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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 24, 2019 6:00am-9:00am GMT

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and sally nugent. our headlines today: a pledge not to increase taxes from the conservatives, as boris johnson prepares to launch his party's manifesto. labour promises to compensate millions of women who lost out because of changes to pensions. police officers are attacked and injured as they tackle a brawl at a cinema in birmingham involving around 100 people — some armed with machetes. he's back and making his presence felt — asjose mourinho wins his first match as tottenham's new manager with victory over west ham in the london derby. good morning. it's a dry day for most of us today, but there's a lot
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of those around, yes, cloudy —looking skies and at times thick enough for the odd spot or two of drizzle. all the details coming up a little later. good morning. it's sunday the 24th of november. our top story: the conservatives will pledge not to raise the rate of income tax, national insurance or vat when they publish their election manifesto this afternoon. borisjohnson has also said he wants to bring his brexit deal back to the commons before christmas, if the conservatives are returned to power. our political correspondent, nick earley reports. what would he do with power? this afternoon boris johnson what would he do with power? this afternoon borisjohnson will what would he do with power? this afternoon boris johnson will unveil the conservative manifesto. his basic message, deliver brexit and move basic message, deliver brexit and m ove o nto basic message, deliver brexit and move onto domestic priorities. he will pledge that the bill that will deliver brexit will be brought back to parliament before christmas if he wins the election. that, he says, would allow the country to move on. so what will the conservatives do on
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the home front? they will pledge today not to raise rates of income tax, national insurance, orvat. that'll make it harder for the government to raise money, but the tories are still pledging to spend. mrjohnson has already promised money for the health service, formal police, for education. today there will be costly pension of family projects, too, like keeping the pension trip a lot and winter fuel payments. as well as more money for childcare, to fix potholes, and skills fund. the manifesto will pledge to and car parking charges at hospitals or protected groups. nhs staff on natives, disabled patients, the terminally ill and their families. the conservative say their plans are fully costed and affordable and they will spend the next three weeks trying to force the —— persuade you that got the best plan on offer. nick earley, bbc news. our political correspondent, tom barton, joins us now. good morning to you. lots of pledges
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from the conservative party, we wait for the official publication of the ma nifesto for the official publication of the manifesto later. is this a bit of a vote winning idea? it is obviously what they are hoping. absolutely. the most eye—catching promise and the one they hope to get people's attention is this thing they are calling the triple lock on taxes, promising not to raise national insurance, income tax, orvat promising not to raise national insurance, income tax, or vat if they win the election. now there should, at least, have been one surprise in this announcement this morning, we think, and that was the promise to raise the national insurance threshold to £9,500 next year, eventually increasing it to £12,500, except that boris johnson pleaded that out, as far as we can tell, at a campaign event a few days ago. we did know that the conservatives were planning on loosening the purse strings at this ma nifesto, loosening the purse strings at this manifesto, and as you saw in nick's report there are lots of promises
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for extra spending. what we don't have yet, but should get at the ma nifesto wa nt have yet, but should get at the manifesto want in the west midlands afternoon is details of how they plan to pay for those promises. the tory say this manifesto is fully costed. we will find outjust what those costs are this afternoon. talking about the labour party, a pledge today from them to compensate women who lost out because of pension changes, women specifically born in the 19505. pension changes, women specifically born in the 1950s. this is a group of women known as the waspy women. this dates back to 2010 when changes of the state pension age were changed. they were told that they would have to work for several years longer before they got there pension. campaign groups say that women born in the 19505 didn't have enough time to prepare for that change and suffered financial hardship while they were waiting for the state pension to kick in. labour i5 palmer's —— promising compensation for what it calls an
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historical debt of honour. it is raising up to £31,000 for the worst affected. they say this will cost £58 billion, a 1—off payment, and it should be met by the state in just the same way as if it lost a court ca5e. the same way as if it lost a court case. thank you very much. police have been deployed to polling stations in hong kong, where people are voting in a local election. it's the first such vote since pro—democracy demonstrations began five months ago. let's speak to our correspondent, jonathan head, whojoins u5 from hong kong now. what can you tell us about what's happening now? well, if you look behind me that polling stations, and it is one of many acro55 behind me that polling stations, and it is one of many across the whole of the territory, is now empty because everyone showed up very early this morning. there was a tremendous turnout, very impressive here in this district and many others as people were very anxious to cast votes in what after all are e55entially local elections were
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relatively powerle55 councils but everybody taking part 5ee5 relatively powerle55 councils but everybody taking part sees this as a vote, 5hall support or opposition for the government and how it has handled the protest. they will be looking very closely at the results of these local elections to see whether the opposition, who have never controlled the5e district council5, they have always been dominated by pro—government group5, whether there is a massive public swing away from the government was the opposition who are supporting the opposition who are supporting the goals of the protest movement. that they say will be an important 5ymbolic victory. it was interesting how seriously people to decide this morning. it is very important to them. clearly people want to use this vote is a way of telling people not what they think about local council5, but what they think about how they are handling this crisis in hong kong. jonathan, thank you. jonathan head in hong kong this morning. a number of police officers have been assaulted while trying to break up a large brawl at a cinema in birmingham. fight5 broke out as police attempted to clear around 100 people from the star city leisure complex. some people were reportedly armed with machetes. simonjones reports.
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it's not what these cinema—goers we re it's not what these cinema—goers were expecting to see, chao5 it's not what these cinema—goers were expecting to see, chaos and confusion at the star city complex in birmingham a5 confusion at the star city complex in birmingham as police tried to restore order. 0fficers in birmingham as police tried to restore order. officers were called following reports that a group of people armed with machete5 had arrived at the cinema stop fights broke out as the police tried to move around 100 people. a number of officers were wounded, though the injurie5 officers were wounded, though the injuries are not thought to be 5eriou5. injuries are not thought to be serious. one girl punched this girl in the face, 5tarted slapping her. the audience watching wa5 in the face, 5tarted slapping her. the audience watching was getting involved. the next thing you know the police rushed in with their baton ‘s, telling everyone to get out and stay away. so there were kid5 crying on the floor with their mums, kid5 crying on the floor with their mum5, because obviously the frozen film was out. and it was just really sad to see. another eyewitness described it as one of the scariest moments of her life. several people have been arrested for assaulting officers and failing to dispose.
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a former head of the uk border force has told bbc breakfast that unle55 ports and ferry companies start to work with the authorities, he fears more migrants could be killed trying to get to the uk. tony smith's warning comes a month after 39 people were found dead in a container in essex, after entering britain illegally. jane—frances kelly reports. it's a month and since the discovery of 39 bodies in a sealed refrigerator container in essex stop all those that died were vietnamese. they had sailed from the belgian port of zeebrugge on a cargo ferry hoping for a better life in britain. the former head of the uk border force as there needs to be more cooperation between the authorities and private firms such as holy and the very companies, to stop further death. a co-ordinated attempt between our5elve5, death. a co-ordinated attempt between ourselves, the uk border force, and of course our colleagues
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in france, belgium, dutch customs. that is what is required, a collaborative, co—ordinated effort along all of those root5, collaborative, co—ordinated effort along all of those roots, which will require a good deal of investment, but a fee if we don't do it then, i'm afraid, we will see more tragedies. his warning comes after three separate incidents in less than a week when migrants were found in containers stop on thursday afternoon, iri5h police found 16 people in a sealed container on a ferry from france to ahlin. ten were found on the m25 in essex. five days ago a found on the m25 in essex. five days agoa group found on the m25 in essex. five days ago a group of 25 migrants were found ina ago a group of 25 migrants were found in a refrigerator container on a ferry travelling from the netherlands to england. the challenges remain con5ta nt. netherlands to england. the challenges remain constant. 0n netherlands to england. the challenges remain constant. on a daily basis migrants attempt to get in the back of lorrie5, drivers have to remain vigilant. people 5muggler5 seem to remain vigilant. people 5muggler5 seem to be the only ones benefiting from the misery. jane—frances kelly, bbc news. doctor5 say people need to take extra precautions, in order to stop the spread of the winter vomiting bug, noroviru5. public health england says there's been a big increase in the number of reported cases, compared to the last five winter sea5on5. this week, pupils in around 60 schools across the north east
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of england were sent home with symptoms. two people are missing in southern france, where heavy rain has caused serious flooding. several roads and railway lines have been cut off and flights from nice airport have been disrupted. tho5e those are the main stories this morning. 7:10. you're up—to—date. it's time now for a look at the newspapers. let's look at the front pages. the sunday telegraph lead5 on bori5johnson‘5 pledge to cut hospital car parking fees for millions of people as he launches the conservative manifesto. the paper also has a photo of him on the campaign trail with his father stanley. labour leaderjeremy corbyn‘s pledge to pay out £57 billion to women who lost out because of pension changes dominates the front page of the sunday mirror. the sunday times has the latest on the prince andrew scandal — the sunday times has the latest on the prince andrew scandal — with reports that the queen has cancelled his 60th birthday party.
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not a picture of him. that is not his photo. it also features a photo of prince charles receiving a traditional welcome during his six—day tour of new zealand. and the most read story on the bbc news website is about the brawl at a cinema complex in birmingham, where police moved in to tackle a fight involving people armed with machetes. much more on the papers throughout the morning on bbc breakfast. while it may not be an election headline—grabber, like brexit or the nhs, the issue of childcare remains hugely important to millions of families. breakfast‘sjohn maguire has been talking to parents and care providers about their concerns and what they'd like to see done to help. have you had a nice day? that is a nice cuddle! it was maycomb time for libby. a5 for all parents returning for work, forje55, finding the
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nursery for work, forje55, finding the nur5ery place for work, forje55, finding the nursery place was for work, forje55, finding the nur5ery place was the first hurdle. it is quite difficult to get into nursery. it is quite difficult to get into nur5ery. so we put it is quite difficult to get into nursery. so we put a down it is quite difficult to get into nur5ery. so we put a down there on the waiting list when she was about a month old. soju5t to make sure the waiting list when she was about a month old. so just to make sure we got a place. so we looked at a couple of nur5erie5 around the area, so couple of nur5erie5 around the area, so obviously it's been convenient was obviously quite critical. what we really like phrase in eastern when we looked around. there were a couple of things about it. itju5t seemed quite relaxed, the children seemed quite relaxed, the children seemed happy. unlike the fact it is in the community centre. downstairs and helen is picking up her son leo. 0nce and helen is picking up her son leo. once a place has been secured the next challenge is paying for it. we are ina next challenge is paying for it. we are in a fortunate po5ition, next challenge is paying for it. we are in a fortunate position, we have got two professionals in our household, which between mortgage co5ts household, which between mortgage costs a nd household, which between mortgage costs and childcare costs, we find that there is not a lot of access at the end of the month. so a thing for people with a lower income it is hugely challenging and they know a lot of people in that category who have, unfortunately, not have the choice of the luxury of being able to go back to workju5t because of the cost of childcare. this is the
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race in bristol nur5ery, it is run a5 race in bristol nur5ery, it is run asa race in bristol nur5ery, it is run a5 a social enterprise with profits going back into the community centre where it's housed. it provides up to 63 places, employ5 almost 30 staff, and was set up to meet 5trong 63 places, employ5 almost 30 staff, and was set up to meet strong local demand. we know that it's a growing demographic of working families. people are making a choice to buy into all the social elements that we are able to bring. so notjust a nursery, are able to bring. so notjust a nur5ery, but they know what they will get high quality staff, they will get high quality staff, they will have well—paid staff, the low turnover of staff, and it's a co nsi5te nt turnover of staff, and it's a con5i5tent place that's going to 5tay con5i5tent place that's going to stay open. that's a very important factor for stay open. that's a very important factorfor a stay open. that's a very important factor for a lot of families as well. availability and affordability are the two key fact is stop research by the family charity quorum put5 research by the family charity quorum puts the average cost of a nursery quorum puts the average cost of a nur5ery place for an under two at £127 per week, more than £6,600 per year. and it's rising above the rate of inflation. we want all parents to have choices about how they balance
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working and caring. your parents will always know what is best for them in their family, will always know what is best for them in theirfamily, but will always know what is best for them in their family, but what's tragic for us as a society is if pa re nts a re tragic for us as a society is if pa rents are really want to tragic for us as a society is if parents are really want to work, who have the skills and talents to work, locked out of the workforce by unaffordable or unavailable childcare. it's also worth saying that we know from hughes, many years of research now, that childcare i5 good for children. children who attend a high—quality nur5ery go on to do better in the gcse‘s. so this i5a to do better in the gcse‘s. so this is a good investment for all of us. the nur5ery in east christ church in bristol has been a part of the local community here for 43 years —— beneath. a5 community here for 43 years —— beneath. as the children play in the garden, if the staff had a magic which, it would be to simplify childcare payment. i think he funding is to be increased. they think it's a very low amount. as i said, for us is a charity is not an issue, but for other places that have got high cost, high staff costs, that dan is a real thing. so
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why think if you are going to be giving more hours, you need to be giving more hours, you need to be giving more hours, you need to be giving more money per hour. and that's a real problem for lots of people. childcare may not be the main headline grabber of this particular general election, but it remains an important issue for pa rents, remains an important issue for parents, for communities, and for the politicians seeking to represent them — now and in the future. john maguire, bbc news, bristol. amazing how much fun you can have with a colander. we have louise with us this morning. what is it looking like today?‘ we have louise with us this morning. what is it looking like today? a lot of places looking a little bit like this at the moment. lots of laying water and pretty grey looking skies. they can offer you something a little drier for today but there is a lot of rain in the forecast. please don't ship the messenger. for most of us this sunday dry almost but rather grey, murky looking skies, really. there has been some
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overnight rain is well into the far north—east of scotland. but we have this brief ridge of high pressure keeping things relatively quiet before the next low ways and living today. 0vernight we have seen some rain in scotland, particularly as you can see across northern eastern areas. elsewhere we have got a little bit of health fog around and some dense fog, perhaps, across parts of east anglia. generally speaking it is a quiet day for many. now that cloud can offer the odd spot or two of drizzle. but hopefully conditions will brighten a little into the afternoon and it is a lot milder than it was earlier on in the week. so not bad in terms of the feel of things. 9— 12 degrees for many. 0ne the feel of things. 9— 12 degrees for many. one or two isolated showers but generally speaking quite a story. as we go through the evening and overnight we are going see that low pressure. some of it heavy across south—west england, wales, and into northern ireland. we keep the cloud. that will act like a blanket. so a pretty mild night, frost free right across the country. 6- 10 frost free right across the country. 6— 10 degrees for the overnight
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lows. that rain will continue to bring some wet weather for the start of the new working week. on monday it looks likely that we will continue to see some rain pushing its way in from the south—west, steadily moving its way north and east. the best of any drier weather for monday looks likely to be the far north of scotland and the northern isles. an even was that rain moves through we could see some sharp, possibly thundery showers developing into the far south—west. it stays mild. 9— 13 celsius. 20 of double—digit honours temperatures there. but as we move from monday to tuesday another area of low pressure. this is the remnants of a storm that was called sebastian. it is going to pep up the rain, potentially, on tuesday. there is still a level of uncertainty as to the timings of this rain. it looks likely to sweep its way in across from the south—west yet again bringing thundery showers with it following on behind. a windy day,
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but again still on the mild side. if you are sick to death of the rain, i'm afraid you'll probably have to wait until this time next week when we start to see something just that little bit drier and quieter stop but it comes at a price. it gets colder again. but either one would prefer this. back to you too. exactly. completely agree with you. lovely to talk to you, louise. cold and dry is better than muggy and wet. totally agree. we'll be back with a summary of the news at 6:30. now it's time for the film review with jane hill and mark kermode. hello and a very warm welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's releases, as ever, mark kermode. hello, mark. hello. something for everyone this week. we have harriet, which is a true story of bravery. we have frozen 2. let it go, again. and 21 bridges, a ‘705—inflected crime thriller.
