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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 15, 2019 6:00am-8:31am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast. i'm in salford and charlie is in aberdeen this morning. our headlines today: labour promises free broadband for everyone. it says it will nationalise part of bt and tax tech giants to raise £20 billion for it. more spending pledges. the liberal democrats promise £100 billion to tackle climate change. the conservatives say they'll help left behind towns. good morning. i am here in aberdeen, a key centre for the oil and gas industry. i'll be finding out how brexit,
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immigration and of course scottish independence could all figure highly with voters here. yes, billions of barrels of oil have been pulled from the sea, providing energy underjobs been pulled from the sea, providing energy under jobs for this been pulled from the sea, providing energy underjobs for this local economy. but what is at stake in this election? what do businesses wa nt to this election? what do businesses want to hear from this election? what do businesses want to hearfrom politicians? england seal their place at euro 2020 with a huge win. harry kane scores a first—half hat—trick as they beat montenegro 7—0 at wembley. more than 140 flood warnings are in force after more heavy rain. we'll be live in yorkshire where the pumps have been going all night. and while there will be some more rain around today and this weekend, not as heavy or as persistent as we have seen. join me for the full forecast right here from the stunningly beautiful and redeveloped aberdeen art gallery. it is all coming up on the wrist. —— on
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brea kfast. good morning from an ever so slightly damp aberdeen this morning, all part of our coverage of the general election here on breakfast. we are going around the country asking people what they ink about what the political parties are saying. 0ur hosts this morning are survivex. aberdeen has so much to do with the oil and gas industry and they have to train people around safety so carefully here. just for your information, for example, aberdeen airport is the busiest heliport in the world. so much industry comes through here. i want to introduce you to craig, one of the bosses. good morning. what you are going to do for us now, you have an amazing training facility here and you re—enact crash situations and you re—enact crash situations and dangerous situations. you are going to do one of those for us now. you are on the walkie—talkie. to warn people in advance, this is a controlled situation you are going to see now, and it is one of your safety procedures. so, go and do
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your alert. crash on deck, crush on deck. fire, fire, fire. just talk us through, immediately people are seeing flames there. what is the scenario? a helicopter has crashed on the deck of an installation. we have to teams on the heli ducks, one tea m have to teams on the heli ducks, one team are looking to control the deck with a foam blanket. that is the fire guys we can see going on now. we can see the flames rose quickly there. this is something that develops fast? there is a lot of fuel on board a helicopter. highly flammable. so we're looking to that extinguished as soon as possible. the second team, you can see up there, they are currently looking to extinguish any external fires and make entry into helicopter, isolate, ventilate, extinguish the fires locate any casualties. we can see the flames going down. worth repeating, these are all trained, these are your firefighters, you train people to deal with these situations? yes, they are all highly experienced firefighters we recruit
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for this industry. they train the delegates on a daily basis. thank you very much. it is a really fascinating place here. i think we can probably show you the interior, as well. they have swimming pools here one day and act other situations, helicopters going into the water as well. the reason we have come to scotland is to find out, as we are through the general election, asking people what they make of the pledges they are hearing. so we have a panel together here and we will be hearing from their thoughts a little later on. the rain is coming down a bit harder now. see you later. stay dry, charlie. what a way to start the programme, with a bit of drama. labour is promising free ultra—fast broadband for every home and business in the uk by 2030 if it wins the general election. the party says its plan will cost £20 billion. 0ur political correspondent jessica parker is in westminster. jess, how is labour going to pay for this? well, one of the main ways they are
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planning on paying for it is a new tax on internet giants, and it is important to say is well, they are saying shareholders would be compensated with government bonds. this is a pretty big nationalisation programme. i think some people have criticised labour in the past with their other nationalisation plans, whether it is water or energy, as something of a throwback to the 19705. i think labour trying to give the programme a more modern slant, playing into this idea, i suppose, that broadband, strong internet access, is not a luxury, it is a utility, like water and energy. the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell, is saying it is something the country can't afford not to do. this is hard—nosed economics. if we do not get on and do this, we will... we already are falling behind our global competitors. and we will fall behind even further. future generations will not forgive us. it is visionary, i accept that. but other countries are having these visions, and we are not. we are
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being held back. and he talks about reaching out, helping those communities that may be feel left behind, smaller towns, communities that may be feel left behind, smallertowns, rural communities that may be feel left behind, smaller towns, rural areas as well. but the plan has come into heavy criticism, the conservative saying it is completely reckless, i fa ntasy, saying it is completely reckless, i fantasy, which will actuallyjust cost taxpayers more money. representatives from uk tech firms are also saying it would be a disaster, not just for are also saying it would be a disaster, notjust for the sector, but for consumers as well. i think deliverability will be a key issue in this debate. they say there is no such thing as a free lunch. is there such thing as a free lunch. is there such a thing as free broadband? we will find out, won't we? if labour get in. what's most lending pledges from other parties coming through?‘ lots more spending pledges. the conservatives have announced a plan to help struggling high streets. this would include business rate relief for smaller pubs, smaller cinemas, smaller music venues. and make it easy for communities to buy up make it easy for communities to buy up struggling pubs as well. the british retail consortium say that actually it will not help the vast
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majority of retail workers but we are seeing this theme of parties wanting to reach out and help communities they feel are left behind, or think i left behind, sometimes taking on the odd marginal seat as well. meanwhile, the liberal democrats are pledging £100 billion of public money to tackle climate change. they want to make britain a world leader on offshore wind energy and tidal power. we have seen lots of the parties trying to jostle into a position to be seen as a leader on tackling green issues. for the first time in a general election, every candidate will receive a leaflet advising them on how to protect themselves. the document, which has been drawn up by policing, legal and electoral experts tells prospective mps when and how to report any abuse or threats to the police. more than 140 flood warnings are in force in england and wales this morning, with more rain on the way. brea kfast‘s tim muffett is in fishlake in south yorkshire, where some streets have been flooded for a week. tim, people there are worried
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about even more flooding? yes, good morning. there was heavy rain yesterday and into the evening. but has stopped, and as you can see behind me, many pubs like this one are pumping the water out of fishlake. —— pumps. the good news is those water levels have come down by about 85%, according to the environment agency. that is the good news. there is still a huge amount of disruption within this village. many houses are still flooded. more than 1000 properties have been evacuated. more than 500 homes have been flooded. so, a huge amount of disruption, a week after the flooding begun. and it isn'tjust here. yesterday there was disruption across other parts of yorkshire, derbyshire, nottinghamshire and lincolnshire. many rail services we re lincolnshire. many rail services were affected as well. there have been many road closures. right now the rain has stopped, so that is
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good news. there is likely to be renewed calls for more assistance, and there has been the army helping out here, as well as teams from the environment agency, and yesterday representatives from doncaster council were here as well. so the support is there, the water is being pumped away under the levels are subsiding, but normality has not yet resumed. now, you may have been watching the telly last night. you might have a bit of a sore throat this morning, because you would have cheered, if you are supporting england, seven times. yeah, especially when you consider they only needed a draw. they only need one point to qualify. but they surpassed that, they scored seven goals. great win. i really historic night at wembley. england's1000 much. a very special evening. was it a perfect performance? there has been some criticism of the defence.
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i think that is the area gareth southgate will be conscious of. there were a couple of opportunities they gave montenegro last night and he will want to iron but out, because top teams, the likes of france, spain, italy, they will punish you. that was the only low point loss night. and, as we will hear, some billing forjoe gomez when he came on as a substitute. —— booing. qualification for euro 2020 is secure after that huge win over montenegro. three of those seven goals were scored by captain harry kane, who grabbed a first half hat—trick, while chelsea's tammy abraham scored his first international goal. some fans booed joe gomez when he came on. raheem sterling criticising fans for doing so on social media. it was sterling who was dropped for the game after he clashed with the liverpool defender on monday. that is a nice touch, isn't it? considering he was dropped... yes, something he said was his fault, and joe gomez shouldn't be criticised for that. leaping to the defence of the liveable depend on social media last night. -- defender.
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and in their first match since their epic wimbledon final, roger federer came out on top this time, beating novak djokovic in straight sets to reach the semifinals of the atp tour finals in london. soi so i wouldn't say it goes some way to kind of appeasing the defeat, but still. a big win nonetheless. the winning solheim cup captain, catriona matthew, will captain europe again for the 2021 contest in ohio. the 50—year—old scot led her team to a thrilling one shot victory over the united states on home soil at gleneagles in september. 0ne one of the best sporting events i have ever been to. it always is. that team dynamic in gold, the way it brings that emotion. the comeback was fantastic. it is so interesting she is comforting again, because so many golfers who know her said that tea m many golfers who know her said that team did it for her. —— captaining. and suzanne peterson, who sank the winning putt, will be her vice captain. that is great. and they
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sort of produce those types of performances, it obviously makes sense for her to stay on. let's take a look at today's papers. is it feeling lonely without charlie on the sofa? i am in his dent. how is that, is it uncomfortable? spacious. nicely put. let's take a look at the papers. labour's proposal to pa rt—nationalise britain's broadband network and offer free internet access to every household and business makes the front page of the times. the paper also carries a picture of borisjohnson with a white rabbit while visiting a school in taunton yesterday. the daily telegraph says nigel farage threatened to report the conservatives to the police after accusing downing street of offering brexit party candidates jobs and peerages to withdraw from the general election. number 10 has categorically denied any bribes were offered. the sun leads with reports that a top bravery medal is to be awarded to a lone sas trooper who killed two gunmen in a hotel siege in nairobi. the paper says the soldier's heroics for the who dares wins unit helped save hundreds of lives. the online edition of the metro
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reports that more than 800 properties across parts of england have been affected by flooding. and the paper carries two pictures showing the extremes of the weather as more rain and snow is forecast to hit the uk. it is not only charlie who is away today. matt is at aberdeen art gallery with the weather this morning. shall be likened to the back pages as well? some nice pictures, as you can imagine. lots of former england players were at wembley last night for that 1000th much. david sobol and paul gascoigne out on the pitch, in and around those games last night. martin keown, tony adams, wayne rooney. nice to see them sharing a joke and laughing last night. it was a really historic night. it was a really historic night for england. 0bviously with
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those tributes paid to the former players. 0bviously gareth southgate will be delighted they managed to get that win. and this is interesting as well. harry kane, hat—trick. he is on such a hot strea k hat—trick. he is on such a hot streak at the moment. fifth now on the all—time goalscoring rankings for england. and i willjust show you this one. these were documenting his goals last night. interesting to note that wayne rooney, england's leading goalscorer, 53 goals over 100 appearances. harry kane, only 44 appearances that less than half the appearances that less than half the appearances and more than half the goals? two-thirds of the way there. exactly. so if you can avoid injury, juno, he could rocket up that list, and no doubt he could go on and surpass wayne rooney's tally. you just wonder, by how many, if he can continue his goalscoring ratio as he is at the moment. now, are you a star wars is at the moment. now, are you a starwars fan, or is at the moment. now, are you a star wars fan, or would you like a heist? a heist, a bit of adventure.
