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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 14, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. today at 2: accident and emergency units in england record their worst performance since modern records began, putting health back to the top of the election agenda. this is basically caused by the huge demand that there is on the nhs, and that's why, now, in the last three months, we have done the biggest investment in the nhs in modern times. it is disgraceful and it is a problem of the lack of staff and the lack of funding for it, so a labour government will increase nhs funding by '23/24 by 26 billion a year. warnings of further heavy downpours to compound the misery of flood victims in parts of england.
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raids across london to rescue women thought to have been trafficked from romania. coming up on afternoon live: all the sport. it's a big night for england. the match against montenegro at wembley this evening will be their 1,000th international fixture. there's no raheem sterling, remember, but can they qualify without him? thanks, connie, and nick miller has the weather. more rain falling where it is just not needed. how much and for how long? plus going in search of snow. i have also found some in africa. thanks, nick. also coming up: as we get the first glimpse of this year's john lewis christmas tv ad, we'll look at what the others are like and ask whether the millions of pounds spent on on them is money well spent.
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hello, everyone, this is afternoon live. accident and emergency units in england have recorded their worst performance since current records began in 200a. one senior doctor has warned emergency care is imploding. the government's target is for 95% of a&e patients to be treated or assessed within a maximum of four hours. but today's figures show that was only achieved with 83.6% of patients. they also show a raft of other targets are being missed in england, including for cancer operations and also routine surgery. in response, the government says huge demand for hospital services is to blame. here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes.
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it's hard to believe that, two years ago, frances reid was effectively crippled by arthritis. her constant pain was ended by a hip replacement operation. nhs targets mean frances should have only waited 18 weeks for surgery. instead, her operation was delayed by six months. that really impacted on my health, my general health, my mobility. i was in an awful lot of pain. i could barely get about. and it also impacted on my recovery time afterwards because i was so unfit, actually, by the time i had my surgery. the delay to frances‘ operation is a sign of a system under growing stress. figures released today show none of the three key hospital targets in england have been met for over three years. waiting times for a&e are the worst ever recorded. it's been more than four years since the four—hour target was hit. the 18—week target for planned operations, like the one frances had, was last met more than three years ago. and just over three quarters of cancer patients started treatment in 62 days in october. the 85% target hasn't been met
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in nearly four years. the numbers in a&e relate to october. for the last two years, performance actually got better in october. autumn isn't necessarily a bad time for the nhs, it's usually ok in a&e. the real difficulties come in december, january and february, so i'm afraid we are probably going to see these numbers get worse before they get better. health is an area of policy that's devolved and, while these figures only apply to england, similar pressures are seen across the uk. but the data comes in the middle of an election campaign in which funding for the nhs has featured strongly. it is disgraceful and it is a problem of the lack of staff and the lack of funding for it. so a labour government will increase nhs funding by 2023—2021; by 26 billion a year. this is basically caused by the huge demand that there is on the nhs and that's why now in the last three months we have done the biggest investment
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in the nhs in modern times. frances‘ operation gave her a new lease of life. nhs england is considering changing waiting time targets, arguing they're outdated. but health charities believe they're still important for patients. behind each of these numbers is an individual living with chronic pain. ajoint replacement operation can take that pain away. delay to that operation can have a devastating impact on the physical and mental health of people with arthritis. nhs england says today's figures reflect the increased number of older and sicker patients who are being seen. but there's a warning from a group that represents doctors that the hospitals they work in are imploding and the real pressures of winter have yet to be felt. dominic hughes, bbc news. our health editor hugh pym has more analysis on those figures.
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this is october and as we were hearing there it is normally fairly sta ble hearing there it is normally fairly stable in the nhs before winter arrives, and look at what has happened, this is the worst figure since records began in 2004 and considerably down on october last year. we had warnings from various hospitals in october that they were under extreme pressure, they have not expected this early, winter had come early in their view, but these figures came as a big surprise to everybody, quite how much of the full they had been, and winter are still ahead in terms of really cold weather and any flu outbreak that develops, so there is real concern looking ahead into those months. pa rt looking ahead into those months. part of it is the whole joined up nature of care. some areas of social ca re nature of care. some areas of social care and primary care, gps are unable to do what they could and should be doing, which is looking after people closer to home. more people are ending up in a&e who
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should not be there, elderly patients who end up there by default. reforms have been talked about and are beginning to be implemented about more joined about and are beginning to be implemented about morejoined up ca re implemented about morejoined up care but they do not seem to have taken care but they do not seem to have ta ke n effect care but they do not seem to have ta ken effect yet. care but they do not seem to have taken effect yet. there is one more issue, pensions, affecting co nsulta nts. issue, pensions, affecting consultants. they say tax situations are making it more difficult for them to do extra shifts because they get taxed more. the conservatives have promised to cut immigration if they return to power but have stopped short of setting targets. the home secretary, priti patel, says they will reduce immigration overall through a points—based system. labour has yet to announce its policy on freedom of movement but say it will be a fair process. it all comes as nominations to stand in the general election close this afternoon. our political correspondent, jonathan blake, reports. if only cutting immigration was as easy as that. the prime minister visited a school in somerset this morning as his party's commitment to reduce the numbers coming to live and work in the uk became the focus
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of the election campaign. beyond the promise to bring down net migration but little if any detail by how much and when. we will have an australian style points based system that will allow us to control who comes in and make sure we do not have so many people coming in without skills orjobs to come to, that we therefore protect wages, we increase wages, and we also make sure, this is a crucial point, that companies in this country, business in this country, invest in the skills of young people growing up in this country. the tories first promised to cut migration in the 2010 election and again in 2015 and again in 2017 but they never achieved that aim so don't expect them to set a similar target now. reducing immigration means reversing a trend.
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the most recent figures show net migration from eu countries was 59,000 but from the rest of the world it was 219,000. ending freedom of movement from the eu, which the conservatives have promised to do, won't do anything to curb the numbers coming to the uk from elsewhere so the questions for the tories are how they plan to meet their pledge and when. for labour, the issue is settling a debate within the party about where it should stand on immigration. jeremy corbyn was heckled on scottish independence in dundee this morning, but on immigration no word yet on how he will balance differences on a commitment to ending free movement versus taking a more relaxed approach. if we are remaining members of the eu, which will be an offer in the referendum, freedom of movement continues. if we come to a special arrangement with the eu, there will be a recognition of the needs of european families
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to have the right to family reunion, the right to reside in this country, and of course british people to work in different european countries. other parties reject the need for tighter controls on immigration. to those considering whether to vote conservative again, the question has to be this, is this the kind of country you want to live in? do we want to endorse this kind of politics? we would like to encourage people to come here, we would like to encourage eu nationals to come here and freedom of movement to continue. just as they did in the brexit referendum campaign, arguments about immigration policy may play a crucial role in the run—up to this election. jonathan blake, bbc news. and throughout the election campaign, we'll be putting your questions to all of the main parties. at half past five, we'll be joined by the leader of plaid cyrmu, adam price. so if you have anything you want to ask, please do get in touch, using the contact details on screen, and we'll put those
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questions to him. please remember to leave your name and where you're from. if you're trying to decide who to vote for, you can go to the bbc‘s new policy guide, which looks at the priorities of the main political parties. christian fraser explains. there's a fantastic new tool on the bbc website. let me introduce you to the policy guide to 2019. so, if you've been getting lost in recent weeks in all these announcements, this is going to help you, ok? so, if i scroll down here, you'll see there's a box for whichever nation you're in in the united kingdom and also one for whichever party you might want to know more about. and also on the website, there is, for each of the parties, a top list of priorities. so, let me show you that. starting with the conservatives. you'll see there's lots of bullet points. i won't go through them all, you can do that at your discretion. but their top priority, of course, to deliver brexit. borisjohnson's deal that he secured with the eu. remember that theresa may tried three times to get her deal through parliament.
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"give me nine more votes", borisjohnson said yesterday. a tory majority the only way, he says, to stop the groundhogary. for labour, of course, it's all about the issues, spending billions more on schools, hospitals and housing. they said yesterday that they're going to spend 6 billion more than the tories have already committed to the nhs. and that will come from higher taxes on the richest in society. the liberal democrats — they're all about stopping brexit. if they get a majority, sasto swinson, they'll revoke article 50 altogether without a people's vote. if they don't get that majority, then, of course, it's about getting behind a plan for a second vote. the snp, well, of course, they want another referendum, a scottish independence referendum, which they lost in 2014. that was supposed to be a once—in—a—generation vote but nicola sturgeon says circumstances have changed. and the timescales for that referendum should be decided by the scottish people. that is the price she will exact for any support for a future labour government.
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the green party — 100 billion a year for the next ten years to tackle climate change. and don't forget, they are now in a remain alliance with the liberal democrats and plaid cymru. so they will not be running against each other in 60 seats around england and wales. plaid cymru — their policies are all on there as well, they're about stopping brexit via a second referendum. the brexit party we know all about, of course. nigel farage said borisjohnson's deal is not true brexit, but then, this week, they announced they will not be standing candidates in those seats where there is a conservative incumbent. so, there you have it, lots of detail on there. we're going to be adding to it, as well, of course, as the manifestos come out. there'll be much more detail coming out in the next few weeks and i'll be taking you through some of those policies here on bbc news. and if you're watching in northern ireland, saying, "why didn't you focus on the parties in our neck of the woods and the policies that they've got?" they are on there. so take a look.
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bbc.co.uk/news. more rain has been falling on parts of england already hit by severe flooding. the army says it's on a high state of readiness in south yorkshire. forecasters are warning of further downfalls around the village of fishlake near doncaster, where hundreds of people have had to abandon their homes and businesses. a yellow weather warning for rain is now in force around sheffield, nottingham and doncaster and will last until the early hours of tomorrow morning. our correspondent, frankie mccamley, reports from fishlake. the small village of fishlake, cut off by flood water earlier this week, now getting the help residents have been asking for. the army have been putting sandbags down and building flood defences since yesterday, but some residents say help has not come quick enough. we need the investment now into here, we desperately need it.
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once all the rainwater‘s gone, we can't ever allow this to happen again. the environment agency have got to sit up, listen to what the people... the farmers around this area have been saying for a long time, listen to what they're saying. parts of south yorkshire and lincolnshire have been badly hit by heavy rain, with around 500 homes flooded in doncaster and 1,200 evacuated. in the last 24 hours, the water has gone down substantially. yesterday, this spot was covered in two to three inches of water and you couldn't see this road behind me. but there is still much more to be done. residents still cannot get into their homes and there are still some roads completely submerged in water. and it's not over yet. there is more rain to come this afternoon and overnight. it's been a very wet autumn so far. some of the flooded regions have had twice the expected amount of rainfall. there is more of it to come today, about an inch worth, not enough to cause further river
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flooding, but it is topping up the water that's already lying on the ground. there are more than 40 flood warnings in place across the country, meaning flooding is expected. more than a dozen of those are along parts of the river don, where fishlake sits. the environment agency says it's pulling resources from across the country but wants people in affected areas to stay vigilant. the rain on its way is not expected to cause further flooding here, but for some their homes and businesses have already been destroyed. it will be weeks if not months before this village can return to some sort of normality. and frankie is in fishlake this afternoon. the problem with that is until then there is still rain coming. exactly. it is raining very likely now but we
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are expecting more rain overnight, and that will concern residents here who are trying to get back into their homes. ijust saw who are trying to get back into their homes. i just saw a family trying to salvage some of their possessions around the corner. as you can see, roads are still submerged in water. joining me to a nswer submerged in water. joining me to answer some of the questions from residents and people across the country is someone from the environment agency. how big is this operation? we have got staff coming up operation? we have got staff coming up from cornwall, hampshire, to help the operation. we have got three sets of pumps around fishlake, moving water back into the river, each set of pumps is moving a tonne of water a second, and we are seeing water levels dropping as a result of that, and that is part of the contribution we are making but the police and fire services here are making as well, the recovery process is really getting into gear, but we can't be complacent, we have got more wet weather coming through and
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we need people to get onto our website, sign up for flood warnings if they are at flood risk because more wet weather on the horizon. yourjob is to manage this floodwater and stop this happening in the first place and residents are saying they have told you time you time and time again, when will this stop? we can never say it will never happen again because with extreme weather like we have seen the levels on the river don have never been higher, so actually ourjob in the environment agency is to do the best we can with the public money we have got, and then to offer a flood warning service to ensure people understand what risk they are at and what they can do to contribute to helping reduce and minimise the impacts of flooding. and there are people across the country, flood warnings in place, people will be concerned, what advice you giving to those? it is a very wet autumn and a lot of catchments are saturated
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throughout much of the midlands and here in yorkshire as well. we need people to keep a close eye on the weather forecast, go to the website, see if they are at flood risk. there are things that can do before flood water crisis, things that can make a big difference to getting their lives back in order because when it happens to you flooding in your house is a horrible experience. and these floods began almost a week ago 110w. these floods began almost a week ago now. people still cannot get back into their homes. when will this be cleared up? there are still areas like we see here of patches of flooded roads but most of them are clear. of course, it relies on getting the water tower pumps being clear. but the levels are dropping, they have dropped by a metre or more in the last 24 and was in response to that huge pumping operation we got in place, so we are doing it as
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fa st got in place, so we are doing it as fast as we can, and that is the start of the meaningful recovery, when people can get back into their homes and rebuild their lives. but there's still a long way to go. we can see the army going door—to—door, offering people sandbags, some people are turning them away, saying it is too little, too late. we are concerned about the weather coming through and it's great to see the army and emergency services giving reassurance to those people here here in the village, that they are being looked out for and cared for. and we are playing our part. we are here to demonstrate that the floodwater is moving, we are getting off the land as quickly as we can to help people get their lives back together. just a little bit of advice for people in this local community who when they are trying to get into their homes and anyone facing floodwater? don't drive through it, it can be dangerous, there are manholes up in the village. you cannot see through it, it is dirty water, it has got
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bacteria, its nasty stuff, don't go near it if you can avoid it. the advices, don't go into the floodwater if see it. you're watching afternoon live. these are our headlines: accident and emergency units in england record their worst performance since modern records began, putting health back to the top of the election agenda. warnings of further heavy downpours to compound the misery of flood victims in parts of england. raids across london to rescue women thought to have been trafficked from romania. england prepare for a landmark game at wembley tonight. they only need a point against montenegro to reach the euros but they won't have raheem sterling who's been dropped. gareth southgate says they can cope without him. thierry henry's got a newjob in management. the former arsenal striker‘s taking over as the new boss of montreal impact in america's mls.