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well, let it go has of course been an earworm all day... of course, of course. ..but let's start with harriet, which i'm really hoping you are going to tell me is really good. it is really good. good! so this is a film about a former slave turned abolitionist harriet tubman. cynthia erivo is the woman who escapes slavery, makes her own way to philadelphia where she meets up with the underground railroad, who cannot believe that she has made this journey pretty much under her own steam. here's a clip. so where are the others? weren't no others. you know, you can trust me. i'm a friend. who — who'd you make the journey with? i left my husband and family. it wasjust me and the lord. well, i don't know if you know how extraordinary this is but by some miraculous means, you have made it 100 miles to freedom, all by yourself. would you like to pick a new name? to mark your freedom?
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most ex—slaves do — any name you want. they called my mama rip. but her name harriet. i want my mama name and my husband. harriet tubman. wow. you really have to remember that cynthia erivo is british as well. remarkable. it is a really brilliant performance. the tag line is be free or die. there is talk about it doing a harriet tubman biopic for quite a long time — i think 20 years ago is when they started talking about it — and no... i mean, it is a really inspirational story. she is terrific in the title role. it is very well — kasi lemmons and the co—writer gregory allen howard do a really good job of taking a quite complex historical story and compressing it into something which works as a really sort of adventurous, engrossing narrative on screen. 0n the one hand, you have the grit of the story, the horror
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of the story. in the way the film is shot, you get — i don't know if you remember this, but with 12 years a slave, there was always that thing about the beauty of the landscape against the horror of what was happening. yes, yeah! you get some of that here. you also get this kind of slightly mystical element. she's had an injury to her head which causes fainting, but she seems to have almost like a hotline to the almighty, and it plays with that really, really well. but the most impressive thing about it is that it manages to tell a historical story in a way that is really dramatic, really engrossing that assumes you wouldn't know anything about this story beforehand and does so in a way that i think a mainstream audience could completely embrace and i think it's, you know, it's think it's a really, really well—made film and a really engrossing story and great to see this story told on the big screen. yeah. rally looking forward to that. frozen 2. i mean, i cannot stop singing it all the time, but, yes... ok, so this picks up, you know, some — a few years after the first film. elsa hears a straight sound
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calling out of the north, calling her to the forest. now there is a new quest, a new problem to be solved. josh gad is 0laf who is grown up and is now dealing with some of the problems of maturity. we have all the stuff that you would expect — we have spectacular visuals, water, ice, you know, heroines, action, drama. we have some absolutely belting songs. we have idina menzel belting out into the unknown which is kinda of up there to some extent with let it go. there's a lovely song by 0laf about when i'm older, everything will make sense, but it doesn't make sense now. i have no doubt that this is going to be a runaway smash and i have no doubt that it is going to find a very, very sympathetic audience because we know these characters, we love these characters, we have so much invested in it — and you can hear a big but coming. laughs. the thing is, from my point of view, you remember when toy story 2 came out and it was "wow! it's actually better than toy story!" yes! and you remember when godfather 2 came out and it's like "wow! "it's actually better than godfather!" well, frozen 2 is...
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it's fine. it's fine, yeah. but the thing is when i saw the first one, i just thought "this is so magical" and i didn't — you know, i had no expectation about it. it was so magical and so thrilling and so wonderful. i have no doubt that this is going to, you know, score a home run with its audiences but what it does not do — and i know it's asking a lot, what it doesn't do is take it to the next level. what it does is it feels like "0k, this is really successful. you'd like to spend time with these characters again and we'd like to repeat that box office bonanza and so, here's frozen." so it's fine. but that's. .. they're not going to put that on the poster, are they? "it's fine." it's fine. but then again, what do they care what a 57—year—old bloke thinks? i mean, as i say, i'm sure with its target audience, it will... ijust want it — i wanted it to be the godfather 2. we so don't have time for that thought! i know. sorry. 21 bridges. so chadwick boseman as a new york cop with a reputation for shooting bad guys. sienna miller is a narcotics cop. they meet up in the wake of a crime which has gone wrong and a number of policemen have been shot.
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they decide that they are going to shut down manhattan by closing the 21 bridges and then they have to pursue what they think are two suspects, including a quite breathtaking chase sequence. here's a clip. police, stop! don't shoot! it's tense! yeah, so what do you immediately think of when you see that? you immediately think of french connection.
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popeye doyle chasing charnier on and off the train, 0k? and the film is obviously referring back to those ‘705 thrillers. it doesn't have the grit or the depth of, you know, serpico or french connection. what it does have is a kind of very cliched, hard—boiled dialogue. it has an absolute nuts and bolts plot. you know, at the beginning, we've got something to do, we've got a limited amount of time to do it, the bridges can only be closed until five o'clock in the morning, we've got to catch these two people. and so, it's kind of set up almost like you think of something like the warriors. you know, very, very simple set—up — you've got to do this and you've got to do it in a limited period of time. what i liked about it is that, for me, it was an a—list b—movie. remember we talked about black and blue before? mmm — yes, yes. i said it's the same thing. you know, it's something which is a nuts and bolts idea but it's elevated because it's got every good performances. the dialogue in this is so ripe, you can actually smell it, but it's fine because you think "0k, it's a b—movie, but itjust happens to being played by very fine performers and it's directed with an efficiency and an enthusiasm for the genre."
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and i like a ‘705—inflected crime thriller, i'm not making any claim for it being great, but i really enjoyed it as a good nuts and bolts popcorn thriller. there is a twist in it that you see coming a mile away. chuckles. but that's absolutely fine because it knows what it is and it does what it is efficiently. it does not have any great depth but then, frankly, it doesn't need it. but it's honest. it's honest! honest! exactly, it's an honest thriller. and best 0ut this week is a re—release? it is. so the bfi's got this musical season and so they have put ken russell's tommy back into cinemas. now, i — i love ken russell. i think ken russell is the great, you know, british post—war film—making talent. you know, powell and pressburger and then onto ken russell — that's the lineage. and tommy is extraordinary. it is based on the who's rock opera but it's completely reinvented
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by russell because russell was interested in films about false messiahs in, you know, twisted religions. it's got brilliant songs, as we know... yes, yes. ..from the who. it's got a a range of completely crazy performances, including famously elton john as the pinball wizard up on those massive boots and i'm — you haven't seen it, have you? laughs. you need to — no, but this is brilliant. it's an embarrassing admission! no, no — it's not! because when tommy came out in cinemas, ok, the only place you could see it with a proper sound mix was in leicester square, when it played... and i was five! yes, exactly. but everyone else who saw it in the cinema saw it with a bad sound mix. now, it's back in the cinema so you can enjoy for the first time the way that ken russell wanted you to experience it. this is a thrilling treat and i think you should embrace that moment. i will, i will! that's the joy of a re—release. it is. that's the joy. and a quick thought about dvd this week? look, i did this with you in mind, 0k? annabelle comes home. i see this! i don't — i don't think it's by any means — but here's what it is. firstly, of all of the annabelle movies, it's the one that i like the most. and i've chosen it for you because it's a horror movie
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but it's actually not very scary. it's actually... 0k... it's got nice characters that we can empathise with and we can enjoy and it's like a — it's like roller—coaster fu nfair ride. so thrilling, but not — it's not disturbing. it'sjust — it has got a... 0k. it's like a — it's like a — it's like a way in. you haven't heard how much i swear on a roller—coaster! it's not pretty! i am going to get you to like horror movies. it's a — i'm — this is gonna happen. this is a very good way in. annabelle comes home. it's fine, just a little bit but nothing deeply disturbing. 0k. scary enough to count as a horror genre, however... yes. 0k. but not scary enough to disturb you or give you a sleepless night. 0k. well, it is certainly a week with something for everyone. something for everyone. exactly as you say. i'm afraid harriet is top of my list but it won't surprise you to hear that. yeah, it's great. and you will really — you will really like it. it's really worth seeing. thank you very much. see you next time.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and sally nugent. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. the conservatives will pledge not to raise the rate of income tax,
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national insurance or vat when they publish their election manifesto this afternoon. borisjohnson has also said he wants to bring his brexit deal back to the commons before christmas, if the conservatives are returned to power. meanwhile, labour has pledged to compensate nearly 4 million women, who lost out when their state pension age rose from 60 to 66. the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell said the compensation, which could cost £58 billionn over five years, would make right a "historical wrong". the snp say they will push the next uk government to lift financial restrictions on the scottish government's spending powers. the party claim it will unlock almost £3 billion over the course of the next parliament, which they plan to use to boost the economy and tackle climate change. a number of police officers have been assaulted while trying to break up a large brawl at a cinema in birmingham. fights broke out on saturday afternoon as police attempted to clear around 100 people from the star city leisure complex. some people were reportedly armed with machetes. 0ne eyewitness described it as one
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of the "scariest moments" of their life. police have been deployed to polling stations in hong kong, where people are voting in a local election. it's the first such vote since pro—democracy demonstrations began in june. reports suggest there's been a big turnout, with a record four—point—one million people registered to vote. the queues formed early and rang long. right around the block here. just a local ballot, true, for relatively powerless district councils. the significance of this first full test of public opinion since hong kong's crisis began more than five months ago was not lost on these voters. there is so much people here. we know that many people here. we know that many people actually awaiting for this opportunity to say something. people actually awaiting for this opportunity to say somethingm people actually awaiting for this opportunity to say something. it is like approving or disapproving the legitimacy of the protest. it is an
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action, one way or the other. so it just shows that people in hong kong believe in elections. and that's very important. it's not long since the police were doing nightly battle with black clad protestors. today they were deployed to secure the polling stations. but there was no sign of trouble here. the opposition was the selection to go smoothly, in the hope that a differential —— decisive swing in its favour might force chief executive carrie lam, here casting her vote, to make the concessions she steadfastly refused to make in the face of protest that had brought hong kong to its knees. the impressive turnout we've seen here shows that although these are just local elections, hong kongers do want to use them to express their views about the government and the protests. but there's something else about this act of civic duty that gets to the very heart of hong kong's crisis. here there is a free vote with a real choice of candidate, something you don't see in the rest of china. the university
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campus which saw such a dramatic confrontation is only a week ago is quiet now. ringed by police, the last few determined activists are hiding on its upperfloors, refusing to surrender. this stage of the protests is all but over. but once the election is done the anti—government campaign will surely resume somewhere else. jonathan head, bbc news, hong kong. a former head of the uk border force has told bbc breakfast that unless ports and ferry companies start to work with the authorities, more migrants could be killed trying tony smith says there needs to be a collaborative, coordinated effort which will require a "good deal of investment". the warning comes after three separate incidents in less than a week where migrants have been found in containers and a month since 39 people were found dead in essex. doctors say people need to take extra precautions, in order to stop the spread of the winter vomiting bug,
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norovirus. public health england says there's been a big increase in the number of reported cases, compared to the last five winter seasons. this week, pupils in around 60 schools across the north east of england were sent home with symptoms. two people are missing in southern france, where heavy rain has caused serious flooding. several roads and railway lines have been cut off and flights from nice airport have been disrupted. you are up—to—date. those are the main story this morning. let us take a look at this point. john is here. ifjose mourinho is smiling he must be happy to be back. he is not there though. he will be this morning. he has got them off to a winning start. he has been happy this week. as he said himself, being back in the dugout is where he belongs. he has changed, hasn't he. he looks like a changed, hasn't he. he looks like a changed man. how long that will last well, we wonder. he's back in his natural habitat
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and his tottenham reign began with a win as the premier league's top 3—3 won, which means liverpool maintain their lead at the top, as gavin ranjaun reports. after 11 months away, jose mourinho is back in the premier league and back with a win. his first assignment was to take his tottenham side to west ham. and it took son heung—minjust side to west ham. and it took son heung—min just over half—an—hour to open the scoring at the london stadium. harry kane put them three up stadium. harry kane put them three up and after holding off a late hammers fight back, it was another day we went for mino. it is a very important three points. we have a little jump in the table and it is important for that for the place to have that smile. for the players to go to the dressing room, a wave of home music on, smile on theirfaces, happiness, and that is very, very important. liveable'sjudged firstly title in 30 years shows no of letting up. they needed another late goal though, this time from roberto firmino to get past crystal palace. that's now 12 wins out of 13 for game clock‘s side. that's now 12 wins out of 13 for game clock's side. we wanted it and they think that is absolutely 0k.
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you cannot run the boys heads off if you only windy brilliant games. i like a lot of performance. but in no why some things were not there. we see them more often. the good things, at least. their closest challenges were lester, who won their fifth successive game at brighton. jamie vardy on the scoresheet once again. manchester city fell behind to chelsea, but had riyad mahrez to think for a crucial three points. the gap to liverpool down to nine. at the emirates, arsenal needed an injury time equaliser to scrape a draw against southhampton. a result that will do little to ease the pressure on n! emory. another manager feeling the heat will be evident‘s marco silva. not getting their first away win of the season and leaving the toffees ina the season and leaving the toffees in a sticky situation. gavin ranjaun, bbc news. that face says it all.