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the thomas crown scare is the title here in the sun. some rembrandt paintings were targeted by break—in, atan art paintings were targeted by break—in, at an art gallery in dulwich, in south—east london. dulwich picture gallery. this cat burglar broke in through the roof, but because the alarms were triggered, and they started spraying this noxious substance, no, sorry, he sprayed a noxious substance into a police officer's face, run—off, the police officer's face, run—off, the police officer caught him, but two rembrandt that could have been stolen. heist foisted. foiled. at least they got the man. stolen. heist foisted. foiled. at least they got the manlj stolen. heist foisted. foiled. at least they got the man. i love that. great film, as well. speaking about, matt is at the aberdeen art gallery this morning. they were brave to let you in. iam indeed i am indeed in an art gallery this
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morning. this is mary agnes, portrait bust, she is overlooking the main atrium of this museum which has just the main atrium of this museum which hasjust undergone the main atrium of this museum which has just undergone a four year redevelopment. absolutely stunning. it cost 34.6 million. it was built in 1885 undone by alexandrova marshall who also designed the waldorf museum. that is also to be redeveloped, new floors added as well, gives you a great sense of the building, wonderful to walk around. look at all of these tiles, as well, all 1300 of them. we will take a look around the gallery throughout this morning. luckily for me, i'm inside this morning. but outside the gallery here in aberdeen it is not as cold as it was yesterday. there have been a few showers over the night and indeed across the country there is still some rain around but not as much as we saw through yesterday. so let's get on and take
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a look at the forecast. rain is tending to be lighter and patchy through today, but there will be some sunny spells here and there. parts of western scotland, northern ireland, stay posted for those. we have low pressure in charge, and that means rain is neverfar away. it will be sitting there right into the weekend. it's never going to be com pletely the weekend. it's never going to be completely dry but after 50 millimetres, two inches of rain in some spots —— 15 millimetres. this is where the heaviest of the rain will be. patchy, light rain and a drizzle elsewhere. it will be lighter in the east midlands by the end of the afternoon. parts of northern ireland, after a chilly start you will have some clear spells and temperatures around 5—8d across northern areas, maybe 8—10 towards southern coastal counties. as we go through tonight, it will be on the move, not staying in one
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place for too long. it will turn lighter and patchy as it pushes west. it's going to turn a little misty over hills but not too cold. maybe one or two areas will see a little frost, most should be free into the start of the weekend. so, lots of cloud to begin with for the weekend, some showers here and there, and some in the west later on. but mostly southern counties of england as western part of scotland, northern ireland will be cloudier than today and temperatures similar to what we've seen over the last few days. sunday, a northerly wind will develop and we will see some showers run down through some irish sea coast, and heavier rain returning towards eastern counties of england. so we aren't getting any real respite with longer, dry spells and still some rain at times. we will have to keep a close eye on the flood warning situation as we go through the weekend. hopefully those warnings will come down as the rain peters out a little later. into next
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week, it is looking that little bit drier. iam week, it is looking that little bit drier. i am in the warmth this morning. hopefully where you are, charlie you aren't going to get too wet. back to you. matt, thank you very much. we had to come indoors as you can see now. it was pretty cold outside. interesting place, this, you come into this giant facility and immediately it is around 26 degrees. it's pretty warm in here and you will see why in a moment. in the water behind me, if we go to our camera above, to my right, i'm a cameraman is up here. these other training pods they use here which they drop into the water and practice the escape routines. they drop down and using the liferaft to the right there. and you can see on the right there. and you can see on the far side, you can see one of the skeletons, essentially. and paul is inside, these are the skeletons they lift up, put into the water with
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crew onboard to train them and then turn them around. we will see more later on. the reason of course, we are here, come to scotland, all part of our mission to find out what you are talking about in relation to the general election. we are in aberdeen today, concentrating on politics here in scotland. jamie has been finding out —— jayne mccubbin has been finding out from the bbc copy card. the copy cut has arrived in the granite city and our coffee is distinctly average. —— coffee cart. what is my market? i'll give you a five. sealer has been making better copy here for 12 years now. yeah, it's been 12 years. what was it like? fantastic, so busy. but times have changed football is not what used to be. liz has lived here all her life. tea with milk. how has it changed in 71 years? it's gotten
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worse. you see people begging in the streets. does there seem to be more poverty? 0h, aye. with the chill of the recession wasn't found here for a long time. aberdeen was cushioned by the boone of north sea oil, but when the crash hit here in 2014, it was hit hard. oilwent when the crash hit here in 2014, it was hit hard. oil went to $124 a barrel, but then it went down, so it was a severe crash. barrel, but then it went down, so it was a severe crash. |s barrel, but then it went down, so it was a severe crash. is one barrel, but then it went down, so it was a severe crash. is one of more —— mark is one of 65,000 who lost a job in that crash. did you think you could lose it all? absolutely. lose the house, lose the car, how would we get through this, i thought? we we re we get through this, i thought? we were lucky we had resources and were able to eventually get through that and come through the other side. but you were scared? it was scary. today he helps other people going to crises. it can affect anyone. and it
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can happen very quickly. yeah. -- going through crises. but the sector is farfrom going through crises. but the sector is far from over. there is plenty of life left in the north sea, but it is getting harder to get hold of. this industry has helped make aberdeen one of the most multicultural cities in the uk. 25% of the population are non— british and the majority of voting to remain. immigrants are taking anyone because ‘s jobs, they are vital to the economy. how many sugars? four sugars. it's notjust oil that brings people in, aberdeen has two universities. one, two, three, four. macy's from alabama. their allotted international students? yeah, i only know one scottish person. really?! she plans to stay after university
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not just because of she plans to stay after university notjust because of the scenery, but also the nhs. i didn't have my heart problem checked out until i got here. really? i did have to pay a lump sum foranyjazz here. really? i did have to pay a lump sum for anyjazz costs, but after that i will pay in taxes. i think the nhs, it's obviously very — it is overloaded right now, it being privatised is so terrifying. and so we leave. —1 mug. so there is jane packing up the coffee cart and making 80 people happy in aberdeen. it is an interesting place. you can find the full list of candidates by going to the bbc news election website. we will talk about some more issues in scotland, i am joined by professor nicola mcewen. she's from the centre on constitutional change at the university of edinburgh.
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good morning to you. what is the key issue for voters in scotland? good morning to you. what is the key issue for voters in scotland ?m issue for voters in scotland? it is a brexit election, but it's notjust a brexit election, but it's notjust a brexit election, but it's notjust a brexit election. and at least as important as brexit is that other constitutional issue that dominates scottish politics, and that is the issue of independence or union? and thatis issue of independence or union? and that is looking very large in this election. saw because about how that equation between brexit and independence vote for scotland, how that plays that in terms of the party as do mike the two issues are quite linked. especially for the snp, because brexit and the fact that scotland voted for a very co mforta ble that scotland voted for a very comfortable majority for remain in the referendum has given the snp the rationale for revisiting the independence issue for demanding another independence referendum. so in some ways after the previous one, thatis in some ways after the previous one, that is why it is so closely linked
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in this particular campaign for the snp more than any other party. and give people a snapshot of where scotla nd give people a snapshot of where scotland is now, politically, since the 2017 general election? we often think of this is a conservative verse think of this is a conservative verse labour election and that is not at all the case in scotland. snp is by far the most dominant, no—one doubts they are going to win. the issueis doubts they are going to win. the issue is over the size of the winning margin. the snp one more seats than any other party yet it was a disappointing election for them because they had lost seats as well. so the issue there is can the others hold onto the seats they gained last time or can the snp win back some of those seeds they lost.
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—— seats. and other things are important too. of course. the economy, which, like everywhere else has had its ups and downs. talking to people in aberdeen over the last 3-4 to people in aberdeen over the last 3—4 years, they have been feeling things are definitely worse. aberdeen is a city has suffered as the result —— a result of falling oil prices. but politicians can see this about independence, but for voters it can be about anything at all. even the nhs as that has devolved to scotland. just so people understand, unnumbered issues are handled just by the scottish parliament. those would normally be
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the key political issues. and they will be key political issues. education, the nhs, housing, social care, all of these beings are areas that are for the scottish parliament, but it doesn't mean they aren't affected by decisions taken by the uk parliament. it's very good talking to you this morning. thank you very much. i will leave you a little shot here from the pool. if you have any questions about the election you would like answered, please send it in. that's to yourquestions@bbc.co.uk, or via the hashtag #bbcyourquestions. we'll be back in a few moments. time for the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. iam i am alex bushell. in their first tv interview, the family of one of the youngest murder victims in the capital has told bbc london he was a talented boy who had the rest of his life to lead. 15—year—old ba ptista adjei from north woolwich was attacked on stratford broadway in east london on his way home from school last month.
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it's been like, hard, because it affected me in school as well. and, like, media and baptiste are used to share a room, so use do everything together —— it has affected me, me and ba ptista together —— it has affected me, me and baptista used to share a room and baptista used to share a room and do everything together. over half of london's specialist treatment centres for alcohol dependancy have closed in the last decade, according to figures from the uk addiction treatment group. the capital has almost 90,000 people with an alcohol dependency. but of the 42 clinics available to treat people with alcoholism, only 18 are still open. police are investigating after an intruder attempted to steal two valuable paintings from the dulwich picture gallery. the paintings were part of the current rembrandt‘s light exhibition at the gallery in south london. police say the intruder escaped after spraying an officer in the face with an unknown substance, but the paintings were recovered. let's take a look at the travel situation now.
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0n the tube you can see from the board there are minor delays, there we go, top right on the metropolitan line, from baker street to wembley park due to a faulty train. severe delays on the overground, and the tfl rail is part suspended as well. 0n the roads, this is traffic westbound on the 813, building out of dagenham into barking. that is the blackwall tunnel, slow from the willis road flyover. in south —— southwark closures due to a water main. now for the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. a chilly start but temperatures above zero so it remains frost free. some outbreaks of rain through this morning, and yes, it still remains
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cold. at least outbreaks of rain are coming on that north—easterly breeze, quite a fresh breeze, actually, throughout the day. so that will feel cold and then heavy rain as we go through the afternoon. temperatures 7— nine celsius. factor in the wind and it will feel colder. we still have outbreaks of rain overnight turning lighter and patchy as we head into saturday morning. clear as well as developing further south, still chilly but again above zero. 2— four celsius as a minimum. so we head into the weekend to saturday. anywhere south of the m4 we could see brighter spells, maybe even some sunshine. further north, though, it is going to remain cloudy, thick enough to produce outbreaks of rain and through the weekend it is still saying rather cold. —— staying. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty.
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charlie stayt is in aberdeen. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. labour is promising free ultra—fast broadband for every home and business in the uk within ten years if it wins the general election. the party says the £20 billion cost will be funded by a tax on technology firms like google and amazon, and that parts of bt will be re—nationalised. the industry body, techuk, said labour's proposals would be a "disaster" for the telecoms sector and customers. for the first time in a general election, every candidate will receive a leaflet advising them on how to protect themselves. the document, which has been drawn up by policing, legal and electoral experts, tells prospective mps when and how to report any abuse
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or threats to the police. there are over 140 flood warnings in place across england and wales this morning, with more rain on the way. in fishlake in south yorkshire, pumps have been working through the night to protect homes and businesses. some streets in the village have now been flooded for more than a week. 20 people have been treated in hospital, after a mini—bus overturned in cambridgeshire last night. more than 20 firefighters and the airambulance attended the scene. non—stop flights between london and sydney could be one step closer, after a test flight beat all previous records for speed and distance. the qantas plane touched down in the early hours of this morning, after 19 hours and 19 minutes in the air. the 40 passengers and crew onboard wore special sensors to monitor the impact of the flight on their bodies.
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and police have foiled an attempt to steal valuable pictures from the dulwich picture gallery in south—east london. some say the actions of security and the two rembrandts being targeted never left the grounds. this came after an intruder broke into the gallery on wednesday night. the exhibition will remain closed while a full investigation takes place. it is now 6:33am and we are celebrating this morning. well, england fans are. good morning. yes, they just needed a england fans are. good morning. yes, theyjust needed a draw last night to qualify for the european championships. instead, they scored seven. goalfest! championships. instead, they scored seven. goal fest! and won convincingly. it was a special night at wembley last night, england's 1000th again. whether lots of fireworks? i didn't watch it. a lot of former players were there, lots of former players were there, lots of tributes paid to players in the past, people who took part in historic winter 1966. a special night, and obviously great they can cap it off with a win, which gets them to the euros. and it couldn't have gone any
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better — a huge win over montenegro at wembley. alex 0xlade—chamberlain with their first in what proved an impresive performance. captain harry kane with a hat—trick, he's now fifth on the list of england's all—time record goalscorers. marcus rashford added another before chelsea's tammy abra ham scored his first full international goal. the one low point, joe gomez booed as he came on following his clash with raheem sterling. the reason i wanted to getjoe on the pitch tonight is he has been with us september— october, and not got him into the games. i know that iam going got him into the games. i know that i am going to start some's on sunday and get him back onto the pitch as well, it was important for both of them to get back on the field with england and show everybody that we are all in this now. well, sterling took to social media to defend gomez.
