uk, i believe, and ultimately to the uk, i believe, and ultimately to the uk economy. so the government could not let this go out of business. it has to find that long—term investor that is needed, that can take the global view, and i hope jingye can do just that. absolutely, gareth, good to talk to
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you. so, as you heard there, this is about longer term investment, £70 million this chinese firm will pay, lots of questions, though. they have already said they will need to cut costs at some point. so, good news in one sense, but the detail really is what we need to keep an eye on. then, thank you. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i‘m alpa patel. almost £400 million of unclaimed money is lying on unused 0yster cards, according to transport for london. around 66 million registered cards haven‘t been used in at least a year. tfl says the money is invested to improve the network. residents in canvey island are being offered reassurance by essex police after a spate of racist and homophobic graffiti appeared on cars and property over the weekend.
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0fficers spent part of yesterday visiting around 250 homes offering advice to residents, after eight incidents were reported. it comes after dozens of 0rthodox jewish families from north london moved to the island in recent years. an exhibition by one of london‘s most successful artists and filmakers opens today at tate britain. steve mcqueen has collated photos of school children from across london. over the last year 75,000 pupils had their picture taken to be included in the exhibition. this is what the hollywood director hopes the children will get out of the experience. that they‘re important. they‘re on the walls of tate britain, and that they‘re important. and they‘re notjust important within their school, they‘re important within the broader, wider environment of london. let‘s take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, minor problems on the central line.
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the picadilly line is suspended between rayners lane and uxbridge. 0n the victoria line there‘s no service between warren street and brixton, and severe delays on the rest of the line while the emergency services deal with a casualty on the track. slow on the 840 because of an earlier accident westbound, just past sweetly ‘s roundabout, causing delays both ways. —— swakeley‘s. slow southbound between m25 and j9 gatwick, through the roadworks. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it‘s a rather wet, windy and cold monday morning, i‘m afraid. we‘ve had some rain overnight. it‘s gradually clearing away as we head through the morning. moving east and then later, drier and brighter with just one or two showers blowing through as well. then we have this quite brisk westerly, north—westerly wind. that‘ll clear the first band of rain through the morning, behind it, like i said, the clouds will be breaking up. nice, sunny spells, blowing some showers through, that will make things feel rather chilly, between 8 and 10
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celsius maximum. 0vernight, still the chance of one or two showers and we hold onto the breeze. they will move through fairly quickly and we will get some clearer spells. temperatures dropping down into low single figures, one degree or two degrees in the suburbs. should remain frost—free because the air is moving around significantly thanks to that breeze which persists overnight. as we head into tuesday, perhaps a drier day, but we will see lots of cloud and those temperatures are still fairly chilly. it stays rather unsettled and cold through much of this week. i‘m back in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it‘s back to dan and louise. good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin.
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0ur headlines today at 8am: british steel saved. the company is set to announce a £70 million rescue deal with a chinese firm. the move would protect 4000 jobs at its scunthorpe and teesside plants, and up to 20,000 in the supply chain. an raf helicopter is sent in to help in yorkshire with more flooding expected. this morning we‘re live in a village that‘s been cut off for days. when moving from the west to the east, clearing into the north sea, but a lot of showers with some sunshine in between. harry billinge‘s tribute to his fallen comrades. this morning on armistice day we‘re live at the national arboretum. we talk exclusively to the top three tennis players in the world. federer, djockovic and nadal together as you have never seen them before. it‘s either all of us stop or none of us stop. i think i'm the first to go! i mean, come on!
