Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 22, 2019 6:00am-8:31am GMT

6:00 am
good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty in norwich and charlie stayt in salford. our headlines today: a 27—year—old man has been found guilty of murdering the british backpacker grace millane by strangling her. in other news, the conservatives want a hike on the stamp duty foreigners pay in england, while plaid cymru will launch their manifesto calling for a £20 billion "green jobs revolution". good morning. we're getting to the heart of the issues that matter to people here in norwich during the election, including the health of the nhs.
6:01 am
hello, and i'm here, just three miles down the road at one of the uk's biggest scientific research parks to find out what businesses here want from this election. good morning. ben stokes stars for england again. he hits 91, as england take a sizeable lead over new zealand on day two of the first test. and weather—wise, after a cold few days, things don't a bit milder as we head towards the weekend, but there is rain and the forecast and through the night heavy rain for wales and south—west england. i'll have all the details here in norwich live on breakfast. good morning. it's friday the 22nd of november. our top story: a 27—year—old man has been found guilty of the murder of the british backpacker grace millane, whose body was found in a suitcase in new zealand last year. in the last hour, her parents reacted to the verdict. grace was taken away from mars in the most brutalfashion
6:02 am
grace was taken away from mars in the most brutal fashion a year ago —— from us. our lives have been u nfa i rly —— from us. our lives have been unfairly ripped apart. this will be with us for the rest of our lives. grace was a beautiful, talented and a loving that one. grace was our sunshine, and she will be mist forever. she did not deserve to be murdered in such a barbaric way. finally, we must return home and try and pick up the pieces of our lives and pick up the pieces of our lives and day—to—day with our beloved ones. thank you. let's speak to our correspondent, shaimaa khalil, who is outside the court in auckland. that verdict coming in just over an hour ago, now? that's right. and it was quite a tense few moments and very emotional by everywhere in the courtroom does make everyone, but of course what grace millane‘s family as thejury course what grace millane‘s family as the jury came course what grace millane‘s family as thejury came in to course what grace millane‘s family as the jury came in to read out the guilty verdict. i could cease grace
6:03 am
millane‘s mother just taking guilty verdict. i could cease grace millane‘s motherjust taking in a very deep breath, and as the jury read out and convicted the 27—year—old man, she breathed out and then both parents broke down in tea rs and then both parents broke down in tears in the courtroom. jury members, i could see them as they we re members, i could see them as they were walking out of the courtroom being very emotional. this has been a case that has gripped this nation. it has shocked everyone here in new zealand, and for three weeks now the court and the jury members had zealand, and for three weeks now the court and thejury members had been hearing what had happened to grace. this is shaimaa khalil the night before her 22nd birthday, the last time she was seen alive. —— this was grace millane. her father described her as gregarious and outgoing. today, the jury found this man guilty of her murder. for legal reasons, we cannot reveal the identity of the man. the —— grace millane met the man the radiating
6:04 am
up. at some point, she mentioned through text to a friend she was having a good time, i was late —— hours later she was strangled. the killer said it was an accident during a sex act, but the jury back to differ. i dialled 911. i was scared at how bad it looked. why do you think you look bad? —— it looked bad? well, because there's a dead person in my room. the killer searched online of how to dispose of a corpse, as well as viewing extreme pornography. cctv footage shows him
6:05 am
going on date with another woman while grace's body was in his room. this is him moving the body in a suitcase, he then read it in a shallow grave outside in bushland. the prime minister was unable to hide her emotions. on behalf of new zealand, i want to apologise to grace's family. your daughter should have been saved here and she wasn't and i'm sorry for that. —— safe. grace came here a year ago on a backpackingholiday —— a year before her murder. and as grace because my father said in his closing remarks, he thanked the police, he thanked
6:06 am
the court and the jury and said now it's time to go home, basically to get some closure and move on to their day—to—day lives without grace. the man's identity will remain suppressed, anonymous, and as thejudge addressed him, he said a date will be set for his sentencing here in auckland. in other news: both the brexit party and plaid cymru will unveil their policies for the general election this morning. our political correspondent jessica parker is in westminster and can give us a full round—up of what we can expect today. morning, jessica. yes. so as you mention, the brexit party are launching not a manifesto, they are calling it a contract with they are calling it a contract with the people. they don't like the word ma nifesto. the people. they don't like the word manifesto. my understanding is it will be a relatively short document, not a competency programme for government. why? the brexit party say realistically they don't think they're going to be in government, they're going to be in government, they only standing 275 candidates. but it will be interesting because we haven't really had a formal
6:07 am
policy document the brexit party before. of course they are quite a young party but what i understand it may include, we've had some clues from nigel farage, things like scrapping hs2, a blessing the house of lords, capping migration and of course they say they want to hold boris johnson's feed to the fire and delivering what they hoped would be a clean break brexit, as they would term it smacked feet to the fire. i think after the conservative government party has been trying to squeeze the brexit party over recent months, plaid cymru also announced their manifesto today. the pro— wells independence party. they will be calling for a £20 billion green jobs revolution. what will that entail? lots of investment in rail, bus travel, three tidal lagoons and offshore wind farms as well. they also want to electrify the main rail lines in wales by 2030 and have another referendum on our membership of the european union. jessica,
6:08 am
thank you, we will talk you the morning. it is now 6:07am. we are trying to talk about what you are interested in about this election. let's get more on the politics now from naga, who's exploring the issues that matter to people in norwich this morning. yes, we are in glorious norwich. called the "fine" city — famed for its two cathedrals and, apparently "a pub for every day of the year and a church for every week!" let me give you a sense of where we are. behind me, you can see the 600—year—old st peter mancroft church. the market below dates back to the 11th century as well. lots of famous people from this area. stephen fry went to school here and actress 0livia coleman has a home not farfrom here. we are going to give you a flavour of the politics here as well. politically, the city has two constituencies: norwich north, which the conservatives have held
6:09 am
since 2009 with a 507 majority, and norwich south, where we are this morning, which has been a safe labour seat since 2015. 0ne one of the issues we are going to be trying to get the heart of today is the nhs. we're inside the forum community building and today we're talking about the nhs. we are talking about the nhs, we wa nt to we are talking about the nhs, we want to know your views as well. get in touch via bbcyourquestions@bbc.co.uk or use the hashtag #bbcyourquestions on social media. lots to talk about, lots of people to talk to to give us a real flavour of what is important in this election campaign. so it'sjohn so it's john and so it'sjohn and i hear on the sofa this morning. keeping each other company. what have you got this morning? ben stokes top—scored for england on day two of the first test against new zealand. he keeps racking up the runs. we saw it in the ashes, and he's doing it
6:10 am
again. he batted confidently, hitting 91, before a collapse left england on 353 but that's still a lead of over 200 runs. we've seen that confidence before, haven't we ? we've seen that confidence before, haven't we? bit of a batting collapse as england ended on 353. from the special one, to the humble one, jose mourinho accepts he's made mistakes in the past — that won't happen again at tottenham, he said they could win the league title next season. and great britain play in the quarterfinals of the davis cup today, doubles pairing ofjamie murray and neal skupski getting them past kazakhstan, to set up a meeting with germany later. and dina asher—smith has been named the sunday times sportswoman of the year, in recognition of her triumph at the world athletics championships this year. so, there we go. dina, ben stokes,
6:11 am
it's amazing. and we just keep talking about them. we will see what happens. let's take a look at today's front pages. the telegraph leads on the announcement that the uk will repatriate orphaned british children living in syria. the paper's main photo shows jeremy corbyn at labour's election manifesto launch yesterday. it's the most radical manifesto for decades, according to the guardian. but the paper says some analysts warn tax hikes "would be likely to have knock—on effects lower down the income scale." the sun reports on more fallout from the prince andrew story and pictures him travelling to buckingham palace yesterday. it's now been nearly a week since that newsnight interview aired. and the huffington post reports on the coal miner's daughter from county durham, which the website says has lit up the impeachment inquiry into donald trump. fiona hill — who's a distinguished russia analyst — has found her accent and straight—talking manner celebrated on social media.
6:12 am
john, have you had a look at some of the insides for us? yeah, just picking up on jose, the insides for us? yeah, just picking up onjose, he said when he joins a club he likes to wear the clu b joins a club he likes to wear the club was my pyjamas. the point being he kind of lives and breathes the clu b he kind of lives and breathes the club —— the club's pyjamas. he kind of lives and breathes the club -- the club's pyjamas. that is a club onesie, is it? i think that isa a club onesie, is it? i think that is a bit ofa a club onesie, is it? i think that is a bit of a photoshop. i'm sure totte n ha m is a bit of a photoshop. i'm sure tottenham have a onesie, if you are interested. christmas isjust around the corner. but it's about him living and breathing the club, i'm sure he said that when he joined chelsea and manchester united. well, what are you going to do? this just generates sort of excitement. yes. a moment in time, now it pans out. and classic deflection from jose, which he has used to take focus of
6:13 am
players' performance and put it on himself. putting him in a onesie today, that has certainly done it, hasn't it? and this one, the mascot, this is a giant skiing marmot that was unveiled at a town as a replacement to a christmas tree. this is in alton. basically they have replaced the christmas tree with this thing. i would feel short—changed. i may traditionalist. you can't beat a christmas tree when it comes to christmas. it has snow and its skiing, they are just trying to do something different, can't you respect that? itjust doesn't scream smith. what's next? this is phil collins, well, it's not phil collins, well, it's not phil collins, the's phil collins. let me explain. this is a 22 foot statue, you can see how big this is of a
6:14 am
babyjesus. you can see how big this is of a baby jesus. we you can see how big this is of a babyjesus. we are in mexico, and this has been unveiled. 0f babyjesus. we are in mexico, and this has been unveiled. of course, people immediately look at that picture and they say that is phil collins. it's true. what you think? there is a similarity. what a great picture to illustrate a point. but what a likeness! someone said with some drums in front of it and it is job done. an extraordinary likeness, but there you go. it's in mexico, if you want to go and see it. there will probably be pilgrimages to go there. genesis fans. i love those bad statue things. they always get a lot of mileage. you always hear about the bad ones, never the good ones. time now to get the weather with matt, who's at the light tunnel installation in norwich city centre. have not seen ti
6:15 am
looks i have not seen this before, it looks magnificent. it is, captivating. a mixture of the old and new. 1600 —year—old church and a captivating light display. 45 metres long, five miles of led cabling and 57,000 light bulbs as well. it has been updated to give an impression of the aurora borealis. it is also raining here in norwich this morning, a sign of things changing. yesterday it was pretty cold across the uk. 3-6d yesterday it was pretty cold across the uk. 3—6d across england and wales. temperature on the rise. the payoff is we will see some rain at times and for sum it will be particularly heavy. low pressure to the west. a south—easterly direction
6:16 am
bringing and squeezing the cold add to the far north of scotland. the payoff is the rain, showers across england and wales, a rumble of thunder further south. brightening up thunder further south. brightening up across thunder further south. brightening up across parts of north—west england especially in the second half of the day. rain past northern ireland and east scotland later. a fairly chilly day here. 8— 11 degrees. heavy rain in the south—west and wales. a wet 36 hours to come that could lead to flooding. heavy rain around us to go into the night and tomorrow morning. into the start of the weekend, saturday looks like any of us will see some rain and times, particularly during the morning. it will push northwards.