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quite a classy tweet there from raheem sterling. after their epic wimbledon final it was roger federer who came out on top this time in their first meeting since the summer, beating novak djokovic in straight sets to reach the semifinals of the atp tour finals in london. his defeat also means that rafael nadal will end the season as world number one, buyt he also faces a fight to reach the last four. and she will get the chance to do what no other european captain has done after catriona matthew will lead the team at the 2021 solheim cup. she led her team to a thrilling one—shot victory over the united states on home soil, but will have the chance to retain the cup at inverness golf club in ohio, in 2021, something no captain has ever done. finally, i know you like your goal. have you ever witnessed this play out? this was tommy fleetwood encountering unusual hazard, playing
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at the nedbank challenge in south africa. a decent effort here, onto the green. 0k. africa. a decent effort here, onto the green. ok. this is in sun city. before a couple of monkeys interfered. —— mongeese. before a couple of monkeys interfered. -- mongeese. is that deplorable? we were just discussing this. i think you can have both of them, mongeese or mongooses. so what is the rule. i think where the ball has ended is where you play from, i think. no? i don't think so. because if you hit a bird or something... that is different, that is hitting something and it bounces off. if the demands and comes to a stop, and is then moved by an outside force, i think you replace it. didn't tommy fleetwood actually tweet about it? he did. we need to find out the rules of golf. i usually carried in my bag. we will find out later. interesting. i thought maybe you have encountered a bit of that in your time. never a mongoose. never mongoose? there is still time. there
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is. i willjust have to head out to where you can find mongeese, or mongooses. if you are wondering where charlie is, he is in aberdeen this morning. so is matt, with the weather, and nina, with the business. they are checking the temperature of the political climate, is of course we are under way with the general election. they will be speaking to people to find out how they feel about how the election is going and looking out the issues surrounding the people in scotland and of course the people in scotland and of course the city often called the oil capital of europe. so we will be getting much more from charlie and the team later on. around 22,000 young people are at risk of being homeless this christmas, according to the charity centerpoint. we'rejoined now by gareth bradbury, who was in a similar situation last year. good morning. good morning. tell me
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your story. how did you get to the point where you are at risk of being homeless? it started off when i was younger, my mother was ill through my childhood, and when i turned 16 she sadly passed away. at this point i had she sadly passed away. at this point ihada she sadly passed away. at this point i had a placement in foster care. my ambition was to become a pe teacher. so, to go to college and university. when i finished college, the big step to going to university was that at this point, i had left that foster place, and there was no other place to call home at that point. my granddad passed away during my second year at university and during the summers, and during christmas time, it was quite difficult, because i didn't have anywhere to call home. so you had no family? no realfamily, no. call home. so you had no family? no real family, no. so call home. so you had no family? no realfamily, no. so where did you stay? during one of the summers i
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stayed with my partner's mother, in her home. and after my final year, i was in limbo in terms of where i was going to go. it's got to a point where there was not anything set in stone and i ended up staying in a hotel for 7— nine days while things we re hotel for 7— nine days while things were arranged for me. who was arranging things for you? were arranged for me. who was arranging things for you ?m were arranged for me. who was arranging things for you? it was my leaving care worker at the time. and how did you get out of this cycle? because it seems that it happened so quickly, there were no arguments, u nfortu nately quickly, there were no arguments, unfortunately your mom passed away and then your grandfather passed away, and it was almost like an u nfortu nate away, and it was almost like an unfortunate series of events. away, and it was almost like an unfortunate series of eventsm away, and it was almost like an unfortunate series of events. it is difficult to get out of that cycle, because at that point, there is nobody who really takes responsibility for you. there is nobody who really cares so much for you at that point. you have just got stuck in the middle of where you are stuck in the middle of where you are
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stuck in the middle of where you are stuck in limbo, of being at university, the brink of being left, you know what i mean...? absolutely, being homeless is a scary prospect and it is something that many people, too many people are living through. i imagine, use that you explained how difficult it was in the summers. tell me what it was like staying, obviously you had good people and your partner's family, but never really a sense of home, i |magine? but never really a sense of home, i imagine? they have always been great, my partner's parents, and theirfamily. i great, my partner's parents, and their family. i went to christmases with them, during the summer i would see them, and they were always very welcoming. but there is always the sense of, like, it is not the norm. this isn't my family. so at christmases i would miss my grandad. i wouldn't miss my mom forced that i would miss my mom. i would miss my uncle. ——i would miss my mom. i would miss my uncle. —— i would miss my mum. they
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we re uncle. —— i would miss my mum. they were difficult periods, getting through my life and shaping me as an adult. so when it comes to that, family occasions, it is actually quite upsetting and it dawns on you how alone you are. so who helped you? i am in contact with my brother. he is really the only family member at the moment i am in contact with. my girlfriend helps me through it a lot, and just friends as well. and what is your situation now? this situation now is, i have gone from being at risk of homelessness to, you know, working within the community, at a local football club, and i volunteer a lot of my time to centrepoint because i am so thankful for them helping of my time to centrepoint because i am so thankfulfor them helping me through that difficult time, because i went from being at an all—time high of graduating university, getting to a point where i have nearly reached my dream job of being ape nearly reached my dream job of being a pe teacher, to then dropping off,
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not knowing what i am going to be doing. sounds like you are on track to getting to be a pe teacher now? yeah, over the last year i have created an action plan of getting to that point and over the next two yea rs i that point and over the next two years i will be getting the experience that i need and the qualifications that i need to get to that point. gareth, iwish qualifications that i need to get to that point. gareth, i wish you all the best. thank you very much for being so candid about your story on brea kfast being so candid about your story on breakfast this morning. thank you. thank you, gareth bradberry there. the government says it has provided £76 million to help reduce rough sleeping. matt is in aberdeen, at the art gallery this morning. charlie is in a training facility where i think he might get dumped in the pool. here is fingers crossed with that. you are ina is fingers crossed with that. you are in a rather more cultural place this morning? i certainly icertainly am.
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i certainly am. good morning. it is pa rt i certainly am. good morning. it is part of the cultural renaissance of the city, a big investment has gone into this, the aberdeen art gallery, £34.6 million in redevelopment, which has opened up new spaces, expanded the number of galleries. this is just expanded the number of galleries. this isjust one expanded the number of galleries. this is just one of the 19 gallery now in place here. and of course with aberdeen being along the coast, they had to be one called the shoreline, where it takes a look at artists inspired by the oceans and the seas around. this particular artwork was done by scottish artist joan erdley. she started in glasgow, painting street children. she moved to the east coast and became transfixed by the sea. this is called high tide on a winter afternoon. looking at this, on a stormy day, she actually carried discounters out there and painted it there. we have all experienced this kind of weather recently, and you will see more of it in the days to come. at least today the winds are
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easing a little bit and it is not as cold and aberdeen asset has been the past few mornings. let's take a look at the forecast for the rest of the uk. the focus has really been on the rain. there are still 140 flood warnings in place across england and wales. more rain to come today. that rain will be lighter and touchier than we have seen. not as great an impact. with us still to the east of us were impact. with us still to the east of us were pulling that chilly north—east wind for a few more days. 0ut there at the moment, some of the wettest conditions across parts of northern england and south—east scotland. these areas pricing up through the day, elsewhere, plenty of cloud, patchy rain and drizzle, not the heavy persistent rain we saw yesterday. some of the brightest spots are likely to be across northern and western scotland and northern ireland. here, a frosty start but with sunshine at times. stay in chilly, temperatures 5— eight across northern areas, may be up eight across northern areas, may be up to 10 degrees some southern coastal counties. 0verall, up to 10 degrees some southern coastal counties. overall, the chilly story continues. now, as we go into tonight, we will continue to see some patchy rain and drizzle
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here and they are, wet conditions to ta ke here and they are, wet conditions to take us into the evening and night across eastern parts of england. that pushes west, starts to fizzle out a bit. then, with plenty of cloud in place, temperatures probably not dropping as much as last night, less frost around us we go into tomorrow morning. into the weekend, plenty of cloud on saturday. a grey day for the vast majority. more cloud certainly in the west of scotland and northern ireland, but some sunny spells will be possible, brighter to the south of england with sunshine at times, as you can see, the cloud is still susceptible to bringing in a few showers, but she drizzle now and again across other areas of the country. it stays on the cool side. as we go into sunday, cloud still dominating. more of a northerly breeze for a time across western parts of the uk. we will see showers running along some western coasts, thatis running along some western coasts, that is we will see something a little bit dry for a time, but more in the way of wet weather, we think, will develop through the day. these are still going to be in areas where we are suffering from flooding at the moment. hopefully not as heavy and persistent as we have seen lately. every drop of rain at the
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moment, of course, is unwelcome. good news as we head into the start of next week, it looks like monday and tuesday will be a good deal drier and brighter for many. and tuesday will be a good deal drier and brighterfor many. but it stays on the chilly side. that is how it is looking here. now let's head down the road to charlie. plenty more on our website at the usual address. i'm just down the road, mad, but i can't think of a more different environment. this is a survival training establishment specific to the oil and gas industry. they train people on safety here. you can see the life rafts here, and there is the life rafts here, and there is the life raft itself. some guys are doing routines, they arejumping off into the water, you see them going there, they take the position and dive in. these are all the trained operatives. it is done under the tightest possible safety procedures. you can see more of that other morning this morning. so, as you know by now on breakfast, throughout the general election campaign we are travelling all across the uk, trying
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to find out what is important to you. today, as we've said, we are in aberdeen, two very hotly contested constituencies. so let's take a look at the situation. scotland's third largest city, aberdeen is situated in the north—east of the country. its nickname, granite city, because of its many grey, stone buildings. but it is a hub for oil and gas extraction. the industry has attracted many foreign workers and its families does make their families. figures suggest one in five people living in aberdeen were born overseas. two of the uk's best selling singers, hailfrom here. and according to the guinness book of records, there city is home to britain's oldest business, aberdeen harbour. belmore castle is located nearby, as is the trump international golf links hotel. ——
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bal moral. politically, aberdeen is a city of swing seats. in 2015, the snp's kirsty blackman gain aberdeen north, 80 straight years of labour dominance. aberdeen south changed from yellow to blue with the conservative' ross thompson claiming victory. this is a city that voted to remain in 2016, and against scottish independence two years before that. they expect both issues to play a part in this campaign. so we've come into the skeleton of the helicopters they used to put into the water. it's still wet because they literally pick it up and drop it in. joining me now is sarah kyambi from migration policy scotland.
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ican i can reassure i can reassure you i can reassure you right now that although they do drop this into the airand drop it although they do drop this into the air and drop it down, we are safe. so we're going to talk about immigration. give us the picture in terms of scotland and immigration. is it terms of scotland and immigration. isita terms of scotland and immigration. is it a big issue? i'm not sure about the election campaign. i think in terms of policy developments what has been difficult in scotland is the need for immigration in scotland also includes a demographic element. that is much more relevant in scotla nd that is much more relevant in scotland and the rest of the uk —— prevalent. scotland is at risk of population decline and has far more advanced population ageing so immigration is more important in scotla nd immigration is more important in scotland than for the rest of the uk. so you think it was like aberdeen, where we are now, what would be the snapshot here? aberdeen's got a high proportion of migrants as part of the population. and that is quite true still in keeping industries going, feeling labour shortages and what you see in
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scotla nd labour shortages and what you see in scotland is that attitudes towards migration are marginally more positive in england but the understanding of the benefits of migration both economically and socially are far more understood in scotla nd socially are far more understood in scotland than the rest of the uk. so how does that play out in terms of the political parties? well, it's interesting. at a scottish level, political discourse on immigration is far more positive, and consistently positive over many yea rs. consistently positive over many years. there has been a former welcoming —— formal welcoming message from the government and parties agree with that. there is a general acknowledgement of the role migration plays and particularly eu migration plays and particularly eu migration in scotland, and the importance of that. i think that is a sharp contrast to how migration functions within uk politics. a sharp contrast to how migration functions within uk politicsm a sharp contrast to how migration functions within uk politics. it is worth pointing out, isn't it, we had to say throughout our discussions this morning, here in scotland, immigration is not a devolved issue. so the government here might have a
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set of thoughts, nicola sturgeon might have a set of thoughts about this but this is a general election. yes, but i think issues — i think the public don't distinguish. and for government, the problem is there needs to be space to address scotland's migration needs and aims within uk immigration policy and the risk particularly when free movement and is is that space is going to be severely constrained. -- when free movement and is. we got through, we we re movement and is. we got through, we were taken into the water. so we are spending our time this morning going around this training facility in aberdeen. we mention quite a few times, the economy here is based on oil and gas. we are going to go to the harbour now. nina can tell us more about what is a hugely important bit of infrastructure relative to the whole of the scottish economy. yes, good morning charlie. it is amazing to think the oil and gas
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that comes out of this water could well be keeping you nice and toasty in your living room this morning, fuelling your car on the way to work. and as you said, charlie, there are 900 businesses based on oil and gas here in aberdeen, 26,000 jobs depend on it. and you might think to a certain extent, that micro economy based on two things might be ring—fenced from politics. is it? let's talk to digi who represents the oil and gas association body. good morning, what are you looking for in this election? oil and gas is important, notjust to election? oil and gas is important, not just to aberdeen but the whole of scotland and the uk. thousands of jobs and a huge proportion of taxes that it pays, and energy supply. so from our point of view it is important all of the politicians understand the contribution we make today and the contribution that we are going to be making as we go forward to the next year and the future. and what does that mean?