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catriona matthew has been given the chance to retain the solheim cup after being chosen to captain europe for the second time in succession. she'll captain again at inverness golf club in ohio, in 2021. i'll be back with more on those stores at half past. the scottish parliament has heard allegations that a child died as a result of contamination at a children's ward in glasgow and the parents were not told the reason why they died. speaking at first minister's questions, the labour msp anas sarwar said he had information from a whistle—blower that the child died in 2017. he said there were 26 cases of infection caused by contaminated water at the royal hospital for children in glasgow. let's get more on this. we can speak to our scotland correspondent, james shaw. what more can you tell us? it was an impassioned plea by the labour msp to the first minister of scotland
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and her health secretary. he said, you are not being told the truth about this case. he believes that managers in the nhs have not been passing on the concerns and information that has been gathered, and we have seen some of the documents which seem to indicate more details about what he has been talking about. they appear to show that a child, we do not know what sex they were or how old they were, a child with cancer died as a result or after taking contaminated water in 2017, and also that there was a request for a review after the death of that child and then a second request, and he said that second request, and he said that second request was not responded to. we should also point out that there have been problems on this hospital campus in the past. this is the
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royal children's hospital in glasgow. the queen elizabeth university hospital next door to it, there have been three deaths as a result of contamination, different infections contracted, and prosecutors are actually looking into those three deaths. there has been an announcement that a public inquiry will be held in to what has happened on this hospital campus so i think there is more in this story that we know at the moment. the mayor of venice says the city is on its knees after floodwaters submerged homes, shops and historical landmarks, including st mark's basilica. it's the worst flooding to his the city in half a century. at least two people have died and it could cost hundreds of millions of pounds to repair the damage. mark lowen reports. come for the renaissance art, stay for the disaster selfies. venice's highest tide in half a century — a draw for the tourists, a tragedy for one
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of europe's jewels. the glorious st mark's square bore the brunt. the 12th century crypt of its basilica flooded for only the sixth time in 1,200 years. 80% of venice has been submerged. the boats that plied its canals beached, local businesses inundated. fierce winds and torrential rain on tuesday night lashed the venetian coast, leading to a storm surge that overwhelmed a city already sinking. it couldn't cope. it's been devastating, what's happened. two days ago, on the 12th of november, it's carved on our memories. like the water flooded our homes, we live on the ground floor and so do many other venetians. there are shops that are affected as well. the prime minister called it a blow to the heart of the country, pledging to complete a flood defence system that should have been finished eight years ago.
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translation: in today's cabinet we'll approve a decree approving a state of emergency in venice. this will make it possible to assign the first financial aid to pay for the emergency spending and to restore services and we'll have two stages of compensation pay—outs. and this is what could have saved venice — 78 flood gates that began to be built in 2003 but were plagued by corruption and overspend. named after moses, designed to halt a biblicalflood, but now an unholy scandal. it's sad that we have to say we cannot trust any more the government, and i know that, all over the world we have problems with the heating, that there will be more tornadoes, but we had a chance building this barrier to save venice, and instead, every two years, they say, oh, we will finish it in another two years. it's too much. climate change and italian mismanagement — venice is drowning in that perilous mix. mark lowen, bbc news.
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time for a look at the weather. first snow of the season for some of us, 150 metres also. parts of the west midlands in south—west england into wales as well. a lot of what has started into snow has turned into rain but in the welsh hills snow up there at the moment. some may be a bit surprised. it was in the forecast. and because of the intensity of the rain that was falling, like wind and turn to snow in places. this is not south wales or gloucestershire. it is actually north africa! i am taking you right to algeria. these are the jury during mountains. the snow does fall
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in the mountains, morocco crossed algeria. it is early to get this much snow. the army keeping some of the high routes open. some of these early snowfalls may become a bit more frequent and snow across this may become more frequent in recent yea rs may become more frequent in recent years with the jet stream driving weather systems further south. i wa nt to weather systems further south. i want to show you where the x coming from. look at the arrows. this is the wind flow. the arrows across north africa, follow the arrows brushing through portugal and spain, follow the arrows here towards the uk, follow them northwards, i am taking you on a long journey! i am taking you on a long journey! i am taking you on a long journey! i am taking you on a long journey from africa to the north pole, and that is where this cold air mass is coming from at the moment. we know it is cold here right now, we have
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had a bit of snow, but all of that is feeding down to northern parts of africa, and the same sort of their we are breeding in dewsbury is in the african mountains. more misery for people who can do without it. we do not want rain in the forecast but we do have rain in the forecast and more hours to come. this is the view from warwickshire earlier today. i wa nt to from warwickshire earlier today. i want to show you the rain and snow. that's where some of the snow fell earlier but it is this rain band causing problems and notice how it is pivoting more across those flooded parts of the east midlands and into yorkshire so weather rain may fall light at the moment it will p9p up may fall light at the moment it will pep up during the remainder of this afternoon and into this evening. i decided that rain band, a few showers. a cold day with a strong cold northerly wind. focusing in on this band of rain, look at the brighter colours here showing a more
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intense heavy rain. that is another 30-40 intense heavy rain. that is another 30—40 millimetres on top of what we have had recently. some people, the situation cannot get any worse than it test but there could be further impacts in of travel disruption and flooding feeding into the river system is once again so we have to keep an eye on that. that starts to ease overnight. a cold night to come, frosty nic across parts of scotla nd come, frosty nic across parts of scotland with wintry showers. this is where the zone of wet weather is sitting at the moment, and it tends to fizzle out, a bit of dry weather by tomorrow afternoon. look at the rain pushing back in towards east anglia and south—east england, deep into the afternoon, and that could turn heavy in places as we go into friday evening, another cold day in court we can to come. this area of low pressure, around that chilly air and plenty of cloud on the cold side of the jet stream. the feel of the weather will not change. cloud
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around on saturday, outbreaks of rain, particularly eastern scotland, england and wales, brighter elsewhere. don't expect a huge amount of sunshine. for most of us, temperatures in single figures. into sunday, wet weather, more widespread on sunday, not huge rainfall totals but of course this is something we need to keep across and more hill snow around, particularly in scotland. that is the forecast. rain where it is not needed, met office weather warnings, environment agency flood warnings, we bring all of those together for you.
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this is bbc news. our latest headlines... accident and emergency units in england record their worst performance since modern records began — putting health back to the top of the election agenda. this is basically caused by the huge demand that there is on the nhs and that's why now in the last three months, we have done the biggest investment in the nhs in modern times. it is disgraceful and it is a problem of the lack of staff and the lack of funding for it. so a labour government will increase nhs funding by '23, '24 by 26 billion a year. warnings of further heavy downpours to compound the misery of flood victims in parts of england. raids across london to rescue women thought to have been trafficked from romania.
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sport now on afternoon live with connie mclaughlin. a big match for england tonight. it is their thousands again. it has been overshadowed by disciplinary issues. yes, very much so. montenegro are the visitors this evening. they only need to draw for the european championship next summer. they finish their campaign in kosovo next sunday. there is a chance she had the slip up. it is going to be a historic night. the manager is well aware of those who have gone before him. when you look at the
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managers that i have played for, it is something that is of huge played like my pride for myself and my family. i am always conscious of that. 7.45 kick off that match at wembley — its live on bbc radio 5 live. a newjob for a legendary premier league striker. yes. thierry henry is heading back to major league soccer — this time as a coach. he's been appointed as the new boss of montreal impact. the former arsenal striker has signed a two—year contract with the option of a further season. his appointment follows an unsuccessful stint in charge of monaco, which ended in january. before that he was assistant to roberto martinez with the belgian national side. henry finished his playing career in the mls, scoring 51 goals
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for the new york red bulls. the atp finals continue in london today with dominic team, who's already qualified for the semi—finals, taking on the italian matteo berrettini at the o2. and these are live pictures... this one is effectively a dead rubber. it is to — one going into the serve. tonight is a big one. it is all about that big match in a little bit later. who will reach the semifinals? ben stokes says his standout performances for england this summer — don't give him any sort of redemption for his problems off the field. stokes was fined and given a lengthy ban after being involved in a fight in bristol in 2017 — although he was cleared of affray. this summer, the 28—year—old helped england win the world cup and also single handedly won the 3rd ashes test, but says his success isn't driven by his past.
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from my point of view, i don't see it like that at all. i see it as me going out, doing as good as i can to help my team win games. i don't see it as redemption. there is nothing else towards it. it is not to prove you wrong type thing? no, nothing like that. to golf and catriona matthew has been given the chance to retain the solheim cup after being chosen to captain europe for the second time in succession. the 50—year—old scot led her team to victory over the united states on home soil at gleneagles in september. she will be captain again at inverness golf club in ohio in 2021. and there's been more success for great britain's hannah cockcroft at the world para athletics championships this morning. she's won her second gold of championships in dubai — setting a championship record in the 800m.
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18—year—old kare took silver in a british one—two. that's all the sport for now. more from us in the next hour. thank you very much. let's return to politics and the conservative party's pledge to cut immigration if they return to power. the home secretary priti patel has promised to reduce 'immigration overall‘ through a points—based system, but stopped short of setting targets. the bbc‘s reality check correspondent chris morris is here to take a closer look at this. so, chris, what do we know about what labour and the tories are saying on immigration? and what do the actual figures tell us about the current immigration situation? let‘s start with labour. this is what they said in their manifesto two years ago. freedom of movement will end when we leave the european union. two years is very long in politics. we are not sure if we are
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leaving the eu and where they stand on freedom of movement. this is what they said at their conference a couple of months ago. we intend to maintain free movement rights. they wa nt to maintain free movement rights. they want to protect the 3 million eu citizens living here and we want to make sure there is as much movement as possible between the uk and eu and if we do leave, if brexit does end up happening, the tories have interpreted this to mean you want to extend free movement rights to the whole world, which is widely then came up with this huge number sing labour‘s policies could mean hundreds of thousands of more people arriving each year. i checked back looking at the party conference motion and it is not really what they are saying that we do need more clarity from labour party. michael gove‘s position is clear. he thinks it is dangerous and out of touch with the people. striking language. what are the tories want? after some toing and froing, we know from the home secretary that the clear goal
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is we will reduce immigration overall. by how much and when? we do not know. they want a points—based system, attracting the brightest and the best. we don‘t really know exactly what it is they are going to do. from both parties, there are still questions to answer on this very, very quite emotional but also very, very quite emotional but also very important issue for brexit, the nhs and the other big issues we care about. with language so important. what did the figures tell us about the immigration system? this is the interesting thing when it comes to free movement. free movement is about becoming an going from the eu. look at this graph here. the blue line is net migration... the pale blue. i am going blue and purple. line is net migration... the pale blue. iam going blue and purple. is it? where are the glasses. the paler line, the one going sharply down towards the end. that is net
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migration over the last few years. the other line, the purple blue line, is net migration from the rest of the world. that is going up in the last few years. the point where the last few years. the point where the line cross, it is pretty much half way through 2016, when the brexit referendum was. since the brexit referendum was. since the brexit referendum, the number of people, the net migration from the european union, has fallen sharply. if you are legally numbers in detail, you can see that fairly clearly. this is the latest figures we have the year ending march 2019. 219,000 coming from the rest of the world, where as from the other countries in the eu, the number is only 59,000. this is the number, the smaller number, that could be affected by ending the free movement of people, it would not affect the bigger number. if this numberfalls even further, you are going to get all sorts of sectors in the british
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economy, agriculture, construction, the nhs saying, where are we going to get our staff from? immigration isn‘t just about numbers, to get our staff from? immigration isn‘tjust about numbers, it is also about filling the gaps and the vacancies which people need to fill in the british economy. chris, thank you very much. let‘s talk now to madeleine sumption, director of the migration observatory. good afternoon to you. free movement of people, what does it actually mean? well, free movement is the arrangement is under eu law by which any british citizen khan go and live or work in another eu country and then an eu citizen khan live here. it gives eu citizens very similar rights. —— citizens are able to live here. we do not know where the parties stand on it. labour has not announced its policies. we will have to wait and see what is in their
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ma nifesto to wait and see what is in their manifesto on immigration. the conservatives, there are a lot of details that we do not know about how the system they are proposing would work. they have been relatively consistent in saying however that they plan to end free movement and they are going to replace it with a single system that treats the same, there will be selection on skills. it is safe to assume that what we would see under assume that what we would see under a conservative government is a more restrictive immigration system that would probably lead to lower levels of immigration. how does migration benefit the economy? this is going to be at the height of the argument. there has been a lot of research on the impacts of immigration. if you look on aggregate and treat immigration as one monolithic hall, generally the research tends to suggest the impacts are smaller than
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many people expect. there are quite big differences. there is a really strong consensus that very significant benefits to highly skilled immigration, on the labour market are public finances, when you look at immigration into low wage our measure whichjobs, look at immigration into low wage our measure which jobs, employers are very concerned about losing access to those workers because they have become very reliant on them. the statistical evidence seems to suggest the aggregate impacts of lower and middle skilled migration. what is the difference comes from the inside of the eu and outside in terms of skills. the nhs saying, where are we going to get our staff from? where are we going to get our staff from ? presumably, after a where are we going to get our staff from? presumably, after a brexit, they would come from just outside they would come from just outside the eu. yes. the profile of eu and non—eu migration are quite different. because there is quite a restrictive immigration system for non—eu citizens, a lot of people
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coming in, a lot of them are international students, if you look at the workers, we are generally talking about skilled work, people in graduatejobs, rising numbers have been going into the nhs. on the eu side, we see much more of a mix. you have people in highly skilled jobs but also in a lot of the middle skilled positions, construction occupations as an example, and low wage positions, waiters and waitresses, this kind ofjobs that under the current immigration system tend not to be eligible for visas. the big question going forward is how much more restrictive with the immigration system be for eu citizens if free movement comes to an end? which of those jobs will still be eligible and which ones will not. it is really good to talk to you. thank you very much. you are welcome. in a moment victoria is going to bring us the latest
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business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. accident and emergency units in england record their worst performance since modern records began — putting health back to the top of the election agenda. warnings of further heavy downpours to compound the misery of flood victims in parts of england. raids across london to rescue women thought to have been trafficked from romania. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. fears rise for the uk economy — as retail sales unexpectedly fall. official figures show sales growth is at its weakest for 18 months. all categories fell, with the exception of food. hong kong protests dent at burberry. hong kong protests have dented overseas sales at burberry. the luxury goods group cuts the value of stores in the territory amid months—long disturbances women should have the right to know what their male colleagues are being paid if they suspect pay discrimination — that‘s according
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to the fawcett society. the gender equality charity is calling for a change in the law to try to cut down on instances of unequal pay. when people think of google, they don‘t think necessarily about banking. they don‘t. that is about to change. that is rate. google has announced that it‘s to offer current accounts from next year through its google pay app. it is questionable to why they are doing it. they have a huge user base. we have something like 1.4 billion people around the world who have e—mail accounts. they are trying to make themselves more indispensable to people but they are not the first big tech company to go into this. we have had facebook, amazon, apple, but even the likes of uberare amazon, apple, but even the likes of uber are going into these products. it has spiked fears that silicon valley has so much data on people. what are they doing with all the data and is it all safe? it has just
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come off the news that we have heard in the united states that google has signed a deal with the us health ca re signed a deal with the us health care provider, giving it access to the medical data of millions of americans. there are lots of privacy concerns around this. no doubt people will be thinking about banking with google. vivienne nunis is joins us now from new york. why do you think google has decided to do this? google is really following any other major tech firms into this world of banking and personal finance, as you into this world of banking and personalfinance, as you have mentioned. we have seen facebook talk about crypto currency, apple pay has been very successful on phones. amazon has introduced credit cards and paper introduce debit cards and paper introduce debit cards and paper introduce debit cards and accounts for its drivers. google is rather late to the party here in the us. there has been a flurry of activity moving into finance in the last year for tech sector. it is quite late to what has
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been happening in china. over there, the technology firm has a dominant position in online payments over there. we are seeing us firms copying what has already been happening in china. google will be building on that huge user base, hoping to make another revenues scheme extreme and have been to keep users and its ecosystem, rather than you having to change what you are looking at on your browser, you will stay looking at google when you go to make a payment. i people concerned about this? i the regulator is taking a look at this? regulators do have concerns. what are they going to do with all our data? they already have so much data, what they do with our financial data? data, what they do with our financial data ? will they try data, what they do with our financial data? will they try to sell us products, depending on how much we have in our bank accounts. they will keep their financial data very separate. regulators are concerned about the infrastructures, detect firms know how to carry out
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banking services? google has tried to allay those by partnering with a real—world banking group, citigroup, it will be hoping they will be able to carry out the nuts and of these data protection sides of things. that is why to limit how they are hoping to relate regulation concerns. users may have concerns of their own when it comes to privacy. another company that has news out today, walmart. and there are massive retail business. we were talking about retail sales in the uk following. walmart own asda, the supermarket here. what the numbers look like? interesting you say that. that was echoed by the walmart to this morning. he said revenue was slightly down, earnings are slightly down in the uk, the supermarket sector, asda, because a brexit. the walmart ceo said shoppers continue to be hesitant because of concerns about the economy and that are
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showing up in their results. there we re showing up in their results. there were some bright spots in the online sector. online grocery shopping is growing for asda. that is reflected in walmart‘s largest sales as well. the online business is also growing in the us. walmart thinks there is a long way for it to go in that sector as well. thank you. interesting. thank you. as we were saying earlier, everyone needs to eat, don‘t they? we wear. thank you. see you later on. 17 people have have been arrested in raids across london targeting a gang suspected of trafficking women from romania. the operation was carried out by the metropolitan police supported by officers from romania. 29 women were rescued and cash, drugs and a stun gun were also recovered. our correspondent gareth furby was with the police as they carried out one of the raids.