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despite the lta boosting the crowd with 900 free tickets for british fans, the gb team were knocked out of the semifinals of the davis cup, losing to the hosts spain in madrid. with an unfit andy murray left out again by captain leon smith, kyle edmund was on court first and he got britain off to the perfect start, beating feliciano lopez in straight sets. but after dan evans lost to rafael nadal, the world number one went back on court with lopez in the doubles — and they edged jamie murray and neal skupski by the narrowest of margins, winning in two tie—break sets. we are hurt in this now. but we have seen an amazing tie here against spain, the strongest being, arguably, in the competition, especially with rough valid island. we have pushed them into a couple points of a final set. to reach semi—finals itself is, think a brilliant achievement. england's cricketers are in big trouble in the first test against new zealand — they lost three wickets late on day
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four in mount maunganui to fall well behind. jb watling continued his sensational innings, making 205, as new zealand powered on, before declaring on 615—9. and england were 55—3 at the close — trailing by 207 runs. they've been hit with a record points deduction and fine in the premiership, but saracens got their european cup campaign back on track with victory over 05preys. they lost to racing in their opening game — but two tries from rotimi segun helped them to a bonus point 44—3 win. saracens have been fined over £5 million and stripped of domestic league points for breaching salary cap regulations. there are details of all the day's games on the bbc sport website. england women ended 2019 with a clean sweep in their autumn internationals, finishing with a huge 60 points to three win over italy. world player of the year emily scarratt scored one of their ten tries in front of a full house in bedford. it was an impressive display against italy, who finished second to grand slam
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winners england in this year's six nations. spain'sjon rahm has taken the advantage over tommy fleetwood, as they vie to end the year as europe's top golfer, in the race to dubai. rahm shot a 6—under par round of 66 to take a share of the lead going into the final day of the season—ending tour championship. fleetwood is four shots adrift. england's charley hull is in contention heading into the final round of the women's tour championship in florida. she sank five birdies in her last nine holes to move to 11—under par — five shots off the lead. finally, back to football, and there was an incredible final in south america's top club competition, the copa libertadores. the brazilian side flamengo trailed argentina's river plate 1—0, but gabriel barbosa scored in the 89th and 92nd minutes before being sent off. it's flamengo's first libertadores title for 38 years.
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so much passion in the competition. escalator, magnified hugely, as you can see, without being a final. and then what a finish! i'd just like then what a finish! i'd just like the way you pronounced it. very good. you can give it a little flourish. cheers. doctors are urging us all to take extra precautions, to help stop the spread of the winter vomiting bug, norovirus. it follows a big rise in the number of cases this year, particularly in schools. here to talk us through what we can do to help is gp dr amir khan. good morning to you. it is a slightly icky thing to think about at this time of morning. why are things so much worse? as you say, it is the winter vomiting bug and it is almost wenda nel. and these things are spread really rapidly. so we
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have seen a rise in schools in particular where we have children in close proximity. children are cute and gorgeous but they are not the most hygienic of beings. don't necessarily wash their hands all the time if their mums are not at school with them and they touch things and then other people touch things and things spread. when you have people in close proximity you are going to get the spread of viruses and this time of year it is norovirus. is a question, why is it was in winter? people's immune systems are a little lower in winter because it is colder, we are doing other things, we are busy and tired. and itjust spreads. how you got against it? it is spread through the, it is not very pleasant, it is early in the morning, through the faecal oral route. if you haven't lost your hands, you touch things, other people will touch them, even if you get close to people with the virus they can breathe out particles with it as well. it is airborne to a degree. so the ways to guard against it is if your child has it, by all means comfort them, but don't get
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too close to them. basic hygiene, wash your hands after you have been to the loo. don't handle food and the north wash your hands. make sure you wash your hands before you eat as well. it is all this stuff our mums told us to do, really, and that's how you protect yourself against it. obviously, in most cases, people recover from against it. obviously, in most cases, people recoverfrom this after a couple of days, but some people are really very much at risk, aren't they? as you say, the vast majority of people will recover themselves without any medical intervention between one and three days. but elderly people and young children in particular are at risk of dehydration and they may need to be hospitalised or go and see the gp. what should you be looking out for if you are looking out for an elderly person a child with this popular basic things. the children everything may become more rapid and if they're dehydrated they become wood rail see, their lips become dry. if they are crying without tea rs,
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dry. if they are crying without tears, that is a sign of dehydration. with elderly people it is all of the above but they can become confused as well. so if they have diarrhoea and vomiting and they have diarrhoea and vomiting and they have those symptoms, then it is worth inking about contacting a doctor. if you are young like you and i, sally, yes, very young. then you can really manage it at home yourself. that is an interesting point. at home. don't go to the doctor. you don't need to go to the doctor. you don't need to go to the doctor. if you are fit and healthy and you have sickness and diarrhoea, this is probably what it is sojust a stay—at—home and super fluids. absolutely. sith lords, don't go and infect other people. people in hospital a very vulnerable to these kind of things. so do stay at home. if things don't resolve after about three days then maybe think about ringing 1114 advise. you're supposed to wait a couple of days before going back to work ascending the children to school. this is not a free pass to have days before
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christmas was up you need to be properly poor. if you have diarrhoea and vomiting, two days after it has settled is when you should return to work or school. food or no food? no food at all? just liquids. try liquids first. if you are tolerating them without vomiting, bland food, dry toast, digestive biscuits. avoid dairy, really, they can upset your stomach a bit more. then work your way up to your favourite foods from there. dr amir khan, good advice. thank you very much. let us all wash our hands even more than usual. just what you want to talk about. shall we look at the weather, hopefully that won't turn your stomach. it will be all right, willis, louise? it is cloudy and grey, and more rain for the next few days. at least today will be better than yesterday, and for many of us, not a bad day in terms of dry, a lot
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of dry weather around. but there is some early morning fog and a lot of cloud, thank you for a bit of drizzle as well. however take a look at what is heading in our direction, this area of low pressure arriving later tonight. we have seen some rain, this weather front is moving away from scotland, some of it is quite heavy and persistent across eastern and northern scotland over the last few hours. that will take its time before it shifts further north, elsewhere, cloudy skies to start with, some early morning hill fog around and that cloud thickener for some drizzle. but slowly conditions were brighten and dry up, and slowly we will see an improvement into scotland as well. the wind direction coming from a south—easterly, so it is mild source, temperature is now back into double digits, that is some good news as well. so it is a day for getting out and about and enjoying yourself a little. and then later on in the day we will start to see this wetter weather pushing into the
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south—west, that will move into wales and eventually into northern ireland. through the night we keep that cloud around, so it is going to bea mild that cloud around, so it is going to be a mild night in comparison to the ones we have seen just recently, overnight lows widely 6—9d, may be double digits in the far south—west. that area of low pressure will still be an issue as we move into monday, thenit be an issue as we move into monday, then it will be replaced by another later on in the week. so we start off monday morning with some rain around across northern ireland, north—west england, through the midlands into the south—east corner, and then behind it they will be a scattering of showers as well. the best of the weather likely on monday, is going to be in the far north of scotland, here it should stay dry without —— with a little bit of sunshine from time to time, 9-13 bit of sunshine from time to time, 9—13 degrees. that system moves away but it will be replaced by another, the timing of this one a little uncertain at the moment, because this has the remnants of what was sebastian mixed in there, so a bit more energy to this area of low pressure. it will bring some rain, some heavy, and then once it is clear through behind there will be some showers, some of those heavy and hungry as well. a windy day on
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tuesday, another mild one, when will this rain all come to a close? if you do like colder but drier weather, you are probably going to have to be patient. most of this week stays unsettled as you can see, but as we head into the weekend, signs of something a little bit drier and sunnier, but also colder as well. there you go. we'll be back with the headlines at seven o'clock. now it's time for the travel show. we start this week in copenhagen. by 2025 the danes hope this will become the world's very first carbon—neutral capital city. we sent cat moh to find out how they are getting on. denmark is a country that takes its eco—friendly reputation very seriously. it is claimed that more than two—thirds of their waste is recycled, and 30% of all their energy consumption comes from renewable sources. they even say the harbour is clean
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enough for you to swim in. not something i'll be trying on a cold winter's day. instead i am on a goboat, one of a fleet of electric boats available to hire here in copenhagen. it is charged back at the dock with solar panels. that means no noisy engines, and low co2 emissions. this green drive has had another added push, with the opening of a new tourist attraction — built on top of the unlikeliest of buildings, a power station. fuelled by waste and billed as one of the most environmentally friendly plants of its kind, opened last month, the copenhill spans more than 40,000 square metres. this slope i am on works its way from the bottom all the way up the side of the building,
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and it's open every day of the week for hikers, sightseers and even skiers. the ski slope is made from a slippery synthetic material which is coloured green to stop the slope from discolouring. they are still doing a bit of work up here, but look, right over there, that's sweden, which is very cool. and on the other side, we have this amazing view of copenhagen. and how did you guys come up with putting a ski slope up here? one of the things we realised quite quickly is that if you take a section of the building it actually steps down from low to high, from the area where the trucks drive into the boilers, the flue gas treatment areas, up to about 90 metres. the other thing about denmark is that danes love to ski, but denmark is completely flat.
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so they will drive for three hours to sweden to ski on a slope that is about 80 metres high. so we quickly realised that since we have mountains of trash apparently, we could turn it into mountains of recreation and skiing, that could become a public amenity in the very centre of the city of copenhagen. sustainability tends to be this thing that is seen as protestant act, something you do which means that you have to do less of something, that you somehow have to have less life experience. but what we really wanted to do with this project is express that somehow sustainability can be something that is positive and fun, and actually gives more back to people, and to the city. inside, a glass lift shows people the inner workings of the power station. and tours are available as an apres—ski activity. so explain to me what's going on, there seems to be a mix of leftover tree branches, but also
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general waste as well. that's correct. we receive waste from five municipalities, both from households and from industries, all the waste that cannot be recycled. how often do these trucks come, because there seems to be a steady flow, even just standing here for the past few minutes. we have around 300 lorries coming in on a daily basis. inside the waste silo, giant grabbers mix the rubbish before dropping it into the furnace. this is where the waste is being incinerated, i will show you over here, it is quite a sight. oh, my eyes! it is like staring into the pit of hell. the plant generates electricity,
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and potentially enough annual heating for 150,000 homes. we have waste in copenhagen, we will keep on producing waste in copenhagen and the rest of the world, so this is a product that is already here so we might as well use it for something reasonable, something that makes sense. back on the slope, it's time for me to get my skis on. can i borrow your boot for one moment? just one is fine, thank you. i have not been on a dry ski slope for maybe 15 years. you will have fun. i have been on actual snow. yeah, well it is quite different. speed is your friend up there. speed is my friend... yeah. i don't really know how this is going to go, if i am going to wipe out.
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laughs. i just want to make it down without falling over! screams. after that initial wobble, i was soon feeling confident. maybe a bit too confident. laughs. that went really well! and the copenhill is open now, to skiers of all abilities. and if you are thinking of travelling to denmark, here are some things we think you should look out for. rwanda has just topped the 2020 africa destination list, and i am here in
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the capital, kigali. the city is a hub for new start—ups, it has a buzzing art scene, and great local entertainment. but while most travellers whizz through here to get straight to the rwandan wildlife, i have come to see what the capital has to offer. welcome to rwanda! the city is impressively spotless, there is wi—fi everywhere, and perhaps most importantly, there is a real sense of pride bursting from every single person i talked to. this is thanks in no small part to the national made in rwanda initiative, a movement to support and inspire local businesses, and the made in rwanda label is now a badge of honour. this all reflects the new rwandan identity, no longer divided along ethnic or tribal lines. i am at the house of tayo, where designer matthew rugamba set up shop eight years ago. he has seen his brand grow in popularity since the launch of made in rwanda last year. he has even seen his clothes strutted on the red
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carpet of the premiere of blockbuster film black panther. i want to show the best of rwanda, there is a lot of undiscovered talent here. it is part of my mandate to utilise as much local talent and expertise as i can. it's very important that we build a local ecosystem of models, photographers, lighting experts, only when we do that we can say that we have a local fashion industry. tayo and other city designers are not only thriving here in rwanda, but are now selling their goods abroad. fashion is not the only thing that is growing here, thanks to the made in rwanda slogan. music and dance has always been a way for people to express themselves, and now, with the national revival, you can't go far here without hearing a drumbeat. inema is one of east africa's largest arts centres, with a range of rwandan cultural experiences. how do i look? good?
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i have noticed this real sense of pride to be rwandan. why is this dance so symbolic of rwandan culture? it is very essential for the kids to have some sort of identity, and to grow understanding of dance, their culture, it is very good as you move forward. well, i guess you can tell what's going to happen next. oh man, here we go! i think i made it through about half of that choreography. these kids are so good!
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i've had so much fun today getting stuck into rwandan culture. now i'm ordering a cocktail and i am about to kick back and enjoy a concert, rwandan style. i am here to see dayo perform, one of kigali's rising music sensations. the inanga is our cultural, traditional music. it is our history, it is our identity. many years ago it was getting disappeared. so i decided to introduce my music to the new world. such a beautiful sound. the lyrics of your music, what do they mean, what are you saying in your songs? i want everyone to know our culture, how we are doing, our history. if everybody listens to our story, where we come from, how we are going on. it gives the inspiration to other nations, so i want to tell the people
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about our country. this new generation of rwandans who have now moved on from the country's darker, violent past, are shedding light and colour across the country. and while most travellers rush through kigali, it is worth keeping some time aside to explore the people, their passion, and their crafts in this bustling city.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and sally nugent. 0ur headlines today: a pledge not to increase taxes from the conservatives — as boris johnson prepares to launch his party's manifesto. labour promises to compensate millions of women who lost out because of changes to pensions. police officers are attacked and injured as they tackle a brawl
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at a cinema in birmingham involving around 100 people — some armed with machetes. he's back and making his presence felt — asjose mourinho wins his first match as tottenham's new manager with victory over west ham in the london derby. good morning. it's a dry day for most of us today, but there's a lot of those around, yes, cloudy—looking skies and at times thick enough for the odd spot or two of drizzle. all the details coming up a little later. good morning. it's sunday the 24th of november. our top story: the conservatives will pledge not to raise the rate of income tax, national insurance, or vat when they publish their election manifesto this afternoon. borisjohnson has also said he wants to bring his brexit deal back to the commons before christmas, if the conservatives are returned to power. 0ur political correspondent, nick eardley reports. what would he do with power? this afternoon, borisjohnson will
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unveil the conservative manifesto. his basic message — deliver brexit and move onto domestic priorities. he will pledge that the bill that will deliver brexit will be brought back to parliament before christmas if he wins the election. that, he says, would allow the country to move on. so what will the conservatives do on the home front? they will pledge today not to raise rates of income tax, national insurance, or vat. that'll make it harder for the government to raise money, but the tories are still pledging to spend. mrjohnson has already promised money for the health service, for more police, for education. today there will be costly pensioner family projects, too, like keeping the pension trip a lot and winter fuel payments. and for a skills fund. the manifesto will pledge to end car parking charges at hospitals or protected groups —
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nhs staff on natives, disabled patients, the terminally ill and their families. the conservative say their plans are fully costed and affordable and they will spend the next three weeks trying to persuade you that they've got the best plan on offer. nick earley, bbc news. 0ur political correspondent, tom barton, joins us now. plenty of pledges from the conservatives. are they going to have the impact that the party wa nts ? have the impact that the party wants? they certainly will hope to grab people's attention, particularly with the promise that they are calling the triple lock on taxes, not to raise national insurance, vat, or income tax stop and we have also had the promise that we heard from borisjohnson a few days ago to raise the threshold for national insurance payments, initially to £9,500, eventually raising the to £12,500. we knew that the conservers were planning to loosen the purse strings, as we saw in the's report there, there are lots of promises to spend more money. what we don't have yet, but
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we should get, when the manifesto is lined a little later this afternoon in the west midlands, is how they are planning on paying for those promises. the conservatives say the ma nifesto promises. the conservatives say the manifesto is fully costed. exactly how they will meet those costs, though, we don't yet know. we hear that labour promising compensation for the millions of women who have lost out in those pension changes. what more can you tell us about that? yes, this is the group known as the waspi women. in 2010 changes we re as the waspi women. in 2010 changes were main to the way the state pension is paid, which meant that they were accelerating the rise to they were accelerating the rise to the state pension age, essentially telling women that they would have to work for longer before they got the state pension. now campaign group say that as a result many women born in the 19505 didn't have enough notice of this change and therefore suffered financial hardship while they were waiting for the state pension to kick in. labour
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is today promising compensation for those women. an average of around £15,000, rising to £31,000 for those ha rd est £15,000, rising to £31,000 for those hardest hit. they say this is a one of those for what they call an historical debt of honour. they say it will cost if the £8 million, but that the state should pick up the cost of that in just the same way as they would if they had lost a court case. thank you very much indeed. that is tom barton for us. a number of police officers have been assaulted while trying to break up a large brawl at a cinema in birmingham. fights broke out as police attempted to clear around 100 people from the star city leisure complex. some people were reportedly armed with machetes. simonjones reports. it's not what these cinema—goers were expecting to see, chaos and confusion at the star city complex in birmingham as police tried to restore order. officers were called following reports that a group of people armed with machetes had arrived at the cinema. fights broke out as the police tried to move around 100 people.