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there will be pressure put on you now because of the green agenda, sustainable energy, it is firmly on the agenda for all of the parties. what does it mean to you? there is an exciting time for us. ok. we think we can be part of the solution and an enablerof think we can be part of the solution and an enabler of the economy as it moves forward. lots of companies are moving into the energy transition while many focus on producing oil and gas and keeping the lights on as we have today. so the fact that green energy has become mainstream for you is good news? and just, you runa for you is good news? and just, you run a buy here, you have a ten yea rs. run a buy here, you have a ten years. you've seen the fluctuation in oil prices and how that affects the economy. what is on the forefront of your mind as we had two december 12? remark we have an interesting situation. we started with money that basically came from oil and gas industries, and that really got us started. since we launched porters gin distilliery we
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have been exporting more and buying goods from other countries. so brexit is definitely at the forefront. that is number-1 for you? we are relying on export growth to basically see success in the business. you told me you voted remain, does that mean you will be moving towards a remain vote orjust getting this through now?|j personally getting this through now?” personally will vote remain because they want to live in the eu and move around freely. but as a company, certainty is by far the most important thing. just knowing what we need to do. and as a small company we don't have, you know, the kind of safety budget to support, like, you know, years of uncertainty or anything like that. we need to crack on. it's really tricky for loss of business is, wondering whether to vote with their heart or
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their head in this election. and deborah, you work in biomedicine. you have nothing to do with this industry. what are you looking for? your needs are very different? absolutely. life science in biomedicine is an incredibly important sector, locally and for the uk. so what i'm listening for is policy around protecting what we have already, further investment into businesses, also with the health service and making sure patients have access to medicine. but, we've had some interesting things from different parties, labour for example with medicines for role, their paper talking about the private — — for role, their paper talking about the private —— de privatising some biopharmaceuticals we still need some investment on these businesses. so for you when you hear, talking nationalisation is an alarm bell rather than a safety net for the
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industry? there are absolutely. we don't have the full story yet but it rings alarm bells for me. really interesting. what we had from bishop auckland when ben was there, and no doubt what we will hear as we move across the country on this tour, if there is no—one reason, there is no—one thing driving businesses when it comes to this election on december 12. there are so many reasons why people will be voting. i'm looking forward to hearing more from you and amazing aberdeen. but first, the news, travel and whether wherever you are, waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london. i'm alex bushell. in their first tv interview the family of one of the youngest murder victims in the capital has told bbc london he was "a talented boy who had the rest of his life to lead." 15—year—old ba ptista adjei from north woolwich was attacked on stratford broadway in east london on his way home from school last month. it's been like, hard,
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because it's affected me in school as well. and, like, me and baptista, we used to share one room. so, like, we used to do basically everything together. and when i'm thinking about it, i'll go on to his bed to... like, i feel that he's there. over half of london's specialist treatment centres for alcohol dependency have closed in the last decade, according to figures from the uk addiction treatment group. the capital has almost 90,000 people with an alcohol dependency. but of the 42 clinics available to treat people with alcoholism, only 18 are still open. police are investigating after an intruder attempted to steal two valuable paintings from the dulwich picture gallery. the paintings were part of the current rembrandt‘s light exhibition at the gallery in south london. police say the intruder escaped after spraying an officer in the face with an unknown substance, but the paintings were recovered. let's take a look at the travel situation now.
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0n the tube, there are minor delays on the metropolitan line northbound from baker street to wembley park due to a faulty train. the metropolitan affected as well as the tower line. and delays on tfl rail. the trains themselves, liverpool street station, platforms 5-12 liverpool street station, platforms 5—12 out of use. 0n the roads, this is the new westbound for traffic on the 813, building from into barking. northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel, slow from the woolwich road flyover, as expected from this time of morning, to be fair. in southwark, borough high street remains closed between southwark street and union street for work to the water mains. what does the weekend weather have in store for us? let's have a check of the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. a chilly start but temperatures above zero so it remains frost—free. some outbreaks of rain through this morning, and yes, it still remains cold.
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some patches of mist as well, especially around the home counties. at least outbreaks of rain are coming on that north—easterly breeze, quite a fresh breeze, actually, throughout the day. so that will feel cold and then heavy rain as head through the afternoon. temperatures between 7—9 celsius. factor in the wind and it will feel colder. we still have outbreaks of rain overnight, turning lighter and patchier, though, as we head into saturday morning. clear as well and developing further south, still chilly but again above zero. 2—4 celsius as a minimum. so we head into the weekend to saturday. anywhere south of the m4 we could see brighter spells, maybe even some sunshine. further north, though, it is going to remain rather cloudy, thick enough to produce outbreaks of rain and through the weekend it is still staying rather cold. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast. i'm in salford and charlie is in aberdeen this morning. 0ur headlines today: labour promises free broadband for everyone. it says it will nationalise part of bt and tax tech giants to raise £20 billion for it. more spending pledges. the liberal democrats promise £100 billion to tackle climate change — the conservatives say they'll help left behind towns.
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and the prime minister willjoin us on the sofa for the first of our interviews with party leaders. that's at 8:00. good morning. we are in a fit —— fairly noisy training centre in aberdeen this morning. we will be joined training centre in aberdeen this morning. we will bejoined byjust to get reaction to the prime minister's interview on brexit, and will be talking about immigration, including scottish independence as well. good morning. tens of billions of barrels of oil have been pulled from the sea, providing energy for the uk and jobs for this local economy. but what is at stake this election? what do businesses want to hear from politicians? england seal their place at euro 2020 with a huge win. harry kane scores a first—half hatrick as they beat montenegro 7—0 at wembley. more than 140 flood warnings are in force after more heavy rain. we'll be live in yorkshire where the pumps have been going all night.
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and the worst may be over for now, as far as heavy rain is concerned, but there is still more rain in the forecast. i have details on that and i will be taking a look around the stunning redevelopment of the aberdeen art gallery. it is all coming up here on breakfast. it's friday the 15th of november. our top story. labour is promising free ultra—fast broadband for every home and business in the uk by 2030 if it wins the general election. the party says its plan will cost £20 billion. 0ur political correspondent jessica parker is in westminster. jess, how is labour going to pay for this? it is raining, i am sorry. we will start with labour. labour is talking about creating british broadband, and you ask how they will pay for it. in large part,
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attacks on tech giants. this is the latest addition to labour's nationalisation programme, and a pretty big and bold addition. i guess it plays into the idea that fast internet speeds are notjust a luxury anymore, they are a utility like energy or water, and labour's shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell said it is actually something the country can't afford not to do. this is hard—nosed economics. if we do not get on and do this, we already are falling behind our global competitors, and we will fall behind even further. future generations will not forgive us. it is visionary, i accept that. but you know, other countries are having these visions, and we are not. we are being held back. he's talking about how this will help those communities that have maybe been left behind, rural areas, communities that have maybe been left behind, ruralareas, coastal towns as well, smaller towns. it has been heavily criticised by the conservatives. they say the plans are conservatives. they say the plans a re reckless, conservatives. they say the plans are reckless, fantasy. it willjust end up costing taxpayers more, and indeed those representing tech firms
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say it will be a disaster for the sector, as well as consumers. but i think deliverability will be a key element to this debate. naga, i suppose they do go around saying there is no such thing as a free lunch. question is, is there such a thing as broadband? lots of people would like that very much! jessica, thank you. there are also more spending pledges from all of the parties coming through? yes, the conservatives are talking about their plans to help struggling high streets. they have announced a raft of measures, rate relief, smaller pubs, independent cinemas, music venues, as well as a £500 million fund to reopen some of those railway lines which were cut under the beaching cuts. it isjust lines which were cut under the beaching cuts. it is just a lines which were cut under the beaching cuts. it isjust a limited number of areas, as you can probably tell from the amount of money involved. labour says this comes off the back of vicious cuts to local services over a number of years. the lib dems, £100 billion of public money over the next five years to tackle climate change. they want the
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country to be a world leader in offshore wind energy and tidal power as well. i think we are increasingly seeing parties jostling for a as well. i think we are increasingly seeing partiesjostling for a lead position in being seen to tackle green issues. jessica, thank you. get dry! we've invited the leaders of all the main political parties to joins us here on the breakfast sofa over the next few weeks. this morning, the prime minister, borisjohnson will be the first tojoin us. that's at 8:00. for the first time in a general election, every candidate will receive a leaflet advising them on how to protect themselves. the document, which has been drawn up by policing, legal and electoral experts, tells prospective mps when and how to report any abuse or threats to the police. more than 140 flood warnings are in force in england and wales this morning, with more rain on the way. several people had to be rescued from stranded cars in 0xfordshire last night. brea kfast‘s tim muffett
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is in fishlake in south yorkshire, where some streets have been flooded for a week. tim, people there are worried about even more flooding? the rain is coming down again, and this is what people were so concerned about? because as soon as the floodwaters recede, there is the risk of them rising again? that's right. heavy rain yesterday and yesterday evening. it stopped overnight, but as you say, it has just started again. there are 38 pumps hard at work, pumping one ton of water a second, according to the environment agency, away from the spillage. the good news is they say flood levels a re spillage. the good news is they say flood levels are down by about 85%. however, take a look at trundle lane behind me, covered in water as you can see. some roads here are still very difficult to pass, even though the levels are lower. as you say, the levels are lower. as you say, the disruption is notjust here in south yorkshire. yesterday there was disruption across derbyshire, nottinghamshire, and lincolnshire as well. many rail services were hit,
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many roads were closed. so although things seem to be getting a little better here, normality is a long way away. saint cuthbert‘s church, as we have seen over the last few days, still a refuge for many people, softer nations keep coming in, bedding and clothing and blankets. —— those donations keep coming. it is easier to get in and out of the village now because levels are lower, but life is not back to normal yet. and our sympathies are certainly with the people there who have lost homes and had their businesses damaged. tim, thank you. we will catch up with you later. more than 22,00016—to—25—year—olds will be homeless or at risk of homelessness this christmas, according to the charity, centrepoint. the figures are based on new data it has collected from councils across england. young adults make up around a quarter of those seeking help. the government says it has provided £76 million to help reduce rough sleeping. the number of children being admitted to hospital in england with a severe allergic
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reaction has risen every year for the past five years. nhs figures show more than 1,700 children were treated for anaphylactic shock in the last year compared to more than 1,000 in 2013. children under 10 were most likely to be affected. non—stop flights between london and sydney could be one step closer, after a test flight beat all previous records for speed and distance. the qantas plane touched down in the early hours of this morning, after 19 hours and 19 minutes in the air. the 40 passengers and crew onboard wore special sensors to monitor the impact of the flight on their bodies. it is 7:08am, and i am on my own on the sofa this morning because charlie has gone to aberdeen, where he has taken our general election rota, he has got the coffee cuts up
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there and he has got lots of activities going on as well. i have just been looking on social media this morning, people have noticed the training facility you are out, and they are quite keen that you participate, perhaps, a little bit more. they are thinking, the word "dunk" has been used, in the simulator this morning. can you promise that will come our way at some point in the next two hours? well, you know very well how these things work. if it were up to me, it is the health and safety guys, i can literally see them shaking their heads saying it is an absolute no—no. we will work on it, ok? that is the most i can give you. we are in aberdeen at this extraordinary training facility. the reason we are here as part of our general election coverage, as we go all over the uk asking people what they think about what the politicians are saying. but before we do more of that, let me tell you a little bit more about this place, set up of course because the oil and gas industry is so big here in aberdeen. real risks
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associated. this is where people come to train. right now, relatively calm. but things can change fast. watch this. ba nta m bantam buchan is an area known for its farming and its fishing. there are families here who have worked these waters for generations. are families here who have worked these waters for generationsm are families here who have worked these waters for generations. it is probably the best thing you can happen, you will get clarity, he was going to run the country. like his father before him, davy milne is a trawler man. he is clear what he wa nts trawler man. he is clear what he wants from politicians. we have a few issues. the main one is to get out of the common fishery policy, but we have a lot of problems with accruing in the fishing industry, and we need to do non—eu labour to come in. fishing communities like this are among the strongest supporters of brexit, but more widely across scotland, a majority of those who voted chose to remain as part of the eu. but what bantam buchan does share with lots of other constituencies right across scotland
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is the fact that it is a marginal seed, and there is everything to play for here. it is a fine line. you could ask i decide whether they would think it would go either way, andi would think it would go either way, and i think both would say, both snp and i think both would say, both snp and conservative, would say that deceit potential to be one. the other parties don't really have a standing here. liberal democrats did not really have a particularly strong showing and are almost non—existent. strong showing and are almost non-existent. certainty going forward is what this craft beer company in peterhead wants from this election. it is important we know the direction our country is going on. we deal with businesses in europe, and since we don't really know what has happened, we have really built up good relationships with these businesses, so to continue that going into the future would be ideal. for this community group, there are big questions singing out. what are the issues
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that are going to influence how you vote in the general election? independence for scotland. you feel strongly about it? oh, yes. aye. what about you, do you feel the same way? no, what about you, do you feel the same i what about you, do you feel the same way? no, i voted what about you, do you feel the same way? no, ivoted against independence and i voted to remain, purely because i do not think scotland has got enough to hold onto our self. no matter what the vote is, there is always going to be people that argue. going to be a hung parliament. it is never going to get resolved. an election dominated here and elsewhere by strong views, but... url still friends? of course we are! of course. the issues of brexit and scottish independence have defined recent elections in scotland. the noises from this campaign so far suggest this one is sounding no different. so, you can find the full list of
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candidates standing here by going to the election section of the bbc news website. we are in aberdeen this morning and we can talk more in—depth about some the big issues here. i'm joined by professor nicola mcewen from the centre of constitutional change at the university of edinburgh. fascinating place, this, and of course the oil and gas industry is so important to the scottish economy, more generally, but aberdeen particularly. yes, and to the uk economy, actually. a big issue in this campaign locally. set us up with the big picture at this general election, and how the parties are. in scotland, as everywhere else, this is a brexit election, but it is not just a brexit this is a brexit election, but it is notjust a brexit election. the other big constitutional issue dominating scottish politics is the issue of independence. it is a huge issue of independence. it is a huge issue in this campaign as well. how does that play out in terms of the parties? the snp is by some distance
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the biggest party in scotland. there are very the biggest party in scotland. there are very few people who would suggest anything other than the snp winning the election in scotland north of the border. the only doubt is by how much they win. and of course they are going into this campaign with the demand for a second independence referendum, and they feel that if they have a strong enough performance, that will help them to make the case for a transfer of power to enable them to hold another referendum. and that is almost, in the minds of the snp, thatis almost, in the minds of the snp, that is almost regardless of who might win in westminster? they think it gives them almost amoral pressure for whoever that government is?” think that is right. they will not argue that they have a mandate already anyway, but given that it is such a big issue in this campaign, if they do well, again and better than the last election, that will strengthen the demand from their perspective. talk to us a bit about
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the economy. 0ur coffee cart was out talking to a lot of people, and as you say, the two big political issues are the issues of scottish independence and brexit, but people have real lives, like everyone else, they are trying to make ends meet. what are the issues under the drivers there. the economy is always important in any election. public services, the nhs, they are important too. that is interesting in scotland because the nhs, health, it isa in scotland because the nhs, health, it is a devolved issue. so it is not really a n it is a devolved issue. so it is not really an area where the uk government makes policy... can you explain that more, so people are clear? those decisions are made by the scottish parliament, around health, education... health, education, environment, social care. so in theory, at least, people are not debating on that in this general election? people will vote whatever they want to vote on. and yes, absolutely, it is the scottish parliament that makes laws in those areas, but that does not mean they areas, but that does not mean they are not affected by decisions taken
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by the uk government and the uk parliament. not just brexit, by the uk government and the uk parliament. notjust brexit, of course. and in terms of, of course, this would be, at this point in time, one of the most important elections for scotland, relative to the uk parliament. probably in a very long time. well, it could be, and of course that might depend on the result. but at stake in this election is yes, it is about brea kfast election is yes, it is about breakfast —— brexit, but it is also about the future of the union, and thatis about the future of the union, and that is a big issue notjust for scotla nd that is a big issue notjust for scotland but for the whole of the uk. we tried to set this up moments ago. it seems relatively calm here but they have all been training in emergency situations. i think we can give a emergency situations. i think we can givea sign emergency situations. i think we can give a sign and they will make the situation changed to magically very suddenly. have a look.
