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tv   BBC News  BBC News  November 17, 2019 10:00am-10:31am GMT

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this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines at 10.003m: prince andrew categorically denies having sexual relations with an american women who says she was forced to have sex with him when she wasjust 17. i can absolutely, categorically tell you it never happened. the duke of york said he does not regret his friendship with the convicted sex offender jeffrey epstein. in the election, the conservatives promise all migrants will be treated equally after brexit regardless of where they come from, but the foreign secretary rules out setting a target for the number of people entering the uk. it's not just it's notjust a volume, which yes we need to bring down, it is the kind of emigration that we have coming to
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the country, but we have to control the country, but we have to control the cost. at 10.30am, we take an in—depth look at the the trade war between the united states and china, as an agreement to resolve the dispute between the world's two largest economies could soon be in sight. prince andrew has "categorically" denied having any sexual contact with a woman, who says she was forced to have sex with him when she was 17. he told bbc‘s newsnight he could not have been with virginia roberts on the day in question in 2001 as he was at home after spending the afternoon at a pizza express in woking with his daughter. the prince was also grilled
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about his friendship with the convicted sex offender jeffrey epstein. our royal correspondent, nick witchell reports. in the state rooms at buckingham palace, a senior member of the british royal family, prince andrew, second son of the queen, is preparing to be interrogated about allegations of sleazy behaviour and gross misjudgment. your royal highness, we've come to buckingham palace in highly unusual circumstances... at issue, which of these two people is telling the truth? andrew or virginia roberts, 17 years old when this photograph was taken? groomed, she says, to provide sexual favours to powerful men. even the photo is contentious. andrew says he has no memory of it. tramp, a nightclub in central london. virginia roberts says she was there with andrew one night in march 2001. she says they later had sex. andrew says he was with his family. and he told the bbc‘s emily maitlis, there's a medical reason why
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ms roberts‘ allegation cannot be true. she was very specific about that night. she described dancing with you... no. and you profusely sweating, and that she went on to have... there's a slight problem with the sweating, because i... i have a peculiar medical condition which is that i don't sweat or that i didn't sweat at the time. is it possible that you met virginia roberts, dined with her, danced with her in tramp, had sex with her, on another date? no. do you remember meeting her at all? no. you can say categorically that you don't recall meeting virginia roberts, dining with her, dancing with her at tramp and going on to have sex with her in a bedroom in a house in belgravia?
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i can absolutely categorically tell you it never happened. do you recall any kind of sexual contact with virginia roberts, then or at any other time? none whatsoever. the other key figure in all of this isjeffrey epstein, the new york financier who befriended andrew. epstein employed virginia roberts and many other young girls. in 2008 he was convicted of a child sex offence and sent to prison. so... do you regret the whole friendship with epstein? now, still not, the reason being that the people that i met and the opportunities that i was given to learn, either by him or because of him, were actually very useful. in 2010 andrew visited epstein after his release from prison and stayed for several nights at his home in new york.
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a wrong judgment, andrew now says — "i let the side down". 0verall, did he think his behaviour had damaged the royalfamily? i don't believe it's been damaging to the queen at all. it has to me. i wonder what effect this has had on your close family? you've got daughters of your own. it has been what i would describe as a constant sore in the family. finally, as he looks back... i wonder if you have any sense now of guilt, regret, or shame about any of your behaviour and your friendship with epstein? as far as mr epstein is concerned, it was the wrong decision to go and see him in 2010. do i regret the fact that he has quite obviously conducted himself in a manner unbecoming? yes. "unbecoming"? he was a sex offender. yeah. i'm sorry, i'm being polite. andrew will be hoping that his
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answers will allow him to move on. that remains to be seen. joining me now is simon jones, who is outside buckingham palace. has there been any reaction yet from the palace to this interview, which is exciting interest around the world ? is exciting interest around the world? it was certainly box office. no formal reaction from buckingham palace, but the tourists who gathered outside this morning are keen to have their say. i was approached by one woman from germany who said that she didn't think he came across well at all and it was being very keenly followed in germany, as it is in many countries around the world. by giving this interview, prince andrew was hoping to draw a line under what happened. look at the papers this morning. the mail on sunday, not one single word
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of remorse. they say many viewers we re of remorse. they say many viewers were shocked by a total lack of empathy. this is the sunday mirror, new sweat and no regrets, talking about prince andrew saying that he didn't sweat in the nightclub and the paper thinking he had no regret for what had happened. 0ne royal commentator said ahead of the interview they thought it was going to bea interview they thought it was going to be a bit ofa interview they thought it was going to be a bit of a train wreck, but having seen it, they described it like a plane crashing into a train that then set off a nuclear explosion. they felt it was that bad. a lot of questions here from tourists and royal commentators and the public about whether this was the public about whether this was the correct thing to do. simon jones, thank you very much. simonjones, thank you very much. joining me now is angela levin, a royal biographer who has spent months with various senior members of the royal family.