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a number of officers were wounded, though the injuries are not thought to be serious. one girl punched this girl in the face, started slapping her. the audience watching was getting involved. the next thing you know the police rushed in with their batons, telling everyone to get out and stay away. so there were kids crying on the floor with their mums, because obviously the frozen film was out. and it was just really sad to see. another eyewitness described it as one of the scariest moments of her life. several people have been arrested for assaulting officers and failing to disperse. simon jones, bbc news. police have been deployed to polling stations in hong kong, where people are voting in a local election. it's the first such vote since pro—democracy demonstrations began five months ago. let's speak to our correspondent, jonathan head, whojoins us from hong kong now. did everything pass off peacefully?
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i would say so. we have yet to get full reports from other polling stations, but the numbers are still very significant here at this polling stations. people have been queueing up from really early, from before 7:30am when polls open. they have now been open for seven and a half hours. still long lines of people and some already, we are being told the turnout, up to now, and we still have another seven hours of voting to go, has exceeded that of the last local elections four years ago, which tells you how important these elections are being seen by hong kongers and that it is not of course just about local services, it is for some, of course, but for everyone the crisis and how they feel about the crisis overs ha d ows they feel about the crisis overshadows everything and many people going in there to cast ballots for local counsellors will also be wanting to send a message either of support or opposition to the government or the protest movement. and the results, when they
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come in, will give a fairly accurate indication of how people feel, public sentiment in hong kong right now about the crisis and how the government has handled it. jonathan, thank you very much indeed. a former head of the uk border force has told bbc breakfast that unless ports and ferry companies start to work with the authorities, more migrants could be killed trying to get to the uk. tony smith says there needs to be a collaborative, co—ordinated effort which will require a "good deal of investment". the warning comes after three separate incidents in less than a week where migrants have been found in containers and a month since 39 people were found dead in essex. it's a month and since the discovery of 39 bodies in a sealed refrigerator container in essex stop all those that died were vietnamese. they had sailed from the belgian port of zeebrugge on a cargo ferry hoping for a better life in britain. the former head of the uk border force as there needs to be more cooperation between the authorities and private firms such as hauliers and the ferry companies, to stop further deaths.
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a co—ordinated attempt between ourselves, the uk border force, and of course our colleagues in french, belgium, dutch customs. that's what's required, a collaborative, co—ordinated effort along all of those roots, which will require a good deal of investment, but a fee if we don't do it then, i'm afraid, we will see more tragedies. his warning comes after three separate incidents in less than a week when migrants were found in containers. on thursday afternoon, irish police found 16 people in a sealed container on a ferry from france to ireland. ten were found on the m25 in essex. five days ago a group of 25 migrants were found in a refrigerator container on a ferry travelling from the netherlands to england. the challenges remain constant. on a daily basis migrants attempt to get in the back of lorries, drivers have to remain vigilant. people smugglers seem to be the only ones benefiting from the misery. jane—frances kelly, bbc news. doctors say people need to take extra precautions, in order to stop the spread of the winter vomiting bug, norovirus. public health england says there's been a big increase in the number
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of reported cases, compared to the last five winter seasons. this week, pupils in around 60 schools across the north east of england were sent home with symptoms. two people are missing in southern france, where heavy rain has caused serious flooding. several roads and railway lines have been cut off and flights from nice airport have been disrupted. large parts of neighbouring italy have also had heavy rainfall and are on flood alert. those are the main stories this morning. it is approaching ten past seven. with three weeks to go until the general election, the conservatives become the last party to officially launch their manifesto today. so what work goes into drawing up these documents? joining us now to explain are two people with plenty of experience — former labour advisor, james meadway. and former advisor to borisjohnson, during his time as london mayor, former labour advisor, james meadway.
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and former advisor to borisjohnson, during his time as london mayor, kulveer ranger. good morning. do manifestos matter as much as they used to. at this point in proceedings, don't most people have an idea what most of the parties planned to do? they do. they have probably been hearing a lot of soundbites, hearing speeches, silly —— seeing politicians make odd policy announcements here and there. these manifestos bring it all together. i am sure, probably, these manifestos bring it all together. iam sure, probably, the average person will not sit down and thoroughly go through all the ma nifestos. thoroughly go through all the manifestos. but it will be for the likes of journalists manifestos. but it will be for the likes ofjournalists and broadcasters who need to scrutinise the policy of what is actually being proposed by political parties. so they are important. that then filtered through to everyone else to confirm the promises that politicians are making and will hope to keep after they are elected. what sort of work goes into preparing them? is this a process where it has been planned for one year, two years in advance, where people are working on this all the time, or is it a
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last—minute scramble? on this all the time, or is it a last-minute scramble? no, it is probably somewhere in the middle of that. it always does depend under what circumstances the election has been called. remember the last general election, theresa may called a snap election, did not give a lot of time for people to put manifestos together and that probably paid out —— played out during the course of that election. this time we know that election. this time we know that this election is being called partially because, if not entirely, because brexit has not been moving forward in parliament and, therefore, the conservative party and parties been thinking in the background are about this election quite carefully. 0bviously with the prime minister, boris johnson, quite carefully. 0bviously with the prime minister, borisjohnson, he has been prime ministerforjust over 100 or so days. he has probably been planning and approach to this election since he became prime minister. so a lot of thought would have been going into the development of these policies that will be in the manifestos. and a bit of testing along that way with how they will land with the electorate. i'm interested in what you just said.
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the conservatives, launching the ma nifesto the conservatives, launching the manifesto today, later than many people would have expected, do you think they will have been monitoring to see how things go down and little lea ks of information to see how things go down and little leaks of information and may be poling and testing and may change things of the last minute to convince people? politicians and political parties are always testing the response from the great british public and to ideas and policies they are putting forward. but in this case, this election does centre around brexit. and, therefore, the conservative party have probably felt that everybody knows where the prime minister and they stand on brexit. they have the slogan of getting it done. but also that everything hangs of that. investment, managers, infrastructure, broadband. these are things they wanted to see done as the country moves forward with a deal around brexit. so their message has been quite clear and therefore there manifesto will mimic that. and i would assume they would think most people would be hearing that. now there will be more detail letting
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that out in the manifesto. shall be talk from moment about a couple of ma nifested talk from moment about a couple of manifested of —— disasters. theresa may in 2017. her manifesto will be remembered for the mistakes over social care. we have the headstone in 2015, ed miliband with promises carved on a big stone. i think we talked about that more than the policies. what are the big mistakes that people have to avoid when launching a manifesto?” that people have to avoid when launching a manifesto? i think the key around avoiding a manifesto mishap as you are describing, is that you have tested it out. the big challenges when developing these manifestos, sometimes it can come down to a small group of people. sometimes even a bit of a bunker mentality reinforcing the views that are inside. it is always good to get those tested externally. those focus groups. when the rubber hits the road and the public get a look at some of the policies, that is the kind of testing that needs to happen. sometimes that doesn't happen. sometimes that doesn't happen because a very small group of people have been involved because of the rush in getting the manifesto
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done. i think this time all parties have had a bit more time to think about exactly what they want to do. we have seen, obviously, a couple of years of the labour party and the jeremy corbyn heading in a direction where they have, which has led into the crystallisation of this manifesto around huge ways of nationalisation and their approach to the economy. i think you have also seen quite clearly from boris johnson as prime minister, from the la st johnson as prime minister, from the last queen's speech, what will probably be in the conservative manifesto, which is about driving the economy forward and moving on brexit. tell me this, what matters most ina brexit. tell me this, what matters most in a manifesto? is it the detail? and i don't mean people, are voters going to go through these ma nifestos, voters going to go through these manifestos, line by line, orare they going to be more swayed by the personalities of the people who present them? i think they will be more swayed by the personalities and also the arguments put forward about whose hands the country will be safe in. because it's about a government and a prime minister that people feel as a vision for this country that resonates with them, that will
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resonate for their families, their children, and the way they see the country. that's probably the most important thing. the manifestos itself, haven't always meant that many people who have read all of them, even found a copy of them. they will be online. they do have people look at them. but i think it will be about the key messages about what you people want for this country going forward and, therefore, which party they believe they should lend their vote for. kulveer ranger, fascinating to talk to you. thank you very much indeed. here's louise with a look at this morning's weather. is that this morning, that is a bit early for that, isn't it? this is last night, this is devon, i have an interesting fact, sad unfortunately but interesting, devon had maximum sunshine yesterday, but only 1.4 hours. it was the sunniest place
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across the uk, but it looks as though today we will see a lot of dry weather, but it will be cloudy as well. we have seen some rain around through the night, the heaviest of which has been across the far north—east of scotland, we have this ridge of high pressure which will bring things down for today before the next low moves into monday. so yes it has been wetter overnight, nearly an inch of rain in parts of eastern scotland, but that rain will drift steadily northwards over the next few hours and we will see an improvement in scotland as we go through the day. just a lot of cloud around, thickener for some drizzle first thing this morning, some hill fog around, it is a drab, murky late november start to the day. eventually conditions were brighten up and into the afternoon we will see some glimpses of sunshine dotted around the coast, and it will be a mild afternoon, 9— 12 degrees. we will be able to get out and hopefully enjoyed a little. through this evening we will see some rain, some of its starting across south—east england and wales, this is an area of low pressure that
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will arrive through the night, we keep a lot of cloud around, it stays mild, frost free for all with lows around 5—9d, that is not bad as an overnight minimum at this time of year. but it does mean we have some rain due to arrive and it will push steadily northwards through monday. first thing monday it will be sitting across northern ireland into north—west england, down through the midlands towards london, the high midlands, sums up showers following, there will be some dry weather in there will be some dry weather in the far north of scotland, you might see some glimpses of sunshine through the day, and we keep that mild theme for all of us, 9— 13 degrees as a maximum. as we move out of monday and tuesday, we could see some more significant rain from this area of low pressure, it has the re m na nts of area of low pressure, it has the remnants of the storm sebastian with it, and that means the rain could be slightly more intense than normal, and the positioning and timing of that rain still subject to question. the rest of the focus on tuesday, we
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will see a spell of wet weather pushing northwards, it will be windy as well, some showers have very —— heavy and thundery, and the temperature is still around 9— 14 degrees. so again, still a temperature is still around 9— 14 degrees. so again, stilla mild theme. if you want something a little more quiet and he has an outdoor plans, try and hang in there until the end of the week, certainly into the weekend where things dry up, but also become a little cooler, perhaps a little more significant as sunday is the first of december, so quite a christmassy feel, cold and crisp. thank you very much. andrew marr is here on bbc one at nine o'clock. let's find out what he has in store. good morning, not quite christmassy at are absolutely at the peak of this extraordinary election campaign, heart pounding, i am joined by two party leaders, adam price of white camry and jo swinson
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of the liberal democrats. the tories, by michael gove and the labour by angela rayner, one of the people always document as a future labour leader. join us if you possibly can at nine o'clock. —— plaid cymru. as the fallout from prince andrew's newsnight interview continues, speculation is growing as to the whereabouts of the woman accused of helping convicted sex offender, jeffrey epstein. ghislaine maxwell, a friend of the duke of york, hasn't been seen in public since the allegations against epstein emerged. investigative journalist mark edmonds has been trying to track her down and joins us now from london. good morning, thank you forjoining us this morning. just explain who ghislaine maxwell is, first of all, people who know? she basically is robin maxwell's favourite child... excuse me, i am sorry.
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unfortunate... is at her on the phone? unfortunately not. ghislaine maxwell was a close associate... sorry, take a second that off. also somebody who had a big following in london, she was a socialite, she had an enormous contacts book full of politicians, famous people, the well—connected, she was a great networker. and she began a relationship with jeffrey networker. and she began a relationship withjeffrey epstein shortly after her own father's death. and that relationship continued probably for the best part of 10-15 continued probably for the best part of 10—15 years, as an continued probably for the best part of10—15 years, as an on— continued probably for the best part of 10—15 years, as an on— off boyfriend— girlfriend situation. of 10—15 years, as an on— off boyfriend- girlfriend situation. and do have any idea where she is?” have an of where she might be, not
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the precise location. i think probably she is under investigation by the fbi. i have heard from sources that if in fact she is at this moment being held by the fbi and questioned. she has neither been charged or convicted of anything, nor has she actually been, she has not faced questioning in away. so we have to presume that there is a degree of innocence at the moment, until proven otherwise. ghislaine maxwell has always denied any allegations of wrongdoing relating tojeffrey epstein. prince andrew has also denied all claims of impropriety relating to the epstein allegations. but one would produce the —— one would deduce that the law enforcement agencies would be keen to speak to her, just in case you could shed any light on anything. very much so, her name has come up
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ina lot very much so, her name has come up in a lot of the augmentation produced by epstein's alleged victims. and if you look at what became known as "epstein? —— epstein's black book", there were so many people in their, some of whom have questionable backgrounds, others of whom are clearly completely innocent, and just happen to have possibly come across ghislaine maxwell at a party. she was that kind of a person, both in london and new york. it is interesting that kind of circles in which these people move, the social circles, to most of us are com pletely circles, to most of us are completely a world apart, aren't they? absolutely. i have a copy of ghislaine maxwell's macbook, which makes for fascinating reading. ghislaine maxwell's macbook, which makes forfascinating reading. in it there are loads of numbers of
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people, tony blair is in there, bill clinton is in their,, hold raft of people from the kennedy family, showbiz people, courtney love is in there, john cleese, there are aristocrats like princess diana's brother, an extraordinary mix of people. you also have a kind of weirdly boring and humdrum list of names, her osteopath, the woman who did her hair, and the local applicant at the pub she is too frequent in london near her house in belgravia. i frequent in london near her house in belg ravia. i rang frequent in london near her house in belgravia. i rang quite a few of these people, and most were totally uncooperative, mr moran, the public and at the nags head, as soon as i mentioned ghislaine maxwell, he slammed the phone down on me. that happened with a lot of people.