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alarms alarm bell rings what you are seeing, i don't know if you can hear me. it's very loud in here. that would be simulating dropping a helicopter into water. we sat in there yesterday. as it drops into the water, it fills up within seven seconds and then you have a moment, you put out the emergency glass in the helicopter windows and escape. it is worth saying every time these are professionals, they know exactly what they are doing. and the reason they are doing this is to make it safer. he gets very
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noisy, as you can see here, trying to replicate real—life situations. so we will go from the noise here, and by way of contrast, to matt at aberdeen art gallery with the weather. thank you, very much. yes, much, much ,. good morning to you from the aberdeen art gallery here. it newly reopened after a four year redevelopment. the city of course has been very much based on the energy industry and things are changing as part of a renaissance of artand changing as part of a renaissance of art and culture in the area. this beautiful building has been reopened, opening up new spaces, ringing back some of the artwork which before there was no space for. and in galleries such as this one, it takes you through the reasons behind some of the art that is around. one of the stories behind it, and getting you involved in
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making your own art and understanding the processes that ta ke understanding the processes that take place. it is a beautiful building. it has been decoratively redone and is worth a visit if you are in the area. if it's raining, it is certainly worth reading to escape some of the weather you can get here in the north—east of scotland. believe it or not, this is one of the drier spots of scotland with only 30 days less rain than glasgow. it looks like nottingham has had its wettest day on record. the rain is a little bit patchy, more hit and miss i'm not quite as heavy or persistent. we still have low pressure close by, and we see rain feeding in. it's an easterly so we have a chilly wind flow at the moment. a chilly start to the west of scotland, northern ireland with a
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bit of frost, but here are some of the brightest conditions for the day. it is going to be a fairly grey day. it is going to be a fairly grey day once again. nothing too significant initially but it does look like something much wetter will spread in across the southeast, east anglia and into the midlands later this afternoon. temperatures may reach 10 degrees in southern areas, yesterday was the coldest day since february earlier this year. as we go through into the afternoon we will see things maybe not quite as cold as it has been in recent nights. a touch of frost where you have clear skies but a lot more cloud around. more rain and drizzle at times, rain starting in eastern parts will fizzle out as it pushes its way westwards. into the weekend, if you have plans it is going to be more of what you have seen, really. plenty of cloud, rain and drizzle at times. across southern counties of england it would be a bit sunnier than today, more cloud around for part of scotla nd today, more cloud around for part of scotland and northern ireland. but for many, temperatures staying in single figures. 0ne for many, temperatures staying in
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single figures. one or two spots in the south could reach 10 degrees. we should be frost free but there could be some in southern areas as we start with sunshine. some northerly wind and showers around western coasts in particular and then later on it does here make we could see something what a return to the east yet again. another cool day, temperatures up a little bit on what we have seen over the past few days. but as we going to next week, a respite from rain at last and things tony vidmar it. but we're still going to see some rain. as i said, this particular gallery is all about interactivity. if you just leave it to me, naga, iwill get interactivity. if you just leave it to me, naga, i will get on with sorting that out. what did you contribute to that other than the cloud, matt? there arejust contribute to that other than the cloud, matt? there are just the clouds. laughter
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i'm glad it doesjust —— i'm glad he does the weather. "consider your safety when out campaigning and avoid going alone" — that's the latest advice to candidates standing in the general election. it's the first time prospective mps have been given any safety guidance. so why‘s it needed? we're joined now by martin hewitt, chair of the national police chiefs' council. why now? good morning. police forces have always given advise to candidates, but this is the first time we are doing it from a national perspective. i'm running an operation to make sure we have a safe and secure election. and we're doing itjointly. this isjointly with the college of policing, it is with the college of policing, it is with the college of policing, it is with the crown prosecution service
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and the electoral commission. and i think there is a number of reasons why: the first one is a think we would all accept that we have got a pretty highly charged political atmosphere at the moment and we're going into a general election. there are going to be over 6000 candidates over the country out campaigning, and we want to ensure they are safe. and of course what we have seen and is well documented, an increase in individual and intimidation and harassment of members of parliament that we have been dealing within the police service. so we are concerned on that level. and any other unusual aspect is first time for nearly a hundred years we have an election taking place in november — december. so much of this campaigning is going to be taking place after dark. we thought it was really important that the police have a role in making sure we have a safe election that is able to run in the way it should run, and obviously we care about the safety a nd run, and obviously we care about the safety and security of all those individual candidates. so it was a goodidea individual candidates. so it was a good idea to put some advice and guidance out there and to provide them understanding of what they ought to look out for, simple advise
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to protect themselves and also the contact points into policing. we have a dedicated detective superintendent in every force in the country who can provide advice and guidance and we obviously stand ready to deal with any incidents prom ptly ready to deal with any incidents promptly and effectively to make sure the election runs smoothly. to give viewers the idea of the number of offences, in 2018, the number of offences reported doubled, more than 340. you mention some factors as to why candidates may be eight risk, what do you think has driven the rise in the number of reported incidents? —— at risk. rise in the number of reported incidents? -- at risk. i think our political atmosphere has been highly charged, and that causes people to feel that they need to do that, to ta ke feel that they need to do that, to take those kind of actions. which i think has been unfortunate and very unpleasant for those members of parliament who had to deal with this. i think also we have seen a
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high proportion of incidents online, they are being delivered through some form of social media or other online platform. that phenomenon on wouldn't have been there as much as it would have been in the past. there is a combination of factors. but it's recognising all of that that we realise we need to — we've a lwa ys that we realise we need to — we've always been involved in making election savours the police service, but we realise in all of the particular circumstances this time, it was important every candidate understood their is guidance, points of co nta ct understood their is guidance, points of contact and we are able to help them. and we are able to conduct the election campaign safely and securely. do you think this advice should stretch to anyone out canvassing, considering it is a highly politically charged environment? absolutely. and so everything that i've said in all of the instruction that has gone out to the instruction that has gone out to the forces is we call it the
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candidates because they are the primary individual, but all candidates will be with others campaigning with them. we have a mechanism well i'll —— where i will get reports and they will all be treated with the same level of seriousness. this is about all of us getting to december 12 with everybody being able to go out and do the campaigning they want to do, have the debates and discussions they want to do, but everyone doing it safely. and police services across the country are to make sure that that happens. martin hewitt, chair of the national police chiefs council, thank you very much for joining me on breakfast this morning. it is 6:27am. charlie is in aberdeen, getting a taste of the election and how people are responding to that. i am here with you in salford, and we have boris johnson joining you in salford, and we have boris johnsonjoining us in these you in salford, and we have boris johnson joining us in these so far —— on the sofa in 30 minutes. now to find out what is happening near you this morning. good morning from bbc
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london news, i'm alex bushell. in their first tv interview, the family of one of the youngest murder victims in the capital has told bbc london he was "a talented boy who had the rest of his life to lead." 15—year—old ba ptista ad—jay from north woolwich was attacked on stratford broadway in east london on his way home from school last month. it's been like, hard, because it's affected me in school as well. mm. and, like, me and baptista, we used to share one room. so, like, we used to do basically everything together. and when i'm thinking about it, i'll go on to his bed to... like, i feel that he's there. over half of london's specialist treatment centres for alcohol dependency have closed in the last decade, according to figures from the uk addiction treatment group. the capital has almost 90,000 people with an alcohol dependency. but of the 42 clinics available to treat people with alcoholism,
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only 18 are still open. let's look at the travel situation this morning. you can see the board, on the jubilee line this morning. you can see the board, on thejubilee line there are minor delays due to train shortages. 0n the metropolitan line, northbound from baker street to wembley park there are also minor delays. that is due to a faulty train. severe delays in the overground and on tfl rail from liverpool street to enfield, so quite a lot going on there, you have been warned. 0n liverpool street station, platforms 5—12 out of service. it is causing disruption. 0 nto service. it is causing disruption. 0nto the road, northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach, as you can see on the right of the screen with the traffic queueing, that is slow going from the willis road flyover. the m25 is also down to two lanes clockwise towards junction 5 at the m26. and
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in southwark, closures between southwark street and union street as well. let's take a quick look at the all—important well. let's take a quick look at the all—importa nt weather now well. let's take a quick look at the all—important weather now with kate and seller. —— kate kinsella. good morning. a chilly start but temperatures above zero so it remains frost—free. some outbreaks of rain through this morning, and yes, it still remains cold. some patches of mist as well, especially around the home counties. some outbreaks of rain are coming on that north—easterly breeze, quite a fresh breeze, actually, throughout the day. so that will feel cold and then heavy rain as head through the afternoon. temperatures between 7—9 celsius. factor in the wind and it is going to feel colder. now, we still have outbreaks of rain overnight, turning lighter and patchier, though, as we head through to saturday morning. clearer spells developing further south, still chilly but again above zero. 2—4 celsius as a minimum. so we head into the weekend to saturday. anywhere south of the m4, really,
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we could see brighter spells, maybe even some sunshine. further north, though, it is going to remain rather cloudy, the cloud thick enough to produce outbreaks of rain and through the weekend it is still staying rather cold. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. join me than if you can. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty, and charlie stayt in aberdeen. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. labour is promising free ultra—fast broadband for every home and business in the uk within ten years, if it wins the general election. the party says it will re—nationalise parts of bt to deliver the policy, which will be announced byjeremy corbyn later today. the bbc‘s business editor simonjack is in our london newsroom. simon, you've spoken to the boss of bt. what was his reaction?
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yeah, i managed to catch him. he is in san francisco at the moment, i spoke to him late last night and it is fairto spoke to him late last night and it is fair to say this was a surprise to him. bt was not on the list of nationalisation candidates, as recently as julyjohn mcdonnell said he had no plans to nationalise bt. so this was a bit of a shock. 0ne thing the boss did say was, listen, iam glad thing the boss did say was, listen, i am glad fast broadband is a national priority, but it is fair to say he didn't think this was the right way to go. first, he disputes how much it would cost. the labour party says £20 billion, he says it would be closer to £40 billion. he also says if you are going to give broadband away for free you are spending £40 billion getting rid of something and you are getting rid of the revenue stream that you get associated with that. so that is a cost which over many years would actually bring it to nearly £100 billion. and he said, listen, if you are going to do this, what does it mean for the competition? if you are
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going to get free broadband from bt, what will that do to the likes of sky, two virgin media? john mcdonnell says he hopes that those suppliers will get on board, and went as far as saying that if they did not, he would consider taking them into private ownership anyway. soi them into private ownership anyway. so i think it is fair to say that all parties agree people need fast broadband, and there are very, very different ideas about how to produce that. keep an eye on bt‘s share price. it was not a candidate for nationalisation, so let's see if there —— where their shares open, because it will give us a read on how likely the markets will think jeremy corbyn is to be the next prime minister. thank you, simon. for the first time in a general election, every candidate will receive a leaflet advising them on how to protect themselves. the document, which has been drawn up by policing, legal and electoral experts, tells prospective mps when and how to report any abuse or threats to the police.
