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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 16, 2019 6:00am-9:01am GMT

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and charlie stayt. our headlines today: prince andrew breaks his silence on thejeffrey epstein scandal — he says he let "the side down" by staying at the home of the convicted sex offender. that's the bit that, that, that, um, as it were, i kick myself for on a daily basis ‘cause it was not something that was becoming of a member of the royal family. a crunch meeting for labour as seniorfigures decide what to include in its manifesto.
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#it # it must be love, love, love. a star—studded line up helps children in need raise nearly 48 million pounds for good causes. rafael nadal may be world number one. but alex zverev‘s win last night sends him out of the world tour still some rain around for some of you this weekend but a window of dry weather coming into the start of next week. i will have all the details right here on breakfast. it's saturday the 16th of november. our top story: in an unprecedented interview, prince andrew has told the bbc that he let the royal family down by staying at the home of the convicted sex offender, jeffrey epstein. he spoke to emily maitlis at buckingham palace, addressing accusations that he'd had sex with a 17—year—old american girl. he said he couldn't remember meeting virginia roberts — the prince denies allegations of inappropriate conduct. our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell reports. he is continuing with royal duties.
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last sunday, he was at the cenotaph, laying a wreath with his nephews. and yet, for month after month, he's been the focus of troubling questions. prince andrew, the queen's second son, one moment seen waving from the doorway of the new york home of a convicted child sex offender, jeffrey epstein, and photographed strolling through central park with him. buckingham palace has consistently denied any impropriety by prince andrew. now, he's decided to speak for himself to bbc newsnight‘s emily maitlis. but you are staying at the house of a conflict with sex offender.m but you are staying at the house of a conflict with sex offender. it was a conflict with sex offender. it was a convenient place to say. does mcstay. i have been through this so many times in my mind was not at the end of the day, with the benefit of all the hindsight that one might have, it was definitely the wrong thing do but at the time i felt that
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it was the honourable and right thing to do. and i admit fully that myjudgement thing to do. and i admit fully that my judgement was probably thing to do. and i admit fully that myjudgement was probably coloured by my tendency to be too honourable but that'sjust the by my tendency to be too honourable but that's just the way it is. and then there was his relationship with virginia roberts who was on epstein‘s payroll. one of epstein‘s accusers, virginia roberts, has made allegations against you. she says she met you in 2001. she says she dined with you, danced with you at tramp nightclub in london. she went on to have sex with you in a house in belgravia belonging to ghislaine maxwell, your friend. your response? i have no recollection of ever meeting this lady. none whatsoever. you don't remember meeting her? no. it was in 2001,
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according to virginia roberts, that she had sex with andrew on three occasions, including one orgy. the palace has denied that. in 2008, epstein was convicted of procuring for prostitution a girl under the age of 18. he was sentenced to 18 months in prison. it was in 2010, after epstein had been released from prison, that andrew visited him in new york and stayed at his mansion. how does he explain that? the problem was the fact that once he had been convicted... you stayed with him. i stayed with him. and that's the bit that — that, as it were, i kick myself for on a daily basis, because it was not something that was becoming of a member of the royal family, and we try and uphold the highest standards and practices, and i let the side down. simple as that. but nothing about
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this story is simple. jeffrey epstein can't answer questions — he took his own life in august. as for andrew, the us authorities will undoubtedly very much like to hear his account of everything he witnessed. well, virginia roberts' legal team has responded to that interview. they say they want prince andrew to speak under oath rather than giving statements to the media. and you can see the full interview in a bbc newsnight special on bbc 2, tonight at 9:00. leading figures in labour and the trade union movement will meet this morning to decide which policies will be included in the party's election manifesto. despite some major announcements, it still has to decide whether to include some policies agreed at its party conference. 0ur political correspondent, john 0wen is in our london newsroom. is there likely to be some difficult conversations about what to include in the labour manifesto? the meeting that is taken place
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today, known as a five clause meeting, it takes its main —— name from the fifth clause of labour's famous rulebook and edit effectively isa famous rulebook and edit effectively is a process of how the party agrees its manifesto. it is to translate policies that have been agreed upon at party conference, policies announced in the shadow cabinet, into a single coherent document. they say, this is what the labour party will actually do if elected into office. in reality, a lot of what will find its way in to the ma nifesto what will find its way in to the manifesto will have already been agreed behind—the—scenes between party officials based on agreed party officials based on agreed party positions but there are a couple of flashpoints that could be up couple of flashpoints that could be upfor couple of flashpoints that could be up for discussion today. one of thoseis up for discussion today. one of those is on the question of free movement. labour party conference agreed to maintain and expand freedom of movement but it is unclear as to whether that will make it in to the manifesto. 0f unclear as to whether that will make it in to the manifesto. of course, brexit will be a question for the meeting to wrestle with. we know that the labour party plan to
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renegotiate a new deal with the eu before putting that in the electorate to the second referendum but it may take an explicitly remain position. finally there is the question around compensation for the so—called waspy women, born in the 19505 and lost out in the change of the state pension age so what compensation will be available for people in those position —— in that position. the environment seems to be the order of the day, with both the lib dems and conservatives pledging to plant more trees? a bidding war has emerged overnight onto how many trains —— trees they will plant. the liberal democrats have doubled the number that the conservatives have announced, saying they will plant 60 million. that reflects a desire of all parties to put the environment right at the heart of their pictures to the electorate in this election. the metropolitan police says it's assessing two allegations of electoral fraud, after claims the conservatives offered peerages to brexit party candidates to persuade them to withdraw from the election.
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the senior labour peer, lord falconer, says allegations made by the brexit party leader, nigel farage, raise serious questions. borisjohnson has dismissed the accusations as "nonsense". emergency crews have worked through the night, to tackle a fire at a student block of flats in greater manchester. eyewitnesses described flames getting ‘more intense' as the fire spread up the cladding of the six—storey building in bolton. it's not yet known if there are any injuries. long—term smokers can improve the health of their hearts within weeks of switching to e—cigarettes, according to new research. scientists at the university of dundee conducted a month—long study, but they warned that vaping is not safe, merely "less harmful" than smoking. the british heart foundation said that stopping smoking was the single best thing people could do for their heart. the bbc‘s children in
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need has raised almost 48—million—pounds this year. celebrities from the world of tv, music and sport all took part in the annual telethon. 0ur entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba has the highlights. three, two, one! the evening's huge total. the end of a fun packed night. i wish for this year's children in need to be really, really big! it started off with a hit musical big. some of the uk's most famous faces were on hand to help with the fundraising efforts. a group of east end as stars talk to that strictly come dancing dance floor. jodie whittaker and the dr who team made a young fan's night with an unexpected appearance. what
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are you going to say to an actual time lord? you are amazing. and some of england's top football players had a surprise for a group of children. all the money from the night goes towards helping disadvantaged children and young people across the uk. children in need say the millions raised tonight should make a huge difference. lisa ms imber, abc news. —— lizo mzimba. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. it's time now for a look at the newspapers. the front pages are dominated by one story in particular. the daily mail describes prince andrew's decision to speak
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to the bbc as a "make or break" tv interview. front page of the express also leads with a large picture of the interview taking place at buckingham palace earlier this week. the duke "acknowledges his conduct fell below the standards expected when he stayed friends" with epstein, the paper says. according to the telegraph, royal sources said the duke had decided to give the interview in the hope it might "draw a line" under the scandal before he turns 60 next year. and most read on the bbc news website this morning is the huge fire that broke out at student halls in bolton last night. more than a0 fire engines were sent to tackle the blaze. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. how are you, matt? very well, thank you. we will see a bit of sunshine around at times this weekend but rain is still not too far away from the forecast. it will come and go
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across some areas. some others will could do with some spells of dry weather at the moment. showing you a couple of stark weather stats from autumn so far. sheffield we saw flooding the other week. very close to their autumn record, still a few weeks to go as far as rainfall is concerned but we have already broken ourautumn concerned but we have already broken our autumn rainfall record in nottingham. 300 millimetres so far this season. still some more to come. an area of low pressure still dominant across a central and western europe. while that is close by, we will be feeding in some cool winds and showers. eastern parts of scotla nd winds and showers. eastern parts of scotland into the midlands and wales in particular. a little bit of brightness. some frost into northern ireland and scotland were not clouding over the west during the day. a few showers in around some english coastal counties. the english coastal counties. the english channel coastal counties and the rest of cornwall. and the far
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west of wales. many other areas of england brighter today than yesterday. still fairly cloudy across parts of england, south and east scotland. it will come and go. drier moments and after a sunniest data across western scotland, northern ireland, it would cloud over here with a bit of rain later. temperatures for many in single figures. through this evening and overnight, we see patchy rain push into western parts of scotland, northern ireland with some rain at times and ran towards cornwall. we're across other parts of scotland and the south and east, these are the areas most prone to a bit of frost as we go into tomorrow morning. for some it will be a colder, frosty start for tomorrow. a few showers around the coast. northern england, to the west of wales, west cornwall, most prone to further rain at times. as for the far north of scotland was not a good pa rt far north of scotland was not a good part of scotland and northern ireland brightening up during the day. good sunny spells but tomorrow again anotherfairly day. good sunny spells but tomorrow again another fairly chilly one with single figure temperatures for just
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about all. i said we need some dry weather and we will get a wind of that as we get into the start of next week. a little bit of high pressure starting to push its way in for monday and indeed tuesday. so for monday and indeed tuesday. so for monday, look at that, not much in the way of rain on the charts. could be a few showers close to east anglia and the south—east corner but foremost a frosty start with mist and fog around. that were clear and for most it will be a sunny but another rather chilly day. that will continue into tuesday with some frost once again. but later in the week, we will see some wet weather return, particularly to southern and western areas. come and go, no rain all the time, but temperatures will climbjust a all the time, but temperatures will climb just a little all the time, but temperatures will climbjust a little bit. it won't all the time, but temperatures will climb just a little bit. it won't be quite as chilly as it is this weekend. back to you both. the wait is almost over for fans of the crown with the latest series of the royal drama officially released tomorrow. set in the 19605 and 705, it boasts an a—list cast, including 0livia colman
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and helena bonham carter. breakfast'sjohn maguire has been given exclusive access to the set at caernarfon castle in wales. for me, it is a way of officially dedicating 1's life or part of 1's life to wales. and the welsh people after a ll life to wales. and the welsh people after all wa nted life to wales. and the welsh people after all wanted it. and i think also that the british, on the whole, tends to be sort of ceremonies particularly well. there is no doubt that the investiture of the prince of wales was done rather well by the british people in 1969, so the challenge for netflix is to try and dojustice challenge for netflix is to try and do justice well 50 years on. —— just as well. prince of wales. 0k, standby to shoot, thank you.“ as well. prince of wales. 0k, standby to shoot, thank you. if you need proof that the level of production here is absolutely extraordinary, taking what would have been once the silver screen down onto the small screen, just look around this incredible location, including a crew that numbers 280 people. that chap there,
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his cross belt needs... sorting out. 0k. accuracy is taken very seriously. major david rankin hunt has more than 30 years experience working in the royal household and has been an advisor since the first series. there are a whole lot of people out there that leave you me will take great delight in writing in and saying you have got that wrong, that metal shouldn't be there or to wrong, that metal shouldn't be there orto an wrong, that metal shouldn't be there or to an extent, i used to be one of those people —— medals. so i think it is important. so the ability to see footage of the actual events can prove problematic for some but for others, it is invaluable, allowing them to recreate the look of the ceremony which was designed by maud snowden. obviously we are in the cattle were it all happened and we have had all the archive footage, the videos and the photographs to work from, so we tried to sort of
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stick to the original kind of plan and look of lord snowdon's work but and look of lord snowdon's work but and reenact it, but obviously we have to do a few tweaks and let tv magic take care of some stuff as well. the last time the deep walls of caernarfon castle witnessed these scenes, it was a summer's day. this time, it is november, so in between ta kes, time, it is november, so in between takes, the actors up against the north wales wind. but beneath the puffer jackets other costumes. north wales wind. but beneath the pufferjackets other costumes. the crown is kind of the ultimate costu me crown is kind of the ultimate costume drama, isn't it? everything isa costume drama, isn't it? everything is a costume. it is the ultimate drama and it is the scariest drama because it is the most popular drama. and we are on the third season but it is wonderful because we are in the most wonderful error. it is extraordinary, those hats, to recreate that has been such fun. but doesn't receive the royal seal of approval? so many of my colleagues have been very complimentary about
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it so have been very complimentary about itsoi have been very complimentary about it so i think that says it all, really. i am told that certain members of the royal family have watched it, including an indication of how the programme has been received. so a good royal reception and the critics have been impressed. but the main challenge comes next with the audience reception. john maguire, bbc news, caernarfon castle. lots of excited people waiting for series three. it will be available on netflix from tomorrow. we'll be back with the headlines at 6:30. now it's time for the film review with jane hill and mark kermode. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. so mark, what do we have this week? i think we have something for everyone. we have le mans 66, starring
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christian bale and matt damon. we have the amazing johnathan, a documentary that becomes an enigma. and the report, in which the cia are called to account. a really interesting week! it is! yes! yes! let's start with le mans ‘66, known in other territories as ford v ferrari. the month was the 19705 film which my dad went —— took me to when i was a kid. this is the story of the ford motor company attempting to regain its mojo by winning le mans at a time whenjames bond doesn't drive a ford. although, henry ford is in the film and he says that is because he is a degenerate. it's about carroll shelby, an engineer. he is an all—american good old boy. he wants to call in ken miles, a british race driver, who is very much his own man. played by christian bale. we first meet him in his garage.
