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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  November 11, 2019 5:00pm-6:00pm GMT

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today at 5 — a boost for boris johnson in the general election. nigel farage gives in to pressure from fellow brexiteers and says his brexit party will not stand in tory held seats. the brexit party will not contest the 317 seats the conservatives won at the last election. but what we will do is concentrate our total effort into all of the seats that are held by the labour party. we'll have the latest from our political correspondent who's travelling with mr farage on the campaign trail. the other main stories on bbc news at 5. a chinese firm confirms a rescue deal for british steel, buying it for £70 million and saving 4,000 jobs in scunthorpe and teeside. it's been a big concern, hasn't it?
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nobody knowing what's going to be happening, whether they've got a job, pay their mortgages, feed their families. it's great news. it's finally something positive, it's good. more rain forecast in areas of england already been hit by flooding. five severe flood warnings — meaning a threat to life — are still in place. mystery surrounds the death of the british founder of the white helmets emergency response group in syria. last post plays. remembering those who died in two world wars and the conflicts since — exactly 100 years after the first two—minute silence was held.
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it's 5 o'clock — our top story. nigel farage has said his brexit party won't now contest conservative held seats in next month's elections. in what is being seen as a boost for borisjohnson, mr farage said he doesn't want anti—brexit parties to win the election. he's standing down candidates in more than 300 consitutencies where the tories won at the last election. instead the brexit party say they'll concentrate all their efforts on labour held seats. 0ur political correspondent, tom barton, is in sedgefield where the brexit party is holding a rally this evening. they are just getting ready here for the next stop on nigel farage‘s general election campaign tour. earlier today he was half an hour away in hartlepool, where he made today's big election announcement that the brexit party will not be
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standing against the conservatives in seats which the tories won at the 2017 election. after his speech, i asked him why, when he has said that the deal boris johnson asked him why, when he has said that the deal borisjohnson has agreed with the eu is such a bad one and that he was going to take the fight to the tories unless they agreed to a no—deal brexit, why now he has decided to back down. we are not standing in the 317 seats the conservatives won at the 2017 general election, because borisjohnson last night said they will be no extension beyond 2020 and he said he is going for a super canada plus style trade deal, not political alignment, so that is a big shift of position, a much more positive shift in position. there are questions about whether he keeps those promises, so what we will do is fight against the labour seats and the remainer parties and focus our efforts and i want to get the brexit party mps into westminster to make sure that borisjohnson
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keeps those promises. for borisjohnson, for boris johnson, you for borisjohnson, you would think this might be a relief. it is to some extent, he tweeted earlier that he welcomes it, saying it helps avoid a hung parliament but he has also said today that anybody who wa nts also said today that anybody who wants brexit needs to vote conservative. there has been criticism despite this concession by nigel farage on the brexit party, there has been criticism that the party is still going to stand in those labour held conservative marginal is that the tories are targeting. the only way boris johnson can get the majority that he craves and avoid a hung parliament, which nigel farage says he wants to avoid, is by winning in those seats. they are seats which the brexit party is still apparently planning to stand in, although earlier today we we re to stand in, although earlier today we were told that they are not going
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to contest the seat of brecon and read and share which is currently held by the lib dems where there was a lib dem alliance. the in no doubt, mergerfright has a lib dem alliance. the in no doubt, merger fright has been a lib dem alliance. the in no doubt, mergerfright has been under a lot of pressure, both from outside his party but also within the brexit party. brexit party candidates phoning him last week to tell him they was considering standing aside as candidates, which has clearly been part of the motivation, part of the reason has been that pressure from inside his party. as for the labour party, who nigel farage says he is going to take the fight to now that he's only standing in seats held by labour and pro remain
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parties, jeremy corbyn said today that a vote for boris johnson's conservatives is a vote to nigel farage and suggesting it's also a vote perhaps for the values of donald trump. nicola sturgeon also today railing against this, saying it shows boris johnson today railing against this, saying it shows borisjohnson and nigel farage are, in her words, joined at the hip. thank you. significant use for the prime minister, that announcement from the brexit party. borisjohnson has been spending the day campaigning in wolverhampton. 0ur political correspondent, alex fosyth, is at the lych gate tavern. what has mrjohnson‘s reaction been to this news? as you say, what is an election campaign without a visit to a pub and borisjohnson was in this one slightly earlier today because he was in wolverhampton to mark
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armistice day with a ceremony. he came to this pub afterwards, where he met veterans and he pulled a pint behind the bar which i was told to get better with a bit of training. he was doing that while nigel farage was making this fairly significant announcement at his press conference. borisjohnson was given a bit of time to die just and then asked about what it might mean. 0n first sight it appears to be a gift to the tories, mrjohnson doesn't have to out brexit the brexit party and some 300 seats. but whether it helped him gain any is a real christian and a big question for mr johnson was whether or not he had done any sort of deal or packed with nigel farage, whether he had spoken to him this —— is a real question. absolutely not. but what i can say is i'm glad there is a recognition that there is only one way to get brexit done and that is to vote for us and vote for the conservatives.