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more than 140 flood warnings are in place across england and wales this morning, with more rain on the way. in fishlake in south yorkshire, pumps have been working through the night to protect homes and businesses. some streets in the village have now been flooded for more than a week. the number of children being admitted to hospital in england with a severe allergic reaction has risen every year for the past five years. nhs figures show over 1,700 children were treated for anaphylactic shock in the last year compared to more than 1,000 in 2013. children under 10 were most likely to be affected. police have foiled an attempt to steal valuable pictures from the dulwich picture gallery in london. staff say the actions of security and the police meant two rembrandts never left the grounds, after an intruder broke into the gallery on wednesday night. the exhibition will remain closed while a full investigation takes place.
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their time is now 7:33am. so, theirtime is now 7:33am. so, drama at the art gallery, and there was drama at the pitch last night. yes, there was. loads of goals. a thrashing? i think you would call 7-08 thrashing? i think you would call 7—08 thrashing, yes. thrashing? i think you would call 7-08 thrashing, yes. they only needed a point. yes, it was a big night last night, it was the 1000th game england have played, so they wa nted game england have played, so they wanted to put on a show. lots of fa nfa re ? wanted to put on a show. lots of fanfare? yes, lots of former players there to pay tribute to that england side over the years, and that it was down to gareth southgate and his tea m down to gareth southgate and his team to try to secure euros qualification, which they did co mforta bly. qualification, which they did comfortably. a big win over montenegro at wembley. alex 0xlade—chamberlain with their first in what proved an impressive performance. captain harry kane with a hat—trick, he's now fifth on the list of england's all—time record goalscorers. marcus rashford added another before chelsea's tammy abra ham scored his first full international goal. the one low point, joe gomez booed as he came on following his clash with raheem sterling this week.
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the reason i wanted to getjoe on the pitch tonight is he has been with us september—october, and not got him into the games. i know that i'm going to start raheem on sunday and get him back onto the pitch as well, it was important for both of them to get back on the field with england and show everybody that we're all in this now. this is what sterling had to say about the booing. clearly, you know, a very classy response there from raheem sterling. he is drawing a line under this
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incident. he was dropped from the tea m incident. he was dropped from the team for that game, fine, he says he supports his teammate, job done, yvonne. absolutely, and such just cements that point he has taken. —— job done, move on. after their epic wimbledon final it was roger federer who came out on top this time in their first meeting since the summer, beating novak djokovic in straight sets to reach the semifinals of the atp tour finals in london. his defeat also means that rafael nadal will end the season as world number one, but he also faces a fight to reach the last four. catriona matthew will get the chance to do what no other european captian has managed before as she stays on lead the team at the next solheim cup. she oversaw a thrilling victory over the united states on home soil and will get the chance to retain the cup in ohio, in 2021. no european captain has ever won two in a row. and this amused us this morning, as tommy fleetwood encountered an unusual hazard while playing in south africa. after a decent shot onto the green at sun city, his ball was interfered with by a couple of mongeese. fleetwood saw the funny side though,
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quickly posting to social media asking "anyone know the rule for a mongoose attack on your golf ball? got to love sun city!" i knew. if the ball has come to rest and then an outside force moves it, you can replace the bolts of the original point where it came to rest. that is sad, isn't it? do you know what that tells you? that i read the rules of golf. it means you play a lot! my idea of, you know, assembling an elite group of trains mongoose to many that your ball towards the whole, it sort of does away with that. —— trained mongoose. even though i checked the dictionary, i could not figure out the plural of mongoose. mongooses, mongeese. i thought i was sure, but i thought i was sure about the rules of golf as well. in about 25 minutes
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the prime minister will be sitting where you are. i should vacate the spot, then. i hope i leave it in a reasonable state. no scripts lying around. yes, tidy it up. shipshape. thank you very much. children in need night tonight, and there's lots going on to raise money for some good causes. we can join holly hamilton who's at a primary school in salford, where they're getting moving with the help of a special guest. good morning. yes, good morning. it is that time of year, children in need. as if the ears didn't give it away. so many of you right across the country are doing your bit to raise money for teenagers, young people and children right across the country. one man has been a very busy boy. joe wicks, known to many of you as the body coach. he is the first ever children in need schools ambassador. 0ver first ever children in need schools ambassador. over the past ten days he has been visiting schools right
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across the country, getting them superfit, and more importantly, raising money for children in need. iam going raising money for children in need. i am going to grab you for two seconds. you guys keep going, don't stop. mid warmup! it is a very important part. we caught up in northern ireland ten days ago, to be exact — might be exact. what have you done since then?” exact — might be exact. what have you done since then? i have been all over the place. i was in glasgow, belfast, wales, being on this bbc tour with children in need visiting ten schools as part of the move for. love to engage with the kids, see the smiles, today is the combination of that habit because now we will have a live stream to every school and you can hopefully hundreds of thousands of kids will take part. earlier to see the reactions of the children as well, they love it. it gets them up and moving first thing in the morning and puts a smile on theirface. in the morning and puts a smile on their face. this is my mission, i went to ireland and northern ireland, iam really went to ireland and northern ireland, i am really enjoying the school ‘s work, seeing kids at a young age engaging with venice.
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imagine children having fun in getting fit and getting motivated and excited while raising money for charity. it is an amazing idea and we have really connected with so many kids this week. pugsblush has been amazing, we have got —— pugs has been amazing, and we have got them three mackie. i look around and pugsis them three mackie. i look around and pugs is doing starjumps, squats, burpees. kids are excited to see me because i do the youtube stuff, but when pugs walks in, it makes it fun for them. i really believe in the mission of burpees —— the mission of children in need. as for you guys, very quickly tell me, what does it mean for you to get involved with children in need? i feel like it is very important for all the children to get as much alpine support as they can. and it is great fun because you get to do this with your friends as well. tell me, did you
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wa nt to friends as well. tell me, did you want to get up this early in the morning and to exercise, be honest? not really, but forjoe, it is always worth it, if you are fit and healthy it is great for your future. exactly, it is all for children in need. we have got the temp two taking place at nine o'clock this morning. if you don't want to get up early like we are, it is on youtube and you can watch it later. —— we have got the big morning move taking place at nine o'clock this morning. i would rather them than me this morning, i think. i would rather them than me this morning, ithink. good i would rather them than me this morning, i think. good on them. the big morning move, withjoe wicks and holly hamilton. she is actually more fit than you would realise, she is very fit. she will putjoe wicks through his paces. the children in need appeal show will be live on bbc one tonight from 7:30. matt is at aberdeen art gallery
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with the weather this morning. and now you have moved up to the roof, lovely. you do like a good balcony. yes, anything with a few of the clouds. i am at aberdeen art gallery this morning, this is a newly opened balcony, not accessible before. they have added an extra floor to the art gallery here. up towards the east, the sun is slowly coming up, it will be up in the next ten minutes. we have got the townhouse, saint nicholas church as well, beautiful examples of architecture there. just behind me, belmont street, one of the nicest rates in aberdeen. we are in the schoolhouse district of aberdeen, and it is here at the aberdeen art gallery where we have seen a massive multi—million pound development, trying to take the focus away from the energy industry and into the cultural renaissance of the city as well. it has been stunning to look around this brand—new, redeveloped place. and if you do get to come here, why not come and enjoy the view as well? it is dry at the moment. i wish i could say it will be dry anywhere. it will not be as wet as it has been. it looks like
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some parts of nottinghamshire have had their wettest autumn on record, particularly around the nottingham area. the rain today will be lighter and patchy. that is the good news. some of the 140 plus flood warnings should start to come down a little bit, they will be somewhat wetter, the low pressure is still very close by. some of their wettest what has been across parts of northern england in southern scotland. but will peter out. things will brighten up will peter out. things will brighten up in southern scotland and northern england compared to this morning. the best of the sunshine across western scotland and northern ireland, where some people will stay dry all day. much of england and wales will be fairly cloudy, occasional rain, later eastern england, especially across the east midlands, east anglia and the south—east, we will see long spells of rain returning, but not at the level we have seen so far this week. a chilly day again. temperatures might reach 10 degrees. for many, 5— nine will be the highs. that ran across east anglia will push further west, turning lighter and patchy. still rain and drizzle for many across eastern england and wales
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overnight. but. temperatures from dropping too much lengthier clear skies, scotland and northern ireland, we see a touch of frost. if anything, tomorrow and into the weekend, scotland and northern ireland is generally cloudier, some spots of rain, many will be dry. we will see some occasional rain across england and wales, but a lot of dry weather too, generally cloudy, southern counties of england and wales hopefully a little bit more sunshine around tomorrow compared with today. that mightjust live temperatures by one degree also. into sunday. more of a northerly breeze across into sunday. more of a northerly breeze a cross western into sunday. more of a northerly breeze across western areas, so we will see showers running down those western coasts, chiefly south—western parts of wales in towards cornwall, and later on we could start to see heavy rain returning to eastern parts of england as well. again, all that rain is very much and welcome. temperatures will rise just a little bit into sunday. they will rise further as we go through the coming weeks. there is slightly good news for monday and tuesday, we should get a respite from the rain. we will see a bit more sunshine, morning frost, mist and fog, and at least
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after a ll frost, mist and fog, and at least after all the rain we have seen this week, we willjust get a short break at the very least. that is how it is looking here from the rooftop in aberdeen. looking out, a beautiful view here. a few miles behind the camera, is charlie, and i hope you are staying dry there. yes, the contrast can be greater between us and matt. what we are in a training facility here in aberdeen, which is so linked to the oil and gas industry. helicopters taking off all the time from here out of the oil rigs, safety paramount, hence what i am wearing now. we have come to one of the swimming pools where they do the exercises. you may remember ten yea rs exercises. you may remember ten years ago, 16 people died in a helicopter crash landing at aberdeen. they take this very seriously and we are getting a real sense about this morning. brock will be my guide to what is happening now. take us through. what are we looking at? we are simulating a scenario where
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they are ditching a helicopter. how much time do they have? there are a few seconds between letting the plane sink so the pressure rises, then opening the window —— so the pressure adjusts. now we get them into this life raft. so now they have escaped. 0ne into this life raft. so now they have escaped. one by one they are going to board. ok. so how many can we get in, do you think? it depends on the size and model of the helicopter. you can get 18 person rafts , helicopter. you can get 18 person rafts, this is 14% plus 10% overca pacity rafts, this is 14% plus 10% overcapacity in weight. —— this is a
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14 person raft, plus 10% overcapacity. so all of you guys are trained professionals, and this is why you get guys to come and learn how to stay safe. this scenario is rare, but we need them to be prepared or a more subdued —— multitude of situations, even worse case. and these people are doing this for the first time today? potentially there will be some later on, yes. i sat in the helicopter earlier on, but they say you have only a few seconds before it fills up. not everyone loves water, there are some challenges there. so, trying to get people through it who don't like being inside a body of water like this. so, we try to calm them down, reassure them and 90% of them down, reassure them and 90% of the time everyone goes through safe and sound. thank you for hosting us
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here today. the reason we're here todayis here today. the reason we're here today is about the general election campaign. we are going to be talking to quite a few people that are on. the prime minister will be speaking on breakfast in a few minutes. jayne mccubbin has been finding out over a hot drink served from the bbc breakfast coffee cart. the coffee cart has arrived in the granite city and our coffee is distinctly average. what's my mark out of ten? i'll give you a five. that bad? sheila has been making better copy here for 12 years now. yeah, it's been 12 years. what was it like? it was fantastic, so busy. but times have changed, footfall‘s not what it used to be. liz has lived here all her life. tea with milk. how has it changed in 71 years? it's gotten worse.
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you see homeless folk begging in the streets. does there seem to be more poverty? 0h, aye. with the chill of the global recession wasn't found here for a long time. aberdeen was cushioned by the boom of north sea oil. butjeff tells me when the crash hit here in 2014, it hit hard. 0il went to $224 a barrel, but then it went down to $24, so it was a severe crash. mark is one of 65,000 who lost a job in that crash. did you think you could lose it all? 0h, absolutely. lose the house, lose the car, how would we get through this, i thought. and we were lucky in that we had resources and were able to eventually get through that and come through the other side. but it was scary? but it was scary. today he helps other people going through crises. it can affect anyone. housing issues can affect anyone.
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and it can happen very quickly. yeah. but the sector is far from over. there's plenty of life left in the north sea, but there's — it's getting harder to get hold of. this industry has helped make aberdeen one of the most multicultural cities in the uk. just over 25% of the population here are non—british and the majority voted to remain. immigrants are taking anyone's jobs, they are doing the jobs, they are vital to the economy. how many sugars? four sugars. it's notjust oil that brings people in, aberdeen has two universities. one, two, three, four. macy lee is from alabama. there are a lot of international students? yeah, i only know one scottish person. really?! yeah.