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here is a clip. another satisfied customer? can i help you, miss? wasn't that an mga 1500? ah, you know your cars! ilike them. i love the sound they make. the way it goes right through you. right. that vibration. mine is the wood—panelled country squire across the street. a real hot rod. oh, yeah? is it fast? very. wait a second. what type of girl are you? the type of girl who likes the smell of wet gasoline. ooh. burnt rubber. ooh. are you some kind of a deviant, are you? well, that makes sense — i married you. i think that gives you a sense of the playfulness of the story,
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which in many ways is very serious. so christian bale as that character and matt damon as someone who is very different. now, like senna, this has sort of a chalk and cheese pairing at the heart — notjust between their characters, but also between then as the designers and drivers — and ford, who is this very corporate motor company who basically want him out because they think he's a loose cannon, he won't do what he's told when he's put in front of the cameras, he says whatever comes into his mind. shelby wants him in because he says it's the only way to win. you have to have someone who knows what they're doing. many things to like about this. first, the performances are terrific. you get to know the characters and like them, and care about them. and secondly, the sequences are nail—biting, much like that film rush. a lot of it is to do with the sound effects, the crunching gears it's filmed in a way that does put
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you right in the cockpit of the car, so you do feel those race sequences. i like the behind—the—scenes stuff, the way in which it's that sort of fight between the corporate and individual, which you can see to some extent as being maybe a fight about making films in a very sort of corporate environment. but mostly, i don't really have any outside interest in motor racing at all, but this documentary made me interested in the characters, i didn't know how the story panned out. i loved the atoms in a film in the same way. it is a fantastic film. —— i loved senna in the same way. it is a fantastic film. and i think it's really down to the fact that the film does have a joyous sense to it. it is a serious subject and it's a life—and—death subject but i think you see from that clip there is a playfulness, sense of entertainment, of liking the cars second. of liking people like the cars first and the people second! the second film, i don't even know how to describe it, i don't know what to make of it. we have to tread... thank god you
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are here. we have to be careful what we say. it's called the amazing johnathan, a documentary about the amazing johnathan, a comedy magician who achieved huge vegas success at the turn of the century and he called himself ‘the freddy krueger of comedy‘ because his act involved him appearing to scoop his eyeball out onstage, appearing to secure his tongue. —— drivea —— drive a skewer through his tongue. and then in 2014, when he was onstage, he announced he had been given a year to live, he had a heart condition. the documentary picks up in recent years. he's still here and is going out to do more gigs. and it begins as a documentary about this extraordinary character about whom i did not know anything, but it very soon becomes a documentary about itself, because we discover that the film—maker not only has his own particular interest in telling the story, but also he's not the only person trying to tell the story. so it has an unreliable narrator, somebody who is an illusionist, a prankster, who make things appear real that aren't real. a documentary film—maker who starts making a documentary about documentary film—making. and we have enough twists and turns at by the time it got to the final, by which point it could have become very naval—gazing,
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it manages to pull off a bravura final flourish. the only thing i have to say is, if it is has intrigued you, see the film without reading another word about it. i know you have read about it. i haven't seen it, and i'm intrigued. the less you know, the better. it's like searching for sugar man and those kinds of films — the less you know going on, the better it is. i did find myself going, "no! no! really?! 0k! intrigued. well, that's always a good thing! the report. adam driver is danieljones, who headed up the investigation into the cia's use of enhanced interrogation techniques. the title says the torture report, with the word ‘torture' blacked out, or, more specifically, redacted. it's about the report into the cia techniques, about which we now know much more than we did then in the wake of 9/11. and his conclusion is firstly, that these are torture and secondly,
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that they don't work. of course, the cia is not impressed. here's a clip. i vehemently disagree with the narrative that you're trying to string together here. it lacks context. it does not paint an accurate picture of the work that was done. senator, john brennan's name is in the report. he was director tenets's chief of staff and then deputy executive director when the programme started. he grew up at the agency. he claims to have spoken out against the eit programmes. where? i've just spent five years looking at their e—mails and never found anything to suggest that is true! well, we knew this wasn't going to be easy, they have their own narrative and they are going to stick to it. maybe we could come up with some middle ground, find some common language. i thought ourjob was to provide oversight and accountability, not middle ground. i have a question for you. do you work for me orfor the report? and i would encourage you to think about that before answering. hmm. so that's annette bening, as dianne feinstein.
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yes. so the interesting thing about this, you can see, it's a drama that plays out in rooms and a lot of it is people in rooms having conversation or looking stuff up on a computer, or going through... which can be dry. and i think there's an argument that there is a certain amount of dramatic inertia. therefore, it says a lot for the film that firstly, the subject itself is really interesting, but also, it's telling that it kept me great. —— gripped. and at the heart of that is adam driver. he has two movies out this week — he is also in marriage story — a netflix release — and he is playing two completely different characters in these films. i absolutely believed in him is this kind of dogged, you know, very sort of low—key person who is involved in seeing this report through to the end. there is a lovely moment where it looks like he's been threatened with legal action and someone says, "you don't have a legal problem, you have a sunlight problem". what they mean is, first,
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the report may never see the light of day, but also he hasn't been in the sunlight for a very long time — he's been in a bunker. so distressing. so distressing, yes. but i think this is judicious in its use of showing us what the report is about. it's mostly showing us his efforts to get that report finished and get it out into the open, against huge odds. it's an important story. it's a very recent history and already is something that, we need to remember these stories because they are important, and i think it's well done. hats off to adam driver for this and also for marriage story, at the same week. best out? this is the last week i'm going to do this. he is the thing! well, here is the thing. the thing is, this looks like a film about child guerillas but for me, it's a modern day retelling of the lord of the flies.
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its got an extraordinary cast, the soundtrack is amazing — one of the best soundtracks of the year. the soundtrack is amazing. yes. visually, it is utterly breathtaking. you're with me so far. i'm with you so far. but you found it too... too stressful. it doesn't get any less stressful. it is still stressful, after three weeks. that's right, but is that not an indication of how powerful it is? yes. that you found it very... because it is meant to be. it's gripping. yeah, yeah. dvd of the week, then? maradona, gripping in a different way. not so stressful! it opens with a car chase through the streets of naples, resembling the car chase in the french connection, and it focuses on diego maradona's time in naples and looks the personal life. and as with all the director's work, i think he's very good at getting under the skin of a subject and finding a way of replacing dualities so that there is a tension in the characters. i thought it was fascinating —
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bearing in mind again i said this about motor racing, i've never seen a football match in my entire life and i still watched this and i knew where i was and understated because it's constructed like a dramatic narrative. it's a very dramatic documentary. he is clever. it really is. and see monos again! again?! a really interesting week. that's it for this week, though. enjoy your cinema— going. goodbye.
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hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and nina warhurst. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news.
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in an unprecedented interview, prince andrew has told the bbc that he let the royal family down by staying at the home of the convicted sex offender, jeffrey epstein. he spoke to emily maitlis at buckingham palace, addressing accusations that he'd had sex with a 17—year—old american girl. he said he couldn't remember meeting virginia roberts — the prince denies allegations of inappropriate conduct. . the problem was the fact that once he had been convicted... you stayed with him. i stayed with him. and that's the bit that i, as it were, kick myself for on a daily basis because it is not something that was becoming of a member of the royal family and we try and uphold the highest standards and practices and i let the side down. sarah ferguson has offered her support to her former husband on social media. writing on twitter, she said the duke was a "true" and "honest" gentleman,
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able to "speak from the heart", and on her instagram account she wrote that she "would be with him every step of the way". leading figures in labour and the trade union movement will meet this morning to decide which policies will be included in the party's election manifesto. meanwhile, both the liberal democrats and the conservatives have pledged to plant more trees in an effort to tackle climate change, if they win the general election. emergency crews have worked through the night, to tackle a fire at a student block of flats in greater manchester. the fire service said the flames spread across all six floors of the university accomodation building in bolton. it's not yet known if there are any injuries. long—term smokers can improve the health of their hearts within weeks of switching to e—cigarettes, according to new research. scientists at the university of dundee conducted a month—long study, but they warned that vaping is not safe, merely "less harmful" than smoking. the british heart foundation said that stopping smoking was the single best thing people could do for their heart. the bbc‘s children in need has raised almost
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48—million—pounds this year. celebrities from the world of tv, music and sport all took part in the annual telethon, to raise money for disadvantaged young people. sport now. how are you going? it has been a fantastic tournament so far at the w —— at the atv. been a fantastic tournament so far at the w -- at the atv. atp. the men's number one, rafael nadal, is out of the season—ending world to that's because alexander zverev beat daniil medvedev to claim the last semi—final spot at the o2 arena in london, where he'll play dominic thiem. zverev is the defending champion and he certainly looked the part, winning in straight sets. nadal was awaiting that result, after beating stefanos tsitsipas earlier in the day. the young greek now faces roger federer, but although he's out, nadal was already assured of finishing the year on top of the world rankings.
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you know, after all the things i went through in my career in terms of injuries, i never thought that at the age of 33.5 i would have this trophy on my hands again so it is... cheering and applause. without my tea m cheering and applause. without my team and family that is here next to me, this would be impossible. ijust ca nt me, this would be impossible. ijust cant say thank you very much eve ryo ne cant say thank you very much everyone for the support. thank you. a hefty trophy, that. england batsmanjoe denly has proved he's fit again, making 68 on his return from an ankle injury. england are playing their final warm—up match before the first test starts next wednesday.
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they closed day two against new zealand a in whangarei on 355 for 8 — a lead of 53 runs. and it was a huge relief for denly, who feared his tour was over when he was injured just over two weeks ago. i have been under a strict rehab programme and hands with the medical team. delighted to be back and able to spend some time out there today. with england already through to next summer's european championship, the other home nations continue their bids to join them today — and it won't be easy. northern ireland are third in a really tough group, behind the netherlands and germany — they need to beat the dutch this afternoon and the germans on tuesday — and hope other results go their way. wales also need some luck, as well as beating azerbaijan tonight and then hungary. scotland face cyprus later — they can't qualify automatically, but they're hoping to build some momentum going into the play—offs next spring. we won the last game comfortably, scored a few goals and looked as though we could score a few more and
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thatis though we could score a few more and that is great. it was another golden dayforteam gb, as the para athletics world championships came to a close in dubai. race running made it's debut at the event — and kayleigh haggo won the women's 100 metres, with gavin drysdale taking the men's honours. both set new world records. the athletes have severe co—ordination impairments and run with the support of a three—wheeled frame. drysdale said "it opens up the door for people like me to compete at the highest level". i can't believe ijust did that. i knew i would probably have to two ra ke knew i would probably have to two rake a world record to win. i want to dedicate this gold medal to my coach janice who would be so proud. to rugby league — and injust under an hour, the great britain lions take on papua new guinea for the first time in over 20 years, as they look to finish their southern hemisphere tour on a high. they've lost all three matches so far — but coach wayne bennett
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says he's not in the least bit concerned by the criticism he's been receiving. first in four months, i haven't read anything. —— first and foremost, i haven't read anything, not interested. i have been a long—term term coaches with criticism helped me, i would term coaches with criticism helped me, iwould read it term coaches with criticism helped me, i would read it but it doesn't so we played three world—class teams in an international field and so we played three world—class teams in an internationalfield and its the losing margin. eight points or ten points of something. i don't see it that way in football. you can watch that game on bbc two this morning. toulouse came from behind to beat gloucester in the openning game of rugby union's champions cup. this try from sebastian bezy proved to be decisive, as they came from 11 points down at half time, to win 25—20. toulouse are looking to win the cup for the fifth time. several top british athletes are threatening to sue the british olympic association over sponsorship rules. adam gemili is among those listed in a legal letter send to the boa, with sir mo farah and katarina johnson—thompson
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also named. they argue that their earning potential is being reduced, as they're not able to promote their own sponsors during the biggest moment in their careers. there is many different things that restrict athletes and for us, it is giving every other athlete the opportunity to go out and correct their own marketing opportunities —— create their own marketing opportunities so they don't have to work a full—timejob. opportunities so they don't have to work a full—time job. 99% of athletes are working a full—time job and don't have to work —— the voice of the platform to speak out against the voa or rule a0 because they are scared of what happened —— might happen against it. —— boa. ahead of this weekend's brazilian grand prix, world champion lewis hamilton says he wants reassurances about mercedes' future before he commits to a new deal beyond next year. he was fifth fastest in yesterday's second practice session, which was marked by a heavy crash for williams driver robert kubica — thankfully he emerged unscathed.
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ferrari's sebastian vettel was quickest. and finally, have a look at this incredible bit of skill. this is england's number one player liam pitchford competing in the austrian open. he beatsjun mizutani ofjapan to reach the last 16, with the help of these two outrageous behind—the—back shots. extraordinary reflexes there! look at that! it is only on the super slow mo that you can see it. finally you see it super slow and the speed as well they are going out. it is unbelievable. completely. just a thought, rafael nadal, member the time a few years ago everyone was saying, you know what, he hasn't got much time left. the injuries and how he was in his head but now... he
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is always —— also that eldest player to finish the rank is at number one. at one point he looked like he was done with the injuries. he is quite a powerful player. traditionally he doesn't do too well at this tournament because it is usually been a tough season. he has won two majors as well. it is nice to see him kicking on and doing well later on in his career. is or was in very good spirits. he is of wilfully enjoying his tennis. two he looks so relaxed. —— he is obviously. roger federer also. incredibly to see the older players doing so well. so old! prince andrew says he "let the side down" by continuing his friendship with the american billionaire, and convicted sex offender, jeffrey epstein. the prince has been speaking about the relationship for the first time, in an exclusive interview with bbc newsnight. he also addressed accusations that he'd had sex with an underage girl — allegations he's always denied.