6:17 am
persistent across eastern parts of scotla nd persistent across eastern parts of scotland and of the north—east of england. 0ther scotland and of the north—east of england. other parts should write another. a breezy day across the north making it chilly. many places seeing temperatures however creep up to double figures. some sunshine at times for sunday. later on more rain and back into the south—west and wales. with the ground saturated, more rain will be unwelcome and we will keep a close eyes. hopefully we have shown a bit more light into the weekend but naga shining more light somewhere over there. good morning. ithink good morning. i think i good morning. ithink i have good morning. i think i have drawn the long straw where there is no
6:18 am
rain. this is the foreign building, home to the public library, also home to the public library, also home to the on line radio and television stations. christmas has arrived early. we have the twinkly lights. a market just arrived early. we have the twinkly lights. a marketjust across that, one of the oldest in the country, dating back to the 11th century. we will touch upon issues that have affected constituents throughout norwich. yes, they get to enjoy 90 miles of coastline and of course we have the gorgeous broads but there are issues that matter to the community. we are trying to get a feel for those marginal constituencies which could make a difference to the outcome of the general election. norwich north is a conservative state but with a very
6:19 am
small majority ofjust 507 and norwich south is a safe labour seat. this is the one we are in today how will the election changes the outcome? the nhs is one of the issues. let's give you some background to the area. norwich is a city with a long and rich history. its name first appeared on a kind mentored in the early 10th century and today retains many its mediaeval features. also known as the city of stories, it was avoided literature status by unesco, the first in england. it help produce one of the greatest storytellers, stephen fryer attended school here and not the radio dj alan partridge. the strathmore fork. norwich north has
6:20 am
been held by conservatives since the 2009 by election. in 2017 her lead over labour fell to 507 votes. it is a different story in norwich yourself where clive lewis increased his majority to more than 15,000 votes in the last election. in the 2016 eu referendum, norwich bucked the trend, voting to remain. was brexit remains an issue, expect the nhs to also get a lot of attention. a little bit of background. norwich is divided into two constituency areas. the seat was previously held by the liberal democrats. and here are the candidates for norwich north. it's a conservative marginal area, where tory mp chloe smith's majority was cut to 507 over labour in 2017. she gained the seat
6:21 am
during a 2009 by—election. so there are two constituencies up for grabs here in norwich. one person who knows better than most what the main issues are is bbc norfolk‘s political reporter, robby west. good morning. should we split these up good morning. should we split these up and get a flavour of each constituency. norwich north, the cathedral, a pretty safe labour seat. norwich south is a safe labour seat. norwich south is a safe labour seat and the east is the safest. the iconic landmarks, the cathedral, the market place and at the forum where we are now. labour is putting up a candidate who was pretty well—known. a well—known local candidate and it is such a slim majority, 507 votes and ifjeremy corbyn wants to make it he has to wind norwich north.
6:22 am
buzzy atmosphere and cool shops but norwich city council has shut quite a few children centre so the issue has been brought to the fore. the cou nty has been brought to the fore. the county counsel have shot a few children centre as part of a £14 million proposed savings put forward to go ahead. it has started to happen already. that is on the doorsteps. we hear time and time again. lots of big national issues are also discussed but that one issueis are also discussed but that one issue is really coming up time and time again on the doorsteps. the tory candidate for norwich south, has been on maternity leave. she has come back to fight the election. both labour and the conservative candidates both see it as a seat they can wind. personality? all candidates are very well—known here
6:23 am
from clive, the mp for norwich south to chloe for norwich north, they have big recognition. there is a huge effort to get them out and in front of people because off of these seeds are up for winning. tell me about the economics. coleman's and brickman are two big employers. lots of people working in that industry. we also have a gaming industry with game designing companies and lots of independent shops popping up. it is a thriving economy. also, in the wider norfolk community farming plays a huge role. drive down any road and you will see a farmer. the farmers union estimated that 40,000 people work in farms across this region. what are the issues that matter to them? a big issue is
6:24 am
brexit... matter to them? a big issue is brexit. .. we got there eventually. it is never too far away. farmers tell me there are tight margins to sell their products and they are looking for that from main parties. north norfolk, the canada liked around here. he is stepping down for this election. —— the candidate. at the last election that it turned the liberal democrat and he is a very well—known in the community. this time the conservatives will see this asa time the conservatives will see this as a seat they could wind but cameron baud is out there trying to keep the liberal democrat seat. what about the nhs? everyone here very
6:25 am
keen to talk about the nhs, especially mental health which sometimes go under the radar. a trust which provides mental health is the only one rated as adequate so it is constantly being talked about in norwich and across norfolk and people are looking for answers from the political party. you are a mind of information at this morning. we will be talking to lots of people around norfolk and norwich as well. on friday the 29th of november, nick robinson will host the bbc election debate — featuring leading politicians from seven parties live on bbc one. if you have a question you'd like to ask, visit the website bbc.co.uk/electiondebate for your chance to join the audience. we'll be back in a few minutes, after the news, travel and weather where you are this morning.
6:26 am
good morning from bbc london. i'm victoria hollands. ten men found inside a lorry container on the m25 have been arrested on suspicion of immigration offences. the driver was also arrested when the vehicle was stopped near waltham abbey last night. essex police has not provided details of the men's ages or nationalities. muslim voters are being encouraged to register to vote as part of a national day of action. according to the electoral commission around 25% of black and asian voters in great britain are not registered. this latest campaign, organised by the muslim council of britain and migrants 0rganise hopes more people from diverse communities will register before the closing date next week. it is your civil right, you should be able to vote and make sure your voices are heard. amongst our friends it is becoming a big thing,
6:27 am
to make sure you have registered. friends it is becoming a big thing, to make sure you have registeredm is essential to get registered and go to the ballot box because that is where change happens it does not happen in the armchair and the mosques. mixed martial arts was once considered a niche sport in this country, but now takes place at sell—out venues, like wembley arena. and tomorrow night, south london's charlotte mcintyre will make her professional debut. she's one of a growing number of female fighters in the sport. have you encountered any sexism? you go anywhere and you hear about inequalities. you go to the mma environment and whether you are on thejumpsuit environment and whether you are on the jumpsuit or not does not mean that a man is better than you and that a man is better than you and thatis that a man is better than you and that is actually really healthy. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. on the roads in peckham: queen's road at asylum road — there are temporary traffic lights for thames water works.
6:28 am
edmonton: meridian way closed northbound from conduit lane for electricity work. purley: 0ld lodge lane closed for emergency repairs willesden green: peter avenue closed because of a burst water main now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. good with elizabeth rizzini. morning. a slightly different feel good morning. a slightly different feel to things this morning. not quite as chilly and also some wet weather in the form of showers but there will be some brighter spells as well. it is a frost free start with showers of gradually drifting northwards, attending heavier towards western counties. the further ease, the more likely to stay dry. some brightness at times. top between eight and 10 celsius so double figures and a fairly brisk south—easterly wind blowing as well. it will cloud over and more wet weather into the first part of saturday morning. shari outbreaks of
6:29 am
rain. a damp start to the day but temperatures milder. it is wet and windy to start the day on saturday but it will dry out into the afternoon and perhaps even a bit of brightness. highs of 11 celsius. 0n sunday rain in the evening. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast. a 27—year—old man has been found guilty of the murder of british backpacker grace millane, whose body was found in a suitcase in new zealand last year. the student from essex met her killer on the eve of her 22nd birthday and spent several hours drinking with him before she was strangled. the jury returned a unanimous verdict after five hours of deliberation. 0utside court, grace's parents described her as their "sunshine".
6:30 am
the verdicts of murder today will be welcome by members of the mullane family and friends of grace —— millaine family. it will not reduce the pain and suffering we have had to endure over the past year. go on. grace was taken away from us in the most brutal fashion a year ago. and our lives and family have been ripped apart. this will be with us for the rest of our lives. grace was a beautiful, talented and a loving daughter. grace was our sunshine, and she will be missed forever. she did not deserve to be murdered in such a barbaric way on her 0e year. finally, we must return home and try and pick up the pieces of our lives and day—to—day without
6:31 am
our beloved grace. thank you, all. that was the father of the victim speaking outside the court in new zealand just over an hour ago. the brexit party will unveil its policies for the general election this morning — in what it describes as a "contract with the british people". its leader, nigel farage, says he isn't calling it a "manifesto", because the word is "too often associated with broken promises". the brexit party will be standing in 275 seats after deciding not to contest those held by the conservatives — to help prevent a split in the leave vote. those are the main stories, it's 6:31am. josh has all the sport for us. england in good shape thanks to ben stokes. how often have we said that? success for england, successful ben stokes, the two go hand—in—hand. he top scored with 91, smashing 12 fours, here's
6:32 am
one of them in all its beauty. —— its glory. not all good news for england, after stokes fell to tim southee, a familiar batting collpase followed, england 353 all—out — a lead of 209. from the special one to the humble 0ne — jose mourinho admits he made mistakes as he faced the media for the first time as the new tottenham boss. and he clearly hasn't lost his sense of humour as these clips show. this morning i woke up in here in the training ground. if we were trying to find a six star hotel, you can find it better than here. great beds, huge pillows. i mean... huge pillows, amazing. you sleep in the middle of five or six huge, soft
6:33 am
pillows. huge pillows. expensive duvet. i where the pyjamas of the clu b duvet. i where the pyjamas of the club and even sleep with the pyjamas. the four years ago, you askedif pyjamas. the four years ago, you asked if you would ever come to spares, news that never, i love the chelsea fans do much —— out. what has changed? before, iwas chelsea fans do much —— out. what has changed? before, i was sacked. laughter fantastic. everyone loves a great pillow from time to time. great britain will take on germany in the quarterfinals of the davis cup later, after beating kazakhstan in madrid. with kyle edmund winning his singles rubber and dan evans then losing his, it came down to the doubles where jamie murray and neal skupski won in straight sets. we had to go out and win the match stop if we would have any chance to progress in the event. we played a great match from start to finish and
6:34 am
we started really quick. we were aggressive, we didn't give them any time to settle, we rushed them alight and i'm really happy with how we played —— trust them a lot. dina asher—smith has been named the sunday times sportswoman of the year. she won gold in the 200 metres at the world athletics championships in doha this year, to became the first british woman to win a global sprint title. it's the second year in a row she's won the award. tommy fleetwood has put himself in a good position to win golf's race to dubai. he's fourth at the season—ending world tour championship, after starting his round in immaculate style with this eagle on the very first hole. if you are making salts that early on, you are in good shape, aren't you? wow! good staff. -- stuff.