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were you gripped by the interview? i was, but on the other hand i wanted to put something over my face because i couldn't bear it. it was so because i couldn't bear it. it was so excruciatingly appalling and ill judged. what did you make of the case that andrew was advancing, that he had never met this woman, she is making allegations that don't stand up, and therefore he is in a difficult position because he says it is not true, she says it is. there were no witnesses. it was a sign of his arrogance. he has always been arrogant. second child, the queen because ‘s favourites. forgetting about it, having no memory of it doesn't mean it didn't happen. i thought it was a strange way of him saying women come and go andi way of him saying women come and go and i really can't remember names.
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you obviously meets loads of them and we all know that there are some types of man, i'm not saying him, who see women in just physical terms, so they don't mean anything. i'm quite sure that he wasn't interested in anything she said sushi she would do in one ear and out the other, which is quite unpleasant. he has denied any inappropriate behaviour and he said in the interview he is sure he never met this woman. in terms of the kind of impression it leaves and the impact that could have on the royal family. he was asked in the interview has this affected the queen and he said no, but it has affected me. presumably, there is some collateral damage when the second son of the monarch is all over the papers and has placed these really terrible allegations —— faced. i can't believe it hasn't
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affected the queen. her motto is... i think that in her heart, quite obviously she would have been extremely embarrassed. he always forgives andrew —— she always forgives andrew —— she always forgives andrew, he is her favourites. also, she is 93 now and she will not get involved. in the past, prince philip would be very involved and he was very strong about what is right and wrong, but he is 98. you will not get the same reaction as you used to. do you have a concern than that in a sense that something is slipping at the palace. we had the megan and harry interview a few weeks ago, one that was given despite advice. we were told the prince andrew rejected advice for
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this interview. now the palace has to pick up the pieces. is there a sense that this is partly because the greenness of advancing years, that the grip that was exercised centrally on what we used to call the firm has diminished? yes. we must just say that prince charles and the duchess of cornwall are terrific. prince william and kate middleton are terrific, so they are not all falling apart. each of the families have separate advisors. they try to put them all together but they didn't get on, so they all have separate advisors and they mirror the person they are looking after. they work hard, are paid very well. i know for a fact that prince andrew doesn't listen to his advisers. they think they know it all, they are more involved in the world, but actually they don't. we have a senior person who join prince
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andrew's team a few months ago and he left a few weeks ago certainly. 0ne doesn't know, but the implication is that he would not have approved of what prince andrew was doing. hejust have approved of what prince andrew was doing. he just goes have approved of what prince andrew was doing. hejust goes his own have approved of what prince andrew was doing. he just goes his own way. he is so arrogant he doesn't listen to people who may know other aspects of the world and might advise him. do you think you will be taken aback by the coverage this morning?” don't think you would understand that. it was all about him, how charming he was, he was more than dutiful, he presented himself in a way that won't wash with the public. thank you very much for coming in to speak to us. thank you very much for coming in to speak to us. the lawyer representing some of epstein's alleged victims, gloria allred, has responded to the interview and urged prince andrew to talk to the american authorities under oath. when prince andrew said that in fact the reason for meeting jeffrey epstein, staying at his home after mr epstein
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was convicted of sex crimes, that even after he was released from prison, that prince andrew went to see him and walked through central park, the reason being that prince andrew says, "it was the right and honourable thing to do". he didn't want to tell him he couldn't see him again because he didn't think that was the right thing to do on the telephone, well, i would say to prince andrew, the charges made by miss roberts, whom i do not represent but is one of the accusers, the charges made by her against you are very, very serious charges. i think the right and honourable thing to do would be for you to say unequivocally i will voluntarily speak to the fbi. i do not depend on whether or not my