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0thers happened with a lot of people. others were charming and helpful. some even now, are retaining a kind of loyalty ghislaine maxwell, because they knew her before she was probably involved with epstein, and they had quite fond memories of her. we are grateful for your time, just to make it clear, nobody in that black book that you have named, there is no celeste —— no suggestion of any proprietary stop absolutely not. it would be wrong to point anything at them. thank you very much. ghislaine maxwell has always denied any allegations of wrongdoing relating tojeffrey epstein. as indeed has the duke of york. we're here on the bbc news channel until 9:00 this morning. coming up: it's been one of the most eagerly anticipated films of the year — frozen 2 has finally opened in uk cinemas. so was it worth the wait? we'll find outjust before 9:00. but this is where we say goodbye to viewers on bbc one.
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bye for now. while it may not be an election headline—grabber, like brexit or the nhs, the issue of childcare remains hugely important to millions of families. breakfast'sjohn maguire has been talking to parents and care providers about their concerns and what they'd like to see done to help. have you had a nice day? that is a nice cuddle! it's home time for libby. as for all parents returning for work, forjess, finding the nursery place was the first hurdle. it's quite difficult to get into nursery. so we put her down there on the waiting list when she was about a month old. so just to make sure we got a place. so i looked at a couple
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of nurseries around the area, so obviously it beeing convenient was obviously quite critical. what we really liked this one when we looked around. there were a couple of things about it. itjust seemed quite relaxed, the children seemed happy. i like the fact it is in the community centre. downstairs and helen is picking up her son leo. once a place has been secured, the next challenge is paying for it. we're in a fortunate position, we've got two professionals in our household, which between mortgage costs and childcare costs, even we find that there is not a lot of access at the end of the month. so i think for people with a lower income it is hugely challenging and they know a lot of people in that category who have, unfortunately, not have the choice of the luxury of being able to go back to workjust because of the cost of childcare. this is a bristol nursery run as a social enterprise, with profits going back into the community centre where it's housed. it provides up to 63 places,
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employs almost 30 staff, and was set up to meet strong local demand. we know that it's a growing demographic of working families. people are making a choice to buy into all the social elements that we are able to bring. so notjust a nursery, but they know what they will get high quality staff, they will have well—paid staff, the low turnover of staff, and it's a consistent place that's going to stay open. and it is a consistent place that is going to stay open. that's a very important factor for a lot of families as well. availability and affordability are the two key fact is stop research by the family charity quorum puts the average cost of a nursery place for an under two at £127 per week, more than £6,600 per year. and it's rising above the rate of inflation. we want all parents to have choices about how they balance working and caring. your parents will always know what is best for them in their family, but what's tragic for us as a society is if parents
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are really want to work, who have the skills and talents to work, locked out of the workforce by unaffordable or unavailable childcare. to work, locked out of the workforce by unaffordable or unavailable childcare. it's also worth saying that we know from huge, many years of research now, that childcare is good for children. children who attend a high—quality nursery go on to do better in the gcse‘s. so this is a good investment for all of us. the nursery in beneath christ church in bristol has been a part of the local community here for 43 years. as the children role play in the garden, if the staff had a magic wish, it would be to simplify childcare payment. i think the funding needs to be increased. i think it's a very low amount. as i said, for us as a charity is not an issue, but for other places that have got high cost, high staff costs, that then is a real thing. so i think if you are going to be giving more hours, you need to be giving more money per hour. and that's a real problem for lots of people. childcare may not be the main headline grabber of this particular
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general election, but it remains an important issue for parents, for communities, and for the politicians seeking to represent them — now and in the future. john maguire, bbc news, bristol. very happy with those kitchen utensils. who needs toys? stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and sally nugent. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. the conservatives will pledge not to raise the rate of income tax, national insurance, or vat when they publish their election manifesto this afternoon. borisjohnson has also said he wants to bring his brexit deal back to the commons before christmas, if the conservatives are returned to power. meanwhile, labour has pledged to compensate nearly four million women, who lost out when their state pension age rose from 60 to 66. the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell said the compensation, which could cost £58bn over five years,
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would make right a "historical wrong". the snp say they will push the next uk government to lift financial restrictions on the scottish government's spending powers. the party claim it will unlock almost £3 billion over the course of the next parliament, which they plan to use to boost the economy and tackle climate change. a number of police officers have been assaulted while trying to break up a large brawl at a cinema in birmingham. fights broke out yesterday afternoon as police attempted to clear around 100 people from the star city leisure complex. some people were reportedly armed with machetes. 0ne eywitness described it as one of the "scariest momemts" of their life. police have been deployed to polling stations in hong kong, where people are voting in a local election. it's the first such vote since pro—democracy demonstrations began in june. reports suggest there's been a big turnout, with a record 4.1 million people registered to vote. a former head of the uk border force
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has told bbc breakfast that unless ports and ferry companies start to work with the authorities, more migrants could be killed trying to get to the uk. tony smith says there needs to be a coordinated effort which will require a "good deal of investment". the warning comes after three separate incidents in less than a week where migrants have been found in containers and a month since 39 people were found dead in essex. doctors say people need to take extra precautions, in order to stop the spread of the winter vomiting bug, norovirus. public health england says there's been a big increase in the number of reported cases, compared to the last five winter seasons. this week, pupils in around 60 schools across the north east of england were sent home with symtoms. two people are missing in southern france, where heavy rain has caused serious flooding. several roads and railway lines have been cut off and flights from nice airport have been disrupted. large parts of neighbouring italy have also had heavy rainfall and are on flood alert.
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it isa it is a 7:32. there is a big picture behind me ofjoe root not looking very happy at all. what is happening? it is really not good. new zealand have scored a massive total against england in the first test, in excess of 600 runs, the highest against england and tests. it means now that with england having lost ticket —— wickets, they have to bat out the final day to try to salvage a draw, with seven wickets in hand. so the way they have been batting... it doesn't look good, does it? england's cricketers are in big trouble in the first test — they lost three wickets late on day four to fall well behind. jb watling continued his sensational innings, making 205, as new zealand powered on, before declaring on 615—9. and england were 55—3 at the close — trailing by 207 runs. he's back in his natural habitat
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and his tottenham reign began with a win as the premier league's top 3—3 won, which means liverpool maintain their lead at the top, as gavin ranjaun reports. after 11 months away, jose mourinho is back in the premier league and back with a win. his first assignment was to take his tottenham side to west ham. and it took son heung—min just over half—an—hour to open the scoring at the london stadium. harry kane put them three up and after holding off a late hammers' fight back, it was another debut win. it is a very important three points. we have a little jump in the table and it is important for that for the place to have that smile. for the players to go to the dressing room, a wave of home music on, smile on theirfaces, happiness, and that is very, very important. liverpool's first title run in 30
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years shows no of letting up. —— liverpool's charged to their first league title. they needed another late goal though, this time from roberto firmino to get past crystal palace. that's now 12 wins out of 13 forjurgen klopp. we wanted it and they think that is absolutely 0k. you cannot run the boys heads off if you only like the really brilliant games. i like a lot of performance. but i know why some things were not there. we see them more often. the good things, at least. their closest challenges were lester, who won their fifth successive game at brighton. jamie vardy on the scoresheet once again. manchester city fell behind to chelsea, but had riyad mahrez to think for a crucial three points. the gap to liverpool down to nine. at the emirates, arsenal needed an injury time equaliser to scrape a draw against southampton. a result that will do little to ease the pressure on emory. another manager feeling the heat will be evident‘s marco silva. not getting their first away win of the season and leaving the toffees in a sticky situation. gavin ranjaun, bbc news. that face says it all.
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the club's board of directors will be meeting to discuss his future. celtic are three points clear at the top of the scottish premiership, after beating livingston 4—0 but rangers can move level again this afternoon — they're away to hamilton academical. st mirren moved off the bottom of the table, thanks to victory at home to ross county — sam foley with a late winner after they'd gone behind. despite the lta boosting the crowd with 900 free tickets for british fans, the gigabits team were knocked out of the semi—finals of the davis cup, losing to the hosts spain in madrid. after winning one singles match each, the tie came down to the doubles — with gb falling just short, as our tennis correspondent russell fuller explains. the magic box in madrid was rocking on saturday night and jamie murray and neal ‘s gutsy came tantalisingly close to setting up a set at the doubles which would put britain into
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another davis cup final. rafael nadal, the world number one, and feliciano lopez, ten doubles match in two day breaks. written had four set points to take them into a deciding set an agonisingly one more points than nadal and lopez. it started so promisingly with kyle edmund winning the opening singles against lopez. dan evans then pushed found that i'll close in the opening set of their singles match. but after he lost that the second set disappeared in a flash, by 6—0. after he lost that the second set disappeared in a flash, by 6-0. we are hurting now. but we have seen an amazing tie here against spain, the strongest team, arguably, in the competition, especially with rafa in it. and we have pushed them within a couple of points of going into the final set to decide who gets the final. injury semi—finals itself is a brilliant achievement. so spain on home soil have the chance to win the davis cup for the first time since 2011. bitter disappointment for great britain. but it has been a
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very, very foraging week. they've been hit with a record points deduction and fine in the premiership, but saracens got their european cup campaign back on track with victory over 05preys. they lost to racing in their opening game, but two tries from rotimi segun helped them to a bonus point 44—3 win. saracens have been fined over £5 million and stripped of domestic league points for breaching salary cap regulations. there are details of all the day's games on the bbc sport website. england women ended 2019 with a clean sweep in their autumn internationals — finishing with a huge 60 points to three win over italy. world player of the year emily scarratt scored one of their ten tries in front of a full house in bedford. it was an impressive display against italy, who finished second to grand slam winners england in this year's six nations. spain'sjon rahm has taken the advantage over tommy fleetwood, as they vie to end the year as europe's top golfer, in the race to dubai. rahm shot a 6—under par round of 66 to take a share of the lead going into the final day of the season—ending tour championship. fleetwood is four shots adrift.
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england's charley hull is in contention heading into the final round of the women's tour championship in florida. she sank five birdies in her last nine holes to move to 11—under par — five shots off the lead. it looks as though tyson fury‘s rematch with deontay wilder is on next february, after wilder beat luis 0rtiz to retain his wbc world heavyweight title for the 10th time in las meanwhile, callum smith has successfully defended his wba super—middleweight title in his home town of liverpool. the fight against fellow—britain john ryder went the distance, but smith won it on a unanimous points decision. finally, back to football, and there was an incredible final in south america's top club competition, the copa libertadores. the brazilian side flamengo trailed argentina's river plate 1—0 — but gabriel barbosa scored in the 89th and 92nd minutes — before being sent off. it's flamengo's first
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libertadores title for 38 years. a bit of drama and emotion at the end there. i am sure they are still celebrating. why not? very passionate in south america, aren't they? people have travelled thousands of miles to what that. what a finish they were treated to as well. thank you, john. much appreciated. you're watching breakfast from bbc news, it's time now for a look at the newspapers. the artist, mackenzie thorpe is here to tell us what's caught his eye. good morning. you have picked a few different stories, but i have to see, i really love the very first story you happy, imagine it is close to your heart. it is very close to my heart. it is about a fellow called eric tucker. all his life, not going to work, going to the shops, gnabry knew he was going to
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his living room and painting pictures, thousands of them. —— nobody knew. and he dies and 2000 people went to his house to see them. it backs up a lot of what i try to talk about two people without an people asking me questions, that viewers of my work, they see themselves in it. there so much attention to my belief, put onto the modern contemporary art, whatever you want to call it, all of its beauty and all its benefits. but, you know, mary brown, who is 90, and she goes into a place and sees something and says i remember this, and can tell them stories until story to the grandchildren, et cetera, and i think the english do it really, well. and when you reach someone like this, this one guy doing it. how many other people are out there doing it was what if we didn't know about him for so many years... exactly. larry was the
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same. he buried himself in his room. five covers, little campuses, painting away. he went to art couege painting away. he went to art college for 21 years part—time to try to learn. it was never happy with what he was doing. but he invented something. nobody really knew what was going on. nobody judged it. nobody said to this guy you can't draw. you only draw people in pubs. you only draw men with working caps. and planning a tour around the world, in a couple of yea rs' around the world, in a couple of years' time. —— i am planning. my theme is going to be the shipyards. and our communities and how it has changed our communities. and these people, i want to honour them. give them the respect we deserve. it is our culture and our life. it should be on paper. the secret lowry of warrington is what they called him to stop your next story is about the
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sumatran rhino. it has died. when it was getting ready to come here yesterday. they live in brighton. the commercial, which they have seen a thousand times, and the guy has a hand on an elephant‘s head. can you imagine the world without elephants? and then we are driving up yesterday and this was on the radio about the last one, is it malaysia to make it has died, only 100 left. it hit me like a sledgehammer. it really is happening. like when you see commercials or new things about the warand it commercials or new things about the war and it washes over you. until yesterday i really thought, i hate those words in my head, we have to do something, something has got to be done now. this is a big, big warning. there are only 100 left for supper imagine if there were only 100 human beings left on the planet. what would we do? we would be doing something about itjoplo i'm going to skip this one we will do it next
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time. it is about murray kerry cancer. think it needs longer than minute we have left —— marie curie. tell us about accidents in your career. you are from middlesbrough originally. we have steph from there. growing up, not as young man, going down to london to study, it was really difficult. my accent has changed a bit. they have moved 18 times. so this story are saying people change their voices are. and it's a real shame. i think you something to be really proud of. i was in liverpool last week. i'm in zero “— was in liverpool last week. i'm in zero —— yorkshire next week, here today, and to hear people speak differently and have different words and different expressions... differently and have different words and different expressions. . ” differently and have different words and different expressions... i do think we getting there.” and different expressions... i do think we getting there. i hope so. i don't think any of us sitting on the sofa talk the way you were meant to talk on the bbc 20 years ago. no, that has gone. there is some
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improvements, i hope. we will talk about murray kerry next time. mackenzie thorpe, thank you very much indeed. here's louise with a look at this morning's weather. a weather watcher picture from greater london, it has that real winter flavour, next weekend, greater london, it has that real winterflavour, next weekend, first of december is when we in the weather centre start calling it winter rather than autumn, but it is cloudy, damp out there, and there is fog around as well as you can see. but it is quiet, and for most of us today, they will be dry weather, so it isa today, they will be dry weather, so it is a good day for getting out there. there is rain around at the
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moment, some is quite heavy across the far north—east of scotland through the night, but that is going to continue to drift its way steadily northwards, it will park itself across the northern aisles for much of the day, but behind it we keep those cloudy conditions, it will be a quiet theme today. any hill fog we have at the moment, that will lift and brightest guys into the afternoon, but it will be hit and miss. if you get sunshine you will be lucky. not much around but it will be dry and mild, temperatures 9—12. there is rain around as you can see into the south—west, an area of low pressure will be moving on through the night, some of that rain is heavy across styles of silly, through the channel aisles into south—west and wales, —— across the isles of scilly. the cloud stays with us through the night, keeping things relatively mild overnight lows of 5—10. we start tomorrow with rain and the forecast. sitting through northern ireland, north—west england, down into the midlands. the winds will
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pick up as well, still from a southerly direction, so still from a milder source, but again we keep that loud with it, there will be outbreaks of rain gradually drifting steadily northwards. not quite making it to the final scotland, so here we could cling onto some dry and sunny spells for much of the day. tomorrow similar today, 9—12, you might see 13 in the south—west. and as we move out of monday and tuesday, more wet weather in the forecast, and the winds will strengthen through the southern friends of the slow. —— flank of the slow. this has the leftovers of some sebastian it, a little bit more energy in the rain, so heavy rain is expected as it pushes northwards, it some showers and it will be windy with that as well. tickly on the southern flank of that low pressure. —— particularly. the milder theme with us, again it will be cloudy with us, again it will be cloudy with outbreaks of rain, if you want something a little quiet a you have to wait until we get into the weekend. first of december looks likely to be dry, settled and sunny,
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cold default. we'll be back with the headlines at 8:00. now it's time for click. streaming services have changed the entertainment landscape. they're taking bigger and bigger chunks from the dvd market, they've completely revolutionised the music industry, and they've got terrestrial tv execs quaking in their expensive boots. but what about streaming video games? well, that's a lot harder, because you need to make the game responsive and playable. so could streaming ever kill the games console? this week, tech giant google launched stadia, a brand—new games streaming platform. marc cieslak has been putting stadia through its paces to see if it lives up to his expectations.