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before dawn in east london and police target 16 properties. some, they believe, have been used as brothels. police! police officers! inside this flat, they found two women. at other addresses — another 27 women. the police believe they were trafficked to london from romania to work on the streets. i‘ve got sisters. i‘ve got a daughter. and i think anyone would be angry and upset that anybody can exploit them for their own gains in this way. today‘s operation followed months of complaints by residents in parts of north and east london about sex working they said was getting out of control in their neighbourhoods. having their sexual acts in people's front gardens, in their alleyways. we filmed as some residents set up their own patrols to try to stop this behaviour. police targeted this high street, but residents said the activity
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just moved into brothels. today‘s raids were a joint operation with police from romania. four properties were targeted there. in london, 17 people, all alleged to have been involved in people trafficking, were arrested. this is absolutely of paramount importance. we are seeking to get to the people that were actually involved in the coordination, the organisation, the upper tier of criminality were involved in this crime type, because this is the way in which you will dismantle this type of offending. the women found at the addresses, potential victims of human trafficking, have now been taken to a place of safety and are being offered support and accommodation. gareth furby, bbc news. it's it‘s that time of the year again.
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# and #and| # and i have to crawl on the floor. # and i have to crawl on the floor. # come crashing through your door forever. i‘m not going to spoil all of it. john lewis and partners latest ad has just dropped this morning and it‘s not surprisingly trending on social media. it‘s a cinematic production starring edgar the dragon who gets a bit too excited about christmas — and accidentally sets the tree on fire. it comes as the advertising association says a record £6.8—billion will be spent on christmas ads this year. but is it money well spent? to discuss this more i‘m joined now by consumer journalist, harry wallop... it isa it is a dragon that has arson tendencies. it has cost an awful lot of money. it has cost we think more than £1 million to film it. a two week shoot in hungary, with a cast
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of 80, one of the best—known british directors doing it. unbelievable. up to £8 million to buy all of the advertising space once you have made the advert. it has become an institution, a tradition at christmas as much as many things. does it work forjon lewis, an advert like this? jon lewis set the trend back in 2011, 2010, of doing glitzy adverts that did not feature the brand. you don‘t even see any product. i think it is is to a christmas pudding you can buy from its sister supermarket. it is about making you feel warm and fuzzy about the company. these are fickle times. we can do our shopping anywhere at the click of the button. what you have an emotional attach to? that is what christmas advertising is all about now? the renault advert that has just about now? the renault advert that hasjust come out, about now? the renault advert that has just come out, that features a same—sex couple and how that relationship develops. again,
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beautifully filmed and a great story. does it make you think of a renault clio? it is almost a whole film. a wonderful happy ending, trauma in the middle. i think it does work. if you say to me renault clio, the first thing i think about is papa. clio, the first thing i think about is pa pa. there clio, the first thing i think about is papa. there is a pepper that gets annoyed. they reconcile because it is always a happy ending in advertising. again, a very competitive market. what you need to make an emotional connection to the consumer. i think a bit more warming about renault clio having seen this advert. we talk about an emotional connection and there was one and the sit out recently, the advert that featured the first world war, and that was sainsbury‘s. featured the first world war, and that was sainsbury's. some people that was sainsbury's. some people that this is very distasteful. this was essentially using the war to end all wars to shift a bar of
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chocolate. sainsbury‘s managed to defuse row by saying all of the profits from the chocolate bar were going to a veterans charity. it symbolised the nature of these adverts, the retailers are throwing shed loads of money to try and get us spending. the retailer itself is less important when it comes to these adverts. audi has spent an absolute fortune on their ad. it may be less classy but it is different. it features a carrot. this is the third orfourth year in it features a carrot. this is the third or fourth year in a it features a carrot. this is the third orfourth year in a row it features a carrot. this is the third or fourth year in a row there has been a carrot. people queue up, they really do queue up, in order to buy the carrot for their children. a sign that the german discounters i desperately trying to reap the profits of the big four supermarket groups and also a relatively down—market supermarket is willing to throw money at a christmas
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advert. it is the middle of november and we are here talking about christmas. it beats talking about brexit. good to see you. let‘s have a look at the weather now. lots is going on. some of us started the day with some snow. the first snow of the season. modest hills. one review here. it is the rain that is the main concern. it is falling on a strip from south—west england. here into yorkshire and lincolnshire once again. it is starting to pivot across more of yorkshire now. and it is turning heavier as it does so. either side of the rain band, brighter skies, wintry ones to the hills of northern scotland. the strong cold winds. several hours of rain to come, particularly through this zone here that continues into the evening. some spots amassing 30 to 40 millimetres of rain. further
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impacts from that and difficult travel conditions as well. it is going to begin to move away. turning a bit drier here as the night goes on. these are our overnight temperatures. icy patches on untreated surfaces. frosty queer stout into northern ireland tomorrow. a lot of cloud from the eastern scotland. —— frosty queer start into northern ireland. ——clear start. most of us are single figure temperatures. a lot of cloud coming occasional weather fronts. doesn‘t look like a huge amount of rain this weekend. it will be wet at times and places. parts of eastern scotland i down through england and wales. occasionally a lot of that is going
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to be light and drizzly. some brighter skies. here will be cloud increasing ahead of a weather front coming in from the atlantic. outbreaks of rain by sunday. a bit more substantial in that spots. again, pointing out the temperatures. yes, equal to that is the forecast. right now we are worried about the rain. some areas have had far too much recently, there are a met office weather warnings and flood warnings. more details online. i will be back in half an hour.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live. today at 3: accident and emergency units in england record their worst performance since modern records began, putting health back to the top of the election agenda. this is basically caused by the huge demand that there is on the nhs, and that‘s why, now, in the last three months, we have done the biggest investment in the nhs in modern times. it is disgraceful and it is a problem of the lack of staff and the lack of funding for it, so a labour government will increase nhs funding by '23/24 by 26 billion a year. warnings of further heavy downpours to compound the misery of flood victims in parts of england. raids across london to rescue women
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thought to have been trafficked from romania. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport. a huge night for england. the match against montenegro at wembley this evening will be their 1,000th international fixture. no raheem sterling, remember, but they only a point to qualify. and nick has details of the forecast. it is raining again and reining in areas that have seen the worst flooding recently. it will continue to rain for several more hours and we will look at how much is on the way, how long it will last, and we will take a look at the weekend as well. hello, everyone, this is afternoon live.
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accident and emergency units in england have recorded their worst performance since current records began in 2004. one senior doctor has warned emergency care is imploding. the government‘s target is for 95% of a&e patients to be treated or assessed within a maximum of four hours. but today‘s figures show that was only achieved with 83.6% of patients. they also show a raft of other targets are being missed in england, including for cancer operations and also routine surgery. in response, the government says huge demand for hospital services is to blame. here‘s our health correspondent, dominic hughes. it‘s hard to believe that, two years ago, frances reid was effectively crippled by arthritis. her constant pain was ended by a hip replacement operation. nhs targets mean frances should have only waited 18 weeks for surgery. instead, her operation was delayed by six months. that really impacted on my health, my general health, my mobility.
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i was in an awful lot of pain. i could barely get about. and it also impacted on my recovery time afterwards because i was so unfit, actually, by the time i had my surgery. the delay to frances‘ operation is a sign of a system under growing stress. figures released today show none of the three key hospital targets in england have been met for over three years. waiting times for a&e are the worst ever recorded. it‘s been more than four years since the four—hour target was hit. the 18—week target for planned operations, like the one frances had, was last met more than three years ago. and just over three quarters of cancer patients started treatment in 62 days in october. the 85% target hasn‘t been met in nearly four years. the numbers in a&e relate to october. for the last two years, performance actually got better in october. autumn isn't necessarily a bad time for the nhs, it's usually 0k in a&e.
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the real difficulties come in december, january and february, so i'm afraid we are probably going to see these numbers get worse before they get better. health is an area of policy that‘s devolved and, while these figures only apply to england, similar pressures are seen across the uk. but the data comes in the middle of an election campaign in which funding for the nhs has featured strongly. it is disgraceful and it is a problem of the lack of staff and the lack of funding for it. so a labour government will increase nhs funding by 2023—2024 by 26 billion a year. this is basically caused by the huge demand that there is on the nhs and that's why now in the last three months we have done the biggest investment in the nhs in modern times. frances‘ operation gave her a new lease of life. nhs england is considering changing waiting time targets, arguing they‘re outdated. but health charities believe they‘re still important for patients.