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0bviously, obviously, it's not bad news for borisjohnson obviously, it's not bad news for boris johnson because obviously, it's not bad news for borisjohnson because it might help them hold the seats they've got, it might make life a bit easier where the conservatives are fighting the liberal democrats in parts of the southwest. to win this election, he needs to get more seats to get the majority he wants, he needs to take seats from labour in the midlands on the north and the brexit party is still standing there. nigel farage has said he thinks he will take more votes from labour than the tories but plenty disagree and there are some who think that by supporting the conservatives, nigel farage might alienate some traditional labour voters who might otherwise have considered his brexit party. this is a very unpredictable election, we can't say for sure what impact it might have but it seems while it might help borisjohnson hold the seat he has, it might not be that much of a boost in getting the extra he really needs. thank you. in scotland, the leader of the scottish national party,
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nicola sturgeon has also been on the camapign trail. in an interview at a community centre in aberdeen, ms sturgeon said today's announcement from the brexit party proved that borisjohnson and nigel farage are — in her words — joined at the hip. any form of brexit that is acceptable to nigel farage is going to be deeply damaging to scotland, and i suspect there are many traditional tory voters in scotland and across the uk that are appalled to find that the party has effectively become the brexit party. you vote tory, you get the brexit party and its view of the world. that's not what scotland needs. i don't believe it's what the vast majority of people in scotland want, but it does underline the view that if we don't take our future into our own hands, that future is going to be dictated by nigel farage, borisjohnson and an increasingly extreme right—wing conservative party.
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china'sjingye group has confirmed it will buy british steel for 70 million pounds, and invest more than a billion pounds into the business. the uk's second largest steel producer employs 4,000 people, most of them in scunthorpe. british steel has been at risk of collapse since may, when it went into liquidation. our business correspondent, theo leggett, reports. this is british steel's plant in scu nthorpe. the beating heart of an industrial town. its future had been in deep doubt after the company went into liquidation earlier this year. but today, news of a lifeline, as chinese firm jingye is expected to buy the business for £70 million. it's been a big concern, hasn't it? nobody knowing what's going to be happening, whether they've got a job, pay their mortgages, feed their families. it's great news. you don't know if you're batting or bowling, do you? nobody knows. once it gets sorted, we can get on with it better, can't we? it's finally something positive, it's good. what are your thoughts aboutjingye? anything is better than nothing, i suppose. yeah, it's getting better.
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british steel employs 4,000 people in britain, at scunthorpe and at other sites in the north—east. 20,000 more are employed in the supply chain. unions sayjingye can protect those jobs. their passion and enthusiasm for steel making really comes through in the conversations that we've had with them. that's what we've said all the way along, that we want a buyer that's going to sustain employment and steel—making for scu nthorpe and the towns that have got british steel there for years and years to come. but british steel has been here before. three years ago, the business was sold for £1 to private equity group greybull capital. there were promises of a new dawn and major new investment. butjust three years later, it was on the brink once again as high costs, fierce competition and economic uncertainty took their toll. the steel industry's trade body says it is essential things are different this time. scunthorpe makes a third of the steel that the uk makes. it's massively significant,
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it's critical notjust to that area, as you say, but also actually to the whole of the manufacturing sector in the uk, i believe — and ultimately to the uk economy. so, the government could not let this go out of business. jingye is a powerful company with more than 23,000 employees and annual sales worth £10 billion. it says it'll now invest £1.2 billion in upgrading british steel's facilities, but people within the industry say more needs to be done to help the sector by cutting energy costs and business rates, for example. otherwise, they say, for british steel, this could end up being just another false dawn. theo leggett, bbc news. colletta smith is at the british steel plant in scu nthorpe. we heard from some workers but there must be a huge relief there, just before christmas, but it looks like theirjobs are going to be
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safeguarded. yes, after six months of free and uncertainty for the staff and of course their families and friends in this area, there is a real relief that another company has come in, but that company is a steel company. 0ne come in, but that company is a steel company. one of the preferred bidders previously had been another investment company, and a lot of unions have been saying today that it's a relief that a steel company are buying british steel so that they understand the business, they are more likely to invest for the long term. there is a palpable sense of relief among the workforce, 3000 of relief among the workforce, 3000 of them based at this one main plant in scunthorpe as well as another 1000 in redcar. what has been a political reaction to this news but this chinese conglomerate is spending £70 million buying british steel? well, we've been having
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reaction throughout the afternoon as the official statement was released from the receiver and from jingye, who say they are planning to invest in the plant and that they say they are contacting workers and hope to be able to offer as many as possible newjobs which leaves open a little uncertainty. earlier i managed to speak to andrea leadsom, the business secretary, and put those questions and concerns to her. it's been great to come to scunthorpe today it's been great to come to scu nthorpe today and it's been great to come to scunthorpe today and see the excitement of staff and to meet again with chairman tim two of jingye and see the enthusiasm. there are regulatory hurdles to get through but today is a great day. i've been given reassurances that next to all current staff will be ke pt next to all current staff will be kept and in the medium to longer term, they are likely to want to expand the workforce. i have been given quite strong reassurances on that front. comments from the labour
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party this afternoon have of course been supportive of the uk workforce, who had been through so much over recent yea rs. who had been through so much over recent years. with companies coming in and out with british steel. again, reassurances for those workers but question marks raised by the shadow business secretary rebecca long—bailey about the long—term future of a chinese company and this particular deal. the main principle of the deal that i would urge the government to concentrate on is long termism. is this a company that will invest in the long term, will ensure british steel remains one of the linchpins of our industrial strategy? certainly, we've also got to recognise that this won't be the panacea that will save the steel sector, the government needs to have a plan in place to support the steel industry which it hasn't had for some time. liberal democrats had put a statement about the deal as it was