6:35 am
great britain's four—man bobsleigh team have finally been awarded their bronze medals from the 2014 winter olympics. jothackson, bruce tasker, stuart benson and joel fearon finished fifth in sochi, behind two russian crews, who were later disqualified for doping. the quartet were given the medals by princess anne at the team gb ball in london. and finally, we know how important a quick pit stop is for formula 1 teams, but imagine how much harder it would be in space! this is the red bull team in zero—gravity conditions. they're in a cosmonaut training plane above russia. the crew have beaten the record for f1's fastest pit stop three times this season trying something different here. so you saw the car coming in through space. when you think about the technology in place in formula 1, there are some... there is a common
6:36 am
thread between space and the technology used there as well. they a lwa ys technology used there as well. they always say it is about the tiny, fine details that make the difference, so there will be a crossover there. they are always looking for an edge, i'm not sure if they will find it in space, but good on them for looking around. it's now fixed 30 six a.m.. —— 6:36am. returning to the general election now. plaid cymru will launch its manifesto later today — unveiling plans for a "green jobs revolution", as well as a commitment to a second brexit referendum. but the party's remain stance could put them at odds with voters in wales, which backed leave in 2016. leader adam pricejoins me now from cardiff. good morning, thank you for your time. good morning. if! could ask you about the green jobs revolution, this proposal? we want to be the cradle of the green industrial revolution as we were for the original one 200 years ago. we have massive answer essential, building tidal lagoons off the coast of
6:37 am
wales, we can utilise the coast of anglesey, that's grabbed the opportunity for wales. now is the time to build out the future. let's make it a decade of change for wales, building our economy as we address the environmental challenges worldwide. stalkers through about what you have to say about brexit in your manifesto —— talk us through? we believe any brexiteer whether it is boris johnson's jeremy corbyn's will be terrible for wales. we are a small country that lives through exports and we are pretty good at it. two—thirds of our exports go to the european union. brexit would decimate well sadly culture —— welsh agriculture. we want to be building wales up, taking us up the economic
6:38 am
table, we don't want to do what we saw in the 19805 with the steel and manufacturing 5ector5. let's take the chance of the next few weeks to put the final say referendum on the agenda so we can remain in the european union. you want a final say referendum, that is the policy? yes! we wa nt referendum, that is the policy? yes! we want to remain in the european union and the only way to do that is to ta ke union and the only way to do that is to take it back to the people, democratically. i've seen a shift in opinion as we move from generalities to the specifics. i think people are realising in greater numbers than ever that this would be disastrous. it would hurt people in wales, the poorest mo5t it would hurt people in wales, the poorest most of all, and if there is anything we can do to avert the di5a5ter, we should do it over the next few weeks. wales did vote to leave, that was the vote in wales. you want a second referendum. you
6:39 am
are at odds with a lot of people. i'm trying to work out why anyone who voted for brexit in wales would wa nt to who voted for brexit in wales would want to vote for you? charlie, wales has voted labour for 200 years, i am trying to change people's minds, thatis trying to change people's minds, that is what you do. we are honest about our position, in contrast with the labour party which has sat on the labour party which has sat on the fence with brexit. we are saying honestly and clearly to the people of wales, brexit will not help us, it will hurt us. let's work together asa it will hurt us. let's work together a5 a nation now to avert that di5aster a5 a nation now to avert that disaster and grabbed the opportunity thatis disaster and grabbed the opportunity that is there for us. the positive opportunity, building up the future, making wales a world leader, tapping into our ma55ive potential in terms of green technology in the future. the future could be bright if we could get rid of these dark clouds
6:40 am
of brexit. you say people want to see clearly where the political parties lie. it's true that you initially, september 2019, you were saying that brexit should be cancelled without the need for a second referendum. we were facing the absolute catacly5m of a no—deal brexit, which would rip the heart of the welsh economy. what we were saying in the last parliament a5 well as more, as a last resort option we had to take no deal of the table. but we've always been absolutely clear — a day after the referendum, i said when the plan was set out, we would always have do ta ke set out, we would always have do take it back to the people. we've been absolutely clear and consistent about that. this is the only way democratically to resolve this i55ue. democratically to resolve this issue. the problem was 3.5 years ago there was no plan. that's why we are in the mess that we are in. now there is a deal on the table. that's
6:41 am
bring that back —— let's bring it back to the people and bring the strongest case po55ible back to the people and bring the strongest case possible that it is in the best interests of our country here, and in wales to retain our economic base, not decimate it, and ta ke economic base, not decimate it, and take a move forward rather than a huge step backwards, which is what brexit would represent. and after the general election, are you prepared to do any kind of deals with the labour party? no, i don't believe labour and conservative governments will solve the problems of wales right now. we have put our faith in the westminster parties, but they have never delivered. i am hoping that the strongest number of plaid cymru mp5 will use our 5trength plaid cymru mp5 will use our strength in westminster on a case—by—case, vote by vote ba5i5. strength in westminster on a case—by—case, vote by vote basis. we will use a leveraged the wales so we can build a betterfuture
6:42 am
will use a leveraged the wales so we can build a better future that we all want to see. adam price, thank you very much for your time this morning. that is ten adam price, leader of plaid cymru, speaking to us leader of plaid cymru, speaking to us from cardiff. john is here with the sport, naga is out and about in norwich, but let's talk to matt now. what is this extraordinary scene behind you? hello, naga is up there in the forum with the twinkly lights. i am out in the rain, but the reflection on the ground is perfect for this. this is the lights are not in norwich. —— light tunnel. it appears for christmas and just gives you that sense of light and comfort on those dark, cold mornings they are experiencing. more than 57 light bulbs in there producing a variety of light displays including
6:43 am
shooting stars. my favourite so far has been the twinkling lights of the aurora borealis, various greens and blues drifting across. the rain adds to the reflections, adds to the atmosphere here and there will be rain over the next few days. here in norwich and across many eastern and northern areas we have had respite from the rain as of late, but that is about to come back. the payoff is things are about to get milder. temperatures only around 3—6d. it was a particularly chilly day, but with low temperatures to the west of us, you can see the yellow colours on the chart pushing northwards. that is the colder air that we have seen over the last few days. temperatures on the rise, but as we have across many parts of england and wales this morning, outbreaks of rain heavy and thundery of the south coast. some drier moments out there was a persistent rain will put its way northwards and put into northern ireland, south—east of scotland later. drain the north—west of scotla nd later. drain the north—west of scotland to today commit bit of a breeze blowing here. we will see some sunshine in the south—east and
6:44 am
east anglia later. temperatures on the up and up, 10— 11 degrees, closer to where we should be for this time of year, and a to follow. but by the end of the day, south—west england, south wales, persistent rain here. we could see up persistent rain here. we could see up to two inches of rain following over the next six hours, that will add to the risk of flooding here. the ground is saturated. heavy rain in other parts of the uk through the night and into tomorrow, but as i said, it won't be too chilly a night. on saturday, lots of cloud around, anywhere will see rain throughout the day. far north—west of scotland, rain most persistent in southern scotland and north—eastern parts of england. we will see some sunshine develop across england and was later, so a slight improvement here as we go through the day. a windy day across the north, that will temper the feel of things even though temperatures are still up to double figures for some of you. and then as we going to sunday, a better chance of staying dry, some sunshine across the country. we will see some
6:45 am
heavy rain return into wales and the south—west later in the day. temperatures, as i said, still up to double figures. so, certainly naga, it will feel milder than the chilly conditions we have had in the last few weeks so far, but the payoff is rain. at least you are in the dry where you are. oh, i feel so bad i'm not out there with you, and out. i wa nt to not out there with you, and out. i want to give our view was a little insight into how meteorologists behave in the morning. we all came into the office 30 minutes before we went on and we set, it is snowing outside was i don't be ridiculous. it was snowing. now it has turned to rain. it was knowing and you said it wasn't. it was not snowing, i promise you. it was not snowing, i promise you. it was not snowing, i promise you. it was heavy rain. in the run—up to the general election,
6:46 am
jayne mccubbin is taking the bbc breakfast coffee cart on her own campaign trail, finding out what people want, over a cuppa. here's what she got up to when she visited norwich north. we have arrived in... norwich. you can go and meetjane at the we have arrived in... norwich. you can go and meet jane at the coffee cut and get what you are worried about off your chest. what is the most important thing to you? brexit. brexit. brexit. the city is surrounded by a sea of leave voters like rob. i am a political animal.
6:47 am
are you a political animal? i am. what is your issue? brexit. we have to become an independent sovereign state again. tea or coffee? for carol it is all about immigration. state again. tea or coffee? for carol it is all about immigrationlj get carol it is all about immigration.” get very vexed over this because they come over, they have to be treated if they are ill. who is paying for it? us taxpayers. eva makes paying for it? us taxpayers. eva ma kes waffles paying for it? us taxpayers. eva makes waffles and is starting to be a nurse. they think we're coming to ta ke a nurse. they think we're coming to take over the country or we just wa nt take over the country or we just want the benefit. we woke hard. we do our best to contributor for the country as well. we take it, we give it back to the country. i have a little boy and he is british. hi, tyler. kisses from mummy. don't ask
6:48 am
me about brexit. brexit polarises but, for some here, it is a distraction. i am really tired of hearing about it. i wish we could talk about education, hospitals and child poverty and jobs for people who do not have jobs instead of talking about brexit all the time. there are 20 slaves until the general election, 33 until christmas. a time meant to be about coming together. ——20 slaves. ——20 nights. i need to take a moment, are you telling me you have faith in politicians? yes, i do. wow! the first person to ever say that. and
6:49 am
so we pack up and prepare for the rest of the road trip. 0ptimism is out there, but it is just very, very ha rd to out there, but it is just very, very hard to spot. it is hard to spot but we are going to be pretty positive. a 600—year—old church behind me, matt is out there in the lighted tunnel, one of the oldest markets as well. this morning in norwich we're concentrating on the nhs. later in the programme the bbc‘s health editor hugh pym will be with us to answer any questions you may have about what the main parties are pledging to do about the health service. send us an email to yourquestions@bbc.co.uk or via the hashtag bbcyourquestions. we'll put some of them to hugh and our experts later in the programme.
6:50 am
we were talking earlier to a political reporter and one of the issues he brought up... the east anglia daily time, you will remember we have spoken about this in recent days with various politicians and this is taking a look at waiting time for emergency treatment. sussex and essex recorded concerning performance figures. an emergency department saying they need to see 95% of patients within four hours but in some areas 80%, 86%. another area of great importance is agriculture. it is the farming industry here which is so important and it is a big generator of economic growth as well. victoria is just a few miles down the road, at one of the uk's biggest scientific research parks, to find out what businesses
6:51 am
here want from this election. we're talking about the food and hopefully, you have had a good first as well. morning, victoria. good morning. so far it has only consisted of coffee. hopefully that will change shortly. this is the speed breeding greenhouse, under a special light which means all the crops are growing really quickly and it meant that rather than having one crop going through, which would be the ordinary thing, they can get up to six through. we know that farmers in the next 50 years going to have to produce the same amount of food as they have done in the last 500 yea rs as they have done in the last 500 years to tackle rising population and of course the climate is becoming more precarious. this is wait here. take this one here, ——
6:52 am
wheat. this will be able to feed more people. increased crop yields, increased disease resistance and lowering the costs for farmers. someone who did that ph d here, doctor belinda clark. you bring together all sorts of different people, research farmers, growers for the whole area. how important is the work here was make critically important. it generates knowledge about how plans and microbes relate to each other it also generates new knowledge for the big global challenges like climate change and food security. everything invested here returns £14 to the economy. every found. around 40% of the most
6:53 am
productive land is in the east of england. we have incredibly innovative farmers who have an appetite for new ways of producing food, new practices and new tools. there is an appetite for doing things well and better but what is the agricultural technology sector wanting to hear at the election? the uk has traditionally punched above its weight in terms of quality and research and we must continue to keep that pipeline full but we need to be better translating that knowledge and developing it so farmers can catch that and create value. there are things like tax breaks, to incentivise engagement with the agenda, to decrease the risk of new technology, through financial and also demonstrators,
6:54 am
being able to see new ways of doing things and see if they can work on theirfarm is very things and see if they can work on their farm is very powerful. thank you very much. i will squeeze underneath you and come this way. norwich is famous for its chocolate or it was. it used to have macintoshes and then round trees. now this man is carrying on the tradition. you were a small business owner in the centre of norwich. what are the key issues for you? this is are the key issues for you? this is a brexit election, we all know that. we export 80% of our products to europe and further afield that we need to be able to trade with europe and the world and that is vital to us, critical to us as a business but there are other factors as well. something we are really passionate about, we are a small business. 60%
6:55 am
of employment in the private sector comes from small business. sometimes i feel the party do not understand that we are the lifeblood of the economy and of this country, of employment and we want more support andl employment and we want more support and i guess sometimes we feel that we are left behind and business rates are a massive problem. the problem that needs to be dealt with because it is killing the high and retail and making the because it is killing the high and retailand making the uk because it is killing the high and retail and making the uk economy subdued. we got positive signs, 0k, we're not in recession the fact is, retail is changing and businesses, we need to support small businesses. we certainly do. we will be talking to more businesses throughout the day. britain does punch above its weight when it comes to agriculture, science and manufacturing businesses clearly wa nt science and manufacturing businesses clearly want to see more in terms of pledges from politicians to support them. plenty more throughout the day
6:56 am
but first the news, travel and whether where you. good morning from bbc london. i'm victoria hollands. ten men found inside a lorry container on the m25 have been arrested on suspicion of immigration offences. the driver was also arrested when the vehicle was stopped near waltham abbey last night. essex police has not provided details of the men's ages or nationalities. muslim voters are being encouraged to register to vote as part of a national day of action. according to the electoral commission around 25% of black and asian voters in great britain are not registered. this latest campaign, organised by the muslim council of britain and migrants 0rganise hopes more people from diverse communities will register before the closing date next week. it is your civil right, you should be able to vote and you have to make sure your voices are being heard. amongst my friends, it is becoming a big thing, like, we definitely need to make
6:57 am
sure you are registered. it is absolutely essential that, not only do we get registered, but we go out to the ballot box — that is where change happens. change does not happen in the armchairs or in the mosques. mixed martial arts was once considered a niche sport in this country, but now takes place at sell—out venues, like wembley arena. and tomorrow night, south london's charlotte mcintyre will make her professional debut. she's one of a growing number of female fighters in the sport. have you encountered any sexism? you go anywhere, whether its work, and you'll hear a lot about inequalities with me nand women. and almost, you go to the mma environment and, whether you are in ju—jitsu and you're both blue belts, you get on the mat, it does not mean just because you're a male, they're going to be better than you and i think that is actually really, rally healthy. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. on the roads in peckham: queen's road at asylum road —
6:58 am
there are temporary traffic lights for thames water works. edmonton: meridian way closed northbound from conduit lane for electricity work. purley: 0ld lodge lane closed for emergency repairs now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. a slightly different feel to things today. the air is a little milder so it will not be quite as chilly. there's also some wet weather around in the form of showers but there will be some brighter spells too. now, it is a frost—free start to the morning. these showers are gradually drifting their way northwards. they'll tend to be a bit heavier out towards western counties. the further east you are, through the afternoon, the more likely you are to stay a bit dry. there will be some cloud but also some brightness at times. top temperatures this time between 8 and 10 degrees celsius so double figures and we've still got that a fairly brisk south—easterly wind blowing too. some clear spells for the first part of the night but then it will cloud over and we'll see some more wet weather into the first part of saturday morning. showery outbreaks of rain. a damp start to the day but temperatures milder, between six and eight
6:59 am
degrees celsius. now, it is wet and it is windy to start the day on saturday but it will dry out into the afternoon, perhaps even a bit of brightness. it's feeling milder with highs of 11 degrees celsius. on sunday, dry for most of the daylight hours, with rain in the evening. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now.