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behind each of these numbers is an individual living with chronic pain. ajoint replacement operation can take that pain away. delay to that operation can have a devastating impact on the physical and mental health of people with arthritis. nhs england says today‘s figures reflect the increased number of older and sicker patients who are being seen. but there‘s a warning from a group that represents doctors that the hospitals they work in are imploding and the real pressures of winter have yet to be felt. dominic hughes, bbc news. our health editor, hugh pym, has more analysis on those figures. this is october and, as we were hearing there, it‘s normally fairly stable in the nhs before winter arrives, and look what‘s happened — this is the worst ever figure since modern records began in 2004 and considerably down on october last year. we had warnings from various hospitals in october that they were under extreme pressure, they really hadn‘t
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expected this early, winter had come early in their view, but i think these figures came as a big surprise to everybody, quite how much of a fall there had been and, of course, winter is still ahead in terms of really cold weather and any flu outbreak that develops, so there is real concern, i think, looking ahead into those months. so what‘s going wrong? part of it is the whole joined—up nature of care. in some areas of social care and primary care, gps are unable to do what they could and should be doing, which is looking after people closer to home. more people are ending up in a&e who shouldn‘t be there, often elderly patients who end up there by default, leaving a&e units extremely crowded. all sorts of reforms have been talked about and are beginning to be implemented about more joined—up care, but they don‘t seem to have really ta ken effect yet. there is one more issue — the pensions issue affecting consultants. they say tax situations are making it more difficult for them to actually come in and do extra
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shifts because they get taxed more. the conservatives have promised to cut immigration if they return to power but have stopped short of setting targets. the home secretary, priti patel, says they will reduce immigration overall through a points—based system. labour has yet to announce its policy on freedom of movement but say it will be a fair process. it all comes as nominations to stand in the general election close this afternoon. our political correspondent, jonathan blake, reports. if only cutting immigration was as easy as that. the prime minister visited a school in somerset this morning as his party‘s commitment to reduce the numbers coming to live and work in the uk became the focus of the election campaign. beyond the promise to bring down net migration but little if any detail by how much and when. we will have an australian style points based system that will allow us to control who comes in and make
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sure we do not have so many people coming in without skills orjobs to come to, that we therefore protect wages, we increase wages, and we also make sure, this is a crucial point, that companies in this country, business in this country, invest in the skills of young people growing up in this country. the tories first promised to cut migration in the 2010 election then again in 2015 and again in 2017 but they never achieved that aim so don‘t expect them to set a similar target now. reducing immigration means reversing a trend. the most recent figures show net migration from eu countries was 59,000 but from the rest of the world it was 219,000. ending freedom of movement from the eu, which the conservatives have promised to do, won‘t do anything to curb the numbers coming to the uk
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from elsewhere so the questions for the tories are how they plan to meet their pledge and when. for labour, the issue is settling a debate within the party about where it should stand on immigration. jeremy corbyn was heckled on scottish independence in dundee this morning, but on immigration no word yet on how he will balance differences on a commitment to ending free movement versus taking a more relaxed approach. if we are remaining members of the eu, which will be an option in the referendum, freedom of movement continues. if we come to a special arrangement with the eu, there will be a recognition of the needs of european families to have the right to family reunion, the right to reside in this country, and of course british people to work in different european countries. other parties reject the need for tighter controls on immigration. to those considering whether to vote conservative again, the question has to be this,
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is this the kind of country you want to live in? do you want to endorse this kind of politics? we would like to encourage people to come here, we would like to encourage eu nationals to come here and freedom of movement to continue. just as they did in the brexit referendum campaign, arguments about immigration policy may play a crucial role in the run—up to this election. jonathan blake, bbc news. the prime minister is in the south west of england today. our political correspondent, alex forsyth, is there with him on the tour bus. the prime minister wanting to focus on immigration but other issues going on as well? there are ways are on campaigns. i am only on the bus because it is so raining outside. we have just pulled up into bristol because it is so raining outside. we
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havejust pulled up into bristol and the prime minister is here on this south—west bd tool. we have had three stops today. he had been to a school in taunton earlier. then he was due to go to a bakery later on in the day in glastonbury but before he got the word had got out of the prime minister‘s pending arrival so there was a group of protesters, climate change activists, somebody bearing a labour placard, anti brexit protesters outside, so the prime minister pulled out of that visit. we are told that was because of security concerns but there was criticism on social media that he did not go along to what was part of the planned itinerary but he did instead go to a high street in wales, and there he did go into a bakery, he served customers, i wasn‘t there because i was waiting for where he was meant to turn up originally, did a walkabout in the town centre. i am told by colleagues the response was good. he did do
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some public facing activity but it was not what was quite planned. you spent the morning at a bakery where nothing happened and you are now on a bus! you forgot the school where i sat and had a cup of tea earlier on. the campaign trail is always a world of glamour, simon! but in terms of what is ahead, the prime minister has tweeted there will be a meeting of cobra this afternoon all to do the flooding. he will not be able to chair it. but who was at that said, events, dear boy, events always catch up with you? the politicians of course want to make the campaign are structured as they can to keep on theirfamiliar are structured as they can to keep on their familiar and preferred turf so yesterday for boris johnson that was all about brexit and his key message which is about, i will get brexit done and then move onto other things, unleash the potential of the country. today the push from the
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conservatives is about immigration, saying they will bring it down, or beat to an unspecified level, and trying to attack labour‘s immigration policy but they cannot control events, things like that impromptu control events, things like that im prom ptu protests. control events, things like that impromptu protests. the big one has been the floods. yesterday he went to flood affected areas and did not get good reception so what he is trying to do is get back on the front foot with rain predicted. it has been a very rainy day in the south—west today. he has put out this tweet with an update on the flooding, saying there are 818 properties flooded, troops are deploying sandbags, there will be another emergency response meeting taking place, he is talking about the number of properties protected by the environment agency, and he is praising the brilliant work from the troops, so i guess this is a sense of the prime minister getting back on the front foot, but events, events, events. when we look at nhs figures and flooding, these are
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events that are more pertinent to this strangely timed winter campaign we are used to. i will leave you to get on with the excitement of the bus! more rain has been falling on parts of england already hit by severe flooding. the army says it‘s on a high state of readiness in south yorkshire. forecasters are warning of further downfalls around the village of fishlake near doncaster, where hundreds of people have had to abandon their homes and businesses. a yellow weather warning for rain is now in force around south yorkshire and parts of the midlands and will last until the early hours of tomorrow morning. our correspondent, frankie mccamley, reports from fishlake. the small village of fishlake, cut off by flood water earlier this week, now getting the help residents have been asking for. the army have been putting sandbags down and building flood defences since yesterday, but some residents say help has not come quick enough. we need the investment now into here, we desperately need it.
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once all the rainwater‘s gone, we can‘t ever allow this to happen again. the environment agency have got to sit up, listen to what the people... the farmers around this area have been saying for a long time, listen to what they‘re saying. parts of south yorkshire and lincolnshire have been badly hit by heavy rain, with around 500 homes flooded in doncaster and 1,200 evacuated. in the last 24 hours, the water has gone down substantially. yesterday, this spot was covered in two to three inches of water and you couldn‘t see this road behind me. but there is still much more to be done. residents still cannot get into their homes and there are still some roads completely submerged in water. and it‘s not over yet. there is more rain to come this afternoon and overnight. it's been a very wet autumn so far. some of the flooded regions have had twice the expected amount of rainfall. there is more of it to come today, about an inch worth, not enough to cause further river flooding, but it is topping up the water that's already
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lying on the ground. there are more than 40 flood warnings in place across the country, meaning flooding is expected. more than a dozen of those are along parts of the river don, where fishlake sits. the environment agency says it‘s pulling resources from across the country but wants people in affected areas to stay vigilant. we do need people to take note of their flood risk and start to plan for what happens if the worst happens, because trying to start to move possessions upstairs in the dead of night in the middle of winter is not the best time to think about it. start early and you'll be better prepared if the worst happens. the rain on its way is not expected to cause further flooding here, but for some their homes and businesses have already been destroyed. it will be weeks if not months before this village can return to some sort of normality. frankie mccamley,
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bbc news, fishlake. and throughout the election campaign we‘ll be putting your questions to all of the main parties. at half past five, we‘ll be joined by the leader of plaid cyrmu, adam price. so if you have anything you want to ask, please do get in touch using the contact details on screen, and we‘ll put those questions to him. please remember to leave your name and where you‘re from. some breaking news to bring you: stephen waterson, who admitted crushing his girlfriend‘s young son with a car seat, has beenjailed at the old bailey for seven years and six months. the court was told he was annoyed by young frankie lam‘s crying. he initially denied manslaughter. in may, alfie‘s mother, who watched as
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her son was crushed, was jailed for two years and nine months child cruelty. he admitted crushing his girlfriend‘s young son and his jailed. i will at the old bailey and will bring us more later on. —— our correspondent is. you‘re watching afternoon live. these are our headlines: accident and emergency units in england record their worst performance since modern records began, putting health back to the top of the election agenda. warnings of further heavy downpours to compound the misery of flood victims in parts of england. raids across london to rescue women thought to have been trafficked from romania. england prepare for a landmark game at wembley tonight. you‘re watching afternoon live. they only need a point against montenegro to reach the euros but they won‘t have raheem sterling who‘s been dropped. thierry henry‘s got a newjob in management. the former arsenal striker‘s taking over as the new boss of montreal impact in america‘s mls.
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catriona matthew has been given the chance to retain the solheim cup after being chosen to captain europe for the second time in succession. i‘ll be back with more on those stores at half past. 17 people have have been arrested in raids across london targeting a gang suspected of trafficking women from romania. the operation was carried out by the metropolitan police supported by officers from romania. 29 women were rescued and cash, drugs and a stun gun were also recovered. our correspondent, gareth furby, was with the police as they carried out one of the raids. before dawn in east london and police target 16 properties. some, they believe, have been used as brothels. police! police officers! inside this flat, they found two women. at other addresses — another 27 women.
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the police believe they were trafficked to london from romania to work on the streets. i‘ve got sisters. i‘ve got a daughter. and i think anyone would be angry and upset that anybody can exploit them for their own gains in this way. today‘s operation followed months of complaints by residents in parts of north and east london about sex working they said was getting out of control in their neighbourhoods. having their sexual acts in people's front gardens, in their alleyways. we filmed as some residents set up their own patrols to try to stop this behaviour. police targeted this high street, but residents said the activityjust moved into brothels. today‘s raids were a joint operation with police from romania. four properties were targeted there. in london, 17 people,
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all alleged to have been involved in people trafficking, were arrested. this is absolutely of paramount importance. we are seeking to get to the people that were actually involved in the coordination, the organisation, the upper tier of criminality were involved in this crime type, because this is the way in which you will dismantle this type of offending. the women found at the addresses, potential victims of human trafficking, have now been taken to a place of safety and are being offered support and accommodation. gareth furby, bbc news. the mayor of venice says the city is on its knees after floodwaters submerged homes, shops and historical landmarks, including st mark‘s basilica. it‘s the worst flooding to his the city in half a century. at least two people have died and it could cost hundreds of millions of pounds to repair the damage. mark lowen reports. come for the renaissance art,
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stay for the disaster selfies. venice‘s highest tide in half a century — a draw for the tourists, a tragedy for one of europe‘s jewels. the glorious st mark‘s square bore the brunt. the 12th century crypt of its basilica flooded for only the sixth time in 1,200 years. 80% of venice has been submerged. the boats that plied its canals beached, local businesses inundated. fierce winds and torrential rain on tuesday night lashed the venetian coast, leading to a storm surge that overwhelmed a city already sinking. it couldn‘t cope. it‘s been devastating, what‘s happened. two days ago, on the 12th of november, it‘s carved on our memories. like, the water flooded our homes, we live on the ground floor and so do many other venetians. there are shops that are affected as well. the prime minister called it a blow to the heart of the country,
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pledging to complete a flood defence system that should have been finished eight years ago. translation: in today's cabinet, we'll approve a decree approving a state of emergency in venice. this will make it possible to assign the first financial aid to pay for the emergency spending and to restore services and we'll have two stages of compensation pay—outs. and this is what could have saved venice — 78 flood gates that began to be built in 2003 but were plagued by corruption and overspend. named after moses, designed to halt a biblicalflood, but now an unholy scandal. it's sad that we have to say we cannot trust any more the government, and i know that, all over the world we have problems with the heating, that there will be more tornadoes, but we had a chance, building this barrier to save venice, and instead, every two years, they say, oh, we will finish it in another two years. it's too much.
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climate change and italian mismanagement — venice is drowning in that perilous mix. mark lowen, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. something of the white stuff this morning? the rain is falling heavily across some sports again but some snow this morning. we have had a lot of wet weather across south—west england, wales, the midlands. that came down so heavily that some of it actually turned from rain to snow to the process of evaporative cooling, which i‘m sure you are fully across, thatis which i‘m sure you are fully across, that is evaporation that takes heat out of the atmosphere in therefore what is coming down a snow, the air around it is cooling therefore it stays as snow to ever lower levels. so the snow level came down 250
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metres. a lot of cold in place. the cold aircoming metres. a lot of cold in place. the cold air coming all the way down from the north pole. we have got some arrows. from the north pole, through the uk, through portugal, through the uk, through portugal, through spain, even further south now, we have now reached northern parts of africa, so what happens when you get colder travelling that far south? you don‘t always think of snow but, wait for it... there you go! we are in algeria. the military called in to get rid of some of the snow from the higher roots. you may not think of snow in africa but it does snow in the mountains. we have actually had some already this season. perhaps this is becoming more frequent. this is a lot of snow that has come down. an interesting
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shovelling method. a side to side shovelling method. a side to side shovel going on rather than whatever it takes to get rid of the! let‘s move on. a lot of people interested in the forecast. it is nasty weather out there at the moment. rain is falling across parts of the midlands already in terms of flooding affecting train services. i want to show you the rain and snow that has been falling so far today. let‘s get onto the serious issue of this rain band. 25 millimetres of rain in the past few hours, and that is pivoting northwards into more of yorkshire at the moment as well. those rain totals will mount, probably through flooded areas quite widely 20—30 millilitres but some could see up to 40 millilitres. either side of that, something brighter this afternoon
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with a few showers. producing snow into the hills of scotland as well. focusing on this rainfall, this is where problems are developing, a lot of standing water, travel conditions difficult, and all of this then has to feed again into the river systems. the situation may not get any worse for you but there may be other impacts on a wider scale as well. we have to keep across that of the next 24—hour saucer. it moves northwards away from the worst flooded areas as we go through. lowest temperatures in scotland, ice on untreated surfaces. this is today‘s rain. look at where it is sitting tomorrow. it has moved further north and it fizzles out tomorrow. looking towards east anglia and the south—east of england, another area of rain. for many of us, tomorrow afternoon, quite a bit of dry and bright weather around. but the temperatures are still in single figures as it will be into the weekend, on the
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cold side of the jet stream, low pressure close by feeding and weather fronts from the east, one is coming in from the west as well. that is the recipe for a good deal of cloud over the weekend. and you will notice bits and pieces of rain. not a huge amount falling but it will be damp in places into the weekend, limited opportunities for seeing blue sky, and that cold filtered things, and showing you sunday, it may well be that the rain is more widespread on sunday, a few heavier bursts, the potentialfor hill snow around, particularly in scotland, it does not get any warmer. it looks like something drier into the starting next week. but of course, travelling around today difficult because of the rain thatis today difficult because of the rain that is falling, further flooding and disruption already starting to happen out there. met office and environment agency weather warnings, all the details online.
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more on that breaking story, the jailing of a man who admitted crashing a three—year—old boy to death by reversing his seat as the boy sat in a car. let‘s go to the old bailey now. richard lister has the details in that case. it was february last year when alfie lamb was pulled unresponsive from the refer well of a car which belonged to stephen waterson. he was sitting between the feet of his mother and almost immediately it was clear to everybody in the car there were four adults in that car that what happened was stephen waterson pushed his car seat back into alfie lamb, causing injuries which pull —— cute and if you days later. he did call 999 but pretended to be a passing by, some are not even connected with alfie‘s death. he persuaded the other adults in the car to lie about what had happened. after being
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spoken to by police which led to the events which led to alfie‘s death. but it became clear that stephen waterson had put pressure on all three, intimidated the driver of the car, beating him up in order to ensure he did not change his story, but alfie‘s mother confessed eventually to what had happened and she testified during the trial. but in that first trial which ended in for bree, thejury in that first trial which ended in for bree, the jury could in that first trial which ended in for bree, thejury could not in that first trial which ended in for bree, the jury could not agree whether or not he was guilty of manslaughter though they did conflict alfie‘s mother for child cruelty. on the day that stephen waterson‘s retrial was due to begin, he finally pleaded guilty to manslaughter and has been sentenced today. mrjustice gave him a five year six—month sentence for manslaughter by gross negligence and added another two years for witness intimidation with another 18 months sentence for conspiring to pervert course of justice, which sentence for conspiring to pervert course ofjustice, which means that
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altogether he is spending seven and altogether he is spending seven and a half yea rs altogether he is spending seven and a half years in prison. sport now on afternoon live they 1000th game tonight but other things are going on. a big game tonight. an historic match. much of the build—up has been surrounded on raheem sterling, who has been dropped tonight for disciplinary reasons. the only need to draw gareth southgate‘s team only need a draw to qualify for the european to qualify for the european championship next summer. they finish their campaign in kosovo on sunday, so there is a second chance should they slip up but it promises to be a historic night as they celebrate the landmark 1000th match
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and the manager is well aware of those who have gone before him when you look at the names, sir bobby robson, and then the manager is that i played for and i had enormous respect for and were a big pa rt enormous respect for and were a big part of england‘s history, it is something that is of huge pride for myself and my family. something that is of huge pride for myself and my familylj something that is of huge pride for myself and my family. i am always conscious of that. 7.45 kick off that match at wembley — it‘s live on bbc radio 5 live. news of a newjob for a legendary premier league striker. very much so, yes. thierry henry is heading back to major league soccer — this time as a coach. he‘s been appointed as the new boss of montreal impact. the former arsenal striker has signed a two—year contract with the option of a further season. his appointment follows an unsuccessful stint in charge of monaco, which ended in january. before that he was assistant to roberto martinez with the belgian national side. henry finished his playing career in the mls, scoring 51 goals for the new york red bulls.