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confirmed this afternoon. they say this deal is a sign of things to come for what brexit britain will look like with an external foreign company owning a british, a key british industry here, like british steel. thank you. with me is lee allen, a metals analyst at fastmarkets. thank you forjoining us. first of all, tell us about this massive chinese companyjingye. all, tell us about this massive chinese compa nyjingye. what all, tell us about this massive chinese companyjingye. what do we know about them and what they want to buy british steel? jingye produced 11 million tonnes of steel last year, more than the uk total. this is quite a large company by uk standards popeye chinese standard is only a medium sized steel maker. they have extremely high competencies in long steel products which is the type of steel british steel producers. 0ver which is the type of steel british steel producers. over half of their output last year was of reinforcing
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bar which goes into construction projects and they produce wire rod and heavy sections which british steel also produces. another interesting point is thatjingye have been very profitable in recent yea rs. have been very profitable in recent years. in 2015, which was in china a very difficult period, jingye were able to mitigate and remain profitable, at times reducing their output. they have tight control of their output and profit and that might bode well for british steel in the future. why do they want british steel? this is their first foray into european markets forjingye. as it stands, britain is able to trade freely steel products into the eu without a tariff quota, it remains to be seen what happens in the brexit deal in the future if that will continue. as things stand, it will continue. as things stand, it will be a quota free tariff free arrangement with the eu which is
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appealing to companies likejingye. the concern is to save those 4000 jobs, willjingye do that or is it too early to tell? it is still a difficult market. we've seen iron ore costs on a pound bass is increasing over 20% year—on—year, finished steel product prices like wire rod have gone down about 8% in europe on a pound basis. it is a difficult operating environment to be in the steel industry at the moment but i'm sure that the steel—maker will be glad that at least a provisional agreement is in place here. thank you. the headlines on bbc news. nigel farage gives in to pressure from fellow brexiteers and says his brexit party will not stand in tory held seats. a chinese firm confirms a rescue deal for british steel, safeguarding 4,000 jobs in scunthorpe and teeside. more rain forecast in areas of england already
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been hit by flooding. five severe flood warnings — meaning a threat to life — are still in place. and in sport, manchester city manager pep guardiola won't face any action from the fa after his side's defeat to liverpool yesterday. he was furious when two penalty appeals were turned down but he insisted there was no sarcasm as he thanked the officials. great britain's hollie arnold has won the javelin title at the world para athletics championships for the fourth time in a row. she threw a personal best in dubai. stefanos tsitsipas has won his opening match at the atp finals in london, beating daniil medvedev for the first time. both players are making their debuts in the end—of—season tournament. i'll be back with more on those stories later. the founder of a humanitarian group that helped civilians in the syrian conflict has been found dead near his
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office in istanbul. james le mesurier set up the mayday rescue emergency response group, which helped train white helmets volunteers. the work of the group has been credited with saving the lives of thousands of people in rebel—held areas during years of bombing by the syrian government and russian forces. hamish de bretton—gordon is former army officer who worked alongside james le mesurier in syria, hejoins me now via webcam. thank you for being with us. tell us a bit about him and the white helmets that he worked so hard for and what they've been doing in syria. well, an absolute tragedy today. james was an absolute mountain when it came to humanitarian support in syria. in 2014, he set up the white helmets which in effect where the national health service, ambulance service
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and fire service, to help people in the devastated areas where all infrastructure had been destroyed. there are many thousands of people alive today that wouldn't be had he not set up the white helmets. we work very closely with them and they have brought many casualties to our hospitals, they are still operating ina hospitals, they are still operating in a small area left under rebel control. james set up such a great, well structured organisation, i'm sure it will go on but he is one of the giants of the humanitarian effort in syria where a lot of countries, western countries, had stood back and not got heavily involved as james and others have done. so, james was found dead in istanbul. there is a bit of mystery surrounding his death and only a few days ago the russians were talking about him, accusing him of being a former british agent with mi6. about him, accusing him of being a former british agent with m16. yes,
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there is some suspicion around his death. i was with him fairly recently and there was no indication he was struggling. i don't know about anything else that he might have on that side. as you say, the russians only a few days ago claimed he was both an al-qaeda operative and an m16 agent, contradictory and ridiculous. i believe our un representative karen pearce has categorically stated he wasn't a security service operative but he was under tremendous pressure from both the syrian and russian propaganda machine who attacked him directly, claimed that the white helmets were working directly with al-qaeda. i never saw that, i investigate a lot of chemical attacks in syria and there was no indication that the white helmets we re indication that the white helmets were involved. i only saw them saving thousands of lives and doing a fantasticjob saving thousands of lives and doing a fantastic job and saving thousands of lives and doing a fantasticjob and changes almost solely responsible for setting them
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up solely responsible for setting them up and getting the funding, and it is the british and american governments who have been funding them. it is a legacy he left behind but a really sad day for humanitarians around the world and they civilian still trapped in syria. you've known him for 15 yea rs, syria. you've known him for 15 years, he said in the military. how do you think he will be remembered? i'm sure from his regiment he will be remembered very, very fondly. he was an outstanding officer. in the humanitarian world, again, singularly effective where many have feared to tread. the very few people who have left to humanitarian footprint in syria with many of the big organisations and international community letting go. james set up the white helmets, he got in there, he did ajob the white helmets, he got in there, he did a job that perhaps others should have done. there will be a lot of tears in syria tonight. syria has lost a saint with his death today but hopefully his legacy will