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but you are staying at the house about sex offender. look, it was a convenient place to stay. at the end of the day, with the benefit of all hindsight that one could have, it was definitely the wrong thing to do. at the time i thought it was the honourable and right thing to do. i admit fully that my i admit my judgement was coloured by my tendency to be too honourable but thatis tendency to be too honourable but that is just the way it is. the problem was the fact that once he had been convict did... you stayed with him. i stayed with him. and thatis with him. i stayed with him. and that is the bit that, that, as it
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were, i kick myself for on a daily basis because it was not something that was becoming of the member of the royal family and we try and uphold the highest standards and practices and i let the side down. simple as that. one of epstein's accuses, and virginia roberts, has made allegations against you. she said she met you in 2001. she says she died with you, danced with you, at trap nightclub in london, she we nt at trap nightclub in london, she went on to have sex with you in a house in the graveyard belonging to elaine maxwell, your friend. your response? -- ghislaine maxwell. i don't remember meeting this lady. you don't remember meeting her? no. last night, emily maitlis explained the long negotiations that went into setting up the meeting. we had been talking to the palace for a long time, many months, almost a year. and after epstein's death,
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you can imagine the talks intensified. we had several meetings and had to make it clear that anything we did would be no holds barred, that we could go to areas which were uncomfortable if necessary and ask the questions we needed to ask and the duke of york for himself had to find approval from the highest levels. we now understand that was the queen. the duke of york did not shy away from any of the questions i put to him. it was not the sound of a preprepared buckingham it was not the sound of a preprepa red buckingham statement. it was not the sound of a preprepared buckingham statement. it was extraordinarily raw, often uncomfortable, but it was very head—on. it is worth saying we will be catching up with emily this morning ataround 8.30. . the interview in full can be heard tonight on bbc two at nine p.m.. it
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is on the front pages of all the papers this morning. you will not be surprised to know. it is unsurprising. many of the front pages are leading with that quote, "i let the side down". the duke of york admitted he let the side down and damaged the royalfamily‘s reputation by maintaining that friendship. it is the same on some of the others this morning was not the line wasn't taken up by the daily mirror. all taking that shot of the interview itself which was filled as we know at buckingham palace. the two chairs set up in the room. emily may tell us a little bit more of the logistics of it later on. the princess as he kicks himself every day for his friendship with epstein. it is the same again on the daily telegraph. "i let the side down" was up and that question if he slept with virginia roberts, something he has categorically denied was not we will be speaking later to a media lawyer who said —— specialises in reputation management and also a bbc well corresponded who knows the prince well. —— bbc royal
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correspondence. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. but is a lovely picture, and something of a flip side of the wet story we are talking about so far this month and understandably so, there has been an opposite to it all because this is shetland, where so far this month we have only had 10% of the normal rainfall for the entire month so while many southern areas are seeing rain after rain after rain, here it has been largely dry and that is because we see the jet stream pushing much further south, taking the low pressure systems with it and they will be a showers in lerwick and across shetland this weekend, certainly for the next 2a hours and there will be further rain for some of you to come this weekend but to sing a little bit more sunshine breaking through at times in areas where it has been predominantly cloudy over the last day or two. the reason we still
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thing the rain is the same reason we have all week, low pressure, just to the east of us at the moment. the heaviest rain back across france and we are bringing in those cool north—easterly winds but certainly lots of cloud end up rectifying today and some parts of scotland, northern england, down into parts of wales. either side of it, sunshine and chilly, frosty start across western scotland and parts of northern ireland before clouding over through the morning. a bit more sunshine in southern areas compared with the past few days but at the moment, and right into the afternoon, this is at two o'clock, further showers in around channel coasts and down into west cornwall, a line of showers will continue to affect you. a few showers across the rest of mouth perhaps but they will come across northern england south and east of scotland. and northern ireland and in across the far south—west of scotland we will see some showers developing through the second half of the day. the rest of scotla nd second half of the day. the rest of scotland will stay largely dry. into this evening and overnight, after a chilly day with temperatures in single figures, clearskies chilly day with temperatures in single figures, clear skies across parts of eastern and southern scotla nd parts of eastern and southern scotland and towards the southern parts of england and wales,
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temperatures will drop the furthest, the chance of a frost around elsewhere though, the same sort of areas northern england into wales and across the western part of scotland, or cloud and it should keep temperatures up. splashes of rain to stop the rain tomorrow. mcgraw flashes of rain to start the day tomorrow. further rain at times but some brighter spells breaking through. sunny conditions will come and go to the south of england and across scotland, northern ireland which of the sunshine develop a bit more widely later but showers are never too far away from shetland this weekend and temperatures still in single figures. we really could do with a longer, drier spell, and thomas will not last too long but until the end —— forced out of next week, the high pressure will bring us week, the high pressure will bring usa dry week, the high pressure will bring us a dry window, monday and tuesday, monday has a frosty start with some mist and fog around and not much rain on the chart, maybe a few showers in shetland and towards coastal areas of east anglia and the south—east first thing but for many,
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dry and sunny day on monday, still on the cold side, as it will be as you go into tuesday with the dry speu you go into tuesday with the dry spell continuing, but through the second half of the week, we start to see the winds flip around to the other direction and temperatures will rise but will rise other direction and temperatures will rise but there will be some further rain at times. it does not look a washout, nina and charlie, but any bit of the rain at the moment i think for some particularly unwelcome. a few days respite before that, thank you. we'll be back with the headlines at 7 o'clock. now, it's time for click. it's kind of hard to remember a time when we didn't have taxi—hailing apps. and when i say taxi—hailing apps, even though there are many more players out there, it is uber that comes to mind first.
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at its conception a decade ago, uber was really disruptive. i mean, the idea that you could have a taxi to you within minutes, it would know exactly where you were, you could see where it was and you didn't even have to have any money on you. i mean, it was revolutionary. the company grew at a rapid pace, becoming the highest valued start—up in the world. this without ever turning a profit. in fact, in the last three months alone, uber lost an eye—watering $5.2 billion. undeterred, uber continues to expand and has its name stamped onto many apps that provide different types of services, all part of the so—called ‘gig economy'. now, it has faced a lot of backlash in many of the countries that it operates in, from taxidrivers who have been losing out because of the platform's aggressive pricing strategies, and from city authorities who've raised concerns over workers' rights
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and passenger safety. here in london, the transport authority says it too has concerns about passenger safety and it will decide later this month whether to renew uber‘s licence. in the meantime, carl miller has met up with an uber driver who has concerns, too — although this is about how uber controls his livelihood. it's monday morning and i'm catching a ride with hadi. another one. like so many parts of the digital world, the gig economy was supposed to be a liberation. you ok? apps like uber were supposed to transform how you worked, work when you want, where you want. but now, many fear that whether it was either in the platforms and how they work, or the data and how it's collected, they don'tjust represent a liberation, but also something
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else — a potent new form of control as well. what i was told is that the closest driver gets thatjob but i don‘t believe that to be right, ‘cause what happens is i‘ve seen customers sitting in my car, trying to book a ride and it‘s not bouncing to me — it‘s actually going to drivers who are far away, five, ten minutes. that was something i really couldn‘t believe, so we gave it a go. but although i was physically sitting next to him, the job went to someone several minutes away. uber has now introduced a system that aims to reduce the waiting time for everyone, not just a particular passenger. and this may lead to the counter—intuitive situation where your driver can get to someone else quickly and another driver can pick you up soon too. confused? well, so is hadi. and although the driver app gives some information, he‘s struggling to understand what factors really determine how work is allocated. in his five years of driving, the work has become scarcer.
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it‘s becoming even more important to hadi to understand the algorithm that actually allocates the work that exists. important, but also unknown. you drive around all day, thinking maybe that‘s the best way to beat this algorithm, or to meet up with the algorithm that has set. carl, i don‘t know what‘s going on. on an average, i used to work six to eight hours, five to six days a week. the number of days have not changed, but the hours have increased. it will still be ten to 12 hours, five to six days a week. after costs are factored in, hadi says he and many of his colleagues are often struggling to make even the minimum wage. not only for hadi, but plenty of other drivers as well, it‘s actually, if you think about it, the algorithm that lets him feed and clothe his family. it‘s cold, hard maths, but with tremendously human consequences. unfortunately, we all
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depend on the algorithm. want we want from it — to be fair, to be transparent. that‘s the most important thing. there was only one way for hadi to actually figure out what‘s been going on — asking for his data. and when he got it back, it made things even more confusing. james farrar established the worker info exchange to help people across the gig economy to actually make sense of their data. he told us the information hadi received refers from everything from speed to battery level, but, crucially, doesn‘t reveal the things he really wants to know, such as rates of pay or the actual time spent on the platform and how to optimise his chances of earning more money. drivers always want to understand that they‘re getting a fair deal, that the value, the quality, the quantity of the work is fairly distributed. well, uber has always proposed to its workforce that the workforce, drivers are their own boss, they‘re
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free to make their own choices, they are effectively running their own business. but if that‘s true, then i must be able to access the endless amounts of data i‘m creating for uber every day. a joint study between oxford researchers and uber itself found that on average, drivers earned above london living wage and reported they were happier than the average worker across the city. critics question, though, whether the full costs of being an uber driver have really been factored in when those figures were arrived at. the same arguments now playing out in the streets of london have happened in the city after city across the world. in what might have been a globalfirst, the powerful taxi and limousine commission in new york didn‘t just ask uber for data, but demand it. and until uber handed it over, they were banned from operating. what we found out was that conditions were worse than what was being
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described to us by drivers. 96% of drivers were making less than the city‘s minimum wage. but without that information, you only have anecdotes, you have stories from drivers about low wages, but you have no way to really quantify that. and without quantifying it, you can‘t create a policy to bring those levels of wages up. in response, uber said: hello and welcome to the week in tech. it was the week disney officially entered the streaming market. well, it didn‘t quite go to plan. disney + finally went live in the us, canada and the netherlands, but customers reported technical issues with many unable to connect. disney said demand had exceeded its highest expectations.
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maybe ralph really did break the internet after all? in the fastest backflip and u—turn since. . .well, sonic, the updated and redesigned hedgehog has been officially revealed in a new trailer for the upcoming live—action movie. the original trailer drew a deluge of complaints and mockery over the original cgi design of sonic himself, forcing animators — quite literally — back to the drawing board. from spinning hedgehogs to backflipping robots. these footballing flipping robots from mit are called the mini cheetah. its creators claim it is virtually indestructible and can right itself if it falls down. as well as some smooth soccer skills, it‘s also capable of working over uneven terrain twice as fast as a human. let‘s hope it can‘t climb trees! and finally, in other robot news, if you‘re one of those people that don‘t like speaking to shop assistants, maybe you‘d rather direct your questions to one of these welcoming faces instead. this humanoid shop assistant from russian company promobot can apparently show emotion
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and they claim they can make photorealistic clones like these arnold schwarzenegger and albert einstein dolls. greeted by these in store, would it be hasta la vista? or will you be back? you decide. for those with serious food allergies, knowing exactly what you‘re eating can be a matter of life or death. when it comes to packaged food, the ingredients are normally clearly on the label, plus a warning if it may contain traces of nuts or any other allergens. but when it comes to eating in someone else‘s house or in a restaurant, things get a little bit more complicated. so if you want to add an extra level of checking what those ingredients are, well, i‘ve been putting some technology to the test that might be able to help. this is nima. now, there‘s a version that tests for gluten and another that tests for peanuts.
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the idea is that you put in a small sample of the food that you‘re eating, as small as a pea, into one of these capsules, that goes inside the device, which syncs up to your smart phone, and you can find out whether the ingredient you can‘t eat is in it or not. i‘m going to put both of them to the test with this cookie, which should contain gluten but shouldn‘t contain nuts. the device uses antibody—based chemistry born out of mit technology to detect proteins or allergen. the company‘s algorithms then translate complex science into a smiley go ahead and eat it face — or not. this is a pricey occupation, though. each one—time—use capsule currently setting you back five whole dollars. and the company does advise that this is an extra level of checking on top of your normal due diligence and, of course, carrying any medication. ok, well, i can confirm that the device
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definitely got this correct. it says that gluten has been found. it comes up here on the device. and you can see here on the phone, 12:30pm today, gluten has been found. if i tap on that, it gives me the option of notjust making a note for myself so i remember, but also sharing the data to the nima database. and, of course, as more people use these devices, that database will start to become a lot more valuable. let‘s give the peanut tester a go. you can do this with liquids or solids. and we have a result in the form of a smiley face. so of course these devices don‘t eradicate the need for a doctor‘s diagnosis or checking what‘s in your food. but for some, maybe they could provide an extra layer of reassurance. i‘m afraid that‘s all we have time for in the shortcut of the programme but the full length is waiting for you right now on iplayer and we are
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a lwa ys you right now on iplayer and we are always available on social media, on facebook, youtube, instagram and twitter. thanks for watching and we will see you soon. here‘s matt with a look at this morning‘s weather. good morning welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and charlie stayt. our headlines today:
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prince andrew breaks his silence on thejeffrey epstein scandal — he says he let "the side down" by staying at the home of the convicted sex offender. that‘s the bit that, that, that, um, as it were, i kick myself for on a daily basis ‘cause it was not something that was becoming of a member of the royal family. a crunch meeting for labour as seniorfigures decide what to include in its manifesto. up to 200 firefighters have been tackling a huge blaze at a student accommodation block in bolton. #it # it must be love, love, love. a star studded line—up helps children in need raise nearly a8 million pounds for good causes. rafael nadal may be world number one, but alex zverev‘s win last night sends him out of the world tour finals in london. still some rain around for some of you this weekend but a window of dry
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weather coming in for the start of next week. all of the details right here on breakfast. it‘s saturday the 16th of november. our top story: in an unprecedented interview, prince andrew has told the bbc that he let the royal family down by staying at the home of the convicted sex offender, jeffrey epstein. he spoke to emily maitlis at buckingham palace, addressing accusations that he‘d had sex with a 17—year—old american girl. he said he couldn‘t remember meeting virginia roberts — the prince denies allegations of inappropriate conduct. our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell reports. he is continuing with royal duties. last sunday, he was at the cenotaph, laying a wreath with his nephews. and yet, for month after month, he‘s been the focus of troubling questions. prince andrew, the queen‘s second son, one moment seen waving from the doorway of the new york home of a convicted child sex offender, jeffrey epstein, and photographed strolling through central park with him. buckingham palace has consistently denied
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any impropriety by prince andrew. now, he‘s decided to speak for himself to bbc newsnight‘s emily maitlis. but you were staying at the house of a convicted sex offender. it was a convenient place to stay. i mean, i've gone through this in my mind so many times. at the end of the day, with the benefit of all the hindsight that one could have, it was definitely the wrong thing do but at the time i felt it was the honourable and right thing to do. and i admit fully that myjudgement was probably coloured by my tendency to be too honourable but that's just the way it is.