7:00 am
good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty in norwich and charlie stayt in salford. 0ur headlines today: a 27—year—old man has been found guilty of murdering the british backpacker grace millane by strangling her. grace was our sunshine, and she will be missed forever. she did not deserve to be murdered in such a barbaric way on her 0e year. in other news, the conservatives want a hike on the stamp duty foreigners pay in england, while plaid cymru will launch their manifesto calling for a £20 billion "green jobs revolution." good morning. we're getting to the heart of the issues that matter to people here in norwich, during the election,
7:01 am
including the health of the nhs. and i'm here, three miles down the road at one of the uk's biggest scientific research parks to find out what businesses here want from this election. it's the stokes show again for england. he hits 91, as they take a sizeable lead over new zealand on day two of the first test. the chill of recent days is about to ease, but as things get milder, it will get wetter as well. concerns denied for persistent rain in south—west england and. i'll have all the details live from norwich, here on bbc breakfast. it's friday the 22nd of november. our top story: a 27—year—old man has been found guilty of the murder of the british backpacker grace millane, whose body was found in a suitcase in new zealand last year. in the last hour, her parents reacted to the verdict. grace was taken away from us in the most brutal fashion
7:02 am
a year ago. and our lives and family have been ripped apart. this will be with us for the rest of our lives. grace was a beautiful, talented, loving daughter. grace was our sunshine, and she will be missed forever. she did not deserve to be murdered in such a barbaric way on her 0e year. finally, we must return home and try and pick up the pieces of our lives and day—to—day without our beloved grace. thank you, all. let's speak to our correspondent, shaimaa khalil, who is outside the court in auckland. we just saw that very raw footage of her parents. and you could feel the tension in the room as well. the
7:03 am
tension in the room as well. the tensionjust before tension in the room as well. the tension just before the jury came in and read that guilty verdict. grace's mother took in a deep breath and breathed out as the guilty verdict was read out and both pa rents verdict was read out and both pa re nts we pt verdict was read out and both parents wept in the courtroom. for three weeks now, the court and the jury three weeks now, the court and the jury have been hearing about what happened to grace millane. this is grace millane the night before her 22nd birthday, the last time she was seen alive. her father described her as "gregarious and outgoing." "what you saw", he said, "is what you got." today, a jury found this man guilty of her murder. for legal reasons, we still cannot reveal his identity. over the past three weeks, thejury heard how grace met the man through a dating app. cctv showed the pair out drinking, and at some point grace messaged a friend, saying she was having a good time. but within hours, she was strangled in his apartment. defence lawyers argued it was an accident, a consensual sex
7:04 am
act gone wrong. but the jury simply didn't believe it. this is the killer, telling police why he didn't call an ambulance to help grace. i dialled 111. um... but i didn't hit the button. um... because i — i was scared at how bad it looked. why do you think it looked bad? well, because there's a dead person in my room. the jurors heard that after the murder the killer searched online for how to dispose of a corpse. he also watched extreme pornography. they were shown hours of cctv of the man after the murder, including him going on a date with another woman while grace's body was still in his room. this is him later, moving the body in a suitcase.
7:05 am
he then buried it in a shallow grave in bushland outside auckland. grace's murder shocked this nation. at the time, the country's prime minister could not hide her emotions. on behalf of new zealand, i want to apologise to grace's family. your daughter should have been safe here and she wasn't and i'm sorry for that. a year ago, grace millane came to new zealand on a backpacking holiday. today's verdict may give some closure to the family of a young woman who'll never come home. and as thejudges and as the judges addressed the killer in the court room, his identity we are told will remain suppressed. he will remain anonymous. thejudge suppressed. he will remain anonymous. the judge said there will bea anonymous. the judge said there will be a date for his sentencing, but at the end of that very difficult day, grace was my parents held hands and
7:06 am
walked out of the courtroom. as her father said, to draw a close and continue with their day—to—day lives without their beloved daughter. in other news, both the brexit party and plaid cymru will unveil their policies for the general election this morning. 0ur political correspondent jessica parker is in westminster and can give us a full round—up of what we can expect today. morning, jessica. yes, so we are hearing from the brexit party, they are actually calling a manifesto, they don't like that word, they are calling it a contract with the people. my understanding is it won't be a particularly lengthy document. why? they are only standing 275 mp5, so it's not going to be a comprehensive programme for government. but it will be interesting. it will be the first time we see a broader formal policy document set out by the brexit party, of course they are a relatively young party. what might
7:07 am
be in the document? we have had clues from nigel farage, things like scrapping hs2, cupping migration —— capping, and holding borisjohnson to account on a clean break brexit. perhaps trying to reboot their campaign somewhat of course, and the conservative party trying to squeeze them on the leave vote. and plaid cymru talking about a green jobs revolution, £20 billion. what might that entail? they are going to talk about investment in rail, travel and bosses, three tidal lagoons and electrifying all of the main lines in wales by 2030. and on the crucial question of brexit as well, they wa nt to question of brexit as well, they want to hold a further referendum on our membership of the european union. jessica, for the moment, thank you very much. it is 7:07am. let's get more on the politics now
7:08 am
from naga, who's exploring the issues that matter to people in norwich this morning. good morning, charlie. thank you very much stop in norwich —— thank you very much. we are in norwich, this holds the studio for our collea g u es this holds the studio for our colleagues at bbc eased. matt is outside in the light tunnel, that is where he is bringing us the weather. and the breakfast cart has been travelling around the country, city has been talking to people about issues that matter to them. behind me, you can see the 600—year—old st peter mancroft church. the market below dates back to the 11th century. they say there is a pub and a church
7:09 am
for every week of the year. we will have more later. returning to politics now. labour has promised to increase annual government spending by more than £80 billion by 2024, if it wins next month's general election. jeremy corbyn has vowed to take on the "rich and powerful" with a programme of reform, which includes nationalising the railways and mail service, building hundreds of thousands of council homes. the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell, joins me now from westminster. good morning to you. good morning. eight thank you forjoining me this morning. your plans are variously described byjeremy corbyn as radical. others have used the phrase eye watering, in terms of the money being spent. how are you going to raise the money? it is pretty big
7:10 am
because of the challenges we face that a pretty big after ten years of austerity. let me take people to very briefly if i can't, we're going to raise taxes, we are being straight about that we're going to raise income tax on the top 5% of the highest earners, 95% will not see any increase in income tax, national insurance of vat. we will be reversing some the corporation tax cuts that the giver raise —— tax cuts, the giveaways the tories did. but we aren't reversing it all to the 2010 levels. we will still be competitive across europe. we are introducing a financial transaction tax on the city of london and asking the city of london to pay a bit more. and also introducing a fairly compensable programme of tackling tax avoidance and tax evasion. i mean, on a whole range of areas like dad, we can raise the funds that we need then to pay for our public services —— areas like that. it is a
7:11 am
bit about ending these tax giveaways, £100 billion has been given away by the conservatives to the corporations and wealthiest in our society. we don't think that's right. we don't think that's fair when there have been cuts to the nhs, schools, and care services. we need to have a fair taxation system. independent bodies like the ifs have analysed your spending plans. alcove this to you now. "the labour ma nifesto this to you now. "the labour manifesto suggest they want to raise £80 billion in tax revenue and these arejust all about £80 billion in tax revenue and these are just all about will come from people earning over £80,000 a year. we cannot raise a kind of money in our tax system without affecting individuals, that is simply not credible. " that's interesting, because i regret respect to the ifs, but since they have made that statement, we have had a large range of economists. i'll tell you where i think they got it wrong. i don't
7:12 am
think they got it wrong. i don't think they've taken into account the whole range of policies that we have been developing and set out in the ma nifesto. been developing and set out in the manifesto. they have been arguing, for example, if we increase corporation tax and we withdraw the corporation tax and we withdraw the corporation tax and we withdraw the corporation tax cuts the tories have given the big corporations, somehow that will result in either lower wages or increased prices. there is no real evidence to suggest that. there is no evidence to say if you give them tax cuts, they will invest the money. i invite the ifs to look into that, a third of their boards should be workers, we will restore trade union rights and we we will protect wages from the cuts the ifs is suggesting. we will have consumers as well in supervisory boards of those companies. i'm afraid there is no evidence to suggest what the ifs is suggesting.
7:13 am
it has also been largely challenged by other economists. people in politics these days love straight talking. you are challenging the ifs' credibility, only 24 hours ago, john mcdonnell, you were quoting the ifs in relation to the conservative party plans over national insurance contributions. you said "independent experts have said this will cost up to £11 billion." so, 24 hours ago, you say the ifs is good and you can use their clothes to shoot down conservative plans does make their quotes, today, 24 hours later, you are saying their analysis doesn't add up. no, that's not what i'm saying. that is exactly what you said. let me finish my sentence. what i said you is i greatly respect the ifs, but on this particular
7:14 am
point, i think got it wrong. 0ther aspects of their work openly agreement —— i fully agree with, i disagree on this area. i think in this area they have gotten this particular point wrong. ok. let's not get bogged down. let's move on. in terms of deliverability, we have heard the numbers and people will make about what they will. jeremy corbyn says when labour wins, the nurse wins. this is in relation to the 5% pay rise was the year 1 nurse wins. this is in relation to the 5% pay rise was the year1 of a labour government, how much will nurses be paid? they will get a 596 uplift in their wages. in year 1? in year1. and uplift in their wages. in year 1? in year 1. and then we will match their wages match the rise beyond inflation across the economy. where did that come from? that came from the nurses union themselves. what i found wonderful about meeting all of these nhs staff, doctors, nurses,
7:15 am
paramedics and others is that they we re paramedics and others is that they were concerned about their pay. that is what we are tackling. but you know what? there were also talking about investment in the nhs for their patience and ending privatisation. can a follow-up question on that? we are talking about your plans for all forms of private enterprise within the nhs. could you clarify exactly what that means in practice? right, ok. what we're going to do it and the internal market which is costing so much money and in the privatisation thatis much money and in the privatisation that is going on at the moment. we are in this ludicrous position where we have private companies suing the nhs if they don't get a contract. what we are saying is there should an in—house preference, and when these contracts come in, the services should be provided by nhs staff. again, that has come from the staff. again, that has come from the staff themselves. they want to be pa rt staff themselves. they want to be part of the nhs, and i completely understand that.