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the atp finals continue in london today with dominic team, who‘s already qualified for the semi—finals, taking on the italian matteo berrettini at the o2. and berrettini took the first set on tie—break. it is into the second tie—break. you can see the pictures right now. it is going with service at the moment. 40 points to 30 up. hits with three matches to two in that one. you can watch this match live on bbc two or via the bbc sport website and app right now. the big one this evening is novak djokovic against roger federer — that‘s a straight shoot out for a place in the last four. to golf and catriona matthew has been given the chance to retain the solheim cup after being chosen to captain europe for the second time in succession. the 50—year—old scot led her team to victory over the united states on home soil at gleneagles in september. she will be captain again at inverness golf club in ohio, in 2021.
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sonny bill williams says he can‘t wait to start his third spell in rugby league. he won the rugby union world cup twice with the all blacks, and last month signed a two—year deal with the toronto wolfpack. they play in the english league system, and havejust been promoted to super league. iam i am grateful for, i am gratefulfor, you know, such a awesome opportunity at this stage. but with it, comes excitement and to bea but with it, comes excitement and to be a part of something special, you know, a club in northern america, if we can get our fit know, a club in northern america, if we can get ourfit in the know, a club in northern america, if we can get our fit in the door know, a club in northern america, if we can get ourfit in the door in the american market, it is going to be, i see it as a great change or opportunity for youngsters coming through for themselves and their families. it would be awesome to be a part of that.
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and there‘s been more success for great britain‘s hannah cockcroft at the world para athletics championships this morning. she‘s won her second gold of championships in dubai — setting a championship record in the 800m. there was a second gold of the games for maria lyle in the t35 200m that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. the bbc has found that most people who appealed against a decision to deny them disability benefits have been successful. charities and welfare rights groups say it shows benefits tests are beset by poor decision—making and inaccuracies. the government insists it is spending more than £55 billion a year supporting people with disabilities and health conditions. alex dunlop reports. ann barker has bipolar two disorder so she suffers from hypomanic and depressive episodes. in 2012, her application for disability living allowance was rejected. it‘s a hideous system, what they make you go through,
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and you know, they beat you down, because they want you to just go away. but ann did not go away. after eight months and with the support of her friend, penny, she finally won her claim. ann was then twice refused personal independence payment, before a second tribunal win. assessors, she says, took no account of her mental health. they‘re trying to take a million people with a million different problems and go, we‘re going to give them 30 questions and try and work out who should have what. that doesn‘t work. research by the bbc found that around 553,000 people successfully appealed a tribunal in the five years to 2018. most of those related to these disability and sickness benefits. 67% of people who appealed to tribunal in great britain won their case. it was 54% in northern ireland. capita and maximus, two of the private companies who carry out assessments, said the majority of people were satisfied with the process
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and they worked with charities and disabled people‘s organisations to improve their services further. ann barker‘s tribunal hearings were held in this building in norwich, but many don‘t make it this far, and that‘s because they first have to undergo an extra review by the department for work and pensions. it‘s called mandatory reconsideration. now, critics say that puts off many applicants because they find the whole process confusing and they have just a month to get their paperwork in order. it‘s a huge mental stress as well, and a financial stress, and some people willjust give up. that‘s why so many cases are going to appeal, because the assessments are being done, the decisions are very poor, and people are being deprived of their benefits. they have to go through all of this very daunting process. it can take months and months, sometimes over a year. the department for work and pensions told the bbc... it adds that... ann, who works as a massage
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therapist, says the disability benefit system is broken but could be on the mend with one key element. i think they need to care more. everybody should have help if they need it, so theyjust need to care more. alex dunlop, bbc news. when you‘re throwing away recycleable plastic waste in this country you assume it will get recycled, yes? well, think again. plastic waste generated by the west is often sent to other countries for recycling. but it isn‘t always recycled. louie lee—ray reports. parts of indonesia are awash with plastic waste. last year, indonesia imported almost 300,000 tonnes of plastic packaging.
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some of it is recycled, but much of the lower quality household plastic waste is dumped. huge piles are building up outside villagers‘ houses. leftover plastic needs to be gotten rid of, so it‘s burnt or sold to tofu food factories as fuel. but the cheap plastic is releasing highly toxic chemicals, which are making it into the food chain. researchers from an environmental group tested the eggs from free range chickens that live here. results revealed levels of toxic chemicals that are 70 times over the european safe levels in food.
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the results of our research is one of the most shocking results that we have ever had. especially in indonesia. we never have this kind of results before. you wouldn‘t get ill eating the odd egg. but long—term exposure to these chemicals, known as dioxins, can cause reproductive and developmental issues, damage the immune system and also cause cancer. that‘s according to the world health organization. the government is now stopping some containers of contaminated waste entering the country. the government is now stopping some containers of contaminated waste entering the country. but campaigners say more needs to be done to prevent burning from taking place. louie lee—ray, bbc news. in four weeks, 50,000 polling stations around the uk will be open for people to cast their vote to decide
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who will be our next prime minister. the december election date means festive plans for some venues have had to be put on hold, with pantomimes, school nativity plays and christmas events being rescheduled or cancelled. our reporterjon kay has been to meet some of those affected. # rockin‘ around the christmas tree at the christmas party hop... four weeks to go. this school in morcombe will be a polling station so their nativity has to be rearranged. for the 600 pupils, it will mean a day off. but for parents, it will mean extra child care. cheering. people have got bills to pay, rent to pay, mortgages to pay. if they‘re not pulling in the pennies, it has a massive impact on what food they can put on the table and nobody can afford to lose money, really, before christmas. so many times we've had to do it over the past, like, three or four years with all these different elections. there's a community church hall down there. why can't they use that
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for the elections? it‘s mad anywayjust generally at that time of year. for the head teacher, it means an extra sack full of stress. the children are off for a day, then they‘re back friday and then they‘ve only got another week before they‘re off and they are getting tired at that stage, it‘s an 8—week half term, this one, so we‘re trying to make it as general and as routine as possible. we head north from morecambe to ca rlisle. this is the hall where they always count the votes and declare the winner on election night. all shout: oh, no, it isn't! not this time. the venue‘s already booked. a pantomime replacing politics. so, this is the council chamber. the man in charge has had to move the count here. it will be the first time for a general election. in council officers against the uk, it‘s a race against time to organise a surprise christmas election. here, they‘ve cancelled staff holidays so they can book 75 polling
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stations, and new flood—proof ballot boxes — a reminder of what a winter vote might mean. we‘re used to tough winters in cumbria, so i think we‘ll be fine. how do you keep those polling stations operating if it‘s a cold, freezing day? for example, we‘re providing some grit at each of the polling stations just in case paths get icy and so on, we can take care of those. across the uk, there will be 50,000 polling stations next month, like this hall in the lancashire village of foulridge. the tables are all round here, are they? it‘s chockablock. trouble is janice had booked it for the pensioners‘ christmas lunch on the 12th of december. all the tickets printed and sold. so, when you heard that that thursday was election day and that this place was needed as a polling station... oh, i freaked out. it was terrible. because that is tradition for the village — every year we‘ve had it on the thursday two weeks before christmas. i even e—mailed the
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borough council to say, "can‘t you have it somewhere else?" i thought you were going to say you nearly e—mailed the prime minister! i wish i had‘ve done. but good news. it‘s the biggie. with the raffle prizes all wrapped, janice has managed to rebook lunch. please, it‘s wednesday the 11th, not thursday the 12th — wednesday the 11th. i‘ve told you now. that is the lunch that is the 11th, not the election. it is still on the 12th. in a moment victoria is going to bring us the latest business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. accident and emergency units in england record their worst performance since modern records began — putting health back to the top of the election agenda. former minister‘s son
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stephen waterson has beenjailed at the old bailey for seven years — after admitting to crushing his girlfriend‘s young son, with a car seat. warnings of further heavy downpours to compound the misery of flood victims in parts of england. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. fears rise for the uk economy — as retail sales unexpectedly fall. official figures show sales growth is at its weakest for 18 months. all categories fell, with the exception of food. hong kong protests dent overseas sales at burberry. the luxury goods group cuts the value of stores in the territory amid months—long disturbances women should have the right to know what their male colleagues are being paid if they suspect pay discrimination — that‘s according to the fawcett society. the gender equality charity is calling for a change in the law to try to cut down on instances
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of unequal pay. john lewis and partners latest ad hasjust dropped & its causing a stir. and not necessarily for all the reasons. have you seen it yet? this is edgar the dragon. what have you made of it? you like all the schmaltz, do you? he goes around setting fire to everything. it is a bit of an arsonist‘s thing. it stars edgar the dragon who gets a little too excited about christmas — and accidentally melts a snowman, an ice rink & sets fire to the village christmas tree. it comes to the village christmas tree anti he bunts it down accidentally. that is millions of
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pounds what is wasted, you have told everybody what is in it. that is your wrap—up, your summary. lots of people may be familiar with the story of frozen. is that princess else? she has these magical powers to control ice and snow. she accidentally when she is playing hearts her sister anna with her magical powers and she lives in fear of her powers are lets it be, let it free, whatever the song is. you told me not to sing. we need every member of the audience we can hold onto at the moment. the question is whether or not any of this is worth it. to be still tune into christmas ads? are we all over it or not? everybody has been on youtube to look at this thing already. yes, it is a thing. let‘s find out from somebody who
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knows. i had to watch it so i know what i am talking about. darren bailes, vccp executive creative director — was it money well spent? i think it was money really well spent. the market at christmas is massive. it is brilliant thatjohn lewis owned the space in a few years ago. everyone has come to the table, eve ryo ne everyone has come to the table, everyone wants to get involved with the big christmas band. we have all saved up our monies and pennies, we wa nt to saved up our monies and pennies, we want to buy gifts, food, and the john lewis adds to us a greatjob. the advertising agency, says 6.8 million pounds is going to be spent on christmas ads this year. i wonder are not to still engage with them in the same way. we are bombarded with adverts now. i think! the same way. we are bombarded with adverts now. i think i christmas the ads are different. they are not
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ramming products down our throat. they are trying to get into our hearts, love their brands. 6.8 million will be spent on those ads. £80 billion will be spent over the christmas period. it is obviously worthwhile forjohn lewis and marks and spencers and all of the brands. it is worthwhile putting on a great show at christmas. you still need to buy the turkey, you have to buy whatever it may be. you christmas pudding, do we really need an advert to decide whether or not we go to marks & spencer is our waitrose or ld or anything else for our christmas puddings, does really make a difference? of course it does. it makes a massive difference. we are ready to do our shopping and buy our guests and we are never quite sure as to where we go. it works. the advertisers, they get you in, they make you fell in love with them, to give you the creative vibe and great feeling. we act on it and spend,
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spend, spend at christmas. feeling. we act on it and spend, spend, spend at christmaslj feeling. we act on it and spend, spend, spend at christmas. i am not so convinced. darren, thank you very much. didn‘t get my heart, i have to say. out of stone. you are beyond saving. warming up for christmas. you were covering the launch of the national lottery. look at this. rory cellan—jones is in liverpool, home of that other lottery — littlewoods football pools. yes, we are at creswells just a mile from littlewoods headquarters. 10,000 retail outlets nationwide, which at seven o'clock this morning started selling national lottery tickets. so far they have sold around 650 and by 1030 this morning all around the country, 2 million tickets had been bought. so, is the national lottery going to change the way we gamble?