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and then there‘s andrew‘s alleged friendship with the then 17—year—old virginia roberts who was on epstein‘s payroll. she‘s alleged that andrew seduced her. one of epstein‘s accusers, virginia roberts, has made allegations against you. she says she met you in 2001. she says she dined with you, danced with you at tramp nightclub in london. she went on to have sex with you in a house in belgravia belonging to ghislaine maxwell, your friend. your response? i have no recollection of ever meeting this lady. none whatsoever. you don‘t remember meeting her? no. it was in 2001, according to virginia roberts, that she had sex with andrew on three occasions, including one orgy. the palace has denied that. in 2008, epstein was convicted of procuring for prostitution a girl under the age of 18. he was sentenced to 18 months in prison. it was in 2010, after epstein
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had been released from prison, that andrew visited him in new york and stayed at his mansion. how does he explain that? the problem was the fact that once he had been convicted... you stayed with him. i stayed with him. and that‘s the bit that — that, as it were, i kick myself for on a daily basis, because it was not something that was becoming of a member of the royal family, and we try and uphold the highest standards and practices, and i let the side down. simple as that. but nothing about this story is simple. jeffrey epstein can‘t answer questions — he took his own life in august. as for andrew, the us authorities will undoubtedly very much like to hear his account of everything he witnessed. well, virginia roberts‘ legal team has responded to that interview. they say they want prince andrew to speak under oath rather than giving statements to the media. and you can see the full interview
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in a bbc newsnight special on bbc 2, tonight at 9:00. leading figures in labour and the trade union movement will meet this morning to decide which policies will be included in the party‘s election manifesto. despite some major announcements, it still has to decide whether to include some policies agreed at its party conference. our political correspondent, john owen is in our london newsroom. is there likely to be some difficult conversations about what to include in the labour manifesto? the purpose of today‘s meeting which is known as a clause five meeting is to translate policies that have been passed at labour party conferences into a single coherent document to be put before the electorate to say this is what the labour party will seek to accomplish over the coming parliament. in reality, a lot of
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what will find its way into its ma nifesto what will find its way into its manifesto will be agreed in advance between party officials based on agreed party positions and much of it has been announced already they won‘t necessarily come to us as a surprise but there are a couple of potential flashpoints that could be up potential flashpoints that could be upfor potential flashpoints that could be up for discussion in the meeting today. one of those is on the question of re— free movement. the labour party conference approved a motion that said free movement would be maintained and even extended and there is a question about whether that would make it into the ma nifesto. that would make it into the manifesto. on brexit, we know the labour party intends to renegotiate its own deal with the eu before putting that deal to the population ina putting that deal to the population in a second referendum. but there is some pressure inside the party for the leadership to adopt a more explicitly remain position so we will see if that makes it into the ma nifesto will see if that makes it into the manifesto as well. just finally, there is some discussion on the question of the so—called waspy women, they are those women who will lose out as a result of changes to
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the state pension age, women body in the state pension age, women body in the 19505 who will lose out as a result of changes —— women born in their 19505. they are some potential areas that could be up for discussion. we look forward to the details. it seems this morning, the conservatives and the lib dems have made more green pledges. the green agenda is firmly at the forefront of campaigning this year, isn‘t it? agenda is firmly at the forefront of campaigning this year, isn't mm really is what stops something of a bidding war emerged overnight with the conservatives pledging to plant 30 million trees by 2025. the lib dems are saying that doesn‘t go far enough. they have doubled that figure and said they will plant 60 million x 2025. as you say, i think that speaks to all of the main parties‘ desires to pitch green issues at the forefront of their election pledges on december the
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12th. the metropolitan police says it‘s assessing two allegations of electoral fraud, after claims the conservatives offered peerages to brexit party candidates to persuade them to withdraw from the election. the senior labour peer, lord falconer, says allegations made by the brexit party leader, nigel farage, raise serious questions. borisjohnson has dismissed the accusations as "nonsense". emergency crews have worked through the night, to tackle a huge fire at a student block of flats in greater manchester. the fire service said the flames spread across all six floors of the university accommodation building in bolton. it‘s not yet known if there are any injuries. long—term smokers can improve the health of their hearts within weeks of switching to e—cigarettes, according to new research. scientists at the university of dundee conducted a month—long study, but they warned that vaping is not safe, merely "less harmful" than smoking. the british heart foundation said that stopping smoking was the single best thing people could do for their heart. the bbc‘s children in need has raised almost
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a8—million—pounds this year. celebrities from the world of tv, music and sport all took part in the annual telethon. our entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba has the highlights. three, two, one! cue the totaliser! the evening‘s huge total. the end of a fun—packed night... i wish for this year‘s children in need to be really, really big! ..that began with a performance from the cast of hit musical big. # do what i do, babe, if you don‘t know how #. some of the uk‘s most famous faces were on hand to help with the fundraising efforts. a group of eastenders stars took to that strictly come dancing dance floor. jodie whittaker and the dr who team made a young fan‘s night with an unexpected appearance. what are you going to say to an actual time lord?
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laughter. um, you're amazing. applause. and some of england‘s top football players had a surprise for a group of children from the england amputee football association. great to meet you all. all the money from the night goes towards helping disadvantaged children and young people across the uk. children in need says the millions raised tonight should make a huge difference. lizo mzimba, bbc news. back to our top story. prince andrew says he "let the side down" by continuing his friendship with the american billionaire, and convicted sex offender, jeffrey epstein. the prince has been speaking about the relationship for the first time, in an exclusive interview with bbc newsnight. he also addressed accusations that he‘d had sex with an underage girl — allegations which he‘s always denied. let‘s have a look.
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the problem was the fact that once he had been convicted... you stayed with him. i stayed with him. and that‘s the bit that, that, that, as it were, i kick myself or on a daily basis because it was not something that was becoming of a member of a royal family and we try and uphold the highest standards and practices andi the highest standards and practices and i let the side down. simple as that. let‘s talk now to the lawyer mark stephens, who joins us from our london newsroom. first of all, a lot of people will be watching those images for the first time this morning. and this is, to give it its full context, this is the queen‘s son in buckingham palace being questioned about various things in his private life. allegations that have been made. it is an extraordinary moment, isn‘t it? made. it is an extraordinary moment, isn't it? it is. it is unprecedented that a member of the royal family
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who is on the fringes of this investigation in america should want to weigh end. in fact, from a reputational perspective, i think we would think it is a catastrophic error ofjudgement. —— would think it is a catastrophic error of judgement. —— weigh would think it is a catastrophic error ofjudgement. —— weigh in. only if he can come away with the overwhelming ponderous of the public believing his version of events and being able to put to rest any questions and queries, has this served a purpose. otherwise, what you have done is made a record for which for the next year or so, lawyers in america, journalists around the world, i going to try and pick holes in and that is going to be no good for him and it gives the story legs. he would have been much better keeping his own counsel until this matter went forward. what we know from bbc newsnight is the agreement which has taken them some time to get to this point where they
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do the interview, but the agreement was it would be no holds barred. he would be asked any questions which we re would be asked any questions which were deemed to be appropriate. yes. and of course that is the ethically right thing to do. no preprepared questions, no notice of the questions, no notice of the questions so it is not a kind of pr spin where emily maitlis gives a load of questions and he really —— rehearses a load of answers in advance, this is, i think, rehearses a load of answers in advance, this is, ithink, going rehearses a load of answers in advance, this is, i think, going to bea advance, this is, i think, going to be a bit raw and of course people will talk about it and talk about who they believe in all of this and i think that the way in which the social media sets the agenda, the media itself sets the agenda after tonight‘s viewing of this, i think he‘s going be critical. —— i think it is going to be critical. if prince andrew is going to be able to effectively walk back all of the criticisms that have been made of him, all of the allegations filed against him, then this will have
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beenjudged in retrospect, an absolutely brilliant move. but if it doesn‘t happen, it will be judged as being brave at full hardy. let us ta ke being brave at full hardy. let us take a moment to look at one of the sequences in the interview. the question from emily maitlis was why did he stay at epstein‘s home. question from emily maitlis was why did he stay at epstein's home. you are staying at the house of a convicted sex offender. it was a convenient base to stay. i have gone through this in my mind so many times. at the end of the day, with a benefit of all the hindsight that one but at the time, i felt it was the honourable and right thing to do. and i honourable and right thing to do. andl— honourable and right thing to do. andl-i honourable and right thing to do. and i — iadmit fully honourable and right thing to do. and i — i admit fully that my judgement was probably coloured by my... tendency to be too honourable?
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but that isjust my... tendency to be too honourable? but that is just the way it is. as you have seen and heard, some of what is already been released, what often happens in these situations is that the intention, as you were alluding to a moment ago, is to dry kind of line underthings but often, it raises more questions. well, i think it does, and of course, you know, one has to ask the courtiers that advised prince andrew asleep on thejob that advised prince andrew asleep on the job because, of that advised prince andrew asleep on thejob because, of course, they would have presumably said that staying with epstein was just not a cce pta ble staying with epstein was just not acceptable for a member of the royal family. and so, questions are now going to be asked about that. and, of course, we have seen reports coming up this morning in this morning‘s newspapers that some courtiers are starting to distance themselves from the decision to actually do this because of course, you know, in any event, the courtiers are going to have to a nswer
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courtiers are going to have to answer some difficult follow—up questions and i think that is the whole point. you know, is this the final word on it? i suspect it is not and final word on it? i suspect it is notand in final word on it? i suspect it is not and in those circumstances effectively, people are going to be looking for inconsistent statements, are there any documents, the photograph that of course prince andrew says is a fake, is that something that can be proven to be true? are there any other documents or manifests from aeroplanes or any other documents which are going to be able to gainsay what he said, and so effectively, this is given material. now, the only other person who had similar allegations against him who did this was max clifford, he did, and of course i am not equating the two... if i may, he did, and of course i am not equating the two... if! may, i think probably the best if we concentrate for the purposes of this moment in terms of this interview, and a last thought from you, it is important, as we look at this, but say the duke of york has denied all
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of the allegations of impropriety and that remains the case, notwithstanding that he has done this interview. yes, absolutely right, and of course the presumption of innocence applies to him and of course there is no charge against him and! course there is no charge against him and i think we should remind ourselves of that. the allegations in america are collateral to him, if you like, in relation to a lawsuit in that country. thank you very much for your time this morning. it is worth saying we will be speaking to emily around half past eight, in just over one hours‘ time, formal sort of colour around this interview itself when word took place and these discussions in advance of the interview. it took almost a year to secure that interview! checking in with matt. my goodness! what a picture! good morning, this is one
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of our weather watchers who captured this yesterday, it is an example of what some are expensing to start the weekend. natural environment whales have about 90 flood warnings in force still this morning, and the worst affected areas are shown here by floodlights and watchers on their map extending from the welsh borders south to the midlands all the way through towards yorkshire and quite understandable when you look at the rainfall totals so far this autumn. sheffield was one of the wettest, very close to their record, but one place has already broken their record is nottingham, there has been 350 millimetres so far this autumn, still a couple of weeks yet to go, the autumn record prior to this was 3a0 millimetres, and more rain to come this weekend with low pressure close by but the heaviest of the rain isa close by but the heaviest of the rain is a way to the south of us across france, the rain nowhere near
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the levels we‘ve seen so far this week. this morning we wake up to a damn start with parts of eastern southern scotland outbreaks of rain through northern england, north and west midlands, wales, and these areas will continue to seek louder brea ks areas will continue to seek louder breaks through the day and a frosty stop right in western scotland and northern ireland and a brighter day to come across some southern counties of england and wales but having said that, i‘m showers come through the afternoon through coastal counties and through this weekend, far west of wales, temperature down towards the west of cornwall. the rain comes and goes across northern england, the south and eastern parts of scotland into the afternoon. western scotland, away from the hebrides and the western isles and to southern eastern parts of northern ireland, dry. some showery rain pushing into the west later on. it will continue overnight. the same sort of areas where we see that our breaks of rain will hold onto the cloud tonight but with some gaps in the cloud, eastern and southern scotland later and towards east anglia and the south—east, these areas most likely to see a frost as we start sunday
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morning. chile, frosty for some, to see a frost as we start sunday morning. chile, frosty forsome, but again, northern and western england and also wales, ploughed around and the occasional rain. running up in scotla nd the occasional rain. running up in scotland and northern ireland after morning showers in the west, some of them continuing in orkney and shetland through the day but still, sunny spells towards the south and east. a chilly day, temperature is around 6—10. things will turn a little milder through the week ahead, certainly not to begin with though, but that is welcome news into the start of next week, this area of high pressure means that for many, it will be a dry and sunny day after a misty and foggy after a misty and many, it will be a dry and sunny day after a misty and foggy start. back to you both. that is what we like, dry and bright! exactly what we need. we all know sir rod stewart for his husky voice and big hits like sailing and maggie may, but did you know he also has a big passion for little trains? i think ithinka i think a lot of people do know this by now. the little ones you build at home. in his case, not so little! i
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did not know this! sir rod has spent the last 23 years — not non—stop! building an epic model railway, which he unveiled for the first time this week. he‘s been telling david farrell from bbc scotland‘s the nine programme how the project has helped him relax while recording a new album. action. action! so rod stewart, it isa action. action! so rod stewart, it is a pleasure to chat to you and we will talk to one of your patient, celtic and football and if we talk about that we will use up the film, ten minutes! about that we will use up the film, ten minutes i believe, but one of the other patients come to light this week is the model railway, 23 years in the making. where did it start? i builta years in the making. where did it start? i built a house in beverly hills at the turn—of—the—century. in the early 905. and i dedicated, i knew i was going to build this model railway. so at the top of the house i built railway. so at the top of the house ibuilta railway. so at the top of the house i built a special huge room like a big attic and i have always been into trans, always, since i was a kid. does it help you switch off? into trans, always, since i was a kid. does it help you switch offlm really does, it is the finest hobby, it is 3—dimensional, it is
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wonderful, you get to be a carpenter and everything. now that is not the only tracks you are making, your new album is coming out in the next week? you have teamed up with the royal philharmonic orchestra for this. i'm not the first want to do it, you remember elvis has done it, i think fleetwood mac did it. it is all the classics that have made me famous over the years. and itjust brings out a new light. you stole my soul but i love you anyway. talking about your cancer diagnosis, what was it that made you want to talk about that after you had got the all clear? simply to help people. i was doing a show with ronnie wood for prostate cancer and i said to ronnie this might be a good place to tell everybody now that i have sort of got the all clear. he said yeah, go ahead and do it. you know, i will be right by your side. so i told everybody and everybody was aghast, you know, that i have been with it for 2.5 years and i had worked through all of that time, which was
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very helpful. at that point did you think do you know what? i will have to slow down and take it easy? no, not at all. not at all. i love what i do. not at all. not at all. i love what ido.i not at all. not at all. i love what i do. i know it will end one day but i will make the most of it while i can. your other patient courses music, model railways and football. well, you had better put my kids and my family well, you had better put my kids and myfamily in well, you had better put my kids and my family in there i will get into trouble! what comes first? football... ? trouble! what comes first? football. . . ? no, the kids trouble! what comes first? football...? no, the kids come first, absolutely, they really do. all of my boys are celtic supporters andi all of my boys are celtic supporters and i have just all of my boys are celtic supporters and i havejust started junior celtic team under tens, for my little boy. they all count in their hoops and their hoops tracksuits and it gives me so much pleasure! just before you go, we have something for you because i hear you like to wake up you because i hear you like to wake up the kids back home in a different manner. you use bagpipes, i believe? 0h, manner. you use bagpipes, i believe? oh, man! that is great! i have got
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you your own set of bagpipe so that you your own set of bagpipe so that you can wake the kids up because you play them on cds? i do! when they are late for school they put a cd on and turn it up! i do not know if you have played the bagpipes before but... know, i have made the noise. do you want to have a try. put it under your do you want to have a try. put it underyourarm. do you want to have a try. put it under your arm. look into it. and then... i mean... we are on a budget when we bought it. so we felt... and then that here, so if you put that, so into your mouth with the... talk amongst yourselves, would you? we don‘t need to worry about that bit. put this over here. round here, like that? like a scarf almost. nice to meet you, so rod. i cannot wait to wa ke meet you, so rod. i cannot wait to wake the boys up with this! cheers, mate. he is like a kid, isn't he? such fun to talk to. and the album is at now, i understand. do you put bagpipes in the same category with
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violin? when played well, marvellous. when not, painful. i love bagpipes, that is my position. played well. stars from shows including doctor who, eastenders and strictly helped make it another big night for children in need. a grand total of more than £a7 million was raised for good causes. let‘s take a look at some of the highlights. tonight is the night when we cross the line. this is our invitation to the line. this is our invitation to the party. our children in need stars are... all around the world, are you ready for a brand new feet? yeah, yeah, yeah. yeah, yeah, yeah. may the force be with you, always. so my name. when you are hurting, darling. i think about doctor who
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andi darling. i think about doctor who and i cannot wait to watch doctor who. i watch him every day. screams. what are you going to say to an actual time lord? what are you going to say to an actualtime lord? look behind what are you going to say to an actual time lord? look behind you right now. oh my god! don't be afraid to let them show. your true colours. true colours. a beautiful like a rainbow. —— are beautiful like a rainbow. gorgeous. rosie millard is the chair of children in need and joins us now from our london newsroom. rosie, that was quite a night, wasn‘t it? culminating in the impressive grand total, incredible. which was the moment that stood out best for you? actually, i thought it was the
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return of the rickshaw, having cycled all the way from wales, matt baker and six amazing young people on stage, celebrating raising £5.5 million from the general public and then sir tom hunter, lady marion joining them on stage and pledging another £3 million from the hunter foundation, so rickshaw this year actually got double than last year and came here, romped home, i should say, with £8.5 million which is amazing and i cycled with the rickshaw on wednesday and it was very, very moving. people were on the verge of holding out tenors and small children from schools waving and waving flags and showing badges —— tanners. and waving flags and showing badges -- tanners. moving and heartwarming. but is what i was going to say, it has been going since 1980 and we go out over the year as journalist as pa rt out over the year as journalist as part of children in need and there we re part of children in need and there were still people in the street waving money, massive enthusiasm in primary schools across the country.