7:16 am
cani can i ask you about your housing plans. this is an enormous housebuilding project. on the issue of deliverability, you one of a labour government, how many council houses will be built? i know it is a five year pledge. 150,000 per annum. iam five year pledge. 150,000 per annum. i am interested in the immediate and how soon. those of the things that people care about. we're be realistic and working with council leaders and others to see how we can build up to that figure and we're working with associations as well... so you are unable to say year 1, two and three. we are publishing our schedule and we have done it on the basis of recognising exactly what labour and conservative council leaders are saying. a lot of
7:17 am
staffing have been undermined in order to deliver. we are saying, let's be realistic and build this up over a five—year period... let's be realistic and build this up over a five-year period... do you understand the problem with this? you could get to four years, five yea rs into a you could get to four years, five years into a labour government and you would not have broken a promise if you have not built any houses. we will do and we will do it in a realistic way and we will reach our target making sure local councils have the resources and if you look at the plans i have published yesterday in terms of overall expenditure, for its range of services, and extra £20 billion and they will be able to stuff up in areas where they have been cut for the last decade. why? because we desperately need our local councils to deliver for us to stop i have confidence in the councils, whatever their political colour and i believe
7:18 am
they will step up to the plate on this and you will see that we will be able to realistically and very pragmatically deliver during that period. thank you very much for your time. as pa rt of as part of our election courage, we are in norwich. time now to get the weather with matt, who's at st peter mancroft church in norwich city centre. doesn't it look stunning. the rain has stopped but i have come inside the wonderful surrounding of st peter mancroft church. norwich has the highest concentration north of the highest concentration north of the alps of mediaeval churches. this was built in 1075 and is a very special place, it is right at the heart of the city. the rain has stopped outside but there will be some rain in the forecast right into the weekend. the payoff is, it will not be quite as chilly as yesterday.
7:19 am
temperatures closer to normal through today but lots of rain across england and wales, in particular to the south coast. some showers coming with the odd rumble of thunder. the driest of all, far north—west of scotland with some sunshine. we will see sunshine in between showers in the south later. we will see heavy persistent rain finish the day in a south—west england into wales and that could cause minor flooding if england into wales and that could cause minorflooding if it england into wales and that could cause minor flooding if it persists into tomorrow morning. tomorrow, just about anyone of us could see rain. far north—west of scotland the best to stay dry. the rain persistent in north—eastern parts of england and south—east scotland. a few places to turn dry and brighter. by few places to turn dry and brighter. by sunday, many a good deal drier.
7:20 am
that is how the weather is looking. iam mad i am mad you got into the drive. a gorgeous morning, what we are looking is to what people want to be talking about during the election. one of the biggest challenges facing the nhs is mental health. all parties are under pressure to improve things if they win the election. here in norwich the trust that delivers mental health services — the norfolk and suffolk nhs foundation trust — is in special measures. graham satchell has been to meet one mum whose son took his own life days after being discharged by the trust. he is the first thing i think about
7:21 am
every time i wake up in the morning, before going to bed. i do not understand how i ended up in this situation. it was the end of my world and my world has never been the same sense. her son took his life into thousand 16. he was just 21. an inquest into his death found a series of failings in his care. —— 2016. he was incorrectly discharged from the mental health unit. he had everything ahead of him, a whole future and because of the wrong decision by the mental health services, his death could have been prevented. the trust has apologised to the family and admitted they care was below standard. mental health services have been officially rated inadequate and the trust is currently in special measures. talking and listening which is so important to all of these... talking and listening which is so important to all of these. .. at this
7:22 am
barber, headdresses like him talk about their problems. they want help in difficult periods. push them in the right direction. this project is run by the charity, the 12th man, working in headdresses, tattoo pa rlours, working in headdresses, tattoo parlours, as part of a way to normalise mental illness. all men need to talk about mental health so what might be a mild mental health condition does not become something more severe. we cannot leave it up to somebody else to fix it. we'll have to fix it. in this election or political participant to improve mental health treatment but other services that if problems escalate? terry 0'shea campaigning in norfolk for the last six years says services have got worse. there is resources that do not match the rhetoric of politicians. 0ne
7:23 am
that do not match the rhetoric of politicians. one in five nurses and doctors places disappear but we still have funerals with people bearing their loved ones, people crying out for support who did not get the support that they need. the nhs trust css it is working to improve quality and standards but, as partners to her cost, ——is this mother knows, suicide rates are up. something needs to change. it needs to change as soon as possible to save lives and save another family go through what my family has had to endure and continue to endure. we are grateful for hearing that story. we're talking about mental health issues and the nhs. the bbc‘s health editor hugh pym is here with us this morning to answer your questions about what the main parties are pledging to do
7:24 am
about the health service. henry was obviously feeling alone that he saw no other way to turn. very tragic story and we do hear others like it and it takes the question, why does it need campaigners in this area to carry on raising these issues even after the trust is got into special measures should be having some central guidance to take it forward because it is rated inadequate. what more can be done to ensure standards are better and this is a big question for all parties in this campaign. pledging money is fun, recruiting new stuff is fine but how do you improve services from this state of play. when you talk about the nhs, the numbers are fine. they need to have an experience which is tangible. the promises can almost seem empty in a general election campaign. yes, we have discovered from figures in england that the a&e
7:25 am
performers in october, it was the worse since records began. similar figures yesterday from wales and it just shows the immense pressure out that people are having to wait longer than four hours and that is our experience. also longways for routine services. we have never seen a figure like this. anything is anglian daily time, picking up on the figure, these missed targets, causing major concerns. we are trying to talk to people here people who are being affected. the shadow chancellor was talking to charlie a few moments ago. he talked about a 596 few moments ago. he talked about a 5% increase in wages for nhs staff. retention and recruitment are key
7:26 am
issues. leaders will say retention and recruitment is the big issue. workforce. in england more than 100,000 vacancies across the nhs. nurses more than 40,000 and parties are setting up plans for recruitment but it takes three years or more, up to seven years for. this. this does not happen overnight and there are shortages right now. of course, the nhs benefits from stuff coming from outside the uk. that needs to be clarity over what will happen after brexited but won't force certainly is the big priority. and morale. if you are on a shift, and somebody is not there, it is difficult. staff are doing their very best. gp services as well looked at very closely. a lot of people's experience is they tried for an appointment, they could not get one
7:27 am
and had to wait two weeks or more and had to wait two weeks or more and some end up going to a&e because ido and some end up going to a&e because i do not have faith in their local gp. gps say that workload is immense stop having ten minutes or less with each patient. there is a work issue for gps. parties have talked about recruiting more gps, that is great but it takes three years on top of your doctor training to become a gp and that will not happen overnight. people want to see some tangible evidence. you can send more questions to yourquestions@bbc.co.uk or via the hashtag #bbcyourquestions. we'll put some of them to our experts later in the programme. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
7:28 am
good morning from bbc london. i'm victoria hollands. ten men found inside a lorry container on the m25 have been arrested on suspicion of immigration offences. the driver was also arrested when the vehicle was stopped near waltham abbey last night. essex police has not provided details of the men's ages or nationalities. muslim voters are being encouraged to register to vote as part of a national day of action. according to the electoral commission around 25% of black and asian voters in great britain are not registered. this latest campaign, organised by the muslim council of britain and migrants 0rganise, hopes more people from diverse communities will register before the closing date next week. it is your civil right, you should be able to vote and you have to make sure your voices are being heard. amongst my friends, it is becoming a big thing, like, we definitely need to make sure you are registered. it is absolutely essential that, not only do we get registered, but we go out to the ballot box — that is where change happens.
7:29 am
change does not happen in the armchairs or in the mosques. mixed martial arts was once considered a niche sport in this country, but now takes place at sell—out venues, like wembley arena. and tomorrow night, south london's charlotte mcintyre will make her professional debut. she's one of a growing number of female fighters in the sport. have you encountered any sexism? you go anywhere, whether its work, and you'll hear a lot about inequalities with me nand women. about inequalities with men and women. and almost, you go to the mma environment and, whether you are in ju—jitsu and you're both blue belts, you get on the mat, it does not mean just because you're a male, they're going to be better than you and i think that is actually really, rally healthy. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. on the roads in peckham: queen's road at asylum road — there are temporary traffic lights for thames water works. edmonton: meridian way closed northbound from conduit lane for electricity work.
7:30 am
purley: 0ld lodge lane closed for emergency repairs now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. a slightly different feel to things today. the air is a little milder so it will not be quite as chilly. there's also some wet weather around in the form of showers but there will be some brighter spells too. now, it is a frost—free start to the morning. these showers are gradually drifting their way northwards. they'll tend to be a bit heavier out towards western counties. the further east you are, through the afternoon, the more likely you are to stay a bit dry. there will be some cloud but also some brightness at times. top temperatures this time between 8 and 10 degrees celsius so double figures and we've still got that a fairly brisk south—easterly wind blowing too. some clear spells for the first part of the night but then it will cloud over and we'll see some more wet weather into the first part of saturday morning. showery outbreaks of rain. a damp start to the day but temperatures milder, between six and eight degrees celsius. now, it is wet and it is windy to start the day on saturday but it will dry out into the afternoon, perhaps even a bit of brightness.
7:31 am
it's feeling milder with highs of 11 degrees celsius. on sunday, dry for most of the daylight hours, with rain in the evening. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty in norwich and charlie stayt in salford. here's a summary of the rest of the morning's main stories from bbc news: a 27—year—old man has been found guilty of the murder of british backpacker grace millane, whose body was found in a suitcase in new zealand last year. the student from essex met her killer on the eve of her 22nd birthday and spent several hours drinking with him before she was strangled. the jury returned a unanimous verdict after five hours of deliberation. 0utside court, grace's parents gave their reaction.
7:32 am
the verdict of murder today will be welcomed by members of the millane family and friends of grace. it will not reduce the pain and the suffering we have had to endure over the past year... i can't see it. all right. go on. grace was taken away from us in the most brutal fashion a year ago. and our lives and family have been ripped apart. this will be with us for the rest of our lives. grace was a beautiful, talented, loving daughter. grace was our sunshine, and she will be missed forever. she did not deserve to be murdered in such a barbaric way on her 0e year. finally, we must return home and try and pick up the pieces of our lives and day—to—day without our beloved grace.