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she plans to stay after university — the pull notjust the scenery, but also the nhs. i didn't know about or have my heart problem checked out until i got here. really? i did have to pay a lump sum for my visa, but after that i will pay in taxes. i think the nhs, it's obviously very — it is overloaded right now, but it being privatised is so terrifying. and so we leave — minus one mug. so the cart will be going all over the country. we have a full list of candidates on the bbc news website so you can see that on screen now. we are saying as well if you have any questions you would like answered, you any questions you would like answered , you can any questions you would like answered, you can send them in. that's to yourquestions@bbc.co.uk or via the hashtag #bbcyourquestions. we'll be putting some of them to our scotland editor,
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sarah smith, a little later in the programme. just after 830 a.m. and the prime minister will be on the bbc brea kfast minister will be on the bbc breakfast so far just after eight a.m.. so we will try and pick up on some of his thoughts with people here after that. so, as you have just by now, we are in aberdeen. this place is so important, the oil and gas industry is so important. we are ina and gas industry is so important. we are in a training facility, but over the harbour, nina is where so many of those ships come in. there are those ships, charlie. there are some mornings when this is the bestjob in the world. look at that view. these boats in a spectacular sunrise. they take food and people out to the regs. there are 900 companies built around oil and gas in aberdeen, 30,000 jobs in the
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industry. so you might think it is ring—fenced from what happens politically. let's find out what is the case. what is you —— what are you looking for in this campaign? we are hoping that politicians really understand and recognise the contribution that this industry still makes in terms of thousands of jobs, security of energy supply and also the billions of pounds in taxes contributed. and what does that mean? you want support? its recognition of the contribution and seeing us as a force that can help with solutions for the energy transition. we are parts of comet we contributed to the wellbeing of this country and we want to be part of the solution as well for the future. because all of the main parties are putting green energy firmly on the agenda. what does that mean in terms of how agile you need to be on changing your direction? there are we do, and we have seen companies moving into that space. this is an
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exciting opportunity for the industry, and as well as oil and gas they are looking into floating, offshore wind farms. so whoever wins this election, green is good news for you? . deborah, this election, green is good news foryou? . deborah, you have this election, green is good news for you? . deborah, you have nothing to do with oil and gas, you work in biodiversity and research, scientific research. what do you wa nt to scientific research. what do you want to hear from scientific research. what do you want to hearfrom politicians scientific research. what do you want to hear from politicians ahead of december 12? want to hear from politicians ahead of december12? i think want to hear from politicians ahead of december 12? i think for our sector and for me, it is investment in life sciences, a sector that is incredibly important in terms of the local economy and economy nationally as well. so investing in that sector, not just funding as well. so investing in that sector, notjust funding for academic research and in terms of business is, but also in skills and the talent that we need as well and recognising the importance of life sciences and biomedicine to the uk. and we're hearing that a with businesses, the skills gap is more important than brexit for some?
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absolutely. and without a pipeline of talent and making sure we have the people who have the skills for the people who have the skills for the future of our sector, there is going to be a sustainable and growing life science sector in the uk. so investment in life sciences but also education and further education? just, you work in a bar, but you have also started your own gin distillery. exports, is not the same for you? i think is a small business, that porters gin distillery started five years ago, we are already quite reliant on exports and imports as well. we have a whole manufacturing supply chain andl a whole manufacturing supply chain and i think that, yeah, it is something. when the deadline passed, you were telling me you needed to import bottle tops from spain. even though we are a small business, problems with exports and imports can seriously affect the company.
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import seeing stoppers from spain or portugal, we relied on the brexit extension in order to get them in time for us to sell bottles before christmas, basically. and for a small company that is like the difference between making money this christmas and not. so, yeah, hugely important for us. we rely on smooth important for us. we rely on smooth import export and freedom to sell as much product as possible, really. import export and freedom to sell as much product as possible, reallym must be incredibly frustrating, waiting to see what happens. it's been an interesting morning in aberdeen. and just like bishop auckland, there is no—one thing driving votes when it comes to business in this election. we will be going across the country to find out what other businesses have to say. let's get the news, travel and weather wherever you are having your brea kfast weather wherever you are having your breakfast this morning. just look at that! good morning from bbc london.
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i'm alex bushill. in their first tv interview, the family of one of the youngest murder victims in the capital has told bbc london he was a talented boy who had the rest of his life to lead. 15—year—old ba ptista adjei from north woolwich was attacked on stratford broadway in east london on his way home from school last month. it's been like, hard, because it's affected me in school as well. mm. and, like, me and baptista, we used to share one room. so, like, we used to do basically everything together. and when i'm thinking about it, i'll go on to his bed to... like, i feel that he's there. over half of london's specialist treatment centres for alcohol dependency have closed in the last decade, according to figures from the uk addiction treatment group. the capital has almost 90,000 people with an alcohol dependency. but of the 42 clinics available to treat people with alcoholism in 2013, only 18 remain open today.
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let's ta ke let's take a look at the travel situation. 0n the tube, there's minor delays on thejubilee line due to trains shortages and on the metropolitan line northbound from baker street to wembley park due to a faulty train. severe delays too on the 0verground between highbury & islington and on tfl rail from liverpool street to enfield town. 0n the trains, at liverpool street station — platforms five to 12 are out of use due to a points failure — disrupting greater anglia services and the stansted express. northbound traffic on the blackwall tunnel southern approach is slow from the woolwich road flyover. the m25 is down to two lanes clockwise, headed towardsjunction 5 at the m26 after a broken—down lorry. roadworks continue on the hampton
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court road near church street in hampton, with westbound tailbacks all the way to the hampton court itself. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it's another chilly start out there this morning but temperatures above zero, so it remains frost—free. one or two patches of mist around as well, especially out towards the home counties. some outbreaks of rain through this morning, and yes, it still remains cold. now, these outbreaks of rain are coming down on that north—easterly breeze. quite a fresh breeze, actually, through parts of the day. so that will feel cold. and then heavy rain as we head through the afternoon. temperatures between 7—9 celsius. factor in the wind, it is going to feel a bit colder. now, we've still got some outbreaks of rain overnight, turning lighter and patchier, though, as we head through to saturday morning. clearer spells developing further south, still chilly but again above zero. between 2—4 celsius as a minimum. so we head into the weekend for saturday. anywhere south of the m4, really, we could see brighter spells —
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maybe even some sunshine. further north, though, it is going to remain rather cloudy, the cloud thick enough to produce some outbreaks of rain. and through the weekend it is still staying rather cold. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in around half an hour. good morning. welcome to breakfast. i'm in salford and charlie is in aberdeen this morning. 0ur headlines today...
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the prime ministerjoins us on the breakfast sofa shortly, for the first of our interviews with party leaders as the campaign is dominated by more spending pledges. labour promises free broadband for everyone. it says it will nationalise part of bt and tax tech giants to raise £20 billion for it. more spending pledges — the liberal democrats promise £100 billion to tackle climate change. the conservatives say they'll help left—behind towns. good morning. the election road trip heads to scotland. we will have reaction to the prime minister's interview on bbc breakfast, talking about brexit, immigration and scottish independence. england seal their place at euro 2020 with a huge win. harry kane scores a first—half hatrick as they beat montenegro 7—0 at wembley.
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more than 140 flood warnings in force after heavy rain. we will be in yorkshire where the pumps have been going all night. some spots of england have now had their wettest autumn on record. still reign over the next few days but thankfully not as heavy or persistent as it has been. i will have the full forecast from aberdeen art gallery. good morning to you. in just under a month, the public will decide who to back in this general election. during the campaign we're inviting the leaders of all the main parties to appear on the breakfast sofa for extended interviews. the first of them is the prime minister and conservative party leader, borisjohnson. good morning. good morning. pleasure to have you with us. i suppose what we wa nt to have you with us. i suppose what we want from the interviews is to get some clarity from party leaders and getan get some clarity from party leaders and get an idea of who you are and
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what you and in your case the conservative party wants to achieve if you win the general election, and if you win the general election, and if you win the general election, and if you remain prime minister. that's the idea for the next 25 minutes. is that all right for you? very good, do you want me to launch in?” that all right for you? very good, do you want me to launch in? i will guide you through it. your main campaign slogan and message for the election is to get brexit done. and to unleash the potential of the whole country. the first part of that, it's pretty clear that by january 31 next year brexit will not be done. will it nearly be done? that we will be out of the eu and that's the most important thing. and more than technically, legally in terms of our money, borders, laws, our ability to do things differently and free trade deals. we will be out, and it will be a great opportunity for the country. let's be clear, by the end of january we will still be paying the same money into the eu budget. we will still be
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following eu rules and regulations by the end of january and following eu rules and regulations by the end ofjanuary and until following eu rules and regulations by the end of january and until the end of the transition period. but it will be up to us, and that's the crucial thing. we've got a great deal to come out of the eu. people saidi deal to come out of the eu. people said i couldn't do it and it was impossible and we did it within the three months we had. what it means is that we take back control as a country of money, borders and laws and you can do free trade deals and most importantly the whole of the uk comes out. england, scotland, wales and northern ireland come out together. the great thing is business has the certainty, to get your point about the transition period, business has the certainty until the end of 2020 that the same arrangements will continue to apply and we will continue to have zero ta riffs and we will continue to have zero tariffs and zero freedoms with our european friends and partners but there is absolutely no reason why
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between january and the end there is absolutely no reason why betweenjanuary and the end of next year we shouldn't complete that free trade deal and have a wonderful new partnership with the eu based on zero tariffs, zero quotas and getting on to develop all the other ways in which we want to be a pro—european country. ways in which we want to be a pro-european country. what is interesting, the original schedule that had to be delayed, you have delayed it, the conservative party has delayed it. whoa, i would say, with great respect, parliament refused to dot at while you lead it, while your party was leading brexit negotiations. we wanted to come out and parliament blocked us, which is why we have to have the election. i don't want the election now, i would rather parliament hadn't blocked our deal, we could have got it over the line. but we are where we are. when it comes to the end ofjanuary, if you win the general election and get
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this deal through and if we technically leave the eu, comejuly you have said there will be no further extension to the transition period. that leads to not asking for an extension byjuly one. have you said that? i have. iwant an extension byjuly one. have you said that? i have. i want to make it clear for the viewers. july the 1st, you will not ask for an extension of. no, i don't want an extension. that gives you from the end of january to july one that gives you from the end of january tojuly one to make sure you have some agreement with the eu in five months. yes, and we can do it! most of the time the sorts of deals ta ke two most of the time the sorts of deals take two years. there is no reason why we can't get cracking long before july. we why we can't get cracking long beforejuly. we will come out of the eu in january. beforejuly. we will come out of the eu injanuary. 0n developing the free trade partnership, we will have bags of time to do it will stop don't forget, the great advantage is
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we are already in a state of perfect alignment when it comes to our tariffs, quotas, our industrial regulatory standards. so the deal we will be doing with the eu is unlike any other deal they have ever done. they are doing it with a state that is already in perfect harmony with their arrangements. so all we have to do is protract those arrangements where appropriate, come out of regulatory alignment and setup, you know, a joint committee so we can discuss how we do any... if there are any further changes we want to make we can discuss those together. but the uk from next year will get on with doing things differently. everything from cutting vat on tampons, to banning the export of live animals, which is so cruel, to putting free ports around the uk, revitalising coastal areas, doing incredible things with cutting tax
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rates on investment in research and development to free trade deals. we can development to free trade deals. we ca n start development to free trade deals. we can start to regulate differently and take advantage of leaving the eu. and much more importantly, this government, if we are re—elected with a working majority, will be able to get on with the priorities of the british people. and if we can get brexit done, which i hope we can, by january, then get brexit done, which i hope we can, byjanuary, then we will be able to get on with lifting the living wage by the biggest ever amount, making the biggest ever investments in the nhs, which we can all see is so absolutely vital. investing in our education and levelling up education funding.” wa nt to levelling up education funding.” want to come on to... we have a fantastic one nation agenda. brexit can turbo—charge that agenda. fantastic one nation agenda. brexit can turbo-charge that agenda. let me ask you quickly, so far you have missed three deadlines, the conservative party missed three brexit deadlines, the 29th of march,
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the end of april and halloween. can you guarantee you will not miss this, you will not change or extend this, you will not change or extend this 1st ofjuly 2020 deadline. can you guarantee it? if we get a working majority, absolutely. and all we need is nine more seats, then we can absolutely guarantee it. the problem is, and everyone can see it, andi problem is, and everyone can see it, and i knew it would be tough when i took over, but parliament, as you remember, past that very destructive a cts remember, past that very destructive acts that put the decision in the hands of the eu. the so—called surrender act, the benn act that made it very difficult for us. although parliament did preliminary approve the deal but voted to extend yet again. and it refused to get it over the line. i'm afraid to say this, this is election time and i have to say this, but it wasjeremy corbyn and the labour party who were
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responsible for the delay. what i'm going to say to you, i started the interview and you agreed this is important, this is about clarity, about you and the conservative party. | about you and the conservative party. i will not say anything more about the dither and delay. we will ask all the other leaders and focus on them in the same way. let's talk about you. let's talk about the nhs, about you. let's talk about the nhs, a much loved institution. you have mentioned it already. it's important toa mentioned it already. it's important to a lot of people. when was the last time you or a member of your family needed to use nhs services? i... iam family needed to use nhs services? i... i am fortunate enough to say i have a wonderful hospital in hillingdon in uxbridge where i represent. foolishly i was making a barbecue and there was a bit of broken glass on the ground. and for some reason or other, a cafetiere.