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i know! how do you maintain that? it isa i know! how do you maintain that? it is a beloved brand, i mean, children in need is absolutely beloved and i think one of the reasons that he so loved is it affects, we find over 3000 charities, grassroots charities, right across the nation, from orkney right down to land‘s end. so you are never very far from a children in need — funded charity and it really affects, we effected last year, we changed the lives of over 600,000 children, young people. but is about the population of glasgow. that is an enormous amount. and that affects many, many people right across the nation. so, you know, it is a known entity, as it were, and a very, very loved one. and i suppose it means when you are approaching big names likejodie whittaker, jim broadbent, it is not that difficult to bring them in and it must be amazing. all of those
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stars who sang so gloriously on our album of cover songs, get it covered, people do love and when you mention, you know, you get to a cab and people say you work for children in need or you are the charity children in need, i will not charge you. people do love it. it is, and celebrities are no different from all of us, and they really do want to help. it is not a problem, asking for people to step up and give some time for children in need, it really is- time for children in need, it really is—it time for children in need, it really is — it does what it says on the tin and so terry hopefully will be smiling down on us because we think about him and the guidance and leadership he gave us . 0h! . oh! i'm sure he .oh! i'm sure he will be smiling down on you and congratulations on another great night and we will speak to matt baker a little bit later on.
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stay with us. headlines in a moment. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and nina warhurst. good morning, here‘s a summary of today‘s main stories from bbc news. in an unprecedented interview, prince andrew has told the bbc that he let the royal family down by staying at the home of the convicted sex offender, jeffrey epstein. he spoke to emily maitlis at buckingham palace, addressing accusations that he‘d had sex with a 17—year—old american girl. he said he couldn‘t remember meeting virginia roberts — the prince denies allegations of inappropriate conduct. the problem was the fact that once he had been convicted... you stayed with him. i stayed with him. and that‘s the bit that, that, um as it were, i kick myself for on a daily basis because it is not something that was becoming of a member of the royal family and we try and uphold the highest standards and practices and i let the side down.
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earlier, the lawyer mark stephens told us that taking part in the interview could have far—reaching implications for prince andrew. could have, only if he can come away with the overwhelming preponderance of the public believing his version of the public believing his version of events and being able to put to re st of events and being able to put to rest any questions and queries has this served a purpose. otherwise what you have done is made a record for which for the next year or so, lawyers in america, journalists around the world, are going to try and pick holes in and that is going to be no good for him and it gives the story legs. sarah ferguson has offered her support to her former husband on social media. writing on twitter, she said the duke was a "true" and "honest" gentleman, able to "speak from the heart", and on her instagram account she wrote that she "would be with him every step of the way".
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and you can see the full interview in a bbc newsnight special on bbc 2, tonight at 9:00. leading figures in labour and the trade union movement will meet this morning to decide which policies will be included in the party‘s election manifesto. meanwhile, both the liberal democrats and the conservatives have pledged to plant more trees in an effort to tackle climate change, if they win the general election. emergency crews have worked through the night, to tackle a fire at a student block of flats in greater manchester. the fire service said the flames spread across all six floors of the university accomodation building in bolton. two people were treated for their injuries at the scene. a big day in tennis coming up and an unexpected upset. yes, arthur nadal
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is out of the tour finals but good news because he is now the season—ending number one and the old est season—ending number one and the oldest season—ending number one since the atp rankings were introduced in 1973. the men‘s number one, rafael nadal, is out of the season—ending world tour finals. that‘s because alexander zverev beat daniil medvedev to claim the last semi—final spot at the 02 arena in london, where he‘ll play dominic thiem. zverev is the defending champion and he certainly looked the part, winning in straight sets. nadal was awaiting that result, after beating stefanos tsitsipas earlier in the day. the young greek now faces roger federer, but although he‘s out, nadal was already assured of finishing the year on top of the world rankings. you know, after all the things i went through in my career in terms of injuries, i never thought that at the age of 33.5 i would have this trophy on my hands again so it is... cheering and applause. without all my team and family that is here next to me,
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this would be impossible. i just can say thank you very much everyone for the support. thank you. england batsmanjoe denly made 68 on his return from an ankle injury and he led a fightback on day two of their final warm—up match before the first test starts next wednesday. the closed on 355—8 against new zealand a in whangarei a lead of 53 runs. denly feared his tour was over when he was injured in practicejust over two weeks ago. when i first did my ankle it was touch and go really, whether i‘d be fit for this game, and i‘d been under a strict rehab programme and under great hands with the medical team here, so delighted to be back and able to spend some time out there today. to rugby league — and the great britain lions have just started their match
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against papua new guinea. the final game on their tour of the southern hemisphere — the lions are hoping to end on a high, after losing all three matches so far. great britain‘s women narrowly lost the curtain—raiser in port moresby this morning — they went down by 20 points to 16 against the papua new guinea orchids. that levels the series at 1—1. you can watch that game on bbc two. toulouse came from behind to beat gloucester in the openning game of rugby union‘s champions cup. this try from sebastian bezy proved to be decisive, as they came from 11 points down at half time, to win 25—20. toulouse are looking to win the cup for the fifth time. with england already through to next summer‘s european championship, the other home nations continue their bids to join them today — and it won‘t be easy. northern ireland are third in a really tough group, behind the netherlands and germany — they need to beat the dutch this afternoon and the germans on tuesday — and hope other results go their way. wales also need some luck, as well as beating azerbaijan tonight and then hungary. scotland face cyprus
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and kazakhstan but they‘re facing a play—off next spring. for wales, the game can‘t come soon enough. the players are ready, they are looking forward to the game and they are excited. it is a challenge. azerbaijan had a good result against croatia last time, drawing. the lads are ready for it. it was another golden dayforteam gb, as the para athletics world championships came to a close in dubai. race running made it‘s debut at the event — and kayleigh haggo won the women‘s 100 metres, with gavin drysdale taking the men‘s honours. both set new world records. the athletes have severe co—ordination impairments and run with the support of a three—wheeled frame. drysdale said "it opens up the door for people like me to compete at the highest level". well, i can‘t believe ijust did that. i knew i would probably have to two
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break a world record to win. i want to dedicate this gold medal to my late coach janice, she‘d be so proud. ahead of this weekend‘s brazilian grand prix, world champion lewis hamilton says he wants reassurances about mercedes‘ future before he commits to a new deal beyond next year. he was fifth fastest in yesterday‘s second practice session, which was marked by a heavy crash for williams driver robert kubica — thankfully he emerged unscathed. ferrari‘s sebastian vettel was quickest. and finally, have a look at this incredible bit of skill. this is england‘s number one table tennis player liam pitchford competing in the austrian open. he beatsjun mizutani ofjapan to reach the last 16, with the help of these two outrageous behind—the—back shots. extraordinary reflexes there!
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you could only follow it when it was slowed down so much. the accuracies isn‘t —— the accuracy is incredible. the liberal democrats say they will plant 60—million trees every year in an effort to tackle climate change, if they win the general election. the party claims their tree—pla nting programme would be the biggest in uk history. let‘s speak to tom brake from the liberal democrats, who‘s in our london newsroom. are pledged to spend 100 billion tackling the effects of climate change. a lot of money. what will it be spent on and how will you find it? the initiative we are launching todayis it? the initiative we are launching today is the proposal for 60 million trees to be planted. that will be costed at £6 billion over and that would amount to a very significant number of trees, of course. why do we think that is necessary? trees and the carbon sink or the capturing
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of carbon that they can provide can make a very positive impact on reducing our co2 emissions and we need to see those hearths by 2030 so it isa need to see those hearths by 2030 so it is a very ambitious timescale. the problem is, the labour party have pledged 60 billion on home efficiency, 500 million by the tories on cleaning up the ocean. the green pledges have become a crowded space in this electoral campaign that it space in this electoral campaign thatitis space in this electoral campaign that it is enough to cut through? well, obviously this is part of a package. it is notjust about 60 million trees. we have also set out some ambitious plans, for instance, for boosting the amount of wind power and tidal power that the uk could generate four. we are an island nation and have huge potential there. what we could also point to in contrast of the other parties is what we did when we were in government in terms of travelling or indeed quadrupling the amount of electricity that came from renewable
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sources so we have shown that when we have positioned to do something about it, we‘ve had on it and i‘m afraid of the measures we sought to introduce in coalition such as making sure all new homes met the high standards for sustainability, those proposals were then abolished by the incoming conservative government. labour was too late -- galvanised the industry and bring in hundreds of thousands ofjobs and you are not going to far. the reality is that what labour are proposing as far as i can see is spending probably the first three, four or five years spending probably the first three, four orfive years in spending probably the first three, four or five years in government nationalising a number of industries including broad hand. at a huge cost of the taxpayer without necessarily being any clear benefit and that would lock them down the —— for probably the first part of
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parliament which wouldn‘t improve people ‘5 lives too much. parliament which wouldn‘t improve people 's lives too much. the ma nifesto, people 's lives too much. the manifesto, there stands on brexit, the sensible thing for liberal democrats to do, this was said, would be to run and relaxed election campaign to make sure they don‘t give that seat to the conservative. should the liberal democrats be doing more of that? well, the liberal democrats will fight to win as many seats as possible and if someone wants to support a party which is clearly a remained party, they can only vote for liberal democrats was not there is a danger that in taking those seats away from labour, you will hand lots of seats away from the conservatives. what labour are saying according to jeremy corbyn if they would negotiate a labour brexit and they can‘t tell people whether they will campaign infavourof can‘t tell people whether they will
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campaign in favour of the labour brexit or in favour of remaining and thatis brexit or in favour of remaining and that is an incredibly confusing position. c don‘t think it would be —— so you don‘t think you should hang back? this is how campaigns work, we are certainly not going to be step standing down for labour mps certainly not going to be step standing down for labour mp5 or labour candidates when it is not clear at all where they stand on the issue of remain or leave. we will learn more of that a little later on. we spoke with borisjohnson yesterday and we will be speaking to lots more candidates. stay with us. headlines in a moment. here‘s matt with a look at this morning‘s weather. a fairly mixed weekend, as i will
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show you, but understandably we have been talking a lot about rain recently and i want to show you before we start the flip side of things here in the beautiful shetland, it has been unusual dry november so far, the exception rather than the rule reallyjust 15 millimetres of rain up to the start of today, but is around 10% of what we normally expect during the entire month and we are already halfway through so it has been very dry here, if few showers this weekend so just changing things ever so slightly and as there will be across other parts of the uk but overall, things turn that gradually bit drier over the weekend and through the start of next week, a welcome weather window for all the rain we have been seeing. looking at the details, we still have the area of low pressure producing all of the rain, heaviest though has been sinking southwards in across france, for us this weather front here is just a zone that is producing the cloud and rain through today, eastern fringes of scotland down into northern england, wales, the farm midlands and western parts of cornwall, claudia zone, western scotla nd cornwall, claudia zone, western scotland and northern ireland bright start with the frost for cloud
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bushes and later, but compared with the past few days across many parts of southern england south wales, a brighter day with a greater chance of sunshine and staying dry, showered through the english channel some to the west of connell and pembrokeshire and still while we have something drier towards eastern wales, any northern western area still prone to patchy rain and in northern england is about the scotla nd northern england is about the scotland heaviest scotland —— showers and lead into the western isles but much of mainland scotland and a good part of northern ireland save one or two isolated showers and staying dry and temperatures like recent days are still in single figures forjust recent days are still in single figures for just about all of you. tonight, the zone of cloud and directs a frame where it is today, a bit more in the way of cloud for western scotland, northern ireland so not as chilly tonight as it was the nightjust gone but eastern southern scotland, and towards positive east anglia the south—east, it is going to be a colder night, a touch of frost into sunday morning but it is these areas again will be seen sometime through the day and many staying dry, by today developing across scotland, northern ireland after some showers to begin with, showers continuing in orkney and shetland but again, northern england through wales may be towards
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the far west of cornwall, continuing to see outbreaks of rain come and go and some heavier bursts north—eastern parts of scotland later in the day. another cool day, 6-9d. we later in the day. another cool day, 6—9d. we only the weather window i have been mentioning and it is about to come in, a brief one but this area of high pressure pushes its way through into monday, keeping things mostly dry. a frosty start, foggy start for the commute for some of you and isolated showers across the likes of the northern isles, maybe down some eastern english channel is, eastern coasts, and through the english channel but for the vast majority of us, a dry day, sunny, it will continue into tuesday after another frosty and foggy start. through the week, it looks as though we will see rain coming back again, on and off and maybe towards southern and western southern and on and off and maybe towards southern and western areas but what you will notice as well, the temperatures mean and charlie will rise just a little bit. temperatures mean and charlie will risejust a little bit. thank you, matt. we‘ll be back with the headlines at 8:00 now it‘s time for newswatch.
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hello and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. the strange tale of how 3—year—old footage of borisjohnson laying a wreath at the cenotaph came to be broadcast on monday morning. was the failure to show this correct footage error, or conspiracy? we ask the editor of breakfast. remembrance sunday is always a significant day in the news calendar with a solemn ceremony at the cenotaph in london governed by a century of tradition. wreaths are laid by members of the royal family and the leaders of political parties. and how the latter do so, particularly during an election campaign, is bound to be the object of scrutiny. this year, the prime ministerfaced criticism on a number of grounds — for stepping out of the line too early, for wearing a blue rather than a black suit, for having his coat undone, and for apparently laying his wreath upside down.