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i'm by far the older guy. mike bows out of strictly in style. he may not have won the glitterball but he‘s done breakfast proud. good morning. it‘s monday 11th november. our top story: six months after the collapse of british steel, a chinese manufacturing giant is on the verge of agreeing a rescue deal for the firm saving thousands of jobs. british steel has been kept running by the government since may, when the company went into liquidation. the agreement will secure the future of the firm‘s flagship scu nthorpe plant, but there‘s a warning that costs may have to be cut. and also the deal is not yet signed. but give us the details. for questions about the detail here but we know that this chinese firm have agreed to buy in principle, when the details are announced, british steel, for £70 million, a significant investment. the government has been running there since earlier this year when it fell into liquidation. we know there are
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4000 jobs in scunthorpe and into liquidation. we know there are 4000 jobs in scu nthorpe liquidation. we know there are 4000 jobs in scunthorpe and in deeside and that is the majority of the ones that will be safeguarded if this deal is done. there are also 20,000 in the so—called supply chain, that supply parts, labour and maintenance to the firms, and they will also be safeguarded if the deal is done. significant that lots of questions about why this deal is any different to those in the in the past. the previous owner has pointed out how difficult it is to run steel in this country. the chinese firm that had bought it, they have 23,500 staff, worth £4 billion, and they are coming in and saying they have the a nswe rs. coming in and saying they have the answers. it is about raising production and making it more viable in the uk. we have been hearing from one expert that is to do with all sorts of things, the business environment in the uk. they will try to bring down the costs. it is very energy intensive, for example, they will need to do that. this might make it more viable and with more of
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a market than in the past. thank you. more than two inches of rain could fall today in parts of northern england, where five severe flood warnings — meaning there is a threat to life — are already in place. an raf helicopter has been brought in to strengthen flood defences. 0ur reporter luxmy gopal joins us now from one of the worst affected areas, fishlake. you have been there all morning and residents are very badly affected. absolutely. just take a look at this road. it looks like a river. hundreds of homes around here have been flooded, with up to 1200 people‘s homes affected. the water levels today are slightly lower than they were. you can see that they have fallen. some of the houses here, when we were taking a walk this morning, the water level was up to the bottom of the windowpane of the ground—floor homes. it is now a foot or two lower than that but it
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is still inaccessible. hundreds of people have had to leave their homes. we know that some of the 1200 people have decided they didn‘t want to leave their homes and the local council is urging them to do so, saying they can‘t help these people if they are in higher risk areas, which most legates. that is the local playpark. it looks like a lake. fishla ke local playpark. it looks like a lake. fishlake is one of five areas under severe flood warning. another is bentley, where the military were drafted in to help with the efforts yesterday. into the early hours of the morning, chinnocks whether to help shore up the defences. no prospect any time soon of people getting home. thank you.
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two cannabis—based medicines, to treat epilepsy and multiple sclerosis, have been approved for use on the nhs for the first time. the move has been largely welcomed by medical charities, but some parents who pay thousands of pounds for certain cannabis drugs say they‘re unhappy that those products are still not available on the nhs. earlier we spoke to hannah deacon, who campained for her son alfie to get the medicine he needs to treat his epilespy. he is never going to be cured. it is about reducing seizures and giving quality of life. it is about the fa ct quality of life. it is about the fact that he can attend school far more than he used to. and it is about me. i couldn‘t sit on the sofa three years ago. i was a full—time carerfor three years ago. i was a full—time carer for six three years ago. i was a full—time carerfor six years where three years ago. i was a full—time carer for six years where i couldn‘t leave the house. i was completely isolated. he still has these are sometimes but a massive reduction in seizures and a massive improvement in quality of life and cognitive development. the conservatives and labour will mark armistice day by announcing new measures for the armed forces. the conservatives have pledged new protections to protect soldiers from legal action, while labour says it will improve military accommodation.
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0ur political correspondent jonathan blake is in our westminster studio. he has been looking through some of these promises for us at the start of another week. very unusual for armistice day to fall in the run—up toa armistice day to fall in the run—up to a general election but the campaign continues and the parties are making various promises to members of the armed forces and vetera ns. members of the armed forces and veterans. the conservatives are focusing on an attempt to change the law to protect veterans from unfair and vexatious, as they describe it, legal action. the defence secretary, ben wallace, this morning describing this as an industry, where veterans faced repeated action in the courts over things that happened mainly during the troubles in northern ireland. they are saying if they win the election and form a majority government, they will change the human rights act to stop that happening. and it is easier said than done, by the way, because the conservative government has been trying for some time to do this and has not managed to get. as well the tories are promising better
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childcare for armed forces and their families and also job interviews childcare for armed forces and their families and alsojob interviews in the public sector. labour said they would improve pay and conditions for people in the armed forces, largely by removing the public sector pay cap and improving housing as well. they‘re a big focus today is on mental health and services for young people. a big chunk of money, £845 million going towards their healthy young minds fund, seeing trained counsellors in every secondary school in england and better access to services as well. jeremy corbyn has said that our society is fuelling mental illness on a huge scale. that is clearly a priority for him. the liberal democrats focusing on adult education. a £10,000 skills wallet which they say would allow people to draw on that allowa nce would allow people to draw on that allowance of money at various points for their adult life to spend on skills and training. that will be paid for by a rise in corporation tax. more details on parties and