7:33 am
thank you, all. that was david millane, father of grace millane in new zealand. let's talk more about the upcoming issues for the general election. 0verseas buyers would pay an extra 3% in stamp duty when purchasing property in the uk, if the conservatives win next month's general election. the party hopes the plans, which would apply to both private buyers and companies, will ease demand for housing stock. i'm joined now by the chief secretary to the treasury, rishi sunak. good morning. you for your time. thank you. could you outline these plans? most everybody wants to own
7:34 am
their own home. that is an aspiration we very much support. today we have outlined a change in the stamp duty regime. if you are a foreign company or someone living overseas, it is as easy you to buy property here as someone who is living here, we don't think that is right. we will have a 3% stamp duty surcharge on foreign transactions. that should make houses more affordable first—time buyers, people wanting to live here and build a family and! wanting to live here and build a family and ifor wanting to live here and build a family and i for themselves. wanting to live here and build a family and ifor themselves. we've heard from jeremy corbyn that home ownership, he had attacked out as a national obsession, we think that aspiration is very much worth supporting. we will move onto labour's plans in a moment and what you make of those during the leadership contest, the conservative contest, there was a proposal of £500,000, where has not gone? our ma nifesto £500,000, where has not gone? our manifesto will be out shortly and there is details will be out there. you are right to focus on stamp
7:35 am
duty. 0ne you are right to focus on stamp duty. one of the postings we have done it in government is removing 95% of first—time buyers paying stamp duty at all. we want to make it easierfor people stamp duty at all. we want to make it easier for people to get on the property ladder. that is why those cuts were so important. are now 95% of first—time buyers don't pay any stamp duty at all. we also saw a record number of homes delivered, 240,000, the highest number in 30 yea rs. 240,000, the highest number in 30 years. so making that dream of home ownership a reality is coming to fruition. we have the labour party to fester, they are focusing on housebuilding, council house building, huge relations in planes and —— relations about. —— as well as bass and trains and transport —— buses. we've had independent experts
7:36 am
from the ifs, very respectable, using words like vast, colossal and extraordinary to describe the scale of spending in this manifesto. and the labour party can't simply provide the plans from just a tax on the ritz, we have said £2400 a year is the bill —— on the wealthy. the ritz, we have said £2400 a year is the bill -- on the wealthy. let's be clear about that figure you have given, all you have done there is divide the total spending by the total number of working taxpayers, which clearly is not the case, it just doesn't correspond like that and you know that. no, it's an estimate we have done looking at all of the various announcements. estimate we have done looking at all of the various announcementsm estimate we have done looking at all of the various announcements. it is not realistic. regardless of what i have said, we have the afs, one of the most respected economic commentators out there —— ifs, using weather bars, colossal and it's ordinary, to describe the spending plans. they have also said our
7:37 am
labour cannot present, and it is the where they have used, that those can be funded solely by rich citizens or corporations. i think that it will affect everyone and that needs to hit home today. you seem to be suggesting that the labour party is promising too much, spending too high and that it can't be achieved. 0ne high and that it can't be achieved. one of the things people want the most is parties that deliver what they say they are going to do. you mentioned housing a moment ago, however on wants to own their own house, maybe on a more basic level they want a house to live in. the labour party plans are about building council houses. now, the conservatives have pledged in 2014 to build 200,000 starter homes. none have been built since then. people willjudge you by your record. our record is we have the highest number
7:38 am
of new homes delivered in 30 years. first—time buyers after falling 60% under the last and when i government are now at each 12 year high. you are now at each 12 year high. you are right to say that people want to know that the government will deliver what they say. the single biggest issue in this election is getting brexit sorted. we have a clear plan people can trust. if we are elected with a majority, we will get back to done in a matter of weeks... but what you said, it didn't happen. and i think that is the core issue at this election, yes we should focus on housing and climate change and everything else, but we can't do any of that if we don't get better done. people just us don't get better done. people just us to get it done in a matter of weeks with a deal already negotiated. the alternative is another year arguing about brexit, more referendums, there will be no focus on anything else. i think that is the clear choice at this election. now, we have seen the labour party pesto, when is yours out? i will be out soon and i can confirm it will be one the most
7:39 am
rigorously and detailed, costed ma nifest rigorously and detailed, costed manifest as we have seen in a long time and all of our plans will be there. it will have notjust a responsible approach to economic management, but it will also offer this clear choice: do you want brexit done in a matter of weeks so we can focus on priorities like the nhs, schools and policing, or do you wa nt to nhs, schools and policing, or do you want to spend the next year arguing more and more on referendums and no progress on your priorities? that is the choice our manifesto will offer the choice our manifesto will offer the people and i'm confident it will get a good hearing. thank you very much. thank you. so, we don't know the date as yet but we ask and they say soon. we will see. john, where are you going to whisk us do next in sport? england in good shape thanks to ben stokes. we saw it unfold in the world cup, well, he's doing it again. an impressive performance from him with
7:40 am
the bat. he top scored with 91, smashing 12 fours, here's one of them in all its glory. not all good news for england, after stokes fell to tim southee, a familiar batting collapse which followed. that will worryjoe root. england 353 all—out with a lead of 209. england should feel really, really happy. they have chipped away and worked well as a unit. i thinkjoe root handled his attack very well. england are definitely in the box seat here, they would chip away again tomorrow, new zealand have run from but they don't have a lot of batting. so i think england will fa ncy batting. so i think england will fancy their chances of leading substantially. they absolutely have the edge for now. that will count for a lot. from the special one to the humble 0ne — jose mourinho admitted he'd made mistakes when he faced the media for the first time as the new tottenham manager —
7:41 am
and he clearly hasn't lost his sense of humour. this morning i woke up in here, in the training ground. if your were trying to find a six—star hotel, you couldn't find it better than in here. great beds, huge pillows. imean... huge pillows, amazing. you sleep in the middle of five or six huge, soft pillows. very, very good. expensive duvet. expensive duvet! so, so good! as i used to say — in a funny way — i arrive, i wear the pyjama of the club and i even sleep with the pyjama. reporter: jose, four years ago when you were at chelsea, you were asked if you would ever come to spurs, and you said "never. i love the chelsea fans too much" what's changed? before, i was sacked. laughter let's be honest. you heard the laughterfrom the let's be honest. you heard the laughter from the press there. do we know the scale of the pillows? he
7:42 am
said they were very large. i imagine you put your face at in and lose yourself in it. it's hard to get a laugh out of him, i didn't imagine it would be a duvet and a pillow. great britain will take on germany in the quarterfinals of the davis cup later, after beating kazakhstan in madrid. with kyle edmund winning his singles rubber and dan evans then losing his, it came down to the doubles — where jamie murray and neal skupski won in straight sets. great great britain's bobsled team have finally been awarded the bronze medal is. the russian crews were disqualified for doping, the medals we re disqualified for doping, the medals were presented by princess and in london, but it was bittersweet. although we got our medals that we well deserved, a lot of things have been stolen from us. it was emotional that at the time we didn't get to have the metal and our families didn't get to enjoy that.
7:43 am
i'm so glad i got something to show them and something to say, you know what, we were good enough and we are that good and we did do it. what, we were good enough and we are that good and we did do itm that good and we did do it. it is nice to get them, but you feel like you miss out on that moment in the sun. they aren't the first. and yea rs sun. they aren't the first. and years afterwards, sun. they aren't the first. and yea rs afterwards, as sun. they aren't the first. and years afterwards, as i say, at that time they were robbed of the moment of enjoying it. and it's what you miss on afterwards as well through sponsorships and other arrangements and things like that. of course. but at long last they have got them. it's 7:43am. naga is in norwich, talking about what matters to the people there. and we have matt comyn who is out the peter mann craft church, right in the city centre. this is a mediaeval church, there are 31 of them in norwich. this one
7:44 am
took 25 years to construct and the stained—glass windows behind his stretch back to 1430, they are nearly 600 years old. it's nice and warm in the shelter, and it has been very chilly. temperatures just 3—6d, but over the next few days it is that you turn milder across the country. temperatures on the rise, but there is a payoff. some of you probably already realising that as you because the copen —— as you cast the curtains open. england and, lots of showers. persistent rain in northern england that will turn
7:45 am
lighter and touchier in the north—west will be brighter later on. across england and, many showers, the south coast can be thundery, more persistent in the south—western wales later. the south—east of scotland will turn damper as we go through the day. the north—west of scotland should be fine. a mild made to come tonight, but a risk of flooding in towards parts of south—west england and south wales as that heavy rain continues to persist. elsewhere, though, as we going to saturday you can expect some rain here and there just about anywhere throughout the day on saturday. persistent in wales in the south—west, that will ease off to the day and be heavy and persistent towards the north—east of england and south—east of scotland again. keep an eye on the state of the rivers as the ground is so saturated at the moment. there will be some sunshine on saturday afternoon, particularly north—west of scotla nd afternoon, particularly north—west of scotland and in the south—east of england. more of you will be dry as we going to sunday, and as a second attempt is close to normal at about 8-10-11 attempt is close to normal at about 8— 10— 11 degrees. you can see the church behind you, but in the tower isa church behind you, but in the tower is a centre for bell ringing as well, just to show you who's having ago well, just to show you who's having a go this morning. you couldn't persuade them? i could
7:46 am
not reach the ropes. he said that, not reach the ropes. he said that, not me. in the run—up to the general election, jayne mccubbin is taking the bbc breakfast coffee cart on her own campaign trail, finding out what people want over a cuppa. here's what she got up to when she visited norwich north. we have arrived in... carn horn we have arrived in... car horn norwich today, you can go and meet jayne at the bbc breakfast coffee cart, get all the things you are worried about, when it comes to the elction, off your chest. what is the most important thing to you? brexit. this city voted remain but it is surrounded by a sea of leave voters like rob. i am a political animal, me. are you a political animal? yes. you look like a political animal.
7:47 am
iam. tell me what your issue is? brexit. we have got to become an independent sovereign state again. tea or coffee? i'll have a tea. cuppa tea ? for carol it is all about immigration. i get very vexed over this because they come over, they have got to be treated if they are ill. who is paying for it? us taxpayers. i pay tax, he pays tax. this woman says she does too. she makes waffles, is studying to be a nurse and has lived here for 11 years. they think that we're coming to take over the country, or we just want the benefit, or soemthing like that. we work hard. for my family, we work very hard and do our best to contribute for the country as well. we take it, we give it back to the country. i have a little boy and he is british. do you want to say hello to your little boy? hi, tyler. kisses from mummy. i was going to photobomb your photo then!
7:48 am
don't ask me about brexit. i'm not going to ask you about brexit. quick coffee? brexit polarises but, for some here, like kathleen, it is a distraction. i am really tired of hearing about it. i wish we could talk about education, and just hospitals and child poverty and jobs for people who haven't gotjobs, instead ofjust talking about brexit all the time. there's 20 sleeps until the general election, 33 till christmas, a time that's meant to be about coming together. keep the faith. mo, for one, still believes, not just in santa, but in politicians. let them do what they've got to do. that's why it's always right, that's all what matters. i need to take a moment, are you telling me that you have faith in politicians? yeah, ido. wow! the first person to ever say that. and so we pack up and prepare
7:49 am
for the rest of the road trip. 0ptimism is out there, but it is just very, very hard to spot. getting out and about and we do want to be positive. i have some lovely people to talk about the nhs issue. some people accuse the parties of using the nhs as a political football, but we all have our own experiences and ideas of how it should work. with me now are three people who've had reason to call on the health service more than most: kyanna sutton, robert barker and sarah taylor. i would like to get an idea of your experiences. you were unwell, out of work for 12 years. how did the nhs help you? i had lupus and i was u nwell help you? i had lupus and i was unwell for eight years. i had to
7:50 am
leave the job i loved. unwell for eight years. i had to leave thejob i loved. i did not think i would get back at one point. i was on steroids and chemotherapy andi i was on steroids and chemotherapy and i had really good care all the way. my consultant was hugely supportive and worked with me as pa rt supportive and worked with me as part of a team. hard work on my part and her part and continuity and eventually i slowly got better and was able to return to work. to a job i loved. it was a very emotional day going back. i can only imagine. you suffer from asthma and you have been taken to hospital many times. what was your experience like?” taken to hospital many times. what was your experience like? i am thankful we have got the nhs. without i would not get by but i am thankful we have got it there but we see the strain it is under. the weights, when you are in a&e. last
7:51 am
week alone i had my first two i will wait in the back of an ambulance because there were no bays. i sat in the back with paramedics. they must be so frustrated as well because they want to treat you. they are obviously... you are there priority. they are all very honest and tell you about all the strains they are under. there was one paramedic last year who told me he had a sickly man in the back of the emblems for six hours before he could get him seen so it is quite scary to think that is happening. i -- you are a retired head teacher but your experience is largely to do with your daughter. and indeed my wife. can ijust say, what a pleasure it is to meet you in
7:52 am
person, i what a pleasure it is to meet you in person, lam what a pleasure it is to meet you in person, i am only guessing you are on the telly over porridge. my experiences have been wholly good. 0ur experiences have been wholly good. our daughter was born in 1970, 1971, with a whole in her heart. she suffered a succession of fits, seizures. she is to turn blue for a day and passout onto the sofa. the first time it happened i was actually played with and my wife was out shopping. i thought she was going to die. she would turn to blue, turned to pink and set up as if nothing had happened. by the time she was 18 months old it was obvious something was wrong and treatment was needed. she was rushed to the children's hospital in london. while
7:53 am
she was in the hospital, my wife and i lived in say the accommodation was provided as well as the care. she underwent the operation. at the time she survived. we think she was the youngest child to survive that operation. while we were in the hospital, we were surrounded by other parents like us who had sick children, living in there. we were very supportive of each other. often ona very supportive of each other. often on a daily basis, children die in a child would disappear and then the pa re nt child would disappear and then the parent would disappear and it was quite dramatic. eventually, she survived and she is now a big bully lass in her 405. coming to more re ce nt lass in her 405. coming to more recent times, in 2002, my wife was
7:54 am
diagnosed with cervical cancer. within six weeks she had undergone the operation and again thankfully successfully and she had a hysterectomy and she's out the bright and bonny lass she was. this has told us today there are so many positive stories from the nhs but they still need help. thank you so much. victoria is just a few miles down the road at one of the uk's biggest scientific research parks to find out what businesses here want from this election. good morning. it was here in this greenhouse, one identical to this, that they discovered last year how to grow wheat six times faster. why does that matter? if you have only one crop a year, that means you have one crop a year, that means you have one chance of making everything work and make some money. if you have six
7:55 am
chances, that is a very different and you can provide more food to the world. of course, at the heart of the uk economy are small businesses and one born in a function is yours. this is a lift share business. why did you decide to go into this business? i was a poor student in bristol and could not afford a train trip home so i set up a noticeboard and it help me loads of money. that was 20 years ago. how has the picture changed when it comes to transport? now it is the most emitting sector. the energy sector has reduced emissions by 60% and transport has done nothing and it is embarrassing. plenty of things we could do right now and sharing is a key solution. what do you want to see from politicians?”