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but that was as nothing compared to the reaction to the following morning‘s breakfast when they broadcast this. the conservatives and labour will mark armistice day today by announcing new measures for the armed forces. the conservatives have pledged new protections to protect soldiers from legal actions against accusations of wrongdoing on the battlefield, and labour says it will increase pay for the armed forces and improve accommodation. the liberal democrats have announced a £10,000 skills training. those pictures, shown three times during monday morning‘s breakfast during the news summary, were in fact from 2016 when borisjohnson was foreign secretary, carrying a green wreath inside of a red one, and lined up alongside then prime minister theresa may and other politicians no longer in post.
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a number of viewers spotted that there was something wrong. it looked rather different to the live broadcast the day before, where, if i‘m perfectly honest, mrjohnson looked a bit unkempt and, of course, has been reported by others, put his wreath down upside down. like a lot of people, i do depend on the bbc to be factually correct and hopefully also impartial in terms of the election. the footage that you broadcast was obviously perhaps a little bit more helpful to mrjohnson than the footage that went out live the day before. now, i‘m quite sure you didn‘t lose it overnight, so my question is, can you explain to us why you broadcast 3—year—old footage without telling us, and why you did it at all? please can someone explain why monday's report of the cenotaph ceremony included footage of boris johnson which was quite clearly shot on a totally different occasion? there are so many obvious discrepancies — not least of which that his wreath was a completely different colour — that i find it very hard to believe
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that this was a genuine mistake. a genuine mistake is exactly what the bbc said it was, but how could it have come about? well, the corporation‘s news footage is saved and stored in a digital system called jupiter, used across television news, including on breakfast. that‘s where journalists can access and edit material that‘s recently been broadcast, feeds from news agencies, and also library material. footage is either marked blue if it‘s online and ready to use, purple if it‘s on the shelf, or grey if it‘s in the offline archive. but anyjupiter user can restore archived material, make a clip from it and rename it, and then it is available for broadcast. that, we are told, is what happened last weekend with those 3—year—old pictures. to shed some more light on what happened, i‘m joined from salford richard frediani, the editor of breakfast. thank you for coming on newswatch.
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given there was so much controversy about the prime minister‘s appearance at the cenotaph, people are really concerned as to why breakfast ran the wrong footage three times the day after. can you understand that concern? i can understand that concern, samira, and as we stated at the time, i want to apologise for that error. it was a human error, it shouldn‘t have happened, and it‘s a mistake that i have apologised for at the time and importantly, i‘ve come on newswatch to apologise again. the archive footage from three years ago — what was it doing on the news server, anyway? so i think it‘s important to try and give some context to this story. the original archive footage had been sourced 2a hours before. so one of the producers on that saturday night into sunday went into the millbank server — which is a separate, smaller server connected to the main one — to search for some material. and a bit like you would do in google, for instance, you might put in something like, "johnson cenotaph".
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and it called up this material. that was then brought across to the salford server and put onto the salford server for use on that programme on sunday morning. now, in the end, it never got used on that programme on sunday morning. again, that‘s not unusual. there is often a lot of material brought into the building that isn‘t used — whether that‘s library or current — but it‘s there as an option to use. that doesn‘t then get automatically deleted. that stays on the system, so that material stayed on the system. another team then came in on sunday night working into monday to work on that programme, and one of the team was responsible for producing what was a small bit of content — it was a summary headline, an ‘oov‘ as we call it at the bbc — out of vision. and that content was prepared for the morning. now, when they went into the system — again, think of it like a google
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search — they searched for "cenotaph" because it was — it was labelled "leaders at cenotaph". when they found that material, they mistakenly thought it was relevant to that day‘s service that had taken place on sunday morning at 11 o‘clock. people are puzzled as to why, before the cenotaph ceremony happened, there was a search for material from the past, why it was on the server at all. in that context, when you‘re putting a programme together that looks ahead to an event, you want a range of material that can help the viewer understand or imagine what will go on that day. now, naturally, with it being his first appearance as prime minister — obviously, he has been there before in his role as foreign secretary — it‘s not unsurprising that by digging out some material that refers to him laying a wreath at a previous event, that this would be the sensible sort of material that you might
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want to use in a broadcast that was done on sunday morning looking ahead to what went on. so when you‘re speaking to a reporter who is at that event at 7 o‘clock in the morning — because obviously not a lot is going on beforehand, but they are throwing ahead to what may happen later — it may be wanted by the programme team to use as a better picture to help illustrate what would be happening later on. of course, the preview footage was not used in that way at all, and i suppose people are wondering was it not labelled with the date? to be used in a news summary the following day, suggests someone either wasn‘t reading the labels — that‘s what people are puzzled about. so you‘ve got to remember is the team was busy, it was labelled "leaders at cenotaph 11—13" — the 11—13 refers to the actual date, but it didn‘t say the year on it. it did have, in a far more detailed way elsewhere, that. but ultimately, they did not read that.
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and that was the human error that came into it. they presumed that this was footage of that day. there was no other recording on our server of the cenotaph service, so they made a mistake — a human error — to use that footage and unfortunately, it went out. and for that, i apologise. yes. and so, just to be clear, the title didn‘t imply the year, you‘d have to have gone into the notes that went with that footage and read them to realise for sure that the footage was three years old? absolutely. 2,000 people have complained to the bbc about this, and of the one suspicions is that ifjeremy corbyn had looked this dishevelled, the news media would have made a very big story of it. so what do you say to those who believe the bbc was trying to downplay the prime minister, looking dishevelled? well, that‘s not true. just being here, explaining to you the course of events in some detail, is an attempt by me to be transparent and honest about a mistake which
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was just a human error. trust and accuracy is important to me as an editor, to all the journalists who work in bbc news, and frankly, speaking for journalists who work in all broadcasters, for them, too, because it undermines the relationship with the audience. for that, i apologise. we try to get things right, but human mistakes can happen. and when they do, we are right to apologise. richard frediani, thank you very much. thank you. bbcjournalists this week have been reporting from many parts of the uk affected by the floods which have caused disruption and damage across swathes of england and wales. elizabeth walker was unhappy with the coverage, writing:
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and richard andrew wanted more of a wider perspective than that. finally, on tuesday, bbc news reported on the death of lord bramall, the former chief of the armed forces who, in 201a, was falsely accused of child sexual abuse. linda caswell was watching, and took to twitter to ask: and peter bowden had a different point to make, having watched the bbc news at ten.
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last week, two viewers told us what they hope to see from the bbc‘s coverage of the general election campaign. we would like to hear more of your opinions on that, so that next week, we can put some of them to the head of bbc westminster, katy searle, whom i‘ll be speaking to. you can get in touch with us on any issue relating to bbc news by e—mailing: or you can find us on twitter at @newswatchbbc. you can call us. and do have a look at our website for previous discussions. that‘s all from us. we‘ll be back to hear your thoughts
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about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and charlie stayt. our headlines today... prince andrew breaks his silence on thejeffrey epstein scandal. he says he let "the side down" by staying at the home of the convicted sex offender. that‘s the bit that, that, that, um, as it were, i kick myself for on a daily basis because it was not something that was becoming of a member of the royal family. a crunch meeting for labour as seniorfigures decide what to include in its manifesto. up to 200 firefighters have been tackling a huge blaze at a student accomodation block in bolton. a star—studded line—up helps children in need raise nearly £a8 million for good causes. rafael nadal may be world number one but alex zverev‘s win last night
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sends him out of the world tourfinals in london. still some rain around full some of you this weekend but there is a window of drier weather coming in for the start of next week. the details right here on breakfast. it‘s saturday, 16th november. our top story... in an unprecedented interview, prince andrew has told the bbc that he let the royal family down by staying at the home of the convicted sex offender, jeffrey epstein. he spoke to emily maitlis at buckingham palace, addressing accusations that he‘d had sex with a 17—year—old american girl. he said he couldn‘t remember meeting virginia roberts. the prince denies allegations of inappropriate conduct. our royal correspondent, nicholas witchell reports. he is continuing with royal duties. last sunday, he was at the cenotaph, laying a wreath with his nephews. and yet, for month after month, he‘s been the focus
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of troubling questions. prince andrew, the queen‘s second son, one moment seen waving from the doorway of the new york home of a convicted child sex offender, jeffrey epstein, and photographed strolling through central park with him. buckingham palace has consistently denied any impropriety by prince andrew. now, he‘s decided to speak for himself to bbc newsnight‘s emily maitlis. but you were staying at the house of a convicted sex offender. yes. it was a convenient place to stay. i mean, i've gone through this in my mind so many times. at the end of the day, with the benefit of all the hindsight that one could have, it was definitely the wrong thing to do but at the time i felt it was the honourable and right thing to do. and i admit fully that myjudgement
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was probably coloured by my tendency to be too honourable but that's just the way it is. and then there‘s andrew‘s alleged friendship with the then 17—year—old virginia roberts, who was on epstein‘s payroll. she‘s alleged that andrew seduced her. one of epstein‘s accusers, virginia roberts, has made allegations against you. she says she met you in 2001. she says she dined with you, danced with you at tramp nightclub in london. she went on to have sex with you in a house in belgravia, belonging to ghislaine maxwell, your friend. your response? i have no recollection of ever meeting this lady. none whatsoever. you don‘t remember meeting her? no. it was in 2001, according to virginia roberts, that she had sex with andrew on three occasions, including one orgy. the palace has denied that.
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in 2008, epstein was convicted of procuring for prostitution a girl under the age of 18. he was sentenced to 18 months in prison. it was in 2010, after epstein had been released from prison, that andrew visited him in new york and stayed at his mansion. how does he explain that? the problem was the fact that once he had been convicted... you stayed with him. i stayed with him. and that's the bit that — that, as it were, i kick myself for on a daily basis, because it was not something that was becoming of a member of the royal family, and we try and uphold the highest standards and practices, and i let the side down. simple as that. but nothing about this story is simple. jeffrey epstein can‘t answer questions — he took his own life in august. as for andrew, the us authorities will undoubtedly very much like to hear his account of everything he witnessed.
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nicholas witchell, bbc news. well, virginia roberts‘ legal team has responded to that interview. they say they want prince andrew to speak under oath rather than giving statements to the media. and you can see the full interview in a bbc newsnight special on bbc 2, tonight at 9 o‘clock. we will be speaking with emilyjust before 8:30am. leading figures in labour and the trade union movement will meet this morning to decide which policies will be included in the party‘s election manifesto. despite some major announcements, it still has to decide whether to include some policies agreed at its party conference. our political correspondent, john owen is in our london newsroom. good morning. some tricky, tricky policy to steer tonight. for a start, brexit my secondary free movement of people. the purpose of the meeting today is to translate
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policies passed by labour party conference, or announced by shadow cabinet ministers into a single coherent document setting out what the labour party would do if elected into office. the reality is, much of what would make its way in the ma nifesto what would make its way in the manifesto has been agreed in advance based on party positions. there are some potential flash points based on party positions. there are some potentialflash points which may be up for discussion today. on free movement, they passed a motion saying they would expand freedom of movement on the eu but it is uncertain if that pledge will make its way into the manifesto. on brexit, we know the party intends to renegotiate its own deal with the eu and then put that deal back to the electorate with an option to remain. there is a pressure inside the leadership to adopt a more explicitly remain position. it will see what makes it into the manifesto on that question. there is likely to
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be some discussion around additional help for these so—called waspi women, the women who lost out regarding a state to the state —— is a change to the state pension age. this election, climate change and the green agenda is at the forefront. all of the main parties wa nt to forefront. all of the main parties want to put climate change at the centre of their offer, policies to address climate change at the centre of the offer to address. we have seen a bidding war between the conservatives and the liberal democrats. the liberal democrats wa nt to democrats. the liberal democrats want to double the number of trees of the conservatives. climate policy is at the centre of this election.
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emergency crews have worked through the night, to tackle a fire at a student block of flats in greater manchester. the fire service said the flames spread across all six floors of the university accomodation building in bolton. two people were treated for their injuries at the scene. long—term smokers can improve the health of their hearts within weeks of switching to e—cigarettes, according to new research. scientists at the university of dundee conducted a month—long study, but they warned that vaping is not safe, merely "less harmful" than smoking. the british heart foundation said that stopping smoking was the single best thing people could do for their heart. the bbc‘s children in need has raised almost £a8 million this year. celebrities from the world of tv, music and sport all took part in the annual telethon. our entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba, has the highlights. three, two, one!
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cue the totaliser! the evening‘s huge total. the end of a fun—packed night... i wish for this year‘s children in need to be really, really big! ..that began with a performance from the cast of hit musical big. # do what i do, fake if you don‘t know how #. some of the uk‘s most famous faces were on hand to help with the fundraising efforts. a group of eastenders stars took to the strictly come dancing dance floor. jodie whittaker and the dr who team made a young fan‘s night with an unexpected appearance. what are you going to say to an actual time lord? laughter. um, you're amazing. applause. and some of england‘s top football players had a surprise for a group of children from the england amputee football association. great to meet you all. all the money from the night goes towards helping
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disadvantaged children and young people across the uk. children in need says the millions raised tonight should make a huge difference. lizo mzimba, bbc news. many thanks to all of those involved in children in need last night. £a8 million raised on the night. political party leaders are being urged to make tackling homelessness a priority, after government figures showed 726 homeless people died in england and wales last year. the mayor of greater manchester, andy burnham, who‘s also a former labour health secretary, thinks he‘s found a potential solution. hejoins us now. good morning to you. homelessness, many people will see it in our daily lives than any big city like manchester but that is replicated all over the uk. it is something you
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personally saw as a challenge. where are you in what you have tried to achieve? i said i would do everything i could to end rough sleeping in greater manchester. a big commitment. it is heading in the right direction. we had seven years of increases in last year we saw a fall in the numbers of people sleeping rough. we can only do so much. there are more and more people coming onto the streets. manchester city councillor called a a00% increase in families homeless, presenting for temporary accommodation. that is completely unsustainable and almost as if this crisis is going on and the general election campaign is talking of other different things. i am saying to hang on a minute. this is a crisis. people are dying on the streets in 2019 for want of a home and party leaders need to address it more directly. he wanted to eradicate homeless completely by 2020. do you think that will be met?