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their promises and crucially how they plan to pay for them when the ma nifesto they plan to pay for them when the manifesto are published in the next week or so. thank you. good to talk to you. jonathan blake in westminster. and as soon as the ma nifestos westminster. and as soon as the manifestos are out, we will look at them on bbc breakfast in great detail. a state of emergency has been declared in areas of australia which are under threat from bushfires. the authorities in both new south wales and queensland have been struggling to control dozens of fires, which have killed three people and destroyed scores of homes. firefighters say the weather conditions are getting worse and that the coming days are critical. police in hong kong have fired live ammunition at protesters, hitting at least one person. demonstrations took place during monday morning rush hour. a hospital authority spokesman told the bbc that the person who was shot is undergoing surgery and is in a critical condition. and it was mike‘s turn to face the music last night as he became the latest contestant to waltz out of the
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strictly ballroom. he may not have won the glitterball, but he‘s done breakfast proud. and he has really enjoyed himself as well. if you‘re going to leave the party, this is the way to go. a conga with everybody. we nearly lost tess daly halfway through! mike will be on the programme with us tomorrow. he didn‘t make it to blackpool but he has been brilliant. you never want to be the person in a conga that lets down the chain. the pressure of the conga! well done to make and we will speak to him on the programme tomorrow. it is eight to 10am and this is breakfast. —— it is 8:10am. since d—day veteran harry billinge was on the programme on friday, here are some of the lovely things you‘ve been in touch with us to say: "a beautiful soul and an inspiration
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to us all." "a truly wonderful man who‘s seen so much." "a hero in every sense." thousands of you have been getting in contact, either on email or social media. harry was here to talk to naga and charlie about the normandy memorial he‘s helped to raise money for, something we were able to show him for the first time. this is it. this is what you‘ve been raising money towards and you‘ve never seen it before. no, never. how does it make you feel? the work you‘re doing, it‘s now concrete. it‘s tangible. it‘s there. you can touch it. marvellous. how does it feel, harry? 0k? yeah. it means so much? i‘m all right. i did it because i had a job to do. all these fellows did a good job. an incredible time on the sofa. so
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many people got in touch about that interview. and while the queen led remembrance sunday events in central london yesterday, harry laid a wreath at st austell in cornwall, accompanied by his daughter margot. always a privilege to work with my dad. that‘ll be the day! he's a very special man. everybody loves my dad. i love my dad more than anybody else. 0k? god bless you, harry. god bless you, too. very good blokes, medics. looked after me. whatever i done, i‘ve done for my mates that never came back. i‘ve done it with my best strength. how are you? i‘m all right. hello. he‘s a hero and he‘s just a lovely man. what he‘s done for his charity is unbelievable. not many people do that.
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the market has made me one of the family. when i‘m collecting for that memorial, i get a great calm in my body and my heart. thank you, darling. i‘m no hero. all the heroes are dead. but they‘re dead to the world, not to me. because these fellows have never died. to live in hearts we leave behind is not to die. they‘re still alive today to me. i want people to remember me as a good old sapper who done his best. that‘s all. i shall never have my
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name on the memorial name on the memorial because they are all to do with the people who gave their lives. i hope i shall live in the hearts of people who won‘t forget harry because i‘ve done my best and that‘s all a man can do. whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might. for there is no knowledge, nor work, nor device in the grave whither thou goest. you could listen to him for such a long time, couldn‘t you? and thank you again for all the messages, emails and comments and the things you have sent through on social media, having listened to harry, not only when he first met naga that when he came back on the stove on friday. he has touched the hearts of so many people. and we will keep in touch with him and pass on your m essa g es touch with him and pass on your messages as well. this year marks 100 years since the first two—minute silence was observed, on armistice day on november the 11th 1919. brea kfast‘s tim muffett
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is at the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire. good morning to you. what a beautiful sight it is. the national memorial arboretum, a place where people can remember. and that is what will be happening at 11 o‘clock on armistice day. different to yesterday. the chance to reflect visual but in a slightly different way perhaps. this is the armed forces memorial and what a stunning sight it is as well. philip, you are in charge of the national memorial arboretum. why is armistice day different to remembrance sunday? 0n our armistice day we bring the focus back to national arboretum and the memorial where we have 60,000 names of service men and women who have given their lives in service and due to acts of terrorism, and it is a very poignant place for people to come and reflect not only about those who have been lost in the past but in more recent conflicts, here
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at the arboretum. it is a beautiful space. there is a gap, and if it is sunny, fingers crossed, the light will come through here and hopefully shine on the memorial we see behind us. absolutely. i think it is specifically designed for this event and aligned for 11 o‘clock, you know, the 11th month, for the shaft of light to remember our respect and remember those who have fallen.” of light to remember our respect and remember those who have fallen. i do see blue skies, so you never know! fingers crossed. i will come over here and have a quick chat to these former veterans, former servicemen, david and javid. how important is armistice day as a chance to reflect? you served in afghanistan and iraq, didn‘t you? reflect? you served in afghanistan and iraq, didn't you?” reflect? you served in afghanistan and iraq, didn't you? i did. at the chance to reflect on the lives of their colleagues last is a very important thing to an neck service man and it is very important to be able to do it here at the armed forces memorial. i have an immense
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sense of pride as i stand in front of the service today to reach the exaltation as we do commit that act of remembrance. behind us we see the names of many who have lost their lives and you knew some of them and you worked alongside them. sadly there are two dozen of my former colleagues‘ names etched into the world here. the first dating back to my service in northern ireland in 1987 and many more have been added since and they continue to do so as they fall and will continue to do so as every serviceman who dies in service of the country here dies in perpetuity from 1945 onwards. thank you. you have work carefully with former muslim service men and women. and it is important to remember the international aspect of the conflict being honoured today.”