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go on and the white helmets will keep selling two saving lives. thank you. -- will keep saving lives. thank you very much. the uk economy recovered in the third quarter of the year, growing by 0.3% to reverse a contraction earlier in the year. but the growth was modest and the figures showed economy has slowed to its lowest rate in almost a decade. here's our economics correspondent andy verity. in peterborough, this is the biggest tyre distribution centre in the country. it is the sort of service business which does well when consumers are not ready to invest in a new car but are ready to buy new tyres to keep the old motor going. in the third quarter of the year, that pattern was repeated across the economy. services business picking up but weak investment not helped by brexit uncertainty. it makes it difficult to plan for the future in terms of our cost base and what sell out price we need
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to make the money that the company needs to return. but also in terms of planning investment for the future, it makes it harder to put that plan in place in a way that you can rely on. you can see on this chart, the most recent figures are not as bad as the ones before, and it means we have avoided the technical definition of recession, where you have two quarters of negative economic growth. but if you look back over the past year, according to the office for national statistics, it is actually the weakest growth we've had since the beginning of 2010. in this election campaign, the government is portraying it as a bounce back. in a global context, it is a strong number. if you look at what has been happening with some of our biggest competitors around the world, germany, italy and france, we are growing faster than most of our g7 competitors, and of course we are exposed to what happens across the world, but the biggest issue right here in our own economy, the big domestic issue, is the uncertainty. to opposition parties, the ongoing weakness of the economy
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suggests a slow puncture which could spell trouble down the road. everything we predicted is coming unfortunately true. two problems, one is nine years of austerity, lack of investment in the economy. every reputable economist advised against this policy and yet the government still pursued it. second, the complete mismanagement of brexit. and it has produced an economy now where i thinkjobs are at risk. look more closely at the numbers and it is a mixed picture. the economy grew well injuly, but in august, the estimates suggest it shrank, and also contracted in september. productivity has ground to a halt and we can see that according to bdo's research, business confidence is now at zero. so it is not a good picture at all, no matter what kind of spin the tories try to put on this, this is a terrible picture of wilful mismanagement, and it is affecting people in their homes and it is affecting people's livelihoods.
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it is notjust that the economy is growing slowly, international investors are losing confidence in the british economy, based on borisjohnson's brexit plans. there was one way that brexit uncertainty helped the economy. it meant a weak pound, which made uk goods cheaper for foreign buyers. exports, notably of cars, were up. but whether this economic pickup is sustained will depend very much on the political road ahead. andy verity, bbc news. the uk has fallen silent for those who died in two world wars and all conflicts since then. it is exactly 100 years since the first two—minute silence was held to commemorate the 15 million military personnel and civilians who died in world war one. daniela relph reports. last post plays. the national memorial arboretum in staffordshire, where remembrance happens daily all year round.
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but today is different. honouring the armistice, those lost and those saved, marked with a service of remembrance, and then silence. 0n the 11th november 1919, the first two—minute silence was observed. 100 years on, wherever you are, it remains a moment to stop, to reflect, and to remember. the first two—minute silence was introduced by king george v.
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thousands packed onto whitehall after he said the country should stop to honour those who never came home. the silence remains at the centre of remembrance a century later. but in 2019, the royal british legion didn't just ask for a pause and a silence. it said we should all mute our phones, switch off tvs and close our laptops to honour those who defended our freedoms and way of life. daniela relph, bbc news. the weather was pretty decent for the armistice day commemorations. let's get the full with louise. it was almost a miracle because the weather has been pretty miserable in november and if you did go to those armistice events, it was pretty decent. lots of showers, some heavy
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with hail and thunder across scotland, northern ireland and north—west england. they will continue this evening and overnight. clearer further south and temperature is likely to fall away. low single figures for many first thing tomorrow morning with plenty of showers around again. we've got an area of low pressure sitting in the north sea, spiralling around. they will move further south is the day continues. lighter winds tomorrow but not much change with the feel of the weather, u nfortu nately. really the feel of the weather, unfortunately. really struggling. as we move into wednesday, we start find that there will be another area of low pressure and the uncertainty as to where this front is going to sit as we move through wednesday night into thursday, it could potentially bring some heavy rain across parts of england and wales and potentially sitting across the areas that have seen the floods. we will update you through the week.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: nigel farage gives in to pressure from fellow brexiteers and says his brexit party will not stand in tory held seats the brexit party will not contest the 317 seats the conservatives won at the last election. but what we will do is concentrate our total effort into all of the seats that are held
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by the labour party. a chinese firm confirms a rescue deal for british steel, buying it for £70 million and saving 4000 jobs in scunthorpe and teeside. it's been a big concern, hasn't it? nobody knowing what's going to be happening, whether they've got a job, pay their mortgages, feed their families. it's great news. it's finally something positive, it's good. more rain forecast in areas of england already been hit by flooding. five severe flood warnings — meaning a threat to life — are still in place. mystery surrounds the death of the british founder of the white helmets emergency response group in syria. remembering those who died in two world wars and the conflicts since exactly 100 years after the first two—minute silence was held.