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if not what is stopping it? last night in manchester we had 350 people in shelters across our ten barrows. we have increased the number of places to over a00. i‘m going to carry on doing that and try to give everybody somewhere to go every night of the week. it is not happening in other cities. we are doing it all year round. that is not a solution in the long run to homelessness. we are dealing with consequences. what i am saying to party leaders is, let‘s reduce the number of people who are coming onto the streets. i want there to be a freeze to people‘s housing allowance in benefits. the gap has been getting bigger. more and more people are coming onto the streets because at that very issue. i am saying to the party leaders, we needed to see an end to the freeze and make sure
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benefits keep pace with rents so people are not made homeless. you talk about the short term solution and the long term solution. you say, tonight, many people will still be sleeping out. why is it that you, as the mayor, cannot find somewhere to sleep? why can't you do that? the government is not funding us to do it. let's be absolutely clear, if i may... we are doing everything we can to raise money from the greater manchester public, footballers, the music industry. where is the government? why aren't they helping. let‘s try and avoid talking over one another here. you are saying very clearly, the conservative party, central government is to blame for the fact you cannot deal with the
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situation here in greater manchester. where do you see another party offering you... you are a member of the labour party. so jeremy corbyn, are you suggesting in this election campaign, he has a solution which will change something the day after, there week after he would be prime minister? jeremy is the only leader to have spoken about ending homelessness. i have not heard the other leaders address it at all. we are hearing about the ma nifesto at all. we are hearing about the manifesto is the only leader to have spoken about ending homelessness. i have not heard the other leaders address it at all. we are hearing about manifestos coming forward. i want, day one solutions. an end to the benefit freeze. an end to no fault elections where private landlords can push people out onto the streets after two weeks. an end to the cool thing for people with no immigration status that they have no recourse to public funds. and crucially more funding for public shelters. we are doing more. i am asking the greater manchester public to contribute. i contribute 15% of
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my own salary to the campaign. surely we are entitled to get more money from government when people are dying across the uk? eight out of ten boroughs in greater manchester voted to leave. labour will need to decide where they stand on brexit. they promised a second vote that today they must splash out what their position will be. what does it say to labour voters in the various? they are right to try and bring the country together. on the one hand you have conservatives with a hard brexit position and the lib dems with quite an arrogant position, which is without article 50 as if it never happened. i do not we should go towards a second referendum. i think it should perpetuate the division in the country. is it a mistake to go towards that policy? they are trying
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towards that policy? they are trying to bring the two sides back together but they are also talking about a practical, close working relationship and a good deal with europe. ifully relationship and a good deal with europe. i fully support that. that should be our focus. europe. i fully support that. that should be ourfocus. i had a concern about a second referendum. that could perpetuate the division in the country and we will need to bring people back here. labour is the only party talking in those terms. thank you forjoining us this morning. the government say the rough sleeping initiative has provided £76 million to 2aa councils to reduce rough sleeping. this scheme will provide an estimated 2,600 more bed spaces and tackle all forms of homelessness. here‘s matt with a look at this morning‘s weather. please could we have a few dry days? i have some up my sleeve. on their way for the start of next week. at the moment and all too familiar scene across parts of england and
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wales. many flood warnings out there this morning. around 90 or so issued by national resources wales and the environment agency. this map shows where the bulk of their mark stretching from the welsh borders all the way through to yorkshire. —— them are. through autumn so far, sheffield is very close to breaking its autumn rainfall record. only about nine millimetres away with two weeks to go. one area to have broken the record is in nottingham. still more rain to come through this month. we will see things turn try this weekend. with low pressure close by and this weather front here, this is where the bulk of the rain and the cloud will be today. light and patchy rain. the odd heavy bursts across eastern areas of scotland, right along the coastal
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fringes. either side there will be dry weather. a brighter day to southern counties compared with yesterday. a lot more sunshine around. more showers in the english channel. into cornwall, this is where we will continue to see heavy bursts. a few heavy showers in eastern scotland. some showers will arrive into the western isles of scotla nd arrive into the western isles of scotland and the west of northern ireland later this afternoon for that much of scotland and northern ireland will stay dry, even if it is claudia than we start with. —— more cloudy. things are not as chilly in western scotland and northern ireland tonight. eastern scotland, southern scotland, east anglia and the south—east when this is where it will be colder tonight. some of you will be colder tonight. some of you will wake up with a touch of frost first thing. tomorrow we are doing it again to a certain extent. fairly
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bright towards the south of that. scotla nd bright towards the south of that. scotland and northern ireland, after early showers, things will turn dry and sunny. we will continue to see rain at times in orkney and shetland. temperatures still in single figures for the vast majority. nina wanted something dry. here it comes in a form of high pressure. it will not hang around for too long. monday, pressure. it will not hang around fortoo long. monday, dry pressure. it will not hang around for too long. monday, dry and sunny for too long. monday, dry and sunny for the vast majority. it will be a frosty start with mist and fog around i cannot rule out if you showers peppering the eastern coast. foremost most welcome dry day and it will last into tuesday. later in the week, more rain to come. i will keep you updated on that throughout the weekend. thank you for that. the wait is almost over for fans of the crown, with the latest series of the royal drama officially released tomorrow. set in the 19605 and ‘70s, it boasts an a—list cast, including olivia colman and helena bonham carter.
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breakfast‘sjohn maguire has been given exclusive access to the set at caernarfon castle in wales. for me, it‘s a way of officially dedicating one‘s life, or part of one‘s life, to wales. and the welsh people, after all, wanted it. and i think also that the british, on the whole, tend to do these sort of ceremonies rather well. there‘s no doubt that the investiture of the prince of wales was done rather well by the british people in 1969, so the challenge for netflix is to try and do just as well 50 years on. prince of wales. ok, stand—by to shoot. thank you. if you need proof that the level of production here is absolutely extraordinary, taking what would have been once the silver screen down onto the small screen, just look around this incredible location, including a crew that numbers 280 people. i‘m just concerned that chap there,
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the gentleman at arms, he, um — his cross belt needs... sorting out. 0k. accuracy is taken very seriously. major david rankin—hunt has more than 30 years experience working in the royal household and has been an advisor since the first series. there are a whole lot of people out there, believe you me, that will take great delight in writing in and saying "well, you‘ve got that wrong," you know, "that medal shouldn‘t be there," or, you know. to an extent, i used to be one of those people. chuckles. so — so i think it is important. so the ability to see footage of the actual events can prove problematic for some, but for others, it is invaluable, allowing them to recreate the look of the ceremony which was designed by lord snowdon. obviously, we‘re in the castle where it all happened and we had all the archive footage, the videos and the photographs to work from, so we tried to sort
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of stick to the original kind of plan and look of lord snowdon‘s work, but — and re—enact it, but obviously, we have to do a few tweaks and let tv magic take care of some stuff as well. the last time the deep walls of caernarfon castle witnessed these scenes, it was a summer‘s day. this time, it‘s november, so in between takes, the actors wrap up against the north wales wind. but beneath the puffer jackets are the costumes. the crown is kind of the ultimate costume drama, isn‘t it? everything‘s a costume. it's the ultimate drama and it's the scariest drama because it's the most popular drama. yeah. and we're on the third season. but it's wonderful because we're in the most wonderful era. it's extraordinary, and those hats — so recreating that has been such fun. but does it receive the royal seal of approval? so many of my colleagues have been very complimentary about it,
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so i think that says it all, really. i‘m told that certain members of the royal family have watched it, a good indication of how the programme is received. so a good royal reception and the critics have been impressed. but the main challenge comes next with the audience reception. john maguire, bbc news, caernarfon castle. so exciting. series three of ‘the crown‘ is available on netflix from tomorrow. you‘re watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. there is very much one story dominating this morning. the daily mail describes prince andrew‘s decision to speak to the bbc as a "make or break" tv interview. the express also leads with a large picture of the interview taking place at buckingham palace earlier this week. the duke "acknowledges his conduct fell below the standards expected when he stayed friends" with epstein, the paper says. according to the telegraph, royal sources said the duke
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had decided to give the interview in the hope it might "draw a line" under the scandal before he turns 60 next year. and most read on the bbc news website this morning is the huge fire that broke out at student halls in bolton last night. more than a0 fire engines were sent to tackle the blaze. broadcaster beverley turner is here to tell us what‘s caught her eye. good morning to you. morning. a lot of epstein, a to prince andrew and tonnes of politics. they will do a few more lighter stories at this point in the morning. having said that, we are starting with politics and an interview withjo swinson in the times today. big interview. i don‘t feel like i learnt an awful lot more aboutjo swinson in this interview than i already knew, which i think it‘s a bit frustrating. what i think it‘s a bit frustrating. what i think she should do, where she is
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missing a trick she is failing to talk beyond brexit. the appeal for jo swinson for a lot of people would be the fact that she is a mother, she has two young children she almost never really talks about. she will be in the nhs a&e at two o‘clock in the morning with a five—year—old. i‘m guessing boris johnson has never done that. we don‘t thinkjeremy corbett is necessarily of the age where he will necessarily of the age where he will necessarily care about education. —— jeremy corbyn. he cares that he is not living it. we are living in a time when everything is polarised between the parties. sometimes when in those situations where there is an interest in the people as their personalities, characters even more. borisjohnson was on the sofa yesterday. do you like the idea of talking about a future would be
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prime ministers? it is not necessarily about her personality. education will mean something different tojo education will mean something different to jo swinson education will mean something different tojo swinson and it does to borisjohnson different tojo swinson and it does to boris johnson orjeremy different tojo swinson and it does to borisjohnson orjeremy corbyn. nhs provision will be different. how she feels about crime as a mother. she will see it through our eyes and she is failing to tap into the female vote. she is failing to tap into the mother of eight was that there will be life after brexit and she is spending so much time talking about it. she is a service user. she will queue for the gp and she will ca re if will queue for the gp and she will care if she has to contribute to school at school. she spent —— we spend way too much time talking about other leaders. switching to vaping is good for arteries, it is
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claimed. i have a problem with these good news stories. one of the hidden dangers of the features we have a whole generation teenagers who think vaping is good. it has had so much good progress in relation to smoking. there are lots of parents actually who feel we are not making enough noise that vaping is not necessarily good for you, it is a better alternative to cigarettes. teenagers are vaping. vaping is aimed at teenagers all say predominantly. there are strawberry flavour, coca—cola flavour dates. subliminally, very insidiously, it is being targeted at a younger generation. parents cannot smell it on their clothes. teachers cannot smell it on clothes. i think we a lwa ys smell it on clothes. i think we always had to take these stories with a note of caution. vaping is not necessarily good for you. with a note of caution. vaping is not necessarily good for youm with a note of caution. vaping is not necessarily good for you. it is better than smoking. of course. this
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isa better than smoking. of course. this is a british girl aged six years old. tell me what she has done. ashley is from west sussex. most of us ashley is from west sussex. most of us cannot get our kids to walk down to the park. if they do, they want a piggyback. this little girl refused a piggyback, refused any help. she went up kilimanjaro with her elder brother nicholas, i feel he should get a mention as well. she has become the youngest female to climb kilimanjaro. they went up in september. she enjoyed it so much that when they came down, her mum said —— she said, can we do it ain? said —— she said, can we do it again? her mum said of course we can. she is not the youngest he had climbed it because at the end it says there is a young boy from mexico. the youngest female. she is just sitting at home saying, ma‘am, you told me i was the youngest. have
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you told me i was the youngest. have you got one more for us? just to make us all feel like really rubbish pa rents make us all feel like really rubbish parents today, this home fit for princess. lots of people will be thinking, do we buy this play for christmas? a lot of people want a playhouse. at the bottom of the garden and they are away from under your feet. this dad, garden and they are away from under yourfeet. this dad, richard thornton, spent the summer spending £5,000. he has built the most incredible two story play has for the kids. it has a chillout area, kitchen dining room and a glass window. a job for the weekend. they have got that and they could stay there for the next ten years. thank you. stay with us. headlines coming up.
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hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and nina warhurst. a summary of this morning‘s main news. in an unprecedented interview, prince andrew has told the bbc that he let the royal family down by staying at the home of the convicted sex offender, jeffrey epstein. he spoke to emily maitlis at buckingham palace, addressing accusations that he‘d had sex with a 17—year—old american girl. he said he couldn‘t remember meeting virginia roberts. the prince denies allegations of inappropriate conduct.
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you were staying at the house of a convicted sex offender. it was a convenient place to stay. i‘ve gone through this in my mind so many times. at the end of the day, with the benefit of all the hind sight one could have, it was definitely the wrong thing to do. but at the time, ifelt it the wrong thing to do. but at the time, i felt it was the honourable and right thing to do. and i... admit fully that my... judgment was probably coloured by my... tendency to be too honourable. but that is just the way it is. the problem was the fact that once he had been convicted... you stayed with him. i stayed with him. and that‘s the bit that, that, um as it were, i kick myself for on a daily basis because it is not something that was becoming of a member of the royal family and we try and uphold the highest
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standards and practices and i let the side down. one of jeffrey one ofjeffrey epstein‘s accuses, virginia roberts has said she met you in 2001. she says she dined with you, danced with you at tramp nightclub in london. she went on to have sex with you in a house belonging to ghislaine maxwell, your friend. your response? i have no recollection of ever meeting this lady. none whatsoever. you don't remember meeting her? no emily maitlis joins us now from our london newsroom. i wonder, many people will be seeing and hearing those words for the first time, just if we can go back a bit first about how this came about. what is an extraordinary, it is an
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unprecedented interview, take us backin unprecedented interview, take us back in the story. what is important to realise is tv news does not happen over night. this interview was many months coming. the thing that really triggered it was the arrest injuly of that really triggered it was the arrest in july ofjeffrey that really triggered it was the arrest injuly ofjeffrey epstein on multiple charges of trafficking, and his death in a prison cell in new york in august. after that point, we we re york in august. after that point, we were hearing many more victims, alleged victims, telling their stories publicly, sometimes for the first time. and more and more questions were being directed towards the duke of york in terms of what he knew aboutjeffrey epstein, why he stayed with a convicted sex offenders at his house in new york and also facing questions about his own sexual conduct in relation to some of the testimony that has been
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made in court by virginia roberts, who you mentioned. i think there was an intensification if you like of the questions surrounding the duke of york after the death ofjeffrey epstein and that was why the meetings became a bit more frequent between newsnight and the palace until we got the go ahead from the top level on tuesday morning of this week and went into to do the interview. when you say the top level, is it your understanding that the queen had sanctioned this interview? that is what we understand. it is important from our side in the talks that this was a no—holds barred interview, we did not face red lines, there were not areas we were kept away from and from prince andrew‘s perspective, there was sign off that he himself needed and i understand that came from the queen herself either late on monday night or tuesday morning. people will see more of the
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interview tonight at nine o‘clock, but they were also be intrigued as to the moment in time, all the front—pages this morning have that extraordinary shot of you and the dukein extraordinary shot of you and the duke in buckingham palace, tell us what it was like in that moment? duke in buckingham palace, tell us what it was like in that moment7m is hard to describe what it is like to be sitting in a state room, what feel like a banqueting room in the middle of buckingham palace, the heart of the royal family, facing the queen‘s son, the prince andrew, duke of york and asking him about his sexual history. it is not something i ever imagined i would be doing. but equally to have not asked those questions would be something i couldn‘t imagine doing either. once we we re couldn‘t imagine doing either. once we were there, i think it became almost... a standard interview, if you will allow for that. there were things that had to be asked of
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anyone in front of me and we were allowed to ask those questions, without push back, without interruption and actually viewers will decide from what they see and from what they hear and for his behaviour, what they choose to believe and what they take away. but in term of his engagement with the actual questions that were put to him, it was pretty frank. i think that makes for a sometimes deeply uncomfortable, but also compelling hour of television. you were be aware and you detailed the length of time it got to this point and people will be well aware that in any of these situations, it happens this is these situations, it happens this is the queen‘s son, any of these situations, the interviewee comes to it from a certain point of view, which is presumably they want to put a side to a story, they have a position that they want to present, you must have been aware of that going into the interrue? ——
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interview. i hope we were ware of job we had to do, we had read the allegations and the court testimony and we had heard from some of the women who had spoken out. in other words, we had done our research and our preparation, but the only thing you need as an interviewer is to go in with fresh eyes and an open mind and... listen to what is being said in that moment and answer or ask the right questions in response. emily, very interesting talk to you. thank you for your time. and you can see the full interview in a bbc newsnight special tonight at 9 on bbc two. in other news, leading figures in labour and the trade union movement will meet this morning to decide which policies will be included in the party‘s election manifesto. meanwhile, both the liberal democrats and the conservatives have pledged to plant more trees in an effort
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to tackle climate change, if they win the general election. emergency crews have worked through the night, to tackle a fire at a student block of flats in greater manchester. the fire service said the flames spread across all six floors of the university accomodation building in bolton. two people were treated for their injuries at the scene. the bbc‘s children in need has raised almost £a8 million this year. celebrities from the world of tv, music and sport all took part in the annual telethon, to raise money for disadvantaged young people. another brilliant night. congratulations to all involved. now we are going to cast our eye over the sport and gavin, it is interesting in tennis, rafael nadal has lost a game. but it is a moment where they say you‘re amazing and you‘re no one in the world.