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seven o'clock this morning and as liverpool gets ready for work creswell's is preparing its lottery lunch. sheila creswell logs onto the central computer and is ready to serve her first customer. the pictures haven‘t improved with age. that, by the way... what was that programme? working lunch. it changed the face. that was adrian charles at that time. he had been my researcher one year earlier and the rest is history. shot to stardom. the programme change the way we talked about business. he was quite rude to senior executives. we did not know what had hit them. let's go off script. let‘s try and bring this back, shall we? we were chatting earlier, you had to buy a ticket, didn‘t you, for this piece? earlier, you had to buy a ticket, didn't you, for this piece? this was the very first day tickets went on
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sale. we were in liverpool. somebody in front of me but 80 tickets. did they win anything? i suspect not. i bought a ticket that day. i do not think i have bought a ticket ever since. i have not and you have not. i have bought a couple but i have never won more than a tenner. the lottery, since 94, has created 3000 millionaires who have made something like 2.8 million each. perhaps we should have bought a ticket at some point between now and 1994. this is the thing, isn‘t it, if you have bought a ticket every single week, you would have spent close to £2000 on tickets. and the odds are that you would have made a loss on that. if you had one, what would use spent it on? i would have turned up with a big bunch of roses. we are going to move on. eurostar, eitherthat
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big bunch of roses. we are going to move on. eurostar, either that story as well. was that the same day? —— you did the story again. it was the first passenger paying eurostar. there week earlier, i was doing a stu nt for there week earlier, i was doing a stunt for the same programme and they had agejourney stunt for the same programme and they had age journey for journalists. i went on the train and a colleague went to paris by plane. my a colleague went to paris by plane. my colleague one. we are crammed on this train from flowing, and it wouldn‘t start. i don‘t think they start them like that, rory. they did back then, simon. the train was an hour late leaving. i was supposed to be reporting live from the other end but i had to report live from the train. halfway down the track, i needed to live into the programme and we didn‘t have mobile phones, they had call box on the train and
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they had call box on the train and they gave us all cards and we were sticking cards in this call box so we could call the bbc and go live on here from the train saying, i‘m sorry, i have lost this race. did you make it? we got there in the end. did you make your broadcast?” got on here saying, i lost. the champion really did begin to flow on the way back. we can imagine a train full of journalists on the way back. we can imagine a train full ofjournalists on their way back from paris on the eurostar. much merriment was had. how times have changed. this has been an unusual business lot. there was a drinks trolley, apparently. in the bus‘s office, a drinks trolley arrived. i don‘t remember that happening on your show. we don't invite you, that is all. thank you very much. good to reminisce with you. we were at school. you probably
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weren‘t even born. —— you are at school. let‘s have a quick look at the markets before we go. the big stories here, the fit see pretty much flat at the moment. the german economy, people have been quite concerned about, the big powerhouse of europe, it has avoided a technical concession. they grew a fraction. pretty flat as well for the decks. that is the view in europe. i will have more in about an hour. good to see you. do you do this every day? your health has been in the news of late. i'm 0k. this every day? your health has been in the news of late. i'm ok. i was diagnosed with parkinson‘s at the beginning of this year. i'm coping pretty well, actually. it was really
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good to talk to you and to reminisce. you look a lot better now. he has hardly changed. that is the most amazing thing. your delivery, the rest of it, it is all the same. i hope in 25 years, it would be the same. more from victoria later on. now for the weather with nick miller. more rain where it is not needed. snow on the hills, south—west england, south wales. it is the rain that is causing more concern. south west england, through the midlands to lincolnshire and parts of yorkshire. especially south and east yorkshire. it is in no hurry to move away. either side of that, brighter skies. the odd shower. wintry showers in northern scotla nd shower. wintry showers in northern scotland on a strong, cold, northerly wind. let‘s focus in on
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this rain going into this evening. some snow to the higher parts of the peak district. the rain, another 30 to 40 millimetres in areas already suffering serious flooding. problems will not be helped by that. it is eventually overnight shift away further north towards north—east england, french eastern in scotland tomorrow morning. a lot of cloud overnight. not too much frost. wintry showers in scotland. some outbreaks of rain to start tomorrow. it will tend to fizzle. actually, quite a bit of dry and sunny weather. it looks like an area of rain will develop and become heavy towards east anglia and the south of england. another day with a chilly breeze. no great change in the figures into the weekend. low pressure in charge. a lot of cloud our way. some occasional rain. it does not look like the rain totals
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would be too huge. we will monitor that. in a lot of cloud through eastern scotland, england and wales on saturday. rain and drizzle. better elsewhere in scotland and ireland. looking into part two of the weekend. the chance of rain could be more widespread then. something to watch. snow for the higher ground. still a very chilly field to the weather for the time of year. that is the forecast. right now, the concern of how much rain is falling where it is not needed. the risk of further flooding, the met office weather warnings and the flood warnings can be found online. goodbye.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m simon mccoy. today at 4. as nominations close for the candidates for the general election — health is back top of the agenda, as accident and emergency units in england record their worst performance since modern records began former minister‘s son stephen waterson has beenjailed at the old bailey for seven years after admitting to crushing his girlfriend‘s young son, with a car seat. with more yellow warnings for rain over areas stricken by heavy floods, the government‘s emergency committee is to meet shortly to discuss a response. police! police officers! raids across london to rescue women thought to have been trafficked from romania. coming up on afternoon live all the sport.
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a huge night for england, the match against montenegro at wembley this evening will be their 1000th international fixture. no raheem sterling remember. but they only a point to qualify. talk more about that in half an hour but let's catch up with the weather hmmfi but let's catch up with the weather forecast with nick in the meantime. more rainfall injust forecast with nick in the meantime. more rainfall in just where forecast with nick in the meantime. more rainfall injust where it forecast with nick in the meantime. more rainfall in just where it is not needed. how much and for how long, we will ta ke how much and for how long, we will take a look at the forecast, plus a look at what we can expect at the weekend. that‘s all coming up. thanks very much. also coming up — we‘ll be speaking tojetman himself — british inventor, richard browning, has broken his own record for fastest flight in a jet suit. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy.
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accident and emergency units in england have recorded their worst performance since current records began, in 2004. one senior doctor has warned emergency care is ‘imploding‘. the government‘s target is for 95% of a&e patients to be treated or assessed within a maximum of four hours. but today‘s figures show that was only achieved with 83.6% of patients. they also show a raft of other targets are being missed in england — including for cancer operations and also routine surgery. in response, the government says ‘huge demand‘ for hospital services is to blame. here‘s our health correspondent dominic hughes. it‘s hard to believe that, two years ago, frances reid was effectively crippled by arthritis. her constant pain was ended by a hip replacement operation. nhs targets mean frances should have only waited 18 weeks for surgery. instead, her operation was delayed by six months. that really impacted on my health, my general health, my mobility. i was in an awful lot of pain.
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i could barely get about. and it also impacted on my recovery time afterwards because i was so unfit, actually, by the time i had my surgery. the delay to frances‘ operation is a sign of a system under growing stress. figures released today show none of the three key hospital targets in england have been met for over three years. waiting times for a&e are the worst ever recorded. it‘s been more than four years since the four—hour target was hit. the 18—week target for planned operations, like the one frances had, was last met more than three years ago. and just over three quarters of cancer patients started treatment in 62 days in october. the 85% target hasn‘t been met in nearly four years. the numbers in a&e relate to october. for the last two years, performance actually got better in october. autumn isn't necessarily a bad time for the nhs, it's usually 0k in a&e. the real difficulties come in december, january and february,
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so i'm afraid we are probably going to see these numbers get worse before they get better. health is an area of policy that‘s devolved and, while these figures only apply to england, similar pressures are seen across the uk. but the data comes in the middle of an election campaign in which funding for the nhs has featured strongly. it is disgraceful and it is a problem of the lack of staff and the lack of funding for it. so a labour government will increase nhs funding by 2023—2024 by 26 billion a year. this is basically caused by the huge demand that there is on the nhs and that's why now in the last three months we have done the biggest investment in the nhs in modern times. frances‘ operation gave her a new lease of life. nhs england is considering changing waiting time targets, arguing they‘re outdated. but health charities believe they‘re still important for patients. behind each of these
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numbers is an individual living with chronic pain. ajoint replacement operation can take that pain away. delay to that operation can have a devastating impact on the physical and mental health of people with arthritis. nhs england says today‘s figures reflect the increased number of older and sicker patients who are being seen. but there‘s a warning from a group that represents doctors that the hospitals they work in are imploding and the real pressures of winter have yet to be felt. dominic hughes, bbc news. the liberal democrats‘ chuka umunna joins me now. good afternoon. good afternoon, good to be with you. what would the liberal democrats do about this? these figures are a damning indictment of the conservatives‘ handling and operational care of our health and social care services here. there are a number of issues. the first is, you cannot escape from the impact of brexit and it is
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noticeable that both borisjohnson and jeremy corbyn don‘t mention brexit in the context of the health service in those clips in the package. but for example, 10% of our doctors are eu citizens and 7% of our nurses are eu citizens and we have 100,000 vacancies currently in the nhs. by keeping us in the european union, we want to stop brexit and ensure the uk remains in the european union. that will help with recruitment because at the moment eu citizens on whom we rely are being put off coming and serving in our nhs. but there are other issues... i need to point this out because the conservatives say they will be 6000 more gps in england by 2024, 6000 more nurses. labouralso promising more staff as well. not everybody is going to have to come from the eu. i'm not saying that but obviously the free movement we have with the eu has been very important in getting eu citizens in to fill the roles we already have. and given the roles we already have. and given the number of vacancies, now is not
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a time to be ending free movement with the eu when we are so reliant, 10% of our doctors and 7% of our nurses are eu citizens. there are other issues here as well. of course, funding is one and we are of the view that we‘ve got to stop, the political system has got to stop lying to your viewers and pretending we can have scandinavian style public services on american levels of taxation. we need to put more money into the nhs and that‘s why we are committed to putting a penny on the pound on income tax and hype of the pound on income tax and hype of the casing and using that specifically for the health service and over the next ten years that would see around £35 billion extra going into our nhs. we have also got to make sure, given one in four people in this country, has a mental health issue, that we ensure parity of treatment of mental health challenges with physical health challenges. we want to make sure that the health system provides the treatment that you need if you have a mental health problem with the
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same urgency if it was a physical health problem. finally, we have to make sure there is a proper integration of social, physical and mental health services beyond funding and that has been a big challenge. there are good recommendations from the nhs itself which we would seek to implement through an nhs bill to help make sure the different parts of the puzzle work together around a person to provide the services they need. the difficulty anybody watching you here is possibly contemplating is there you are promising more than 30 billion, the tories promising 20 billion, the tories promising 20 billion by 2023 and labour 26 billion by 2023 and labour 26 billion by 2023 and labour 26 billion by 2023. you are saying 1p on income tax will do it. will it? it will. it won‘t provide us with all the money we need. so, no, it won‘t, then? all the money we need. so, no, it won't, then? will it solve every problem in the health service simply injecting money into it? no. if anybody tells you that they are lying. you just did, you said 1p
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would do exactly that. no, i didn't. isaid a would do exactly that. no, i didn't. i said a penny on the pound would enable us to put more funding into the nhs. but ijust explained there are other problems too, integration, ensuring parity of treatment of mental health problems and physical health problems and also ensuring we don‘t ask the nhs to go through a whole top—down reorganisation again. i don‘t think at any point in this interview i have suggested money will make all the difference but with the liberal democrats we are telling you where the money will come from and we are being open with you, which is that if we want to put more money into our nhs we will all have to pay a bit more to ensure that it has the funding it needs to provide those really important services that we treasure and we shouldn‘t take for granted. services that we treasure and we shouldn't take for granted. and are you perhaps underestimating, as others may have done already, that the pressure on the nhs that the conservatives are saying, they are saying there is too much pressure on the system? i don't think so. there
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are two challenges here. first of all, how do we ensure that the nhs has the resources it needs to be able to carry out the functions it already does at the moment and then secondly there is an issue of how are we going to ensure it can keep pace with rising demand? that isn‘t just an issue of putting money into the system so that it can treat problems once they arise. we have got to make sure that we have more integrated services and that there is more prevention. i keep talking, and may be i‘m using too much speak, but when i talk about innovation, let‘s ta ke but when i talk about innovation, let‘s take social care. one of the things putting so much pressure on the nhs at the moment as we are living longer and older people are tending to go to hospital more often when actually we should be providing them with treatment and care out—of—hospital which is far better, less costly and gives them a much better personalised standard of care. the problem is often when older people are going through nhs hospital, once they get in, it is very ha rd hospital, once they get in, it is very hard for them to come out
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because it‘s an environment which isn‘t necessarily the best environment for them. anybody watching this who has an elderly relative in their family will know exactly what i‘m talking about. so it isn‘t just an exactly what i‘m talking about. so it isn‘tjust an issue of money. people can play the game of spraying money around here. first of all they have got to make sure they identify whether money is coming from, liberal democrats have done that and the conservatives and labour party haven‘t done that. we have also got to be clear that money will not be the only way that we address the health care challenges that we have here. chuka umunna, good of you to join us. thank you for your time this afternoon. thank you. you‘re watching afternoon live. former—minister‘s son stephen waterson, who admitted crushing his girlfriend‘s young son with a car seat, has beenjailed at the old bailey for seven years and six months. our correspondent richard lister is at the old bailey. richard. it was february last year when alfie lam, just three and a half years old, was pulled and responsive from the rear foot well of stephen waterson‘s convertible
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audi. stephen waterson was sitting in the front seat and it emerged that he had pushed his seat back crushing the little boy who eventually died a few days later of crush asphyxia. initially, stephen waterson panicked, he knew he was in trouble and rang for an eminence but pretended on the call to be a passer—by saying he didn‘t know exactly where he was and he couldn‘t recall what phone number he was using and he wasn‘t involved. he also pressurised, the court heard, the three other adults in the car to make upa the three other adults in the car to make up a story about what happened to alfie, to lie about stephen waters and‘s involvement. eventually, though, alfie‘s mum, who we re eventually, though, alfie‘s mum, who were sitting in the rear seat with alfie between her feet, were sitting in the rear seat with alfie between herfeet, confess were sitting in the rear seat with alfie between her feet, confess to what happened to police and there was a trial that followed here at the old bailey. during the trial, more details emerged about what had happened, when these four adults and two children had got into this overcrowded car that adrian had asked stephen watson to push his seat forward and he said to her he
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wasn‘t being told what to do by a three—year—old and pushed his seat back not once but twice causing those injuries which eventually killed him. in the initial trial, adrian was found guilty of child cruelty but the jury was unable to agree on the verdict of the manslaughter charge against stephen waterson. so he was facing a retrial. on the eve of the retrial he finally admitted to manslaughter of alfie lamb and was sentenced today altogether for that manslaughter getting a five year six month sentence for that and also sentenced for perverting the course of justice and sentenced for perverting the course ofjustice and the intimidation of a witness, the car‘s driver, marcus lam, who he beat up, and the court was shown footage of that happening. in total he will face, because some sentences were running concurrently, seven and a half years, and in sentencing thejudge seven and a half years, and in sentencing the judge said he accepted that stephen waterson was now genuinely remorseful but he said that remorse had come late and followed his denial of any
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responsibility initially from alfie‘s death. responsibility initially from alfie's death. richard lister at the old bailey, thank you. we have some breaking news from the metropolitan police counter terrorism command who have said they have just arrested a man on suspicion of terrorism offences at heathrow airport, 26—year—old man was arrested after arriving at the airport on an inbound flight the uk from turkey. he was arrested on suspicion of preparation of terrorist acts under section five of the terrorism act 2006. he has been detained and currently remains in police custody. the arrest according to police is syria —related. officers from the met‘s terrorism command arresting a man on suspicion of terrorism offences at heathrow. we will bring you more on that as we get it. the conservatives have promised to cut immigration if they return to power but have stopped short of setting targets. the home secretary priti patel says they will reduce "immigration overall" through a points—based system.
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labour has yet to announce its policy on freedom of movement but say it will be a fair process. it all comes as nominations for candidates to stand in the general election have just closed. our political correspondent jonathan blake reports. you have almost cracked it. that is unbelievable! if only cutting immigration was as easy as that. the prime minister visited a school in somerset this morning as his party‘s commitment to reduce the numbers coming to live and work in the uk became the focus of the election campaign. applause beyond the promise to bring down net migration but little if any detail beyond the promise to bring down net migration there‘s little if any detail by how much and when. we will have an australian style points based system that will allow us to control who comes in and make sure we do not have so many people coming in without skills orjobs to come to, that we therefore protect wages, we increase wages, and we also make sure,
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this is a crucial point, that companies in this country, business in this country, invest in the skills of young people growing up in this country. the tories first promised to cut net migration to below 100,000 in the 2010 election then again in 2015 and again in 2017 but they never achieved that aim so don‘t expect them to set a similar target now. reducing immigration means reversing a trend. the most recent figures show net migration from eu countries was 59,000 but from the rest of the world it was 219,000. ending freedom of movement from the eu, which the conservatives have promised to do, won‘t do anything to curb the numbers coming to the uk from elsewhere so the questions for the tories are how they plan to meet their pledge and when. for labour, the issue is settling a debate within the party about where it should stand on immigration.