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google stadia does away with one of these, a games console, and replaces it with one of these, a chromecast ultra. if you want to play a game on a tv, that is. stadia also allows you to play on a tablet, computer or phone. in theory, it's capable of producing 4k visuals. it plugs into the back of a tv and then connects to a router. this then makes the connection with a data centre. this controller communicates with the router via wi—fi and allows me to actually play a game. streaming a game is more difficult than streaming video, because with video, you have data travelling in one direction, from the server to the viewer. with a game, data travels both ways. the inputs i'm making to control the game travel to the server and the graphics displaying the effect of my input has to come back to me. this is where a potential problem could occur, due to a thing called lag. if the inputs don't match up
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to the graphics, then the game becomes impossible to play. google claims its data centres use special tech which helps avoid this, as well as recommending that users are capable of receiving particular internet speeds. so the minimum spec required for stadia to actually work is an internet connection of 10mbps download and 1mbps upload speeds. so i have everything connected via wi—fi. and are we ready now to consign our consoles to the bin? um, initially, no. because, as you can see, performance is, well... it's a little bitjuddery, a little bit laggy, and nowhere near as smooth as you would expect from a console. and there we have "your game may stop because your connection isn't stable". i'm inside a bbc building using a router which should be more than capable, as far as this is concerned. so what is stadia like out in the real world?
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so we take a quick trip across town to check. it's quite impressive. because it's smooth, it works, we're playing the game, everything's working properly. but after a little bit of time playing, i've encountered quite a few issues with performance. we get graphics sticking. this is actually working quite well now, it's actually settled down quite a bit. i should point out i couldn't get stadia to work on any public wi—fi, though — the kind of stuff you find in cafes and bars. there are a number of video game streaming services already available, but stadia is perhaps the most ambitious. so far, it has a list of 22 titles at launch, and only one exclusive. and while games like tomb raider and destiny 2 are solid titles, they're not exactly brand—new games. we have work to do.
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but perhaps the biggest challenge to google comes from microsoft with its games streaming offering, which was on show at a recent xbox event. microsoft's response to video game streaming is project xcloud. i'm playing halo: the master chief collection on a mobile phone over a wi—fi connection. the crucial difference, i suppose, between this service and google stadia is that this is currently in its testing phase. microsoft taking a very cautious approach. my view is we're all in the testing phase. we're early in this technology and we view it will take many years before this technology becomes mainstream. there's been a lot of confusion about stadia's pricing, with lots of people thinking it's a "netflix for games". it's not. basically, the user pays a subscription to access the service.
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all of the games must then be purchased in order to play them. but on this evidence, video game streaming is surely the future. the problem is, today's technology isn't quite up to the task. newsreel: chapman built his first car for fun. it was an austin 7 special. no—one knows why, but he called it a lotus. since the ‘505, lotus has been producing lightweight cars designed to thrill, from the classic ‘605 elan to formula 1. commentator: 23 speed aces are on the grid at brands hatch to start the european grand prix. lotus has been specialising in affordable sports cars, offering 200, 300 or even 400 horsepower. but now, with new investors, its first foray into electric is as eye—wateringly expensive as it is powerful, and no—one has seen anything like it. this car is the first all—british electric hypercar. it will be the most powerful production car in existence when it
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goes into production next year. it's a huge statement of intent, announcing that lotus is back. so we have four 500ps motors to deliver 2000ps in total. that's german for 1,973 horsepower. these are the first pictures of the evija in action on a test track. while it's still being tinkered with, it's in camouflage paint. but the new poster child for lotus is notjust a pretty picture. the evija will have some truly astonishing abilities under the hood.
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so, there's no gears. there is a single—speed epicyclic box which means we have completely linear acceleration, from 0 to over 225 miles an hour. what that does do is it gives us unbelievable acceleration. so we can go, you know, from 0—300km/h in significantly less than nine seconds. the lower seating position is afforded by placing the 600kg of batteries in a pyramid formation behind the driver's seat, like a mid—mounted engine. working with partners to develop ultrafast chargers, which means we could charge this same car, you know, in less than nine minutes, up to 100%, and in about six minutes up to about 80%. that would be truly world—class. "that's all very well, dan," i hear you say, "but where do i put my luggage?" well, how about a carbon suitcase that you fit just
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here inside the driver's door? there's also one on the passenger side, so you're not fighting for space. at £2.2 million each, just 130 evijas will be made, starting next year. but the tech behind them will be around for a long time to come. cambridge union is the world's oldest debating society. in the past, it has hosted winston churchill, the dalai lama and theodore roosevelt, but tonight's star guests are not human, but artificial intelligence. project debater: the next issue is bias... ibm's project debater is the first of its kind in the world. a machine that can debate humans on complex objects. and in another world —first, it is here tonight to help two teams of humans debate the motion a! will do more harm than good. project debater, these take the floor. applause.
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project debater: ai will not be able to make a decision that is the morally correct one. the two project debaters are present in this single avatar using a female voice. each team's debater presents the opening arguments for the debate, which have been determined from over 1,000 contributions, something ibm calls speech by crowd. project debater: but first, we'll demonstrate how ai will automate repetitive tasks. the next issue will show how ai will create new jobs. the system solves the responses into meaningful groups and identifies central themes. the a! then generates a narrative from what it deems the most relevant information. and then, the human team members take over to continue the debate. they peer deeply into our soul because of the amount of data we trail on an everyday basis. whereas with al, it's absolutely crucial. why? because without data, there is no ai.
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the fact you have an ability to collect information or to perhaps get evidence and being confronted with the other side is taking things that humans already do as part of debating, but it's just enhancing you abilities to do it much better. some abilities are just going be able to be pushed much further with the technology of our system. project debater: greetings, harish... project debater first faced debate champion harish natarajan back in february in san francisco. project debater: but i suspect you've never debated a machine. and while losing the debate, the audience felt they had learned more about the subject from the ai than from the human champion. i think when you have access to far more information, it changes the way in which you think about the topic. and humans augment that by being able to talk about some of the emotional and moral issues, and i think, at least at this stage, artificial intelligence is behind. the future is in a synergistic collaboration between the system and humans, and not in replacing humans. so you never think it will be as sophisticated in developing arguments as a human? i believe when you're actually trying to use this technology, you should do that in collaboration with humans. in the end, tonight's ai—assisted
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debate was a tight—run contest — 51% voted against the motion that al would do more harm than good, with 48% voting for and 1% abstaining. so an ever—so—slightly upbeat view on the future of ai and human interaction here at cambridge. and that's it for this week. the full version is available right now on iplayer and we are on social media, wherever you need us. we're on facebook, youtube, instagram and twitter at @bbcclick. thanks for watching and we will see you soon.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and sally nugent. 0ur headlines today: a pledge not to increase taxes from the conservatives — as boris johnson prepares to launch his party's manifesto. labour promises to compensate millions of women who lost out because of changes to pensions. police officers are attacked and injured as they tackle a brawl at a cinema in birmingham involving around 100 people — some armed with machetes. england face a fight to save the first test, they're completely outplayed by new zealand — and they'll need to bat out the final day tomorrow to earn a draw. good morning, it is a dry day for most of us but there is a lot of this around. cloudy looking skies and at times take enough for the odd spot or two of drizzle, all the details coming up later.
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it's sunday the 24th of november. our top story. the conservatives will pledge not to raise the rate of income tax, national insurance or vat when they publish their election manifesto this afternoon. borisjohnson has also said he wants to bring his brexit deal back to the commons before christmas, if the conservatives are returned to power. 0ur political correspondent, nick eardley reports. what would he do with power? this afternoon, borisjohnson will unveil the conservative manifesto. his basic message — deliver brexit and move onto domestic priorities. he will pledge that the bill that will deliver brexit will be brought back to parliament before christmas if he wins the election. that, he says, would allow the country to move on. so what will the conservatives do on the home front? they will pledge today not to raise rates of income tax, national insurance, or vat. that'll make it harder for the government to raise money, but the tories are still pledging to spend. mrjohnson has already promised money for the health service,
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for more police, for education. today there will be costly pensioner family projects, too, like keeping the pension triple lock and winter fuel payments. as well as more money for childcare, to fix potholes, and for a skills fund. the manifesto will also pledge to end car parking charges at hospitals for protected groups — nhs staff on natives, -- nhs —— nhs staff on night shifts, disabled patients, the terminally ill and their families. the conservative say their plans are fully costed and affordable and they will spend the next three weeks trying to persuade you that they've got the best plan on offer. nick earley, bbc news. 0ur political correspondent, tom barton, joins us now. good morning, the conservatives, relatively late in the day, could be a canny move, maybe they are waiting
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to see what the others are offering. is this likely to play well with the voters ? is this likely to play well with the voters? the tories will be hoping that promise to introduce what they are calling a triple lock on taxes, keeping income tax, vat and national insurance frozen, will be something that catches voters eyes. 0n insurance frozen, will be something that catches voters eyes. on top of that catches voters eyes. on top of that there is the announcement from a couple of days ago to raise the threshold in which people start to pay national insurance. 0n threshold in which people start to pay national insurance. on top of that we knew the tories were planning on spending much more money than in recent years that he saw in the report, there are lots and lots of promises. what we don't yet have, we should perhaps get more detail later today when the manifesto is launched, is how they are planning on paying for those promises. the conservatives say this manifesto is fully costed. we will find out later today what those costs are. labour
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today what those costs are. labour today saying they are going to compensate millions of women who lost out on pension changes a couple of years ago, specifically women born in the window of the 19505. this is a group who are affected backin this is a group who are affected back in 2010 when changes to the state pension age were celebrated and women were told that even though they are expected to retire at 60, they are expected to retire at 60, they would have to work several yea rs they would have to work several years longer. campaign groups say as a result many women born in the 19505 did not have enough time to prepare and suffered financial hardship as a result of that delay while they were waiting for their pension to kick in. labour today are promising compensation for those women, on average, they say, of £15,000 rising to £31,000 for the people who are most heavily impacted by that change. they say it is a one
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off payment, it is going to cost £58 billion according to the labour party, but they say this is a one—off historical redress, what they call a historical debt of honour. they say the state will pick up honour. they say the state will pick up the bill but they should find the money in the same way as if they lost a court case. thanks very much. a number of police officers have been assaulted while trying to break up a large brawl at a cinema in birmingham. fights broke out as police attempted to clear around 100 people from the star city leisure complex. some people were reportedly armed with machetes. simonjones reports: it's not what these cinema—goers were expecting to see, chaos and confusion at the star city complex in birmingham as police tried to restore order. officers were called following reports that a group of people armed with machetes had arrived at the cinema. fights broke out as the police tried to move around 100 people. a number of officers were wounded, though their injuries are not thought to be serious.