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lawyers say that i should do it. i know that it's the right thing to do, i have nothing to hide, i'm going to do the right and honourable thing. i say whether a person is a prince or a pauper, if anyone has evidence or information that might be relevant to an investigation of a criminal case, that person should provide it to law enforcement. in this case, it would be the federal bureau of investigation. i can share with you that my clients, who allege they are victims of mr epstein, some of whom were sex trafficked when they were underage girls, have spoken to law enforcement. they didn't need the advice of a lawyer to decide to do it, although certainly i provided advice. i have had many people call me and say, tell me how i can speak to law enforcement, i might have information that
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could be helpful to them. some of those people couldn't even afford lawyers, didn't need lawyers, they knew it was the right thing to do. that is what i think and i think it is overdue for that to happen and i challenge him to do that. the conservatives have set out more details of their plans for immigration after brexit, saying migrants will be treated equally regardless of where they come from. but they've refused to set a number for the number of people coming into the country. meanwhile, jeremy corbyn has refused to say whether he would favour the continued free movement of migrants after brexit. we can speak to our political correspondent susana mendonca. hello, again. since we spoke last we have had the interviews on the andrew marr show. let's start with this conservative pledge that they are making. the conservatives in
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terms of their line today are talking about immigration and the need to end freedom of movement. and labour, too. both of them are talking about about the conservatives are specifically looking at what they would do when we leave the european union, saying that people would need a job offer if they are coming from the eu or anywhere else, saying that the charge for using the nhs would increase from £450 a year up to £650 a yearforforeign increase from £450 a year up to £650 a year for foreign migrants. increase from £450 a year up to £650 a yearforforeign migrants. they also say that foreign migrants couldn't clear benefits for five yea rs. couldn't clear benefits for five years. the labour party have their ma nifesto years. the labour party have their manifesto which you will get clear details on later on this week, but we understand it was hammered out yesterday. there is a question around what happens in terms of freedom of movement because at the party conference, labour members said they wanted to extend freedom of movement. jeremy corbyn has
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addressed that issue we today. understand that in the manifesto there will not be an explicit temp two extend freedom of movement. he was talking about how what he thinks those members were talking about we re those members were talking about were family reunions. so those immigrants who would come to the uk and the right to be able to bring theirfamily over data and the right to be able to bring their family over data run. and the right to be able to bring theirfamily over data run. he and the right to be able to bring their family over data run. he says he is in agreement with that in principle. explaining that element of it. we understand in the labour party manifesto there will be some policy around there. jeremy corbyn was asked about whether or not free movement would end if there was a labour government and he wouldn't be pinned down on the detail, but he was saying that there would be a great deal of movement after brexit. there will be a great deal of movement. a great deal of movement, so movement. a great deal of movement,
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so free movement will not hand. you will have to wait until thursday, and you are very impatient. overall, immigration has been a huge topic around brexit. what i am trying to work out is whether your instinct is for more free movement of people around the world, including from the eu? my instinct is to recognise that economies are interdependent around the world, that we all benefit from people moving to living in and working in different societies every benefit massively from the vast numberof benefit massively from the vast number of overseas students to come here. i don't want us to become an isolated society. i am proud of the diversity of our society and our country and they want that to be the basis of how we leave. we have heard from dominic rab today as well. the conservatives have had as well. the conservatives have had a difficult time with immigration of the past. they talked about bringing it down to the tens of thousands and
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never meeting our targets. dominic raab was asked about this today, would you be able to set a target for how low you can get immigration. it was clear that he didn't want to be drawn on the numbers. it seems to be drawn on the numbers. it seems to bea be drawn on the numbers. it seems to be a tactic from what we are hearing from different government ministers about this issue, that they are talking about not setting arbitrary targets because if you don't set a targets because if you don't set a target you can't be accused of not hitting that target. it is notjust the volume, which yes we are committed to bringing down, but also the kinds of emigration you have got coming into the country. we want people coming here who want to contribute, but we need to control the costs. let me ask you about that, then. groups of workers do you wa nt fewer that, then. groups of workers do you want fewer of? it is not about stigmatising... want fewer of? it is not about stigmatising. .. it's not, want fewer of? it is not about stigmatising... it's not, but it doesn't make any kattar sense at the moment. if you talk to business, running care homes or whatever, they all want more workers coming in, including unskilled workers, so i