7:56 am
key solution. what do you want to see from politicians? i want to stop pushing things off to the long grass. we have solutions that can help in the next five years. they should be investing to start getting public private sectors to solve these problems. sharon, walking, cycling, if we can get it done now we can start reduce emissions and improve air quality. we are killing 40,000 people due to a quality issues and we can solve it now. plenty of people who at the moment i getting into their cars, go to work, getting into their cars, go to work, getting kids off to school and transport is a big issue. you have a manufacturing business in the heart of the city. clearly brexit is for front. we explored 80% of our products so we do need a free market and we need to exported to europe and we need to exported to europe and further afield but there are other issues. i am a huge advocate
7:57 am
of supporting small businesses and we need the government to be business friendly. it is something that is becoming more pressing. we wa nt that is becoming more pressing. we want to grow and develop pushing forward and actually we do not want to be or have obstacles in our way. 60% of small businesses create huge employment in this country and we need to support them. we need a government that helps and supports and allows us to grow. quite a lot of issues going on, both big and small but this part of the country punches above its weight when it comes to agriculture, technology, manufacturing. now news, travel and whether where you are... good morning from bbc london. i'm victoria hollands. ten men found inside a lorry container on the m25
7:58 am
have been arrested on suspicion of immigration offences. the driver was also arrested when the vehicle was stopped near waltham abbey last night. essex police has not provided details of the men's ages or nationalities. muslim voters are being encouraged to register to vote as part of a national day of action. according to the electoral commission around 25% of black and asian voters in great britain are not registered. this latest campaign, organised by the muslim council of britain and migrants organise, hopes more people from diverse communities will register before the closing date next week. it is your civil right, you should be able to vote and you have to make sure your voices are being heard. amongst my friends, it is becoming a big thing, like, we definitely need to make sure you are registered. it is absolutely essential that, not only do we get registered, but we go out to the ballot box — that is where change happens. change does not happen in the armchairs or in the mosques. mixed martial arts was once considered a niche sport in this country, but now takes place at sell—out venues, like wembley arena.
7:59 am
and tomorrow night, south london's charlotte mcintyre will make her professional debut. she's one of a growing number of female fighters in the sport. have you encountered any sexism? you go anywhere, whether its work, and you'll hear a lot about inequalities with men and women. and almost, you go to the mma environment and, whether you are in ju—jitsu and you're both blue belts, you get on the mat, it does not mean just because you're a male, they're going to be better than you and i think that is actually really, rally healthy. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. apart on the tubes this morning. from the dlr which has pa rt apart from the dlr which has been part suspended. on the roads in peckham: queen's road at asylum road — there are temporary traffic lights for thames water works. edmonton: meridian way closed northbound from conduit lane for electricity work. purley: old lodge lane closed for emergency repairs now the weather, with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. a slightly different feel to things today.
8:00 am
the air is a little milder so it will not be quite as chilly. there's also some wet weather around in the form of showers but there will be some brighter spells too. now, it is a frost—free start to the morning. these showers are gradually drifting their way northwards. they'll tend to be a bit heavier out towards western counties. the further east you are, through the afternoon, the more likely you are to stay a bit dry. there will be some cloud but also some brightness at times. top temperatures this time between 8 and 10 degrees celsius so double figures and we've still got that a fairly brisk south—easterly wind blowing too. some clear spells for the first part of the night but then it will cloud over and we'll see some more wet weather into the first part of saturday morning. showery outbreaks of rain. a damp start to the day but temperatures milder, between six and eight degrees celsius. now, it is wet and it is windy to start the day on saturday but it will dry out into the afternoon, perhaps even a bit of brightness. it's feeling milder with highs of 11 degrees celsius. on sunday, dry for most of the daylight hours, with rain in the evening.
8:01 am
i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. good morning and welcome to breakfast, with naga munchetty in norwich and charlie stayt in sa lfo rd. our headlines today... a 27—year—old man has been found guilty of murdering the british backpacker grace millane by strangling her. grace was our sunshine, and she will be missed for ever. she did not deserve to be murdered in such a barbaric way. in other news, the conservatives want a hike on the stamp duty foreigners pay in england, while plaid cymru will launch their manifesto calling for a £20 billion "green jobs revolution". good morning. we're getting to the heart of the issues that matter to people here in norwich, during the election, including the health of the nhs. it's the stokes show
8:02 am
again for england. he hits 91, as they take a sizeable lead over new zealand on day two of the first test. and it has been pretty cold of late, at least we have had some dry weather, but as temperatures rise, the rain is back. i will have the details coming up from here in norwich. it's friday 22nd november. our top story... a 27—year—old man has been found guilty of the murder of the british backpacker grace millane, whose body was found in a suitcase in new zealand last year. earlier, her parents reacted to the verdict. grace was taken away from us in the most brutal fashion a year ago. and our lives and family have been ripped apart. this will be with us for the rest of our lives. grace was a beautiful, talented, loving daughter.
8:03 am
grace was our sunshine, and she will be missed forever. she did not deserve to be murdered in such a barbaric way on her oe year. finally, we must return home and try and pick up the pieces of our lives and day—to—day, without our beloved grace. thank you all. let's speak to our correspondent shaimaa khalil, who is outside the court in auckland. so, real raw emotion, as you can imagine, from the family, as they spoke immediately after the verdict? and there was real raw emotion inside that court room, in the most tense of moments, as the family held hands tightly and waited for that verdict. and as the jury members came in and read out the guilty
8:04 am
verdict of that 27—year—old man, grace's mother just verdict of that 27—year—old man, grace's motherjust took verdict of that 27—year—old man, grace's mother just took a verdict of that 27—year—old man, grace's motherjust took a deep breath and then released it and broke into tears, both the mother and the father, as this three—week trial came to a close. for those three weeks, the jury on the court heard what happened to grace that night. this is grace millane the night before her 22nd birthday, the last time she was seen alive. her father described her as "gregarious and outgoing". "what you saw," he said, "is what you got." today, a jury found this man guilty of her murder. for legal reasons, we still cannot reveal his identity. over the past three weeks, thejury heard how grace met the man through a dating app. cctv showed the pair out drinking, and at some point grace messaged a friend, saying she was having a good time. but within hours, she was strangled in his apartment. defence lawyers argued it was an accident, a consensual sex act gone wrong. but the jury simply
8:05 am
didn't believe it. this is the killer, telling police why he didn't call an ambulance to help grace. i dialled 111. erm... but i didn't hit the button. erm... because i... i was scared at how bad it looked. why do you think it looked bad? well, there's a...a dead person in my room. the jurors heard that after the murder, the killer searched online for how to dispose of a corpse. he also watched extreme pornography. they were shown hours of cctv of the man after the murder, including him going on a date with another woman while grace's body was still in his room. this is him later, moving the body in a suitcase. he then buried it in a shallow grave in bushland outside auckland. grace's murder shocked this nation.
8:06 am
at the time, the country's prime minister could not hide her emotions. on behalf of new zealand, i want to apologise to grace's family. your daughter should have been safe here and she wasn't and i'm sorry for that. a year ago, grace millane came to new zealand on a backpacking holiday. today's verdict may give some closure to the family of a young woman who'll never come home. and this is the end of a case that has really shocked this nation to its core. thejudge has really shocked this nation to its core. the judge said that this man is going to be sentenced on another date. his identity remains anonymous. at the end of the day, grace's mother and father held hands and they walked out of the court together, as you have heard, to go back home to the uk, without their
8:07 am
daughter. in other news.... both the brexit party and plaid cymru will unveil their policies for the general election this morning. our political correspondent jessica parker is in westminster and can give us a full roundup of what we can expect today. morning, jessica. yes, as you say, two manifesto launches, of sorts, although the brexit party are not calling it a ma nifesto, brexit party are not calling it a manifesto, they're brexit party are not calling it a manifesto, they‘ re calling brexit party are not calling it a manifesto, they're calling it a contract with the people. they say that people don't trust the word ma nifesto. that people don't trust the word manifesto. so, they will be launching this contract, and i think it will be probably the first time we have seen a broader policy outline from the brexit party. i don't think it will be a lengthy document, i'm told it is not going to be necessary some kind of comprehensive programme for government. remember, they are now only standing 275 candidates. what might be in it? welcome nigel farage has been dropping some hints, talking this morning about a £10,000
8:08 am
tax—free allowance for start—up businesses on their profits. he has talked before about scrapping hs2, abolishing the house of lords, and of course, the clue is in the name, the brexit party, they will want to deliver as they see it a clean break brexit, and whichever government comes into power, holding theirfeet to the fire. so, that will be launched today. also, plaid cymru launching their manifesto, the pro—welsh independence party. so saying we'll be talking about a greenjobs saying we'll be talking about a green jobs revolution, saying we'll be talking about a greenjobs revolution, £20 billion, which will be talked about today, railand which will be talked about today, rail and bus travel, three title schemes, a new offshore wind farm as well as electrifying all the main railway lines in wales by 2030. and on the crucial question of brexit, plaid cymru want to have a further referendum. and we have been touring the country before the election, asking you about the things that matter.
8:09 am
let's get more on the politics now from naga, who's exploring the issues that matter to people in norwich this morning. you can see the coffee cart, you may be familiar with that by now. and we've got two people, i think, in the driving seat. good morning to you! iam the driving seat. good morning to you! i am not in the driving seat, matt has taken over, he's making the noise. good morning, everyone. we are in this city of norwich. the locals call it the fine city. it has two cathedrals, loads of churches, apparently, a church for every week and a pub for of the year. shall we try them out? a little bit early! and also the highest concentration of mediaeval churches north of the alps. we're talking about lots of things today, lots of famous people around as well, stephen fry. olivia colman lives here. and lots of issues to talk about. i have been
8:10 am
talking to lots of people where we are in the centre of norwich, about the nhs, positive stories which are coming out, which is what we like to hear, but people who want to keep the nhs going and be able to treat new people as well. and we want to hear your stories as well get in touch so, lots of things to talk about today, we will be getting a flavour of how people are voting or thinking of voting, but for me and matt, we're going to enjoy a bit of coffee, we will see you later, charlie. one of the issues we are talking about specifically today is the nhs, any questions, do let us know this morning. let's go on to one of our main stories this morning. just yesterday, marie mccourt found out that her daughter helen's killer, ian simms, had been recommended for release.
8:11 am
he has never revealed where her body is. for the last four years, marie has been campaigning for the introduction of legislation that would deny killers parole if they refuse to disclose the location of their victims. we'll speak to marie in a moment, but first, here's abi smitton. it's been 31 years since helen mccourt disappeared on her way home from work near st helens. ian simms was arrested and convicted of her murder and was handed a life sentence in 1989. he's never revealed where helen's body is. her mum marie's been campaigning to deny parole for killers who don't reveal where their victims' remains are, but she ran out of time. helen's law was due to be introduced when parliament was dissolved for the general election. yesterday she was told ian simms is now eligible for release. the parole board said he demonstrated a lack of empathy by not revealing where helen's body is, but they believe he'll never disclose that information.