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jeremy corbyn was heckled on scottish independence in dundee this morning, but on immigration no word yet on how he will balance differences over a commitment to ending free movement versus taking a more relaxed approach. if we are remaining members of the eu, which will be an option in the referendum that we will put, then freedom of movement continues. if we come to a special arrangement with the eu, there will be a recognition of the needs of european families to have the right to family reunion, the right to reside in this country, and of course british people to work in different european countries. other parties reject the need for tighter controls on immigration. and to those considering whether to vote conservative again, the question has to be this, is this the kind of country you want to live in? do you want to endorse this kind of politics? we would like to encourage people to come here,
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we would like to encourage eu nationals to come here and we‘d like for freedom of movement to continue. we have the social and cultural benefits. we have the social and cultural benefits. just as they did in the brexit referendum campaign, arguments about immigration policy may play a crucial role in the run—up to this election. jonathan blake, bbc news. just a reminder that throughout the election campaign we‘ll be putting your questions to all of the main parties. at 5:30pm, we‘ll be joined by the leader of plaid cyrmu, adam price. so if you have anything you want to ask, please do get in touch, using the contact details on screen, and we‘ll put those questions to him. do remember to leave your name and where you‘re from. the government‘s emergency committee cobra is meeting shortly to discuss the response to the severe flooding affecting northern england and the midlands. more rain has been falling on areas already hit by rising waters. troops are helping deploy over 20,000 sandbags to protect properties at risk near the river don in south yorkshire. forecasters are warning of further downfalls for the next few hours around the village of fishlake near doncaster where hundreds of people have had to abandon their homes and businesses. our correspondent frankie mccamley
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reports from fishlake. the small village of fishlake, cut off by flood water earlier this week, now getting the help residents have been asking for. the army have been putting sandbags down and building flood defences since yesterday, but some residents say help has not come quick enough. we need the investment now into here, we desperately need it. once all the rainwater‘s gone, we can‘t ever allow this to happen again. the environment agency have got to sit up, listen to what the people... the farmers around this area have been saying for a long time, listen to what they‘re saying. parts of south yorkshire and lincolnshire have been badly hit by heavy rain, with around 500 homes flooded in doncaster and 1,200 evacuated. in the last 24 hours, the water has gone down substantially.
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yesterday, this spot was covered in two to three inches of water and you couldn‘t see this road behind me. but there is still much more to be done. residents still cannot get into their homes and there are still some roads completely submerged in water. and it‘s not over yet. there is more rain to come this afternoon and overnight. it's been a very wet autumn so far. some of the flooded regions have had twice the expected amount of rainfall. there is more of it to come today, about an inch worth, not enough to cause further river flooding, but it is topping up the water that's already lying on the ground. there are more than 40 flood warnings in place across the country, meaning flooding is expected. more than a dozen of those are along parts of the river don, where fishlake sits. the environment agency says it‘s pulling resources from across the country but wants people in affected areas to stay vigilant. the rain on its way is not expected to cause further flooding here,
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we need people to take note of their flood risk and start planning for when the worst happens because starting to move possessions u psta i rs starting to move possessions upstairs in the dead of night in the middle of winter is not the best time to think about it. start early and you will be better prepared if the worst happens. the rain on its way is not expected to cause further flooding here, but for some their homes and businesses have already been destroyed. it will be weeks if not months before this village can return to some sort of normality. frankie mccamley, bbc news, fishlake. the scottish health secretary has said she knew that a child had died after contracting an infection from contaminated water in a hospital in glasgow but decided not to go public because of patient confidentiality. bbc scotland has seen documents which indicate that the child died in a cancer ward at the royal hospital for children in 2017. let‘s get more on this. we can speak to our scotland correspondent steven godden in glasgow.
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we have known there were problems in these cancer wards in the hospital in the past but this puts a more serious complexion on those problems. back in 2018, patients we re problems. back in 2018, patients were moved out over infection first linked to the water supply in the woods and later it was confirmed there were more than 20 cases, investigators finding what they described as widespread contamination linked to that water supply. these allegations relate to 2017. doctors went back further, they looked and discovered that there were more cases, many more cases, again, more than 20, and crucially the case of one young cancer patient who died after contracting an infection that was linked to the water supply. now, the allegations came via a whistle—blower and were voiced by labour msp anas sarwar today in the chamber at holyrood in which he said the family had not been told about this. that is something nhs glasgow would not address directly. there is
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a wider context to this, which is there is already an investigation going on into three other deaths at the wider hospital can post there, two patients died after contracting an infection linked to pigeon droppings and related death where a patient contracted a fungal infection. the reasons for those deaths are part of the reason that jean freeman, scotland‘s health secretary, has launched a public and quarry into the hospital. she said today that she confirmed that she knew there had been a fourth death ofa knew there had been a fourth death of a child who had died in 2017 after contracting an infection. but she said she hadn‘t spoken about it publicly due to patient confidentiality. she said crucially, though, she had taken action. nhs glasgow, they say that they put in place extensive measures to ensure that the water supply was safe, that it is safe to use and that is the message they are putting out to patients today. steven godden, thank you very much. you‘re watching
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afternoon live from bbc news. now, just take a look at this. british inventor richard browning has more than doubled his own jet suit world speed record with a blistering 85mph flyby at brighton pier this morning. dubbed iron man, he more than doubled his previous record of 32mph set in 2017 for the fastest speed in a body—controlled, jet engine—powered suit. in challenging weather conditions, and with sparks flying out of his futuristic suit, he flew along the length of the pier. let‘s speak now to the jet suit world speed record—holder, richard browning. you‘re mad! you're mad! it might look like that
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but it was a super fun. this is the culmination of at least two and a half years of development. we have taken this all over the world, we have done over 90 events in over 30 countries with this. it is still relatively unknown but we are fairly good at progressing this technology now. we are going to show these pictures again. describe what it feels like. you have five jets on your back is that right? turn on each arm and one on the back, the one done like the ones on the arm feel like they are way ahead would be, they act as three forms of propulsion, three vectors of thrust, and you can manipulate them so intuitively, we can train people and we have trained clients and our own tea m ofte n we have trained clients and our own team often within one day on a tether to fly. maybe not at 85 mph and with the wing and everything but to manoeuvre those jet engines you can achieve remarkable stability and control. it is essentially a little bit like a
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control. it is essentially a little bit likea human control. it is essentially a little bit like a human harrier aircraft for those that remember the harrier aircraft that propelled downwards to propel it upwards and sideways to propel it upwards and sideways to propel it upwards and sideways to propel it sideways. it is the landing, it looks remarkably cool, farfrom mad. what is going through your head as you are doing this?” get asked that quite a bit. i‘m not a racing driver but i think there might bea a racing driver but i think there might be a parallel there where you arejust very might be a parallel there where you are just very focused on managing a number of variables. we didn‘t know what the weather would be like, the first few runs i didn‘t exactly know where the boat would be and what it would be like to land on it. there is just would be like to land on it. there isjust a would be like to land on it. there is just a number of things you have to deal with. on top of that, trying to deal with. on top of that, trying to explore and experiment at the edge of the control envelope ever—increasing speed. it is quite unusual feeling going from just hovering around, we can fly 30, 40, 50 mph like that, but to flatten out and fly with a degree of aerodynamic lift is a whole new realm so venturing into that is such a privilege, it is like a tiny little wright brothers moment every time we go and do it and it is exhilarating.
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i‘m sure it is and that‘s when it is a success. i‘m guessing along the way they have been the odd problems. have you got wet a lot of times? you know the last time was about 40 at our isa know the last time was about 40 at our is a go, we were experimenting with another version of that suit that you see there. and i got it slightly wrong and this is why we go over water and not too high because when you get it wrong it‘s like falling of a jet ski at speed, it is no fun and pretty cold at this time of year. it is a fairly benign environment to do all that learning from failure, which we are very good at. just explain, before you take off what preparations... do you get a match out? how does it all start? they are little jet engines, very similarto they are little jet engines, very similar to the kind ofjet engine you have on a civil airliner or a jet fighter, just very small, to put out a huge amount of thrust. you rely on a computer—controlled start to get them up to an idle level. you just squeeze a trigger, the power comes in and it feels like a spongy push on your arms and your back. you flare it out to the sides, feel the power come in and point it
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downwards, simple as that, and you start rising up. and after that, the amazing part of the human brain that does so well when you walk, snowboard or ride a bike, that part kicks in and it‘sjust snowboard or ride a bike, that part kicks in and it‘s just kind snowboard or ride a bike, that part kicks in and it‘sjust kind of effortless and intuitive. you just think where you want to go and direct your thrust in the opposite direction. it is one of those weird things that it takes the experience of being on the tether and learning it to really appreciate how effortless and intuitive it is. is this how we are all going to be travelling in a few years? is this how i‘m going to get to work? i‘ll admit it is noisy and it does use a lot of fuel, you can use biodiesel and we have built another version but it is quite challenging.” and we have built another version but it is quite challenging. i think of it as a formula 1 car or a fashion show. both examples are not very practical but they shine a light on what might become practical in the near future and hopefully inspire people to go down that journey of rethinking how humans move around. but in the meantime we are focused on building our international race series, guys and girls will be raising these over water and hopefully continuing to
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inspire people. we have the 94 events in 30 different countries. all of that equipment packs into two chicken suitcases in an aeroplane so we have been lucky to share this and show this to people all over the world. i take it back, you are not mad at all, congratulations, richard browning. from the united states, these live pictures of a reported shooting at a school near los angeles. the latest reports suggest seven people have been injured. this is in santa clarita near los angeles where multiple people are reported to have been injured according to the los angeles police department. deputies are reportedly swarming the scene at are reportedly swarming the scene at a high school 35 miles north of downtown la with the los angeles cou nty downtown la with the los angeles county sheriffs department saying stu d e nts county sheriffs department saying students are being led, as you can see here, in single file through the campus by armed officers. in many
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ambulances on their way to the scene. this is the initial information. but as with many stories in this part of the world, news helicopters very quick to the scene. this shooting reported just a short time ago at this high school in california with, as i said my latest reports suggesting at least seven people injured. no word on the perpetrator at this stage. but single file, the youngsters being led away by armed officers. we are getting information on this all the time. this is at a school 35 miles outside downtown la. suspect described as a male asian in black clothing is still at large, that is the news coming from the santa clarita valley sheriff, speaking on
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twitter, saugus high school and all schools in the district have been placed on lockdown while authorities flood the area, one local nbc station reporting there were several casualties. we are hearing that at least seven have been injured in a school shooting, at this school, near los angeles. this, as i say, in sa nta near los angeles. this, as i say, in santa clarita, this is the saugus high school. 35 miles north of downtown los angeles. as we have just been seen, students lead single file through the campus by armed officers to take them away from the shooting scene. so, that‘s the latest, just before midday in los angeles. we will get more on this from colleagues in the united states and we will bring you any more information as we get it. santa clarita, california, that part is in lockdown, after a shooting a suspect
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described as a male asian still at large, a male asian in the black clothing. that is the very latest we have on that, manhunt under way, after shots we re that, manhunt under way, after shots were fired and students injured at that high school, in santa clarita, in los angeles. as soon as we get any more on that, we will bring it to you. now it‘s time for a look
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at the weather with nick miller. hello. rain continues to fall from south—west england south east wales, through the midlands, into parts of yorkshire, including south and east yorkshire. across some areas here that really don‘t want any more rainfall. several hours more rain to come as we go through the rest of the afternoon. ending to this evening. either side of that, a few showers, wintry in northern scotland over relatively modest heels and a strong northerly wind. eventually into tonight, this area of rainfall pushes north away from flooded areas. it starts to break up, but still some outbreaks of rain into tomorrow. eastern scotland, north—east of england and through parts of wales and the far south—west of england. it will be a frosty start for some in the morning, especially in parts of scotland and parts of northern ireland. it could be icy on untreated surfaces as well as seeing some showers. this area of rain starts to fade into a few showers during the day. it could well be turning wetter later in the day in parts of east anglia and the south—east of england
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and it‘s going to be another cold day. this is bbc news, our latest headlines. nominations have closed for the candidates for the general election and health is back top of the agenda, as accident and emergency units in england record their worst performance since modern records began. former minister‘s son stephen waterson has beenjailed at the old bailey for seven—and—a—half years after admitting to crushing his girlfriend‘s young son, with a car seat. with more yellow warnings for rain over areas stricken by heavy floods, the government‘s emergency commitee is to meet shortly to discuss a response. police to discuss a response. officer! raid! raid! raids across london to rescue women to discuss a response. thought to have been trafficked from romania. british inventor "jetman" has broken his own record for fastest speed in a jet—engine powered suit. richard browning more
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than doubled his previous record from 2017 by going 85 miles per hour. sport now on afternoon live with connie mclaughlin. a big kick off for england, it is game number 1000. a big kick off for england, it is game number1000. trying a big kick off for england, it is game number 1000. trying to qualify for the european championships, raheem sterling is not playing, after disciplinary issues, all the focus against montenegro tonight is now on the fact that it is the 1000th international match for england. our reporter rhia choahan is at wembley stadium for us. what‘s happening tonight to mark the occasion? it will be a ceremonious affair, commemorative match programmes and the england players have all been assigned with legacy numbers. looking carefully you will be able to see those numbers on their shirts, and there will be a few familiar faces in attendance as well. former world cup players have
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been asked to attend, former england captains have been asked to attend, as well as england's most capped players. viv anderson is also expected to be there, the first black player to represent england at senior level. england on the verge of qualification, what they need to do this evening? england are currently top of their group, in these qualifiers, they need only one point to qualify, if things do not go to plan tonight, they will also have another chance on sunday, when they travel to kosovo, squad and fans are going to want to do it tonight, it is there 1000th the game, and gareth southgate is not going to want to have this hanging over his head when the squad to travel to kosovo. var is "alive and kicking",
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that‘s the verdict of the west ham co—chairman david gold after a premier league meeting to discuss the technology. the referee‘s chief mike riley gave a full appraisal of the video assistant referee in what‘s been described as a "fractious" meeting with clubs this afternoon. they agreed there would be no big changes this season to protect the integrity of the competition, but the premier league wants to improve consistency, speed of decision of making and communication with fans. thierry henry is heading back to major league soccer, this time as a coach. he‘s been appointed as the new boss of montreal impact. the former arsenal striker has signed a two—year contract with the option of a further season. his appointment follows an unsuccessful stint in charge of monaco, which ended in january. before that he was assistant to roberto martinez with the belgian national side. henry finished his playing career in the mls, scoring 51 goals for the new york red bulls. matteo berrettini has become