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those are our latest headlines. let's get all the sports news now with 0llie. good evening. we had a lot of fallout from liverpool's victory over manchester city and the video assistant referee. the man in charge of its impleemntaion, former ref neil swarbrick, has told us that it could be two or three years until they will be compeltely happy with how it's being used. pep guardiola was very animated at fulltime following manchester city's defeat at liverpoool. two penalty appeals were turned down, but he won't face any action from the fa for this at fulltime. he insisted there was no sarcasm as he said "thank you so much" to the officials. swarbrick told me that he can understand the frustartion that the system causes but they are getting more decisions right. we have been at this nearly three years now, and obviously we have officiated 70
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games in the league cup, fa cup, for the last two seasons, trying to get experience, but that is nothing like doing 10 premier league games every weekend, we realise that, and we know we will be scrutinised and there will be people looking at our every move, but the position i'm in, i'm comfortable with where we are. i've no doubt there is room for improvement, in terms of speed we will get there, but it has been a good work in progress for me. and you can hear much more of my interview with swarbrick on sportsday at 6.30pm. neil warnock has left cardiff city by mutual agreement. he took over three years ago and led them to promotion to the premier league in 2018, but they went straight back down again last season and they‘ re currently 14th in the championship, seven points off the play—offs. the leeds united captain liam cooper has pulled out of the scotland squad for their euro 2020 qualifiers. he suffered a muscle tear in his groin during leeds' win over blackburn in the championship on saturday.
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scotland cannot qualify from their group but they may make it to the finals through a nations league play—off. they're away to cyprus on saturday, then host kazakhstan three days later. ellen white is one of four players who will be missing from the england squad for tomorrow's friendly against the czech republic. she scored in their defeat to germany on saturday — her first international match since her return from a knee injury — but she'll be rested tomorrow, along with captain steph houghton. alex greenwood and jodie taylor are out injured. england have lost five of their last seven matches. great britain's hollie arnold has retained herjavelin title at the world para athletics championships in dubai. that has laid down a marker for next year's paralympics in tokyo where she'll also be the defending champion. she threw a personal best as she made it four world titles in a row in her class.
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ididn't i didn't even mean to. —— i didn't mean to cry. it means so much to have that fourth title and pb at the same time, so, yeah, i'm really happy. stefanos tsitsipas has won his opening match at the atp finals, just edging out daniil medvedev at the 02 arena in london. there was only one break of serve in the match, tsitsipas winning 7—6 6—4. both players are making their debuts at the end—of season event and medvedev has won more matches than any other player this year, but this is the first time tsitsipas has beaten him in five attempts. he described it as one of the toughest, most important victories of his career so far. it's pure joy playing here. seeing myself on this court and it's been a long way to come here, so i'm really grateful. i'm really grateful for the people that really believed in
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me. it's an honour for me just sitting on this court right now. it means a lot to me. i've worked very hard, asi means a lot to me. i've worked very hard, as i said before, to come here and things are not easy. we'll have more for you in sportsday at half past six. that's all for now. throughout the election campaign, we will be putting your questions to all of the main parties. joining me now to answer your questions is the deputy leader of the liberal democrats, sir ed davey. he's going to answer your questions. thank you for being with us. let me first ask you before we get to the viewers' questions, a couple of my own. first of all, nigel farage announcing this truce with the conservatives. what is your reaction to that? many conservative voters
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will be turned off the conservative party now they have been endorsed by nigel farage and the brexit party, by donald trump, it is increasingly clear that boris johnson by donald trump, it is increasingly clear that borisjohnson is leading the conservatives to the hard right. there will be a lot of moderate conservatives, remain conservatives, pro—business conservatives very worried about that and we are already finding those lifelong conservatives coming to the liberal democrats. i think this move will backfire on the tories and we will see a lot more coming to supportjo swinson and the lib dems. let me also ask you, you have launched legal action today about the tv debate, specifically itv because you're a leader is not part of that itv debate with jess jeremy corbyn and boris johnson. itv debate with jess jeremy corbyn and borisjohnson. why are you doing that? realistically, those are the two candidates for prime minister? know, there are three candidates and jo swinson is one of them. the biggest debate is about brexit and both jeremy corbyn biggest debate is about brexit and bothjeremy corbyn and borisjohnson support brexit, saw the millions of people who want to hear the voice of
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remain will not hear it ifjo swinson and the liberal democrats are not in that debate. that would undermine our election, our democracy and i am very surprised that both itn and dare i say the bbc are trying to excludejo swinson and if you look at the opinion polls, you got opinion poll shows two to one voters wanted jo swinson to be in the debate, wanted a liberal democrat voice to be heard. it is quite surprising, frankly, that public broadcasters are not responding to that. 0k, public broadcasters are not responding to that. ok, let's answer some of the viewers' questions directly now. maria from blackpool — i own a small business, battered and bruised by the continuing brexit fight. we import from the eu. though my heart wants to vote liberal democrats, my tactical vote says vote labour in my constituency. is it not time to form a remain alliance with labour even withjeremy corbyn as leader? well, liberal democrats have been the champions of stopping brexit and a second referendum. we have argued