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international aspect of the conflict being honoured today. i think that is absolutely vital. when we look at the contribution of the commonwealth during world war i and world war two, it is not to be underestimated. i think that difference can be highlighted in a number of the names on the memorial behind us. a corporal, a muslim, who moved to birmingham, and peter thorpe of the royal signals, different individuals, one a muslim and one lot, from different cultural backgrounds, but what bonded them of their military service and sadly well together serving their country they were killed in action in afghanistan on the 3rd ofjuly 2006. i think that exemplifies that the british armed forces are a mixture of people of diverse backgrounds, but one thing that binds us together is our camaraderie. thank you for talking to us. there will be a special moment at 11 o‘clock. two minutes of silence held here and across the country, a real chance for everyone to reflect on the sacrifices that have been made. as we have been hearing from philippa, the light may well shine very
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poignantly onto the memorial itself, which will be quite a moment to reflect. every time we are there, it strikes me as a beautiful, peaceful place. thank you very much. and the design as well, that gap with the shaft of light that comes through, beautifully put together and it looks lovely this morning even though the weather is not perfect. it isn‘t, is it, carol? good morning. good morning, everyone. we could see some sunshine this morning. when we lose the band of rain, it will be a mixture of sunshine and showers but heavy showers and blustery ones to boot. you can see the spectre of derby, used to illustrate the flooding that has taken place across the midlands and northern england. —— you can see this picture of derby. sheffield has seen 383 millimetres of rainfall which in old money is 15 inches. to put it into context, that is 45% of the average annual rainfall, not
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monthly. this month alone we have had just over 119 millimetres of rainfall in sheffield. defra has got some flood warnings in force, 48 to be precise, and five severe flood warnings. that means imminent danger to life, so take action. keep up—to—date with those warnings. you can find them on our website. the met office weather warnings are there as well and there is one that lasts until midday tomorrow for rain and another for rain lasts until midday tomorrow for rain and anotherfor rain on lasts until midday tomorrow for rain and another for rain on thursday. weather fronts moving from the west to the east, depositing snow in the highlands above 200 metres, taking the rain with it. you can see from the rain with it. you can see from theice the rain with it. you can see from the ice abide, close together, that we are looking at gusty winds, particularly so with exposure. —— the isobars. rain clearing into the north sea from all but the far north—east of scotland. in between the showers, some bright spells.