8:12 am
however, they say simms' behaviour has improved while in prison and that he now met the test for release. while it remains unclear when simms will be released, marie now has three weeks to launch an appeal against the ruling. marie is with me now. thank you forjoining us today. this decision by the parole board was precisely what you didn't want to hear, tell me about your reaction first? 0h, to hear, tell me about your reaction first? oh, i was to hear, tell me about your reaction first? oh, iwas absolutely to hear, tell me about your reaction first? oh, i was absolutely stunned, you know? i couldn't believe it, because the hearing we had was good, and for the first time in years, i felt that the parole board was listening to what we were saying, about this man, and so it came as a real big shock. i may have expected that they could have made it earlier, that he could have another pa role earlier, that he could have another parole hearing, maybe in 12 months,
8:13 am
because up until then, he had not had one for over three years, and then all of a sudden he's brought in and then he's getting released. when we look at what the parole board said, they said that there is no prospect of sims ever disclosing the whereabouts of his victim, even if he were kept in prison until he died. and that's something ijust can't understand. are they saying, in other words, we have had him in prison and he's not going to tell us, so there is no point in keeping us, so there is no point in keeping us inside, its only costing us money? and i think sometimes that is what it is coming down to, keeping him in prison. they kept ian brady and myra hindley in prison for life, and myra hindley in prison for life, and they had done exactly the same thing. they would not say where their victim is' remains were hidden. the parole board said the progress he had made in prison, the change in his behaviour, not being involved in any violence or
8:14 am
substance misuse, all of that, and they were satisfied he met the test for release. how can that meet a test? they are not allowed to have drugs in prison, they are not allowed to have alcohol, they have to behave. and if they can't behave when they're in prison, how on earth are they going to expect him, when he comes out with freedom again, and he comes out with freedom again, and he is going to go on a binge, he may wait 12 months, as he's very calculating... can i ask you about, in practice, the options open to you now? there is a three—week period which you can appeal? well, i would like to appeal on the grounds of what the parole board has said that they feel he should be released, because, to me, to say that he shows no empathy, but they know that he is guilty, and they don't believe that he will ever tell me where helen's body is, so, why don't they say to him, unless you say where your
8:15 am
victim's remains are, you will never come out of prison? that is punishment. and what that means two otherfamilies punishment. and what that means two other families who are in the same situation as me is that they can then ponder on that and think, well, i'm either going to have to say where their loved one's body is hidden, or i am going to stay in prison all my life. so, you are going to appeal? i definitely am seeking help for an appeal. of course, on top of the obvious emotional trauma this is causing you, you have the added frustration that you are very close, in terms of legislation, to getting helens passed. it is effectively because of the general election, and the pores, but it has gone past the early stages, and this is the law which says that somebody can be kept in prison relating to whether or not they have disclosed the information. that is on hold, effectively, but
8:16 am
you have made a lot of progress?” have made a lot of progress, twice, in the last four years, and each time, when it should have gone through to the second hearing, where it is then passed and treated as a law, theresa may called an election, and once they call an election, everything falls. if it hasn't got to second base, it falls. and this is what has happened again. and i just think that they don't think about the families who are suffering terribly, 0k, about the families who are suffering terribly, ok, it's an election, but they should still carry on. helen's law was given out in the queen's speech and david gauke, he told me on 15th may, helen's law is going ahead, because it is an all—encompassing thing of parliament. everyone was agreed, helens is necessary. and so, why
8:17 am
couldn't helens still continue? i was told on 15th may by the judges, who do, who write the law out, i was introduced to them in david gauke's office, and david gauke ask them, how long will it take for helen's law to be on the statute book? and they said, this isn't a difficult one, it should be quite easy. and so, he said, so, are we calling it 2-3 so, he said, so, are we calling it 2—3 months? and the lady who spoke said, yes, possibly sooner. so, i worked that out that come the end of august, maybe, when they're back, because of the summer recess, i thought, well, it will be done then, but of course they prorogued parliament when they came back. we've spoken to you a number of
8:18 am
times on bbc breakfast and you've a very bravely and openly spoken about things which are very, very personal, i can only imagine how you must feel now, thinking that maybe something was going to happen, and now it's not, and getting that news yesterday, what kind of a toll is it taking on you? a dreadful toll, you know. half of my adult life has been fighting, not to keep this man in prison, just for him to tell me where her body was. i wrote to him three years after his committal for her murder, and i wrote a letter to him, it wasn't a nasty letter at all, because people who read it, like the police and that before i send it on, they all said, marie, you haven't put in there that you can't forgive him, why don't you put that in that you can't forgive him
8:19 am
until he tells you where she is? for some reason i said, i don't want to put anything like that in, he may go off on put anything like that in, he may go offona put anything like that in, he may go off on a tangent saying, how dare i say i forgive him? ijust want him to read this letter, as a mother who is desperate to bury her murdered child, and i will then, if he tells me, he will not hear anything from me, he will not hear anything from me ever again. really appreciate you coming in here, and i know how difficult this is every time but it is also hugely important that you keep the message out, which is why you choose to speak to us. yes, and it's so important, if helen's case is the first one, which it isn't really the first one, but now, we have other families, another family will be coming forward to the parole board in the early months of next year, and, are they going to get the same treatment as me, you know?
8:20 am
these killers who hide the bodies do not want to let go, that is the only hold they've got over the law and over the victims' families, and that's why it's so wrong, ian hindley did it and myra hindley. and they both died in prison, and that's what should happen with these killers. thank you very much. time now to get the weather with matt, who's at norwich market. people care about the weather, almost above anything else, what is the picture? yes, it has been the topic of the autumn so far, we are now heading for our wettest autumn on record across many areas. just
8:21 am
behind me, we have the council buildings, overlooking the city centre, the guildhall, and in the distance, we also have norwich castle. and this is all behind us, the wonderful setting of the market here. it has been in place for 900 yea rs here. it has been in place for 900 years and it is one of the largest outdoor markets in the uk. a little bit of shelter from the rain, because there is some more rain around. yesterday we were talking about the cold, 3—6dc at best, but things are going to get milder over the next few days, however, it does come with some rain. low pressure to the rest of us will be bringing the milder winds from a southerly direction. you can see the warmer, yellow colours pushing northwards. limiting the blue to the far north of scotla nd limiting the blue to the far north of scotland today, the colder air. just about anywhere could see outbreaks of rain this morning.
8:22 am
heavy showers towards the south at the moment, with sunshine in between. the north—west of scotland should stay dry throughout today. it will be quite breezy, temperatures are on yesterday, getting close to where we should be for the time of year. we finish the day, wales and the south—west of england getting more persistent rain, which is a bit ofa more persistent rain, which is a bit of a concern, with saturated ground at the moment, we could see 24 hours or so of at the moment, we could see 24 hours orso of rain, at the moment, we could see 24 hours or so of rain, which could bring a risk of flooding for tomorrow. it should be frost free as we go into saturday morning, a reasonably mild to start to the day. saturday is likely to be the wetter day of the weekend for many of you. the rain will be persistent towards that south—west corner. it will then move up south—west corner. it will then move up towards south—east scotland. other parts of england and wales will brighten up, north—west scotla nd will brighten up, north—west scotland should see some sunshine, breezy across the north. another
8:23 am
reasonably mild today compared to what we have had of late. 0n reasonably mild today compared to what we have had of late. on sunday it looks like we willjust see some rain in the far north of scotland, one ought to isolated showers elsewhere, it should be a drier day for most with a bit of sunshine at times, but later on, more rain returning to the south—west and western wales later in the day. going into next week, we're going to be back into that changeable story of some dry days and some wet days and of course temperatures holding up and of course temperatures holding up around where they should be for the time of the year, winds generally coming from a southerly direction. so, things are set to turn milder. last night, in fact, for the first time since third november, nowhere in the uk dropped below freezing. looking ahead towards the winter forecast, and it looks like we will continue with a mild and changeable theme to take us through december, but moving into the second half of the winter,
8:24 am
things are set to turn a bit colder. but for today, many will need their waterproofs yet again. two metal detectorists have been found guilty of stealing and concealing a £3 million viking hoard that experts say has the potential to "rewrite history". george powell and layton davies didn't declare their thousand—year—old find back in 2015, and instead sold it to dealers. our correspondent robert hall has more. the treasure stolen by a viking invader. gold, silver and coins — a missing link in the birth of a nation. what we have is coins minted in two neighbouring kingdoms — wessex, which was basically everything south of the thames, and mercia, which extends from the thames up to the humber. this hoard dates from the very moment that england, as a single
8:25 am
kingdom, is taking shape, so you could argue this is england's first hoard. we don't know why the viking loot was buried here in herefordshire, but it lay undiscovered but it lay undiscovered for 1,000 years, until it was stolen again. a treasure trove unearthed piece by piece and captured on the finder‘s mobile phone. layton davies and george powell, metal detectorists for years, now had a decision to make. if you find treasure, you need to declare it within 14 days of knowing it's treasure. they didn't. they then eventually declared some of it, being the gold, which was something that you couldn't sell to anybody because it's so unique. the coins were another matter, and the thieves found just the man to sell them — detectorist simon wicks. wicks took samples to a london dealer and passed on the news that they were looking at a value of well over £3 million. by the time the trio enlisted paul wells,
8:26 am
another local dealer, police were already on their trail. but it wasn't easy. it's an unregulated body, the coin dealerships in the united kingdom, and that proved a big problem for us. there is no regulation, there is no records. one crucial piece of evidence turned up at paul wells' home — coins from the hoard sewn into the case for a magnifying glass. this is a fraction of what the thieves found. the trail‘s gone cold and so far they've done nothing to aid the search for the treasure. the feeling of finding something like that would be amazing and the first thing that most metal detectorists will do is share that, as in, would want to share that with the museum or want to share that with their friends. the fact that these two guys haven't done that undermines all of the good work of all those people who do the right thing. the men, who will return to court today, could hold the key to a mystery yet to be solved. robert hall, bbc news, herefordshire.
8:27 am
we'll be back with more from naga in norwhich in a few minutes — after the news, travel and weather where you are. a rather chilly three days with a rather brisk south—westerly wind yesterday, but over the next few days it will turn mild, temperatures coming into double figures for many, but rain is in the forecast. certainly through this morning we have quite a bit of rain, but some cloud on the satellite imagery across the uk, the weather system moving on towards the bay of biscay will bring more wet weather as we go into saturday. for today, will bring more wet weather as we go into saturday. fortoday, heavy showers across southern areas before persistent rain moves in to
8:28 am
south—west england, wales, the midlands. rain edging further and across scotland at the east of northern ireland later this afternoon. a few bright skies in scotla nd afternoon. a few bright skies in scotland and northern england later, temperatures will get to about eight or10 temperatures will get to about eight or 10 celsius. the rain will continue to spread north and west into west wales and northern ireland tonight, further rain moving in across england and wales during the early hours of the morning. temperatures staying way above freezing, round about six to 8 degrees. throughout saturday it will be quite a wet day, particularly for england and wales. the rain is particularly heavy in the south—west of england and will edge further north into scotland and northern ireland. some brighter skies towards the south—east of england, temperatures will be getting up to around ten or 11 degrees. across the board, temperatures getting into double figures, quite a mild day. on saturday night, the first weather system pushes north, then we get a bit of a gap before the next area of
8:29 am
low pressure moves in, which will mainly move in across south—western areas of england. there could still be some rain in the north—east in the morning, that will generally clear. for most of us, for most of the day on sunday, it will be dry and there will be bright skies before the rain moves into the south—west. maximum temperatures on sunday of about nine to 11 degrees.
8:30 am
this is worklife from bbc news, with maryam moshiri and samantha simmonds. twitter cracks down on political advertising, as the tech sector rushes to announce measures to help safeguard democracy. the big question is, will it work? live from london, that's our top story on friday 22nd of november. twitter says it's banning political ads because they could be a source of misinformation. but facebook refuses to follow suit, saying the clamp—down threatens freedom of expression. also in the programme: guilty of conspiring with the cryptoqueen.

28 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on