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that there should be an agreement between those parties. indeed, we have an agreement with plaid cymru in wales and with the green party in a number of seats across the country. there was an organisation called unite to remain who helped broker that agreement. they approached the labour party and the labour party did not want to take part. we were not that surprised by that because the labour party, there are some good remain people in the labour party and i do not suggest otherwise, but the leadership, jeremy corbyn, is a brexiteer and basically wa nts jeremy corbyn, is a brexiteer and basically wants brexit. a similar question but more specific. nic on email — where lib dems have consistently come third in recent elections in safe tory seats, why do they not step down to allow labour a clear run? because the remain — leave debate has changed. we saw in the may elections, the european elections just a few months ago that the liberal democrats beat both the labour party and the conservative party at the same time in a national election. that had not happened for
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over 100 years. we are finding liberal democrat votes in safe conservative seat, to use the phrase of your questioner, that we are axing our head of the conservatives. take a seat adjacent to mine, eves ha m take a seat adjacent to mine, evesham and walton, conservative yea rs evesham and walton, conservative years but we believe we can win that seat from the conservatives, take wimbledon in south—west london, again, we have never been in competition there but we are now, so i think this whole issue around brexit has fundamentally changed the electoral maps and you can't go back to 2017 and suggest that that helps you. really, the european election results, the most recent ones, are probably the most helpful to indicate to voters who is likely to be the lead candidate, be that labour or tory. lyn on email — jo swinson has repeatedly declared she will not support a minority labour government. will she also rule out supporting a conservative minority government? yes. y? well, boris johnson and jeremy corbyn are both taking their
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parties to the extreme. you have a very ha rd left parties to the extreme. you have a very hard left left—wing party under jeremy corbyn, who does not support oui’ jeremy corbyn, who does not support our position of stopping brexit. he wa nts our position of stopping brexit. he wants brexit. equally, boris johnson, supported now by nigel farage and donald trump has taken the conservative party to the extremes and he wants brexit. it's very difficult for the liberal democrats as the stock brexit party who, i think, democrats as the stock brexit party who, ithink, represent democrats as the stock brexit party who, i think, represent most peoples' views, who are in the centre, reasonable, evidence—based people, we cannot support these people, we cannot support these people who have taken their parties to the extremes. if you vote liberal democrat, you will get liberal democrat, you will get liberal democrat mps pushing our values and policies and i think it will be liberal democrat mps who either are the largest party after the selection or we can hold the others to account because we will hold the balance of power. this is a question we have had asked well over 20 times, 24 times i think. david is one person asking this question.
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in seeking to revoke the 2016 referendum, you don't appear to be either liberal or democratic. are you considering renaming the party? no, ithink no, i think that is totally wrong andi no, i think that is totally wrong and i will explain why. yes, we do wa nt to and i will explain why. yes, we do want to stop brexit. that is true. but we only want to do it with a democratic mandate and there are two ways of getting a democratic mandate. the first would be a peoples vote and the liberal democrats have led the campaign for that, clearly wanting to have a democratic verdict on the complete chaos and cost of brexit that we have seen of the past few years, so that would be our preferred option. u nfortu nately that would be our preferred option. unfortunately in parliament, although we campaign for it and picked out 17 amendments, the other parties were not up for that. the general election is now that option and what we have said very transparently is that if we win a democratic mandate, if we win 326 seats injo swinson becomes the prime minister, i think it would then be a democratic mandate to stop brexit. there is a democratic mandate for a democratic mandate for
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brexit. we had our referendum and 17.4 million people voted for brexit. and then we have had elections in other elections and i think in this case, people realise that what they were told in 2016 has not happened. let me give you one example, boris johnson in not happened. let me give you one example, borisjohnson in 2016 in the referendum said we could leave and stay in the single market. he now says as prime minister that that is not true. he has no mandate as a british prime minister. he basically lied, he is totally untrustworthy and that is why now we have the full fa cts and that is why now we have the full facts and people can see through some of the deceptions from people like borisjohnson, some of the deceptions from people like boris johnson, it some of the deceptions from people like borisjohnson, it would be absolutely the most democratic thing to put this back to the people. so, right, leading to the next question. this is from andrew. jo swinson has clearly stated if there was a second referendum and leave won again she and the lib dems would fight by any means try to overturn the result. that is not true. what we have said and whatjo swinson has said is that we would absolutely respect that vote because it would be much more
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informed, we have seen the brexit deal will stop so you would accept a lever vote in a second referendum? i will finish. clearly in 2016 we did not have a deal. we have a deal now so not have a deal. we have a deal now so it would be more realistic to accept that. whatjo swinson has said and what i say to you today is that while we will accept that verdict because it would be really clear, we are still pro—european. that is still our values and our beliefs. just because you lose an election or a referendum doesn't mean you change your beliefs. that would be really weird in a democracy. so the liberal democrats are internationalists. we believe in working with other countries. we see this to our mutual benefit and things like trade, the economy, climate change, security and dealing, for example with crime, going after the bad guys, and one reason we are so opposed going after the bad guys, and one reason we are so opposed to brexit is that brexit will damage our country. it will damage our economy. but just to be country. it will damage our economy. butjust to be clear, if there was another referendum and leave one again, you would accept that? yes. i