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just wonder what's aries you don't wa nt just wonder what's aries you don't want people coming in from? want to make sure that the best and the brightest can come here and contributes. we want to be able to plug contributes. we want to be able to pluq gaps contributes. we want to be able to plug gaps in specific sectors, whether it is in the nhs or elsewhere. what you don't want to do is encourage elsewhere. what you don't want to do is encourage over elsewhere. what you don't want to do is encourage over reliance on cheap labour from abroad which has a depressing effect on wages in this country. the big other parties are kicking up over the terms of the election debates that the broadcasters are having. has not been addressed? they are very unhappy they will not be involved in this first debate on tuesday between jeremy corbyn and borisjohnson. the snp, we heard from ian blackford earlier on. they are taking legal action in order to try and get them included in this debate. you need to
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have the plurality of voices in that debate. everybody must be represented. 0ne debate. everybody must be represented. one of the difficulties we are in at the moment, theresa may and borisjohnson we are in at the moment, theresa may and boris johnson have we are in at the moment, theresa may and borisjohnson have never come to terms to the fact that they are minority governments and there are other parties that will send mps to the house of commons. it is right that the public hear the views of the other party standing in the selection. that is democracy and fairness. it is a sign of how high the stakes are in the selection. the snp or liberal democrats could have the balance of power. the government and armed forces have been accused of covering up illegal killings by british troops in afghanistan and iraq. an investigation by the bbc‘s panorama programme and the sunday times has spoken to british detectives who say they found credible evidence of war crimes. but the investigators say strong cases were not prosecuted,
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and evidence of torture and murder was disregarded. the ministry of defence has denied the claims. sport now and a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. thank you very much. good morning. wales moved a step closer to qualifying for next summer's european championships after winning their penultimate qualifying match. goals from kieffer moore and harry wilson meant them beat azerbajan 2—0. the hopes for northern ireland lie in the play—offs. the hopes for northern ireland lie in the play-offs. full wheels, it was baku or bust. in the well‘s lowest lying capital city, they choose to aim high. that is six foot five key mirror, who could have retired earlier this year with a fractured skull. every takes
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different forms, sometimes it is the privy just to different forms, sometimes it is the privyjust to have a go. 2—0. that sucked the nerves out of the air. there were chances for a third but thejob was done, or at there were chances for a third but the job was done, or at least part one. hungary on tuesday will be decisive. northern ireland know their manager, michael 0'neill, will be leaving them, but first he has something he wants to finish. northern ireland are guaranteed a spotin northern ireland are guaranteed a spot in the play—offs, so why not have a go against the netherlands? the referee spotted a dutch handball. penalty. steven davis the captain, owner of a caps took the penalty. anyone can miss them. it felt as crucial as it did cruel as the netherlands pushed on in the second half, threatening only rarely by controlling your completely. they only needed to draw to reach the finals. northern ireland needed more but they wouldn't get another chance. they must make do with the play—offs, but for those games at
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least, 0'neill will be there by their side. there might be some leaving do. scotland will also have to qualify via the nations league play—offs despite getting their first away win under steve clarke in cyprus. england have already qualified. they do still have to play kosovo this afternoon in theirfinal do still have to play kosovo this afternoon in their final group game. the kosovan manager is: end of the best side in europe right now, anti—england manager says that is because of an abundance of attacking options. we have got a lot of good attacking players. that is the beauty of this team, that we can... it's difficult for defences to focus on one person to try and stop them because three, four other players can step forward, score goals, create goals. the movements are good and the individual ability is good, so i think we are quite difficult at the moment for the opposition to plan for. joss buttler hit a century in england's final warm—up game ahead of their two test series