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one girl punched this girl in the face, started slapping her. the audience watching was getting involved. the next thing you know the police rush in with their batons, telling everyone to get out and stay away. so there were kids crying on the floor with their mums, because obviously the frozen film was out. and it was just really sad to see. another eyewitness described it as one of the scariest moments of her life. several people have been arrested for assaulting officers and failing to disperse. simon jones, bbc news. police have been deployed to polling stations in hong kong, where people are voting in a local election. it's the first such vote since pro—democracy demonstrations began five months ago. let's speak to our correspondent, jonathan head, who joins us from hong kong now. it all certainly looks really very peaceful there. it it all certainly looks really very peacefulthere. it has it all certainly looks really very
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peaceful there. it has been peaceful, it has been orderly and the turnout has been spectacularly strong. in fact these queues are beginning to diminish a bit, after eight hours of voting. they have been solid. the turnout by lunchtime, less than half way through the total voting time, had already exceeded the total turnout for the whole day in the last election four years ago. although they are in local elections, frankly quite powerless district councils, everybody knows they are casting a vote not just about local services but either in support of or against the government. you have an alliance of opposition parties who have adopted broadly the goals of the protest movement who are running in these elections, letting people know if you vote for us give us a chance to win these council elections, we will see this as a vote of no—confidence in the government of hong kong over its handling of the protests. that is the way it will be read. in these areas we get the impression that a lot of people who
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wa nt to impression that a lot of people who want to show their opposition to the government have cast their votes. what we don't know at this stage is whether the government hope of the escalation in violence we have seen, the very dramatic confrontations and clashes between police and protesters, whether that might persuade some people who may be dissatisfied with the government to stick with them for fear of what has been done to hong kong's economy and the disorder. it is not clear how the disorder. it is not clear how the votes will play out but at the end of this boating, when the result start to come in, everyone will be watching to see how much are they drumming the government has got. after that no one can tell what will happen. where the protest movement to restart? everyone guesses it well, although in what form we don't know. and will beijing allow the government to make any concessions. thank you very much indeed. a former head of the uk border force has told bbc breakfast that unless ports and ferry companies start to work with the authorities, he fears more migrants could be killed trying to get to the uk. tony smith's warning comes a month after 39
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people were found dead in a container in essex. jane—frances kelly reports. it's a month on since the discovery of 39 bodies in a sealed refrigerated container in essex. all those that died were vietnamese. they had sailed from the belgian port of zeebrugge on a cargo ferry hoping for a better life in britain. the former head of the uk border force says there needs to be more cooperation between the authorities and private firms such as hauliers and the ferry companies, to stop further deaths. a co—ordinated attempt between ourselves, the uk border force, and of course our colleagues in french, belgium, dutch customs. that's what's required, a collaborative, co—ordinated effort along all of those routes, which will require a good deal of investment, but i fear if we don't do it then, i'm afraid, we will see more tragedies. his warning comes after three separate incidents in less than a week when migrants were found in containers. on thursday afternoon,
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irish police found 16 people in a sealed container on a ferry from france to ireland. ten were found on the m25 in essex. five days ago a group of 25 migrants were found in a refrigerator container on a ferry travelling from the netherlands to england. the challenges remain constant. on a daily basis migrants attempt to get in the back of lorries, drivers have to remain vigilant. people smugglers seem to be the only ones benefiting from the misery. jane—frances kelly, bbc news. doctors say people need to take extra precautions, in order to stop the spread of the winter vomiting bug, norovirus. public health england says there's been a big increase in the number of reported cases, compared to the last five winter seasons. this week, pupils in around 60 schools across the north east of england were sent home with symptoms. two people are missing in southern france, where heavy rain has caused serious flooding. several roads and railway lines have been cut off and flights from nice airport have been disrupted.
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large parts of neighbouring italy have also had heavy rainfall and are on flood alert. it is exactly ten past eight. the snp have announced they will push the next uk government to lift financial restrictions on the scottish government's borrowing powers. the party claim it will unlock nearly 3 billion pounds over the course of the next parliament, which they plan to use to boost the economy and tackle climate change. let's speak to the snp's david linden, whojoins us from glasgow. good morning, thanks very much indeed forjoining us this morning. why do you feel you need this extra capacity to borrow? at the moment we have a challenge in terms of climate change and making sure we invest in infrastructure, under the current fiscal framework scotland can only borrow for capital borrowing. we are asking you to government to lift that fiscal straitjacket and allow
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the scottish government to invest in our national infrastructure, make sure we can meet some of the challenges around climate change and thatis challenges around climate change and that is what we will hopefully do on the 12th of december. why specifically infrastructure and climate change when voters in scotla nd climate change when voters in scotland may feel things like the health service, education are more pressing priorities? take the example of health, we have £40 billion worth of record investment in the nhs. in terms of a&e, we have the best performing in the last yea rs. we have the best performing in the last years. we have a good set up. one of the big challenges is that of the climate emergency. we have some of the toughest climate challenges in terms of commitment in scotland, but what we have done during the course of the election campaign has unveiled plans for a new green deal which will be backed up by about £3 million of investment, making sure we have the interconnect is for scotland's islands, making sure we drop the charges around unfair transmission charging, so there is a
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lot of stuff we want to do in terms of meeting that challenge around climate change, and that is why we are asking the uk government left the fiscal straitjacket we have at the fiscal straitjacket we have at the moment. he said the nhs scotland is one of the best performing in the country but the audit scotland report which came out last month said it is struggling to become financially sustainable. surely the money would be better placed in the nhs? we are certainly very committed to making sure we invest in our national health service, it is £40 billion worth of racket funding. there is a product conversation to be had about how scotland operates economically because at the moment we do so with one hand tied behind our back. that is why scott needs the right to choose its own future, in its own hands and not boris johnson. when the person strings are controlled by westminster gimmicks is difficult for us but in terms of the nhs, we have a good nhs, they just think how much more we can do. that is why a vote for the snp will
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lift the fiscal straitjacket and give scotland the opportunity to put future in its hands and not boris johnson '5. future in its hands and not boris johnson 's. two in eight key waiting target time is not met, highest drug deaths in the european union, 1100 last year, consulting vacancies unfilled. she and cupid putting money into that? one of issue covers from westminster. we are aware there isa from westminster. we are aware there is a drugs problem in scotland, that is a drugs problem in scotland, that is why we act consistently said we are looking at the full devolution of the 1971 drugs misuse legislation. at the moment, based on evidence, it has been brought forward by the national health service. want to look at a safe injecting facility to tackle that. u nfortu nately injecting facility to tackle that. unfortunately those pleas have fallen upon deaf ears with the uk government so if the uk government are not willing to take action on theissue are not willing to take action on the issue of drugs death, they
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should have the courage to devolve legislation to holyrood. due to the... we have a plan to take that on, but unfortunately uk government are not cooperating with scotland at the moment and that is deeply disappointing. education is developed and yet one in three pupils leave primary school without basic literacy, fewer than three in five of the poorest areas, why don't you put the money into education if you put the money into education if you are feeling scotland's children? we have 1200 more teachers in scotland's schools since nicola sturgeon came to power. we are investing in funds, we are seeing benefits, one school has been given a pot of money which is given to the head teacher to make sure they can target those interventions. the people equity fund has been a good
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thing and is bearing fruit. but our education has a good record to tell and that includes young people getting free tuition at university, in education we have a good record and we are invested in that making sure scotland is the smart place to go and live. there is a real possibility that the snp could hold the keys to power perhaps for labour. nicola sturgeon has talked on the bbc on friday night about some of the things she would want from that. are you having conversations with the labour party already about that? we have certainly been very clear throughout the process of this election campaign, exactly what concessions the snp would seek to extract. at the snp would seek to extract. at the moment the proposal is looking good, we are looking forward to holding the balance of power and you can rest assured that the snp mp5 in large numbers will extract significant concessions and drive a ha rd significant concessions and drive a hard bargain for scotland. we critically with all parties that one of the prices for our support would
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be giving scotland to the right to choose its own future because the uk that people voted for in 2014 will no longer exist. we face the prospect of being dragged out of the european union against their will so we are crystal clear in this election campaign that we want to escape brexit give people the right to choose their own future, put scotland's future in scotland's hands. if the conservatives win a clear majority, that won't happen. borisjohnson has clear majority, that won't happen. boris johnson has made clear majority, that won't happen. borisjohnson has made it clear brexit will be delivered, perhaps by christmas. if you're in a position we have that influence and are able to hold sway of a labour administration underjeremy corbyn, is that referendum something that you will push for? he said he will not do it in the first couple of yea rs not do it in the first couple of years anyway. we have certainly been consistent throughout this election campaign that we have that clear message of giving scotland the right to choose its own future. it behoves any prime minister to ignore that,
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we are confidentjeremy corbyn will see the merits of our argument to have a independence referendum. you might still be in europe anyway because jeremy corbyn might still be in europe anyway becausejeremy corbyn has said he will have another referendum and he will have another referendum and he will abide by any outcome. if we end up will abide by any outcome. if we end up staying in europe would you drop the independence referendum? there's a degree of ambiguity because if a peoples vote takes place, which will jeremy corbyn campaign on? i think the biggest issue of the date that is an untenable position. scotland faces the prospect of being dragged out of the european union and even if there is a peoples vote, what happens if people in the rest of the uk as they did in 2016 vote to leave. scott needs to have that escape route from brexit and that is the clear mandate that snp are standing on the selection. thank you for talking to us this morning. here's louise with a look at this morning's weather. a promise of a break in the rain
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eventually? eventually. today is going to be quite dry but it is painful, the weather at the moment, there is more rain in the forecast, don't look away, you have to know when and where. this is the current story across much of the country, it is a drab november day. pretty cloudy, murky, the cloud is thick enough drizzle around as well. we have seen rain from this weather front in scotland, that is going to push steadily northwards and allow this little ridge of high pressure to keep things quiet for today. not much of the way of sunshine but quieter and drier. this is a story of the rain for the last few hours, it is pushing up and for the rest of the day it will pack itself across the day it will pack itself across the northern isles. behind that we keep that cloud, a light south—easterly breeze, because the winds are so light that is not going to help shift it and break it up. we could see a couple of points is of brighter skies and the fog were left but it stays dry and mild. this is
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the next area of low pressure that is going to bring some rain across south—west england into wales through the night, gradually moving into northern ireland. because we keep that blanket of cloud across the country it is going to be a mild night, incredibly mild relief at this time of year. 0vernight lows of 5-10d. the this time of year. 0vernight lows of 5—10d. the rain is there first thing on monday morning and it will continue to push its way north and east. around the area of the pressure we will see winds picking up pressure we will see winds picking upa pressure we will see winds picking up a little more in comparison to today. some rain around first thing across northern ireland, north—west england, stretching through the midlands and east anglia and the south—east. behind it we could see sharp thundery downforce following on but if anywhere is going to stay dry, with maybe some sunny breaks, it is the far north of scotland. as a move into tuesday we do it all again but this time of this area of the pressure has the remnants of
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storm sebastien. there might be a little bit more energy, the isobars squeezing together, the wind stronger. there will be rain around as it moves steadily north, more rain to come in the forecast on tuesday, a windy afternoon for many of us but at least the wind direction coming largely from the south so it stays mild again. there was peaking at 14 celsius. when will we see drier weather? probably towards the end of the working week into the weekend. things were quite down —— things will quieten down. that will come at a price, it will be colder but that is the price i will prefer. back to you too. thanks very much indeed. in the last week, there have been three separate incidents in which migrants have been found trying to enter the uk in shipping containers. it comes a month since 39 people were found dead in a container in essex.
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so why do people continue to put themselves in such danger? we're joined now by gulwali passarlay who came to the uk from afghanistan 12 years ago. you have put yourself in exactly the same situation that those people who died so tragically in essex did. you came ina died so tragically in essex did. you came in a refrigerated lorry.” didn't really put myself in that situation, i was forced or being put in that situation, i was a child. the last part of myjourney to the uki the last part of myjourney to the uk i was in the back of a refrigerated container, my fate could have been similar but tha nkfully could have been similar but thankfully i survived. the difference between my lorry and this was it was a refrigerated lorry behind a truck, so notjust any container on its own. why did you feel that he wanted to put yourself in that position, that risk, that danger to get here? one of the reasons i came to the uk, i left afghanistan as a child because of the conflict, i was forced to three. in the journey the conflict, i was forced to three. in thejourney i the conflict, i was forced to three.
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in the journey i was the conflict, i was forced to three. in thejourney i was in the conflict, i was forced to three. in the journey i was in the hands of smugglers and traffickers. the reason i was coming to the uk was because supposedly my brother was here. people say fans a, germany is safe, why don't you stay there? people do stay there. —— france is safe. in my case, i was not safe. the condition was not good for humans, it was terrible, people are getting arrested daily. i attempted some risky roots and we were put in this dangerous position by the smugglers. i would say the reason i had to go for this because there we re had to go for this because there were no safe legal routes to do that in the uk. i had a legal right to do that because my brother was here. but that was not available to me is that list are not available to a lot of people who want to come here in a civilised and legal way. three lots of migrants have been found in
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separate incidents in three different routes, does that surprise you? it doesn't surprise me because it is going to continue to happen u nless we it is going to continue to happen unless we move on from the hostile environment and move on from protected borders, we should protect people. the policy has been don't come here and people make those journeys from many reasons, they may have legitimate reasons from prosecution. we have a legal and moral reason to welcome these people. we need to move away from the hostile environment. let's have alternatives for people to come here if we are going to have worse, worse. ‘— if we are going to have worse, worse. “ worse. if we are going to have worse, worse. —— worse. we do have a processing centre so the home office can do the same thing when people get here. yet have a land that may
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yet be on the land to claim asylum. how are we supposed to get online if we don't have safer routes? i have been campaigning we need to do human policies. you are not advocating we open the doors to everyone and anyone? that would be great but we don't live in that sort of wealth. we can't cope with everyone. less than 1% of our population are refugees. we have a more obligation. we cannot expect other countries to ta ke we cannot expect other countries to take the borders and challenges. with a specific 3000 unaccompanied minors from europe, which are only 300. local authorities across uk we re 300. local authorities across uk were to foster those kids, they offered placements for safe passage, but the government is not bringing those young people in. you work with refugees all the time, what are the stories you are hearing at the moment? it is heartbreaking. even when people make it here it is not the end, it is the beginning of the end. the home office dehumanises, the process is very dehumanising. it
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took me five years to get my refugee status, it took me 11 years to get my settled status, hopefully another year until i get my citizenship. it is not easy that people come here. we have to treat these people as people, we have to treat them fairly, these are human beings, not statistics, numbers and political tools. we have to develop policies and make policies that are in line with our human rights and obligations. thank you for coming doctors are urging us all to take extra precautions, to help stop the spread of the winter vomiting bug, norovirus. it follows a big rise in the number of cases this year. earlier, we spoke to the gp, dr amir khan who told us it was a particular problem in schools. we have seen a rise in schools in particular where we have children in close proximity, children are cute and gorgeous but not the most hygienic of the beings so they don't
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necessarily wash their hands all the time if their mums are not at school with them and they touch things and things spread. when you get people in close proximity you are going to get the spread of viruses in this time of year it is norovirus. why is it worse in winter? people's immune systems a re it worse in winter? people's immune systems are a little bit lower because it is colder, we are busy, we are tired. itjust spreads. how do you guard against it? it is not very pleasant, it is early in the morning, it spreads through the faecal oral route. if you haven't washed your hands, you touch things and then other people touch them, evenif and then other people touch them, even if you get close to people with the virus, they can breathe out particles so it is airborne to a degree. the waste to guard against it as if your child has it, by all means convert them but don't get too close. —— the ways to guard against it. but basic hygiene, wash your hands after you have been to the
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loo, don't handle food and don't wash your hands, wash your hands before you eat. all the stuff our mums told us to do and that is how you protect yourself against it. mums told us to do and that is how you protect yourself against itm most cases, people recover after a couple of days, but some people are really very much at risk, aren't they? did as majority of people were recover themselves without any medical intervention that the vast majority of people will recover. but the elderly and children are at risk of dehydration. they need to be hospitalised or see their gp. what should you be looking out for? basic things, with children their breathing may become more rapid if they are dehydrated, they become drowsy, electro— dry, if they are crying without tears, that is a sign of dehydration —— their reps become very dry. the same with the elderly but they become very confused. it is
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worth contacting a doctor if they have these symptoms. if you are young like you and i, sally. then young like you and i, sally. then you can manage it at home yourself. i was going to say that is an interesting point, at home. is going to say you don't need to go to the doctor if you are fit and healthy. if you have sickness and diarrhoea, this is probably what it is so stay—at—home and separate fluids. absolutely, don't go and infect other people because people in hospital are very vulnerable to these kinda things. if things don't resolve after three days maybe think about ringing for advice. you're supposed to wait a couple of days before you go back to work or school. this is not a free pass to have a couple of days off before christmas? if you have diarrhoea or vomiting, two days after it has settled, is when you should return to work or school. food or no food?