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asked jo swinson that a few weeks ago and she said they would not accept that. what she has said and what i say to you is that our values will not change, but clearly they would be much greater democratic legitimacy then there was in 2016. however, i believe if there is a people's vote, people will vote to remain because they have seen the damage that brexit is doing. they have seen, for example, it will undermine our influence in promoting peace. they have seen it will undermine the united kingdom and many people are worried that brexit will lead to the break—up of our country with a customs union down the irish sea pushing northern ireland away and with the snp using brexit to push for scottish independence. i would just say to you and to people who are asking this question, people who voted to leave, you were not told that on leaving the european union would break up our wonderful united kingdom. you were not told that the united kingdom, our unionjack, would be destroyed by brexit, but
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thatis would be destroyed by brexit, but that is what is going to happen. i deeply regret that, but that is a threat that is facing us with brexit. deeply threatening our country and that's why i am opposed to it, because i am a patriot. lets move on from brexit. catherine — why do you have a carbon net—zero target for 2045 when 2030 is the latest we can aim for before the damage caused by climate change becomes irreversible? we wa nt we want to go as fast as humanly possible to tackle climate change. she says that is not fast enough. the point is you have to do a huge number of things to get there. there are 22 million gas boilers in peoples homes, 30 million vehicles, we have to replace those. i'm afraid if people think that can be done in a minute, in a few years, i think they are a little bit mistaken. as climate change secretary when i was on the government, i thought the tories tooth and nail who tried to stop me taking action on climate change, but i beat them in two ways. i beat them by massively investing
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in renewables. thanks to the liberal democrats, renewal power in our country quadrupled and we are now the world leader in offshore wind power thanks to the liberal democrats and in europe, because i was able to go as a british member to the european union, i managed to get other countries to take climate change more seriously, so the liberal democrats are passionate about tackling climate change, but we are also realists and we want to make sure we get the right policies in but we will go as fast as possible. 0k, another specific policy. chris — how will the lib dems fund 35 hours of free childcare from nine months? two ways, first of all, we want to put a corporation tax up to what it was just two years ago to 20%. the tories have dropped to 17% we do not think that a sensible, so we would put it up back she was just two yea rs put it up back she was just two years ago, is not a dramatic increase but raising a huge amount of money. the second issue, we want to make sure that there are some reforms to capital gains so that the
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allowa nces reforms to capital gains so that the allowances you get for capital gains are introduced into the income tax allowa nce are introduced into the income tax allowance which would also raise the money. that's how we would pay for it. i think that free universal child care, the best offer the selection on childcare would be fantastic for countries up and down the country. the last question. simon — given your new alliance with the green party, are you now in favour of the uk unilaterally disarming its nuclear deterrent? no. we have made an agreement with the greens and plaid cymru because we do share some policies, particularly remain, stopping brexit, but there are a number of green and plaid cymru policies that we do not agree with. but this election, first and foremost, is about stopping brexit. that is what the liberal democrats have let on, soiam the liberal democrats have let on, so i am not apologising forfinding a way to try to make sure there is an agreement between those remain parties so that remain vote is not split. liberal democrats are the lead party with the best deal from that agreement and i think it will
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result injo that agreement and i think it will result in jo swinson that agreement and i think it will result injo swinson becoming prime minister. thank you very much for being with us and taking the viewer is‘ questions. more rain is set to hit parts of yorkshire and the midlands already suffering from the effects of flooding. the environment agency has issued dozens of flood warnings across the country, including five severe warnings on the river don in south yorkshire. many homes have been flooded in fishlake near doncaster, and hundreds of properties have been evacuated. military helicopters have also been used to help flood defences. luxmy gopal reports. a community cut off. the only way to get around some parts of fishlake is by tractor. 0r boat. even the emergency services have had to abandon the odd vehicle. a few miles upstream along the river don, the town of bentley called in the military. the raf chinook was dropping tonnes of aggregate to shore up flood
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defences until the early hours of this morning. in fishlake at 11 o'clock, people had gathered for remembrance outside the church where some flooded residents had been sleeping overnight. claire holling is lucky. she has a relative to stay with, but she's been away from her own home for days. just emotional. it's how i can describe it. my elder daughter and son,i haven't seen them, they haven't been able to get in to see us, so when i speak to them, they are upset as well. some villagers are angry at the local authorities. they haven't been very helpful and now what they are saying is if we don't evacuate they won't give us any help, but we don't want to evacuate. we've got pets at home and there have also been looters going around so people are concerned. south yorkshire police says it's had no reports of looting and is carrying out round—the—clock patrols to reassure residents. this local farmer remembers when it flooded this badly 12 years ago. he says not enough was done to stop it happening again. they haven't done a lot, have they? they've raised it a little bit
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where they've took levels on top of the bank and put a bit of soil on top, but nowhere near enough. but the environment agency says it isn't that straightforward. we will, obviously, as we always do, review what's happened in this event, talk to our partners, look at our investment plans and see what more we might need to do in the future. the water levels have dropped a lot but with more rain forecast later this week, it will be a while before people can go back home. 0ur correspondent, spencer stokes, has spent the day in bentley in doncaster where residents have been clearing up after being deluged with water last friday. the flooding has gone, very little rain of the weekend and some water has been pumped away by the what if our service. but the damage has been