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where they say you‘re amazing and you're no one in the world. rafael nadal is an incredible athlete, 33 and a half, world no one, so many injury problems. we will get to that later in the sport. zblu to rugby league and the great britain lions are bidding to end their tour of the southern hemisphere on a high — they‘re playing papua new guinea in theirfinal game, after three defeats. and they were leading by 10 points to 6 at half time. they opened the scoring after 1a minutes — a swift move gave blake austin a clear run into the corner, for his first international try. but after a second for great britain, the hosts scored a spectacular try — what a run from edwin ipape. we‘re into the second half in port moresby — you can watch it over on bbc two. england‘s women agonisingly lost the curtain—raiser this morning — a last—minute shirleyjoe try gave the papua new guinea orchids their first test win against england. they won by 20 points to 16
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to level the series at 1—1. england batsmanjoe denly made 68 on his return from an ankle injury and he led a fightback on day two of theirfinal warm—up match before the first test starts next wednesday. they closed on 355—8 against new zealand a in whangarei — a lead of 53 runs. denly feared his tour was over when he was injured in practice just over two weeks ago. when i first did my ankle it was touch and go really, whether i‘d be fit for this game, and i‘d been under a strict rehab programme and under great hands with the medical team here, so delighted to be back and able to spend some time out there today. dan walker is with us, to tell us what‘s on football focus today. great to see you. good morning. we have one of those power half hours.
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no premier league, but plenty of football in the lower giggses. er divisions. mondondo plays in germany and he is a welsh international. he has left his domestic team to play for his country. the rarity is we took our cameras and followed him. here is a bit of it. getting ready for international break. these are my boots which will be taking. the wales flag and the congo flag representing my family. there is just a few things i will need throughout the week. essentials, as all gamers though, this one. normally my mum does this, but she is not here with me. i have to do it myself. thanks, mum. don't go anywhere without your fifa controller. or your mum. wales haved
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a azerbaijan. and northern ireland have the netherlands and germany, but they can hopefully, they can still qualify automatically, but scotla nd still qualify automatically, but scotland can‘t qualify automatically. they could make the play—offs and they play cyprus and kazakhstan. and the mood around england has been dominated by sterling and gomez and that altercation and we will talk about that. they play kosovo and it is women‘s football weekend and there isa women‘s football weekend and there is a north london derby and a merseyside derby and the final thing is we have the longest serving manager in the football leek. he is
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gavin ainsworth. he has been there since 2000... he is known as wild man. he has long curly hair and he is quite wild. but not in a terrible way. which club is he at? wycombe wanderers. all the clubs he has played at, he has been a local legend and he is top of league one and we have a feek on him. —— feature on him. we have an england manager on the sofa, from another sport. that will be fantastic, considering the hopes he had and so many people had that england would win the world cup and eddiejones will be here on monday talking about not quite making it and whether, what the next few years are like. his demands of himself and his team are huge. i think we will see that. we did beat new zealand. hold on to
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that moment. thank you. the men‘s number one — rafael nadal — is out of the season—ending world tour finals. that‘s because alexander zverev beat daniil medvedev to claim the last semi—final spot at the 02 arena in london, where he‘ll play dominic thiem. zverev is the defending champion and he certainly looked the part, winning in straight sets. nadal was awaiting that result, after beating stefanos tsitsipas earlier in the day. the young greek is through to the semis, though — he‘ll face roger federer — but although nadal is out, he was already assured of finishing the year on top of the world rankings. you know, after all the things i went through in my career in terms of injuries, i never thought that at the age of 33.5 i would have this trophy on my hands again so it is... cheering and applause. without all my team and family
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that is here next to me, this would be impossible. i just can say thank you very much everyone for the support. thank you. it was another golden dayforteam gb, as the para athletics world championships came to a close in dubai. race running made it‘s debut at the event — and kayley haggo won the women‘s 100 metres, with gavin drysdale taking the men‘s honours. both set new world records. the athletes have severe co—ordination impairments and run with the support of a three—wheeled frame. drysdale said: "it opens up the door for people like me to compete at the highest level". well, i can‘t believe ijust did that. i knew i would probably have to two break a world record to win. i want to dedicate this gold medal to my late coach janice, she‘d be so proud. ahead of this weekend‘s brazilian grand prix, world champion lewis hamilton says he wants re—assurances about mercedes‘ future, before he commits to a new deal beyond next year.
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he was fifth fastest in yesterday‘s second practice session, which was marked by a heavy crash for williams driver robert kubica — thankfully he emerged unscathed. ferrari‘s sebastian vettel was quickest. and look at this piece of skill. look at the reflexes. unreal. it is the spin on the bat. practice at home, you will sort that out. table tennis brings out the festive spirit in me. looking forward to seeing eddiejones. matt in me. looking forward to seeing eddie jones. matt has in me. looking forward to seeing eddiejones. matt has the weather. do you play table tennis? not for yea rs. do you play table tennis? not for years. i could watch that again and
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again. you have the moves. let me show you this lovely shot from shetland. the reason i‘m showing you this, while most of us have seen a lot of rain this month, some breaking rain fall records, in shetland it has been unusually dry. it is only 10% of the normally monthly total. things have been dry here. but we will see one or two showers this week. there will be a few around. it will turn drier into the start of next week. some will say dry with some more sunshine. low pressure has dominated this month. still with us really, although the main rain—bearing clouds across france and spain. the weather front draped across northern england and wales and the south west. rain and drizzle coming and going. some
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heavier showers in eastern scotland. a bright start in the west of scotland, but clouding over. some of the sunny spots will be further south. so a better chance of sunshine. through the channel and to the west of cornwall and pembrokeshire, further heavy showers possible. maybe some heavier showers in the north—east of england and scotla nd in the north—east of england and scotland and showers in the western isles later, but much of scotland and northern ireland will have a dry day, clouding over after a bright start. the best of the sunshine in shetland. here some showers tonight and tomorrow. showers across the west of scotland and northern ireland. not as cold. eastern scotla nd ireland. not as cold. eastern scotland and southern scotland and east anglia and the south—east temperatures could be close to freezing. but sunday roughly the same sort of sorry. northern england
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and the south—west some rain. showers in scotland and northern ireland and some sunshine in the afternoon. still a bright one in east anglia and the south—east. some could get a dry weekend. although again chilly. temperatures similar to today in single figures. many of us to today in single figures. many of us in england and wales want a window of drier weather. that moves infor window of drier weather. that moves in for monday. maybe a few showers close to the north sea coasts, but away from that most start with frost and fog. but dry and sunny. drier can‘ts continue into tuesday. but there will be further rain in the second half of the week. but it is turning milder. thank you. if you‘re tricked into sending money to a scammer, would you expect your bank to help
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you get your money back? well, it seems banks are struggling to agree on a long—term solution on the best way to pay refunds to customers. paul lewis from bbc radio a‘s money box programme has been looking into this and joins us now. what sort of scams are we talking about and what sort of reimbursement programme is there in place?|j about and what sort of reimbursement programme is there in place? i could call them psychological scams, people are convinced their money is at risk and are persuaded to help thieves move it into a safe account. they‘re called authorised payment scams and it is 53,000 people in the first six months of this year lost nearly £150 million. it is a huge fraud. until may, the banks didn‘t reimburse anybody. they said it is your fault. reimburse anybody. they said it is yourfault. since reimburse anybody. they said it is your fault. since may they have had to refund them. now they‘re squabbling over where the money will come from. at the moment they‘re
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paying it themselves, some want a levy, so when we make a payment, some would be going into a fund that would be paid by the banks. this week, they rejected that solution. so it is a bit in limbo. where could this leave victims, it is devastating for people who lose vast amounts? it is, in the last six months there has been a mood change among the banks, they‘re telling us they‘re committed to makings sure victims don‘t lose out and they‘re committed to the programme of refunding people and they said they‘re committed to finding a solution by the end of the year. the regulator has said they have to find a solution. so i think there will be a solution. so i think there will be a solution. so i think there will be a solution. the one that‘s being considered is a meeting later these week is that banks should just pay their own customers, which seems a
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sensible way of sorting it. but the banks say we are not at fault and the customer is not at fault, why should we cough up? so we are not quite sure where this will lead. hopefully there will be that pot of money if the regulator is asking for that. the best thing is to not let it happen. what should people look out for. if somebody rings you up and says there is something at risk at your bank account. put the phone down. it is a con. if you engage them ina down. it is a con. if you engage them in a moment‘s conversation they will start reeling you in. put the phone down. the bank would never do this. if your bank does ring you, look up the bank‘s number somewhere separate, dial it, perhaps on another phone, are wait a few minutes and then speak to your bank and say, did you ring me. 99 times
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out of a hundred they will say no we didn‘t. one bank we spoke to said it one unthinkable if there wasn‘t a solution. thank you. since it began 25 years ago, the national lottery has raised more than a0 billion for charities and good causes. now, some of those charities have been recognised for the work they do, in a special awards ceremony. the winners were chosen by a public vote and we‘re joined by two of them now. jacqueline williamson runs a charity which supports children taken into care. and elizabeth burton—phillips‘s charity supports those affected by drug addiction. very proudly holding your trophies. congratulations. i know it is about a lot of work you have done in the past. tell us about the charity you run? i manage a charity called
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kinship care and we provide support services to children and young people. these are youngsters that have been raised by grandparents and other family members. it ties in with your personal story. other family members. it ties in with your personal storylj other family members. it ties in with your personal story. i became a carer to my with your personal story. i became a carerto my then with your personal story. i became a carer to my then seven—year—old niece, but i grew up in the care syste m niece, but i grew up in the care system in northern ireland. i spent 14 system in northern ireland. i spent ia years in children's homes and left ca re ia years in children's homes and left care at 17. for me, there is a big emphasis on family and a lot of the children we look after are being cared for by their extended family, who have a great commitment and love for the youngsters. your charity is based in a separate area. tell us about how it came about? well, in 2004, one of my twin sons, nicholas, died by suicide, as a result of his heroin addiction and that had a massive impact on everybody in the
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family. as part of the recovery journey for me, coming to terms with such a traumatic loss, i discussed with other members of the family, my husband, my other son and something that we could do in nicholas's memory as a legacy to him, that would support families who might be going through similar experiences, whether. .. going through similar experiences, whether... now we work with families where there is addiction going on and those bereaved by addiction and some educational work. as a mum who has lost her son, does that help you, being part of that for other families? i think it does a huge amount. but i have got to say that... i have an amazing team behind me. wonderful front line team and a husband who looks after me and feeds me and clothes me and does all the washing and helps so much.
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because i'm often on the road.|j the washing and helps so much. because i'm often on the road. i can only imagine how often that personal experience of that dreadful moment when you found out what happened, i dare say now that is useful in terms of showing people you understand? yes, absolutely. for me, i mean, to go through that trauma, it is not easy, but all these years on, when we have callers phoning in to say i've lost a son or a partner or something in addiction, we understand it and we want to deliver care, understanding and support for everybody who contacts us. that is the same for you, for somebody who may be thrust into looking a of a member of the family, having had that experience gives you insight? yes and it gives you a lot of commitment for the children and family, you can see first hand the
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confidence that's built within the youngsters that you're working with. it isa youngsters that you're working with. it is a rewarding job as well. am i right in thinking, that people managed to keep this secret from you? in advance of getting the award. indeed there was a web of lies! nice lies. fibs. nice fibs. look at you there. alex jones come from the... hold on. you can't fake that expression. you had no idea, you were at the thing and didn‘t know. yes i sat down on table 15 and turned to the lady to my right and i said, what charity are you from? she said, what charity are you from? she said i'm the chief executive of national lottery, i thought, that is impressive. i was clapping and... when you got your award, i was clapping. i said to her, is it ok if igoto clapping. i said to her, is it ok if i go to toilet. she said there is a
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couple of awarped —— awards coming. and tanni gray thompson won an award and they said this recognition of achievement of award is going to, i thoughts who is going to? and i thought, what? the pictures you can probably see how shocked i was. then i got probably see how shocked i was. then igot up probably see how shocked i was. then i got up on to the stage and they announced that he was going to present, because i'm a fan of lord grantham. ican't present, because i'm a fan of lord grantham. i can't work out the difference between him and hugh. what a special moment. i‘m so pleased for you. well done. really pleased for you. well done. really pleased you joined us. clutching those. a smashing addition to your ma ntle those. a smashing addition to your mantle piece. my grandson wants to
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know if it is real gold. it is better than real gold. you can watch the national lottery awards: celebrating 25 years on bbc one on tuesday evening at 11:45pm. you‘re watching breakfast. still to come this morning: from afghanistan to zambia — we‘ll meet the man who‘s ran a marathon in every country around the world, setting eight world records along the way. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with nina warhurst and charlie stayt. our headlines today... prince andrew breaks his silence on thejeffrey epstein scandal — he says he let "the side down" by staying at the home of the convicted sex offender. that‘s the bit that, that, that, um, as it were, i kick myself for on a daily basis because it was not something that was becoming of a member of the royal family. a crunch meeting for labour as seniorfigures decide

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