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someone had dropped it. i was jumping up and down, music was playing, and a piece of glass went into the bottom of my foot. it was absolute agony. it went away for a while. so you went to the hospital? hillingdon were incredible. this was last year. my family use it all the time. when you went there and spoke to staff, who would have recognised you, did anyone say, we are fine. shall i tell you what they said? yes. thank you for asking the question. they said what they needed was more investment, which is what we are providing with the biggest ever cash investment in the nhs of £34 billion. we want to continue to do that, and the crucial way we can continue to do that is by having a strong, robust and dynamic economy, which is what we one nation
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conservative a believe in. but not just hillingdon hospital, but 39 others, we want to rebuild it. as a result of the decisions this government has taken in the last three months, we will build 40 new hospitals and upgrade 20. it's not just putting money into bricks and mortar and machines and scanners, this is about also helping doctors, employing tens of thousands more nurses, employing many more thousands of gps. that helps to reduce waiting times. i know yesterday the statistics came out and what they show is that we need us and what they show is that we need us to fund the nhs, to keep funding it and support it. the statistics yesterday showed, and i would like to see your reaction to these statistics. i was keen to see them yesterday when they came out. the
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most damning statistics for nhs england were released. a&e targets we re england were released. a&e targets were the worst since records began 15 years ago. it hasn't been hit at all since 2015. cancer targets have not been hit since 2015. routine ca re not been hit since 2015. routine care waiting times have not been hit since 2016, all during a conservative government. that's why we are now investing the record amount. the reason, by the way, the nhs is facing massive demand, and it's incredibly successful as an organisation. and your annual spending increase since 2010 when the conservatives came to power on the conservatives came to power on the nhs have fallen to 1.3%. the money you are proposing, which is £25 billion, which is correct... that's not correct. the correct number is £34 billion. you will
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increase spending by 3.4%, and the figure we have is 20.5 billion. well, the figure we are spending is 34 billion. it's the biggest increase in modern memory in the nhs. iwant increase in modern memory in the nhs. i want to repeat, we want to spend it and are spending it on recruiting thousands more nurses, thousands more gps and that will enable us to meet the demand of the nhs. but you can only do that if you have a dynamic and robust economy. i know you don't want me to mention any other political parties, i understand that, but the debt that labour would rack up with their economic policies would make it impossible for us to make long—term investments in public services that we need. we are committed to long—term funding. we will legislate for long—term funding for the nhs. that's what i believe in. and that
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is the... what i believe in, and you said you wanted to discover what is at the heart of our agenda and what we believe in as politicians. well, i think this country is the greatest place on earth, a fantastic country, but its success depends on two things being in balance. 0ne but its success depends on two things being in balance. one of them is fantastic public services and the other is a fantastic market economy. an economy where business can take on new business. at the moment business is stymied and frustrated by the refusal of parliament to get brexit done and move on. there is a huge amount of investment and economic growth that is just waiting to happen if we can get brexit done. you mention bringing in more staff. former health secretary jeremy you mention bringing in more staff. former health secretaryjeremy hunt under the conservative government has committed to more gps, 5000 more in 2015. are you committed to
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bringing in 6000 more gps in the next five years. the number of gps that has risen is actually 272. i put it to you that the average increase in spending is going to be low. lower than the institute for fiscal studies says it needs to be, which they say is 4%. you have offered 3.4%. you haven't increase gps like you promised. three months ago i stood on the steps of downing street and said what we were going to do when i first became prime minister. we are committed, as i say, to upgrading 20 hospitals and 40 new ones will be built. we will recruit thousands more nurses. by the way, there are 17,000 more nurses already under this government than there were when labour left office. i have only been in for three months... you have been in the
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government for longer. 17,000 new nurses. when labour left office in 2010, as with every labour government, they had wrecked the economy. unemployment, as with every labour government, was higher than when they began and debts were massively higher. since 2010. .. and as liam byrne at the treasury said, there is no money left. since 2010 you say you have managed the economy sensibly. you have been in powerfor nine years, your party. let me show you the state of someone who is experience of the nhs, which you say you are so proud of at this moment. this is peter tuck, whose mother—in—law, jill — she's 88 and has dementia — spent six hours on a trolley in a+e. it was better. there were trolleys in the corridors and in doorways. they were bringing trolleys in, moving your trolley and pushing you further and further and further,
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fitting two people in that way and to make people in that way. they we re to make people in that way. they were having to move trolleys to get more trolleys by. it didn't stop, as you nipped out to the toilet and things like that, they were waiting in the door is ready to come in. how do you feel about that?” in the door is ready to come in. how do you feel about that? i sympathise very much for peter's experience and his mother. we have got to do better now. i don't deny that. that doesn't mean i'm not also incredibly proud of what the nhs is achieving. you look at other health services around the world, we have amazing staff and doctors. yes, we need to invest more in that and that's exactly what we are doing. let's talk about how we get the staff in the nhs, when it comes to immigration. 0bviously get the staff in the nhs, when it comes to immigration. obviously not just about funding, it's about for and recruiting. if we look at what comprises nhs england star. —— it's
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about retirement and recruiting. there are many who work in the nhs from the eu. net migration, to lay it out for the viewers, is at 226,000 at the moment, net migration. is that going to rise or fall under the next conservative government if you win the general election? just on the nhs and the situation there, as you know, we've just brought in a new fast—track for visas for nurses coming in from around the world, notjust from other eu countries but across the world, and that's fantastic and they doa world, and that's fantastic and they do a wonderfuljob. by the way, there are more eu nationals in the country now than ever before. that's also a great thing. i do think, myself, that we have been running very high rates of immigration for a long time and i am, you know, was
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mayor of london for a longer time, as you say, and i was very proud of what we did in that city. i am a pro—immigration politician. immigration can be a wonderful thing. i happen to think the rates you are talking about have been very high and what we will be able to do once we come out of the eu in january, once we get brexit done, is we will be able to take back control of our borders. the great thing is that you will have democratic control, so when it comes to unskilled immigration for people who don't have a job to come to, we will get the numbers down. 0verall, as a result it will be lower. i can't give you a figure. it will be lower than 226,000, but will it be higher than 226,000, but will it be higher than the 100,000 target you had in 2010 and 15. i will not get into a numbers game. why not? people have
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plenty of experience with the difficulty of satisfying those particular targets. so you can't reach the target so you are abandoning it? we are bringing immigration down for unskilled people who don't have jobs to go to by getting rid of uncontrolled immigration. and that's what we have at the moment. uncontrolled immigration from a territory of 580 million people. i know you don't wa nt million people. i know you don't want me to talk aboutjeremy corbyn, but what they have proposed is uncontrolled immigration from the whole world. in my view that is not a sustainable option for the country. this is an amazing place to be, to grow up and live, and we will ta ke be, to grow up and live, and we will take the country forward in all sorts of extraordinary ways, but very high levels of immigration at the size of a large town coming in every year are putting strains on public services and over the last 20 yea rs
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public services and over the last 20 years unskilled immigration has certainly helped to keep wages down. you do need unskilled workers in the nhs as well, and a massive majority... you need skilled workers as well. what you have with an australian style points based system is the ability to decide who comes in. that's what we mean by control. who gets more points, a brain surgeon or a porter. we will look at the circumstances of the sector concerned and they will decide what the numbers will be. i think that's what people want. there's people in this country who are not against immigration. the people of this country can see what a fantastic thing it can be, but what they want is democratic control. i'm a beneficiary of immigration to this country personally. since you want to know about my own family background. i think it's an amazing
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thing, that we are so welcoming and generous to people from around the world. it's a fantastic thing about our country. and by the way, it's a vote of confidence in the uk that people want to come here, but it should be democratically controlled at the moment it is not controlled and i'm afraid jeremy corbyn and the labour party have a policy of zero control. let's talk about you again. fine. our reporter tim muffett is in fishlake in south yorkshire this morning, where the rain is coming and flood defences are being challenged again. do you think you have done enough to support the people of this country during the floods? i have been twice to affected areas, once to derbyshire and wants to south yorkshire. i have seen for myself what is going on. today we are announcing more support for affected homes for council tax relief, affected businesses for business rate relief. there is a huge amount of work going on around
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the clock. if you're saying, do i sympathise with people... no, i was asking if you think you have done enough. you can never do enough for somebody who has suffered a disaster like flooding. you only have to go there and see them and talk to them to understand the depth of the psychological impact it has. how does it make you feel when somebody says to you, i don't want to talk to you. you have come to us too late.” totally understand how they feel. do you think you should have been there earlier and dunmore? of course, there is always more that you can do. you can never do enough. 0n the first night, i have been twice. but we are covering people's council tax and business rates and we will make sure insurers don't weasel out of
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their obligations towards flood victims. we will bring forward further packages of compensation, and a huge amount of work is going on. at the moment, the... things are looking a bit better, but that is no consolation for those who have suffered. what we have got to do is to continue to invest in flood defences and this government has put far more into flood defences than the previous labour government, and i know i'm not to meant to mention them. 2.6 billion. we have a huge infra structure of investment programmes to implement that. a bit about my vision for the country. what i think we should do in the uk, we have an amazing opportunity now and if we can get brexit done, it then we can move on and build a partnership with our european friends based on free trade and take advantage of all the things brexit brings, from free ports to free trade around the world. you have
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said this. but it is true. but we wa nt to said this. but it is true. but we want to get on with the thing is to unite and level up. when i look at the uk i see talent, genius, flair and brilliance evenly distributed. let's flip this on its head, when the uk looks at you... let me com plete the uk looks at you... let me complete the thought. i think i will anticipate the point you will make the stop icy ability everywhere. i wa nt to the stop icy ability everywhere. i want to see our country united levelled up. i want to see better education, levelling up education funding around the country, insisting on superb education for every child, and better technology everywhere. i want to see our country unitedand levelled up. i wa nt to country unitedand levelled up. i want to see every child in this country have fantastic opportunities. this is the most amazing place and we are lucky to be in the uk today. i started this interview... too many people don't get the opportunities they deserve and we can unleash the potential of
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the uk if we can get brexit done and that's what i want to do.” the uk if we can get brexit done and that's what i want to do. i started the interview today by saying the idea is the viewers get clarity and an idea of who you are, what you wa nt an idea of who you are, what you want and why they should believe you are the person to lead the country after the general election.” are the person to lead the country after the general election. i hope i have tried to give you some...” hope so. i have a couple of questions for you. i want to a feel for who you are. i have seen the video, that the conservative party put out. you were cooking steak and oven chips the other night, you made a cup of tea and put the milk on top of the tea bag. why does everybody object to that? it's a bad thing. why does everyone object to leaving the tea bag in? if you want to keep drinking a cup of tea for a long time, it's better. give someone idea of what the family man is like. you
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are with your partner, carrie symonds. you are a family man and a father. why are you relatable to families up and down and across the country? how can they relate to you and your family? i think that the best a nswer and your family? i think that the best answer i can give is that i... of course, i have been... i've had a very happy and wonderful life in many, very happy and wonderful life in any very happy and wonderful life in 5. very happy and wonderful life in many, many ways. iwas very happy and wonderful life in many, many ways. i was the beneficiary of... my parents gave me fantastic opportunities. they brought me up to... i've been very... family man? what i want for every child in this country is to have a sense they can achieve their full potential. i think at the moment, if i look around the uk, and i think this is one of the reasons people voted brexit in 2016, genuinely, i think there are too
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many parts of the country where people don't feel they have the opportunities that they could. what i want to do, and i am sorry to get back to my principal message... i know you want to talk about my family stop what i want to talk about how you are relatable. i will show you a picture. how may relatives do i have? how you are relatable to other people. this is why people perhaps don't think you are relate above. have you ever used up are relate above. have you ever used up before? that isjust, you know... you don't like my mop work? you are not squeezing it for a start. i'm doing it there. why are you relatable and how can people connect with you? this man who is from a rather different background to most people in this country. you have privilege, and that's fine, you are lucky, but why are you relatable?”
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love this country and want to serve it. it's an amazing place for stop if you ask me why i am relatable, i have not the faintest idea how i am relatable. it seems the most difficult psychological question.” am glad we challenge do. boris johnson, thank you so much for your time, prime minister. the prime minister has kindly said he would ta ke minister has kindly said he would take more questions from bbc viewers and listeners just after nine o'clock this morning. in a special programme on bbc radio 5live, the bbc news channel and online. if you've got a question, you can get involved via the hashtag bbcyourquestions, text 85058 or email yourquestions@bbc. co. uk. half an hour with the prime minister and it's been a pleasure. in—flight excercises as you watch the sunrise — is this the future of flying long haul? we'll be live in sydney to find out.

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