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showers can be heavy and thundery with some hail and falling above 200 metres as snow. sustained wind speeds here, with gusts of more than that. with the wind and showers, it will feel cold whichever way you look at it. temperatures five to 11 degrees. for many parts of the uk, temperatures are just a touch below average for november. as we head into this evening and overnight, we continue with the showers. some heavy and that we with hail and some clear skies as well and it will be breezy. we are not expecting frost for most but in the sheltered glens out of the breeze for example you could see a bit of frost. 0n tuesday, low pressure is anchored across the north sea. and its attendant weather fronts and still that north or north westerly breeze. everything around low pressure rotates in an anticlockwise
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direction so you can see where all the showers are coming in. it is hit or miss whether you catch one or not and that means you could see frequent showers or none at all. if you don‘t see any, bright and breezy with sunny skies, but still above 200 metres under the heavier showers in scotland we could see some snow. temperatures five to nine. still feeling cold. from wednesday into thursday, a new area of low pressure comes our way, moving across us. this is the track we think it will take. there will be some further rain in areas we don‘t want it. northern england and the midlands, hence the next met office yellow weather warning for rain. in summary, there the spells of rain and sun hill snow. it will be windy and sun hill snow. it will be windy and not surprisingly with that combination it will feel cold. i bet. thank you. we will see you in half an hour. some parts of yorkshire
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and the midlands saw a month‘s worth of rain injust 24 hours this weekend and severe weather warnings are still in place. one of those warnings is for fishlake in doncaster, which was badly flooded after the river don burst. 0ur reporter, luxmy gopal, joins us from there this morning. we can see why people are having serious problems. absolutely. the red behind me looks like a river and hundreds of homes have been flooded here. one of the homes is there behind me and you can see how bad the flooding has been. levels have gone down a little bit. you might be able to see the dark water mark of where the water came up to is just up where the water came up to is just up to the window sill of the ground floor window. it has gone down a bit but it is still really serious and not surprising that residents have been told they are unlikely to be able to return to their homes for at least a day while the water is still at these levels. i have got some residents with me now, a team of local farmers who have been affected by the flooding. if we start with
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you, alan, how have you been affected ? you, alan, how have you been affected? our farm is five feet higher than the road and the water level has been two foot higher than every building on ourfarm, is all the grain stores are flooded and the houseis the grain stores are flooded and the house is two steps up the stairs.” do have been affected.” house is two steps up the stairs.” do have been affected. i live next doorto do have been affected. i live next door to palin and the whole house has been flooded. all of the farm buildings, we have had to move livestock to higher areas to try and keep them out of the water. it has been such a stressful time, it really has. i can imagine. been such a stressful time, it really has. ican imagine. richard, what have the authority is done to deal with the situation? not much, really. all the farms in the area are of the opinion that the river don has got to be dredged. we have been speaking to an environment agency gentleman who said that would not cure the problem. they say that dredging is not suitable for all places and they feel there are other measures better suited to this place. are you happy with that
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response? not at all. he has promised me that after all this is over we can have a meeting and they will come and speak in front of me, and it will be very well attended by local farmers, to try and convince us that not dredging the river won't solve the problem. what would be a better solution? i would like to see that river dredging. we are all farmers and we do our own ditches out for our benefits and we have neglected our ditches in the past and seen the damage it causes. the river is effectively a big ditch. but there has been neglected, which we feel has caused this. we would really like to see something happen up really like to see something happen up there and we don‘t want this devastation to happen ever again in my lifetime, or anybody‘s. it devastation to happen ever again in my lifetime, oranybody‘s. it is devastation to happen ever again in my lifetime, or anybody‘s. it is so heartbreaking. understandably. all of you will remember the flooding in 2007. how worried are you about something like this happening again? people keep banging on about global warming and this is part of global
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warming and this is part of global warming and this is part of global warming and it is obvious that it is happening and we want to be able to control the flow of water around these villages and farms, as opposed to letting it run through. and it can be done. if people put the money up can be done. if people put the money up to do it. the environment agency has said they have invested a huge amount of money in this area and that fewer homes have been flooded this time round than last time as a result of that. of course there are potentially more worrying times to come for people here and in other areas who have that severe flood warning in place by the environment agency because the forecast is that to potentially worsen with more rain ahead in the next couple of days. just take a look behind you. you can see why this is a really worrying time for the people of fishlake. thank you for bringing us up and good luck to everybody who is there. coming up on breakfast: kay mellor is the writer behind tv dramas such as the syndicate
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and fat friends. now her ground—breaking series band of gold is being adapted for the theatre. she will be here to tell us all about it. now it is time for the news, travel and weather where you are. hello. yet more rainfall as we head through the forecast this week, especially for areas that have seen flooding. showers piling on for the north—west as we head through the day, heavy infantry, some hell, possibly some lightning as well, met 0ffice weather warning for south yorkshire down into the peak district, where we had recent flooding. turning drier and brighter, some sunshine further south and east, strong gusty, cool feeling north—westerly wind around today, temperatures not getting out single figures for most. 0vernight where we have seen showers through the date they continue on moving
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down on the north—west wind, turning wintry over the hills of scotland at times, down through northern england as well, clear spells in south and east, brisk north—westerly wind keeping any widespread frost at bay, chilly started the day tomorrow. mooring for the rest of the five severe flood warnings in place from the environment agency, all the details on the weather website.
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this is worklife from bbc news, with sally bundock and maryam moshiri. up in smoke? the two biggest economies in the world take further action as concerns about vaping and e—cigarettes intensify. live from london, that‘s our top story on monday 11 november.

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