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done. take a look over these garden walls here and you can see how the water got into homes and people now are having to throw everything out. a lot of what is he is soaked. there's also the risk that it has been contaminated by sewage. everything has to come out of homes. we have had a look in that one and walls —soaked, we have had a look in that one and walls —soa ked, plasterboard crumbling away, so a really long up, drying out operation ahead and for people here, well, it brings back memories of 2007 when there was a very similarflooding memories of 2007 when there was a very similar flooding the streets and this part of doncaster, so they know that this will not be sorted in a matter of days or weeks, but it will be months or possibly a year until they are back to normal. they also know that in that time span, there is always the chance that there is always the chance that there could be another flood. spencer stokes reporting from bentley in doncaster. 0scar—winning film director steve mcqueen opens a new exhibition at the tate tomorrow. year three saw him and his team photograph more than three—quarters
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of a million year three children across london's schools. the project, which aims to be a visual snapshot of the people of the city now, was inspired by looking at his own school photo. brenda emmanus went to meet him. big smiles! for the last year this has been happening in london. class photos of seven and eight—year—olds that are part of one of the most ambitious art exhibitions ever staged. do you feel special? yes. you should do. it is the brainchild of steve mcqueen, an award—winning artist and 0scar—winning director, now going back to school for his latest work. this was his school photo in the 1970s. his plan was to turn that image into a picture for london in 2019. my first ever visit to tate britain was on a school bus. it isjust about reflecting london and, you know,
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the future, our future. here we have photos of the test this morning. with so many schools signing up, the challenge has grown and grown. numberone! 2000 more to go! three weeks later they are ready for the grand reveal. what you think is going to happen when these kids come in here and see them? what do you hope will be their response? that they are important. they are on the walls of tate britain and they are important. they are not just important within their school, they are important within the wider environment of london.
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the first visitors, children from steve mcqueen's old school, little ealing, here to find their picture among the many thousands. really surprising and cool. amazing and cool. it is really amazing to be here. like, ifeel really, like, inspired. the exhibition won'tjust be at the tate britain. but on 600 billboards across london. and at specially decorated tube stations. it's great because you see it in situ. that is exactly what steve wanted, to have this epic projectjust visible in the everyday spaces. it is hoped close to 80,000 young people will see the exhibition in the next six months. time for a look at the weather.
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here's louise lear. well, for those of you who have been out and about over the last few hours, you will know that it is cold out there, but at least we had scenes like this for many of their remembrance services through sunday and monday. it was relatively dry. for some, we have seen and monday. it was relatively dry. for some, we have seen some and monday. it was relatively dry. for some, we have seen some pretty u nsettled for some, we have seen some pretty unsettled weather as we have a low pressure driving the story at the moment and that is low is going to set over into the north sea and still produce some pretty intense outbreaks of rain at times, so for the next few days, unfortunately, further spells of rain around. there will be some hilts know because it is going to stay pretty cold too. this has been the story of the showers to the next two hours, mostly to scotland, northern ireland, some into north wales, one or twojust ireland, some into north wales, one or two just drifting across england and wales but into this evening and overnight, the showers are going to tend to fade away in a few spots and so temperatures will fall away as
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well. it stays fairly persistent on the far north as that area of low pressure d rifts off the far north as that area of low pressure drifts off into the north sea, is a plenty of frequent showers here, still likely to continue. single figures tomorrow, a cold start for many of us, plenty of showers to scotland, northern ireland, northern england drifting their way into the midlands, down to southern england as we go through the day. now, there will be lighter winds tomorrow so some of the showers could be pretty slow moving in places. not everywhere will see them. we could get some sunny spells with scatter sharp showers with temperatures again struggling to climb into double figures, five to 9 degrees quite widely. as we move out of tuesday into wednesday, we have a brief ridge of high pressure building. that will quieten things down for a time. could start actually, some patchy fog around but not lasting. another lowe moves into the south—west bringing heavy rain, south—west england, wales, into northern ireland and then gradually as we go through wednesday into thursday, it may well grind to a halt for some time. now, just where
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this front is going to be sitting, still subject to doubt. it could be a little further north or south, but it may well affect some of those flood affected areas. don't forget, we have five a severe flood warning still in force. you can always find information on that on the bbc weather website, but it does look as though the weather is set to stay u nsettled. though the weather is set to stay unsettled. it will stakeholders and certainly you will need to keep abreast of the forecast through wednesday and thursday to find out exactly where that rain is going to sit. take care.
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an early christmas present for the conservatives? the brexit party says it won't stand in seats won by the tories at the last general election. nigel farage says he's prepared to give way to try to make sure the uk leaves the eu. the prime minister has now moved to a position that looks a bit more like brexit. and for once, let's forget about left and right. let's think about putting country before party. some of the brexit party's bravado may have gone, but nigel farage may well still cause trouble for the tories. we'll be looking at what difference it could make on election day. also tonight, relief for the workers at british steel. its future looks secure as a chinese firm agrees to rescue the business. it's been a big concern, hasn't it? nobody knowing what's going to be happening,

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