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in new zealand. but the game ended in a draw in whangarei. buttler‘s 110 runs helped england make 405 in reply to the new zealand a side's 302—6 declared. and despite three wickets each forjofra archer and sam curran, england couldn't bowl them out in time so it was drawn. the first test is on wednesday in tauranga. stefanos tsitsipas will face dominic thiem in the final of tennis's world tour finals in london this afternoon. it's the first time tsitsipas has qualified for the tournament and he caused a big upset in the semifinals, beating roger federer. the greek player, who's 17 years younger than federer, took an early lead and eventually the first set. federer was flawless in beating novak djokovic earlier in the competition, but was well below par as tsitsipas eventually took the match in straight sets. i grew up watching roger as a kid, watching him at the finals, watching him in the wimbledon, plenty of finals. wished i can step out on the court one day and face him
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and today i am here, living the dream. i could never picture myself standing here, but it did happen. dreams do come true! still two more races in the season in formula 1. it is the brazilian grand prix today are max verstappen will start on pole. he was a tenth of the second faster than sebastian vettel‘s ferrari. lewis hamilton is in third. that's all the sport for now. former british athlete sir chris hoy and his wife, lady sarra, welcomed their son callum into the world back in 2014. however, he was born 11 weeks early, and, as a premature baby, they faced many challenges. today, on world prematurity day, the couple are spearheading a campaign to help other premature babies by donating hundreds of thousands
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of nappies to uk hospitals. we can speak to them now. good morning to you. thanks for speaking to us on bbc news this morning. how big a shock was that when you realise that you were going into labour that early? it was a huge shock. it is something that you don't prepare for. 11 weeks before the birth i hadn't even done an antenatal class, so i had no idea what was happening. it was just the hospital, the doctors guiding me through saying we have got to a point where he has got to be delivered for the sake of your life in his life. chris, to see a baby that small, that fragile, that soon, born too soon, how to due process
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that? you are so reliant on the medical staff and they can achieve so medical staff and they can achieve so much now with premature babies, but even so, it must have been a joyful, but quite frightening time. yeah, the overriding emotion was terror and seeing how was. of course, the doctors and nurses can give you any concrete answers, they just say it is one step at a time. you just have to be patient. you have to sit and watch and try to enjoy every moment. it is hard to enjoy every moment. it is hard to enjoy when you see your child and plastic box, in an incubator in a darkened ward and all you can do is sit and watch. the two things you can do that process is change the nappies, picture hands into the incubator and change the nappies, then get to hold them a couple of times a day, skin on skin contact, which is very special. i should
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imagine it is like handling a china doll. absolutely. you are terrified of disrupting your child any more thanit of disrupting your child any more than it already has been. you are acutely aware that it should still be in yourwomb. acutely aware that it should still be in your womb. it is a hard thing to reconcile, whether you are doing the right thing or causing your child any further pain. that is very distressing. i was just going to ask you, what would you have liked to have known then that you do know now? i'm just trying to think of those who might experience it. from my perspective, it was to know that you're not alone, it is not that uncommon. 60,000 babies born prematurely every year, one of 13 babies. look at the size of this little nappy. these are been designed specially for premature babies. we didn't have these when
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callu m babies. we didn't have these when callum was born. to know that you are not the first family to go through this whole process, to know that you have this support, that would make a huge different, it certainly did for us. and to know that you can and should lean on people. charities like place, which is the uk's because neonatal charity. they provides hands—on care, metaphorically and literally, holding hands with families going through this. they are partnered with pampers to assist with this incredible nappy. you feel so isolated, it feels micro it goes against the grain of everything that you parenting instantly is trying to tell you, but you know that you could look down and find your tiny baby wearing a pampers nappy, there is something that makes you feel, well, this must happen to a lot of
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other people. it can't be this abnormal. it does

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