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the first italian to win a match at the season—ending atp finals. he‘d already been knocked out of the tournament, but put that disappointment behind him to beat dominic team in straight sets at the o2 arena in london. thiem is already in the semi—finals and will play either novak djokovic or roger federer who go head to head tonight. to golf, and catriona matthew has been given the chance to retain the solheim cup after being chosen to captain europe for the second time in succession. the 50—year—old scot led her team to victory over the united states on home soil at gleneagles in september. she will be captain again at inverness golf club in ohio, in 2021. and there was a very unusual hazard for britain‘s tommy fleetwood to deal with at the nedbank golf challenge in south africa. what looked like a pretty decent shot into the green at sun city, was interfered with by a couple of mongeese. fleetwood himself said he was unsure of the rules when a mongoose attacks
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a golf ball... me, too! that‘s all the sport for now. now on afternoon live, let‘s go nationwide, and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. caroline davies is in london for us and will tell us more about today‘s early morning raids across east london which were carried out as part of an international human trafficking investigation. and amy garcia is live in bentley near doncaster in south yorkshire for us this afternoon and will give us the latest on the severe flooding that has affected the area. back with amy in just a moment but first, tell us more about these raids. they took place in the early hours of the morning before dawn, police targeting 16 properties, some of which they believe were operating
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as brothels, and they found 29 women they suspect had been trafficked from romania to london. they have taken those women, offered them accommodation and help. the suspects, 17 of them, 14 men and three women, in custody in central london, they are aged between 17 and 50. held on suspicion of modern slavery, controlling prostitution, class a drug offences and firearms offences as well. police who were there and operating the raid, they say these raids are important in trying to tackle human trafficking: this is absolutely of paramount importance, we are seeking to get to the people that were involved in the coordination, the organisation, the uppertierof coordination, the organisation, the upper tier of criminality, involved in this crime type. because this is the way in which you will dismantle this type of offending. how big is this type of offending. how big is this issue of human trafficking across the uk? according to
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government figures, 6993 potential victims of human trafficking registered last year, that is children and adults as well. one third of those were in london. i have been speaking to the human trafficking foundation and they say because the individual has to be wa nt to because the individual has to be want to be registered as a victim of human trafficking, in reality, those numbers are much higher than is suggested. many of those counted in that nearly 7000 are from the uk, that nearly 7000 are from the uk, thatis that nearly 7000 are from the uk, that is because incidents of county lines are presented as human trafficking victims as well. romania, that is fifth down in terms of the countries where these individuals who are suspected to be victims come from. the key question is, whether these raids are going to be stopping human trafficking, many of those people who have been offered help in the past do not accept it, and that is because they could be worried about repercussions
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on them, family back home, may be because they do not feel they can trust authorities, at that stage and what they have been through, they may feel they cannot trust anyone any much at all. it is a much bigger protest to rehabilitate these women and men and bring them back in, rebuild their lives afterwards. for women they are victims of domestic servitude and sexual exploitation, for men it is physical labour they may have been trafficked for. the foundation also say, actually, sometimes they bleed in between each other, not quite as clear—cut one way or another. the other thing interesting about these raids, they we re interesting about these raids, they were done with the metropolitan police and the romanian police as well, and in fact, police and the romanian police as well, and infact, in police and the romanian police as well, and in fact, in romania, four other properties were targeted at the same time, the idea is to share intelligence, to get an understanding of these networks, to stop human trafficking no matter what country it is happening in. more tonight on bbc london, amy, one
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week on, much of the flood water is gone, but it looks grim and the forecast is not much better, either. yes, it‘s really terrible, people here are preparing for the worst, hoping for the best. this is the village of bentley, doncaster, one of the village really badly hit by the floods, and one week on, floodwater pretty much gone, let me show you the pumps behind me. still pumping water, the army have been in here, 100 army personnel brought into south yorkshire yesterday, bringing sandbags and knocking on doors, reassuring, making sure they are all right, and with rainfall coming, people are extremely concerned, they don‘t want a repeat of what happened last week. to put it into perspective, last week, a months worth of rainfall in 24 hours that led to the river don bursting its banks. this is a pop—up canteen, serving teas and coffees, food for volu nteers serving teas and coffees, food for volunteers of the emergency services, but also emergency food
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supplies for people in their homes, may be unable to use any of the cooking facilities, maybe they don‘t have electricity in their homes yet. let me take you on here, this is usually a windows and doors company, it has been turned into a community centre, to help with the relief effort, they have had donations of cleaning products, there is shovel is, all the things you could possibly want to try to sort out, homes that have been really badly hit. hello, you are the owner here, you have very kindly donated the building to help with the relief effort, what has the last week been like? horrendous, i came down here on friday, water gushing down the street, absolute bedlam. people running around, worked through, 60, 70—year—old people dragging wheelie bins, just trying to get their front doors shored up. we checked the building to make sure people are ok, we are a metre higher than the ground level, so we started letting people come in here to get warm and
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ta ke people come in here to get warm and take off their shoes, get tea and coffee, and it has escalated from there. such a horrendous thing that has happened to these people but what a community spirit. it has been unbelievable, from the second we opened the doors, everyone came in, it started with a bit of anger, people shouting and angry, what is the water coming people shouting and angry, what is the watercoming in? people shouting and angry, what is the water coming in? we calmed them down, people realise what we need to do: get this sorted, get the sandbags out there, work together as a community. from then on, unbelievable, huge companies, small businesses, all pulling together, donating things from food to cleaning products. if you look around, vans have been pulling up every ten minutes outside, off—loading whatever we need, and anything we put out there on social media is being brought to us, it is fantastic. this is not the first time you have been hit by floods, bentley, 2007, homes were destroyed ina bentley, 2007, homes were destroyed in a flood. really difficult for this community. and those wounds are still there, i live close by, just
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over the road, and still there, i live close by, just overthe road, and i still there, i live close by, just over the road, and i watched the floods, i have gone to a lot of the houses on the street and met with people who were hit. £250 insurance when the floods hit, they went to reassure and they were told it was £1200, £1000, they could not full to again. you can see, they do not have that kind of disposable income in these villages. these people are wounded from when it happened last time, for that to happen again, it is horrendous. i have gone in those houses, there is a stench that is awful, pulling up floorboards and still three, four inches of water underneath the floorboards of sewerage. it's terrible. keep up the good work. the worry in bentley and other areas is a risk of flooding again. there are 19 flood warnings in south yorkshire, not severe, not what we saw last week but to put it into perspective for you, look north have
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learned that in the six and a half weeks leading up to last week‘s floods, there were six months of rainfall, huge amount of rainfall, and that led to the river don breaching its banks. people here are preparing for the worst but hoping and praying for the best.” preparing for the worst but hoping and praying for the best. i know you are presenting from there, 6:30pm, look north, thank you very much. if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can access them through the bbc iplayer, a reminder, we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm, afternoon live. more than a breaking story, authorities in california responding to an active shooter situation, a high school in santa clarita, a city 35 miles north of downtown los
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angeles. shooting reported at the high school, this is the saugus high school. 35 miles north of downtown los angeles, this is the scene live, as armed officers are reported to be storming the area. looking for a man described as asian, dressed in dark clothing.
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we are hearing that amongst the victims, at least one gunshot victim, according to the sheriffs department. the suspect is believed to be part of the student body, cannot confirm that, i am hearing that from the abc network. earlier, we saw students led single file through the campus by armed officers, many ambulances on scene as well, worried parents jamming the street. local community centre has been opened as a meeting point for pa rents, been opened as a meeting point for parents, who, obviously, are heading to the scene as they hear reports of the shooting. sheriffs official urging people who live in the area to lock doors and stay inside, with other nearby schools placed on lockdown, according to officials. this story very much ongoing, with
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just being near lunchtime, in los angeles. with that latest casualty figure, five victims being treated, and as! figure, five victims being treated, and as i am reading from the abc news wire there, suggesting at least one of those has received a gunshot wound. the gunmen is still on the loose. live incident ongoing in los angeles, we will keep you updated with any developments throughout the afternoon. most people who appealed against a decision to deny them disability benefits have been successful, the bbc has found. charities and welfare rights groups say it shows benefits tests are beset by poor decision—making and inaccuracies. the government insists it is spending more than 55 billion a year supporting people with disabilities and health conditions. alex dunlop reports.
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ann barker has bipolar two disorder so she suffers from hypomanic and depressive episodes. in 2012, her application for disability living allowance was rejected. it‘s a hideous system, what they make you go through, and you know, they beat you down, because they want you to just go away. but ann did not go away. after eight months and with the support of her friend, penny, she finally won her claim. ann was then twice refused personal independence payment, before a second tribunal win. assessors, she says, took no account of her mental health. they‘re trying to take a million people with a million different problems and go, we‘re going to give them 30 questions and try and work out who should have what. that doesn‘t work. research by the bbc found that around 553,000 people successfully appealed a tribunal in the five years to 2018. most of those related to these disability and sickness benefits. 67% of people who appealed to tribunal in great britain won their case. it was 54% in northern ireland. capita and maximus, two of the private companies who carry out assessments,
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said the majority of people were satisfied with the process and they worked with charities and disabled people‘s organisations to improve their services further. ann barker‘s tribunal hearings were held in this building in norwich, but many don‘t make it this far, and that‘s because they first have to undergo an extra review by the department for work and pensions. it‘s called mandatory reconsideration. now, critics say that puts off many applicants because they find the whole process confusing and they have just a month to get their paperwork in order.
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ann, who works as a massage therapist, says the disability benefit system is broken but could be on the mend with one key element. i think they need to care more. everybody should have help if they need it, so theyjust need to care more. alex dunlop, bbc news. business news in just business news injust a moment, but first, the headlines. nominations have closed for the candidates for the general election and health is back top of the agenda, as accident and emergency units in england record their worst performance since modern records began. with more yellow warnings for rain over areas affected by heavy floods, the government‘s emergency commitee is to meet shortly to discuss a response. at least five people have been injured in a school shooting, in santa clarita — north of los angeles according to authorities.
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police say a suspect described as a male asian in black clothing is still at large. the school has been placed in lockdown. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. fears rise for the uk economy as retail sales unexpectedly fall. official figures show sales growth is at its weakest for 18 months. all categories fell, with the exception of food. hong kong protests dent overseas sales at burberry. the luxury goods group cuts the value of stores in the territory amid months—long disturbances women should have the right to know what their male colleagues are being paid if they suspect pay discrimination, that‘s according to the fawcett society. the gender equality charity is calling for a change in the law to try to cut down on instances of unequal pay. so, burberry sales are up, shares are up, but there are worries about what is going on in hong kong. yes, huge worries, 8% of total sales come
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from hong kong, and this is a key market for them, the asian market is a huge market for them, they are concerned about this but as you can see, shares are up 3%, they have come off a little bit. doing better at the beginning of trade. —— come up. other bits of news, walmart, most people think amazon is the biggest retailer in the world but it is not, walmart, and in the uk they own asda, so it is quite interesting, what they had to say about demand in the us against demand and confidence in the uk. we will talk a little more about that ina will talk a little more about that in a second. they have upgraded the forecast for the outlook for the us, that business is looking strong. look at that, shares down 18%, this is the massive transport company thatis is the massive transport company that is technically a brisk macro by british company but greyhound bus route in america is a big part of their business. those iconic buses, they are doing really badly, they
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are trying to sell that part of the business. really bad news for first group, lots of people will have been on those buses and quite enjoyed them, we used to have them here in them, we used to have them here in the uk until quite recently. they had wi—fi, they were reasonably priced, lots of people wondering where it went wrong. we can speak with an investment director at aj bell. gets it right all the time! no pressure! laughter burberry. .. let‘s talk pressure! laughter burberry... let‘s talk about burberry... let‘s talk about burberry. burberry, yes, seems to be strong, if anything it is improving, a new chief executive officer a couple of years ago, and a replacement at chief creative, they seem to have refreshed the range and retail sales are very strong, that isa retail sales are very strong, that is a big reason why profits were up. if anything, what they are trying to do is turn it into not so much a fashion machine as a high end luxury
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goods company, luxury goods are love because they are expensive and not everyone can fold them but those that do afford them like them for that do afford them like them for that reason, that helps to drive profits higher. skipping over walmart because we are running out of time, we want to talk about first group, they are trying to sell the business, the greyhound business, why isn‘t it working? business, the greyhound business, why isn't it working?” business, the greyhound business, why isn't it working? i think it is very difficult, the market is competitive, they are at the mercy of oil and fuel prices, and insurance cost have been going up because there has been so many insurance claims, that has been pressuring profits, investors will be hoping that they can sell the bus business and get a profit, they have written down the value of that by £100 million, they will not get as much money for that as everyone was hoping. doesn't look like they will, thank you very much, thank you very much, sorry for cutting short. no problem at all. mrs you cannot keep,
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but never mind... you can keep them for me! laughter before i hand you over to the five o‘clock team, the weather forecast, with nick —— with nick miller. across some areas that really do not wa nt across some areas that really do not want any more rainfall, there is more rain, several hours more rain to come as we go through the rest of the afternoon, and into this evening, and either side, showers, wintry northern scotland, relatively modest hills on a strong cold northerly wind, eventually into tonight, this area of rainfall pushing north, away from flooded areas, starting to break up. still some outbreaks of rain into tomorrow from eastern scotland, north—east england, down to parts of wales and the far south—west, in what will be a frosty start for some, especially across parts of scotland and northern ireland, could be icy on
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untreated surfaces. this area of rain starts to fade into a few showers during the day, could well be turning wetter later in the day, across parts of east anglia, into south—east england, on what will be another cold day.
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this today at five — accident and emergency waiting times in england at their worst since current records began. new figures out today show a whole raft of hospital targets are being missed — including for cancer and routine surgery. it‘s put the nhs at the centre of today‘s election campaigning. this is basically caused by the huge demand that there is on the nhs, and that‘s why, now, in the last three months, we have done the biggest investment in the nhs in modern times. it is disgraceful and it is a problem of the lack of staff and the lack of funding for it, so a labour government will increase nhs funding by '23/24 by 26 billion a year. we‘ll be assessing the impact of today‘s figures on the election

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