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just liquids? just liquids first, if you are tolerating them without vomiting land food, dry toast, digestive biscuits. avoid dairy because that can upset your stomach and then work your way up to your favourite foods from there. wash your hands before you eat, etc etc. stay with us, headlines coming up. good morning, welcome to breakfast
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with rogerjohnson and sally nugent. it's 8:30, here's a summary of this morning's main news. the conservatives will pledge not to raise the rate of income tax, national insurance or vat when they publish their election manifesto this afternoon. borisjohnson has also said he wants to bring his brexit deal back to the commons before christmas, if the conservatives are returned to power. meanwhile, labour has pledged to compensate nearly four million women who lost out when their state pension age rose from 60 to 66. the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell said the compensation, which could cost £58 billion over five years, would make right a "historical wrong." the snp say they will push the next uk government to lift financial restrictions on the scottish government's spending powers. the party claim it will unlock almost £3 billion over the course of the next parliament, which they plan to use to boost the economy and tackle climate change. a number of police officers have been assaulted while trying to break up a large brawl at a cinema in birmingham. fights broke out yesterday
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afternoon as police attempted to clear around 100 people from the star city leisure complex. some people were reportedly armed with machetes. 0ne eywitness described it as one of the "scariest momemts" of their life. police have been deployed to polling stations in hong kong, where people are voting in a local election. it's the first such vote since pro—democracy demonstrations began in june. reports suggest there's been a big turnout, with a record 4.1 million people registered to vote. a former head of the uk border force has told bbc breakfast that unless ports and ferry companies start to work with the authorities, more migrants could be killed trying to get to the uk. tony smith says there needs to be a coordinated effort which will require a "good deal of investment." the warning comes after three separate incidents in less than a week where migrants have been found in containers and a month since 39 people were found dead in essex. doctors say people need to take extra precautions, in order to stop the spread of the winter vomiting bug norovirus.
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public health england says there's been a big increase in the number of reported cases, compared to the last five winter seasons. this week, pupils in around 60 schools across the north—east of england were sent home with symptoms. two people are missing in southern france, where heavy rain has caused serious flooding. several roads and railway lines have been cut off and flights from nice airport have been disrupted. large parts of neighbouring italy have also had heavy rainfall and are on flood alert. those are the main stories this morning. an update on the cricket. not a good morning if you are an england cricket fan. it has not been pretty and that's why joe cricket fan. it has not been pretty and that's whyjoe root is looking a little paint because it has been painful to watch and probably painful to watch and probably painful to watch and probably painful to play and at times because new zealand have racked up the runs. the biggest score against england. england's cricketers are in big trouble in the first test,
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falling well behind on day four in mount maunganui. jb watling continued his sensational innings, making 205, ably supported by mitchell santner, who hit a century as they declared on 615—9. england finished on 55—3 at the close, losing three wickets forjust six runs — that's 207 runs behind as they crumbled in the face of that scoreboard pressure and that impressive partnership between the two batsmen. it was a terrific partnership that has put new zealand in a fa ntastically has put new zealand in a fantastically strong position to dominate this game. england now, there are only thoughts of trying to save it. unfortunately they have lost three wickets towards the end of the day, so with one day to go england have it all to do. jose mourinho made a winning start in his first match as tottenham manager, beating west ham 3—2. the top three won yesterday, which means liverpool maintain their eight—point lead at the top. gavin ranjaun reports.
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after 11 months away, jose mourinho is back in the premier league and back with a win. his first assignment was to take his tottenham side to west ham. and it took son heung—min just over half—an—hour to open the scoring at the london stadium. harry kane put them three up and after holding off a late it was another debut win from renewa bles it was another debut win from renewables to it is a very important three points. we have a little jump in the table and it is important for that for the place to have that smile. for the players to go to the dressing room, a wave of home music on, smile on theirfaces, happiness, and that is very, very important. liverpool's first title run in 30 years shows no signs of letting up. they needed another late goal though, this time from roberto firmino to get past crystal palace. that's now 12 wins out of 13 forjurgen klopp's side.
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we wanted it and i think that is absolutely 0k. you cannot run the boys heads off if you only really brilliant games. i like a lot of performance. but i know why some things were not there. we see them more often. the good things, at least. their closest challenges are leicester, who won their fifth successive game at brighton. jamie vardy on the scoresheet once again. manchester city fell behind to chelsea, but had riyad mahrez to thank for a crucial three points. the gap to liverpool back down to nine. at the emirates, arsenal needed an injury time equaliser to scrape a draw against southampton. a result that will do little to ease the pressure on unai emery. another manager feeling the heat will be everton's marco silva. norwich getting their first away win of the season and leaving the toffees in a sticky situation. celtic are three points clear at the top of the scottish premiership after beating livingston 4—0, but rangers can move level again this afternoon —
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they're away to hamilton academical. st mirren moved off the bottom of the table, thanks to victory at home to ross county — sam foley with a late winner after they'd gone behind. despite the lta boosting the crowd with 900 free tickets for british fans, the gb team were knocked out of the semifinals of the davis cup, losing to the hosts spain in madrid. after winning one singles match each, the tie came down to the doubles — with gb falling just short, as our tennis correspondent russell fuller explains. the magic box in madrid was rocking on saturday night and jamie murray and neil skupski came tantalisingly close to setting up a deciding set of the doubles which could have put britain into another davis cup final. but ra found the tao of the world number one and feliciano lopez won the doubles match into microtitre plates. britain had to set points to take the match into a deciding set and agonisingly won more points than the dow and la paz. it had all started surprisingly with kyle edmund winning the opening
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singles against lopez. dan evans then post attempt to close in the opening set of their singles match but after he lost that the second set disappeared in a flash 6—0. but after he lost that the second set disappeared in a flash 6-0. we are hurting just now but we had an amazing tie against spain the strongest team arguably in the competition and we have pushed them within a couple of points of going into a final set to decide who gets to the final and to ridge xi finals itself a thick as a bleak achievement. spine on home soil have achievement. spine on home soil have a chance to win the davis cup for the first time since 2011. big disappointment for great britain but it has been a very very encouragingly. they've been hit with a record points deduction and fine in the premiership, but saracens got their european cup campaign back on track with victory over 05preys. they lost to racing in their opening game — but two tries from rotimi segun helped them to a bonus point 44—3 win.
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saracens have been fined over £5 million and stripped of domestic league points for breaching salary cap regulations. there are details of all the day's games on the bbc sport website. england women ended 2019 with a clean sweep in their autumn internationals — finishing with a huge 60 points to 3 win over italy. world player of the year emily scarratt scored one of their ten tries in front of a full house in bedford. it was an impressive display against italy, who finished second to grand slam winners england in this year's six nations. spain'sjon rahm has taken the advantage over tommy fleetwood, as they vie to end the year as europe's top golfer, in the race to dubai. rahm shot a six—under par round of 66 to take a share of the lead going into the final day of the season—ending tour championship. fleetwood is four shots adrift. england's charley hull is in contention heading into the final round of the women's tour championship in florida. she sank five birdies in her last nine holes to move to 11 under par — five shots off the lead.
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it looks as though tyson fury‘s rematch with deontay wilder is on next february, after wilder beat luis 0rtiz to retain his wbc world heavyweight title for the tenth time in las vegas. meanwhile, callum smith has successfully defended his wba super—middleweight title in his home town of liverpool. the fight against fellow—britain john ryder went the distance — but smith won it on a unanimous points decision. finally, back to football, and there was an incredible final in south america's top club competition, the copa libertadores. the brazilian side flamengo trailed argentina's river plate 1—0 — but gabriel barbosa scored in the 89th and 92nd minutes, before being sent off! it's flamengo's first libertadores title for 38 years.
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i wonder what he got sent off for. sarcastically applauding a decision by the ref, but after that all the ha rd by the ref, but after that all the hard work had been done, so i guess abroad the way. good knowledge, but you on the spot. you're watching breakfast from bbc news, it's time now for a look at the newspapers. let's look at the front pages. the sunday telegraph leads on borisjohnson's pledge to cut hospital car parking fees for millions of people as he launches the conservative manifesto. the paper also has a photo of him on the campaign trail with his father stanley. labour leaderjeremy corbyn's pledge to pay out £57 billion to women who lost out because of pension changes dominates the front page of the sunday mirror. the sunday times has the latest on the prince andrew scandal — with reports that the queen has cancelled his 60th birthday party. it also features a photo
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of prince charles receiving a traditional welcome during his six—day tour of new zealand. and the most—read story on the bbc news website is about the brawl at a cinema complex in birmingham — where police moved in to tackle a fight involving people armed with machetes. the artist mackenzie thorpe is here to tell us what's caught his eye. good morning. let you to choose from in the papers this morning. john bishop is on the sunday mirror and says a cancer scare made me face my own death. it was a scare, he didn't have it, just a worrying scare. yes. he looked on the website for information and got panicked and confused and found out that it wasn't cancer. but i have been there stop i know exactly what he is talking about. i think it is great that he, everybody associates this man with funny things and life must be great for him, he is famous, nobody is immune to cancer. i went
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to the doctors on a thursday morning, thursday afternoon i went into the hospital because he couldn't figure out what was going on and! couldn't figure out what was going on and i was in so much pain. they came in to see me after a scan about four o'clock in the afternoon and said it is a good job it is ready because of it was sunday you would because of it was sunday you would be dead. and that was it. susan ran out to get a dressing gown and pyjamas because i wasn't leaving the building. what happened? i woke up fine. they had erupted my bowels and it was a dangerous thing. i woke up totally not expecting to wake up, i got my mind ready for that very quickly but you do realise it is downhill now to stop i am not a team, i have got an admission, i will be the greatest artist of the world, it is right, i have to get on with it, get to work, time is shorter, move on. john bishop talks about all the things he loves and misses and now he takes the time... i was on misses and now he takes the time... iwas ona misses and now he takes the time... i was on a jetty in a lake in my
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mind witha i was on a jetty in a lake in my mind with a dog, i hear the dog barking, my dog when i was a kid and my son saying dad, dad, dad and susan saying, you are all right, you are all right. come on, you have to do now, you have got to. it goes on about the hardest thing for me with marie curie... this story about marie curie... this story about marie curie, the words to use when talking about debt.” marie curie, the words to use when talking about debt. i found the hardest thing being told i might not wa ke hardest thing being told i might not wake up, i could handle that. having to ring after the operation because i had no time to talk beforehand, i was walking down the street in hove to ring my brother and my sisters and my uncle, saying, i have got cancer. to hear them get upset and cry, that was the hardest thing to do. it really was. you can't talk to anybody about how you really feel. susan had to put up with howl
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anybody about how you really feel. susan had to put up with how i feel, what is going to happen, the fear. it is good to talk. before i can get it out there. on a lighter note... this is quite appropriate. how do you sit on a sofa? picture, or hugger? you don't want to be one of those on the sofa, that's for sure. this isn't the most comfortable sofa ever. it is the most famous sofa ever. it is the most famous sofa ever. my first time in here, how are you going to sit, how would you put your jacket, would you you going to sit, how would you put yourjacket, would you have your elbow like this and it owes makes me smile when charlie is doing this programme and he does this with his leg. he does! there he goes again. the desk is too close to him may be because it is not that comfortable. you do have to slightly shuffle.” will not get myself into trouble by
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standing up but if you could see how threadbare this is underneath, just because of other squishing that people do on the sofa. it is a very nervous place for some people. if i was being myself i would be laid down. i will not be celebrating the situation here. look at this chap here, on his bum, legs out, poor lady here, no space at all, that is no good. these people out socialising, should you click when you drink? toasting a tricky art according to the daily telegraph. you read the article it has been going on since roman times, in japan, you look the person in the eye. people who do that... you are all in the same place. my grandchildren do it. before every meal to stop it breaks the ice. with juice i hope, rather than champagne stops by and no, it is always the
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vodka! the queen mother wouldn't click a glass, she would hold the glass up and say the name of a person she liked. and then hold the glass down and the name of a person she didn't. all the papers are full of losing things. we have these traditions, we should be holding onto them and passing them down. thank you, it has been great to see you. seeing as you have been talking about ice and breaking the ice before the end of the programme, in case you are desperate to know about it we will be talking about frozen two. iam it we will be talking about frozen two. i am going. it we will be talking about frozen two. iam going. i haven't it we will be talking about frozen two. i am going. i haven't seen it yet. it's time now to say goodbye to sally — she's off to read the news for the andrew marr programme. here's louise with a look at this morning's weather. haven't seen frozen one yet. i have
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got rugby playing boys, it was never a highlight in our house. look at this beautiful photograph in barnsley. not great weather but very atmospheric pictures. it is cloudy and drab, a november day. the leaves are now off the trees. winterjust around the corner. it arrives next sunday as far as we are concerned. we will be saying winter rather than autumn. for here and now we see rain through the night pushing its way up into the far north of scotland as we speak. elsewhere we have got this bike at the cloud across the country. some fairly stubborn foreground at the moment which will gradually let. the cloud might brighten a little and we see a few brief glances of sunshine if we are lucky but the emphasis is staying dry for most of us. cloudy and mild. temperatures will pick as high as 11 or 12 which is not bad for this time of year. but some rain to come. it arrives to disabling, overnight, some of it heavy in south—west england into wales. gradually
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nudging towards northern ireland and into the south midlands by the end of the night. with the cloud around it is staying mild. a blanket of cloud preventing those temperatures from falling anywhere close to low single figures. 5—10. tomorrow we start off with this front bringing that rain. it will continue to move its way north and east. that means in wet weather for the early morning rush—hour across north—west england, into the midlands, eventually at the london area as well. behind it was the frontal wrinklies the scattering of sharp showers. some of those heavy and the odd rumble of thunder mixed in. for north of scotland may stay dry and going on to a bit of practice. temperatures 9—13. again still pretty mild. there is more rain to come. we do it all again on tuesday. another low pressure moves through. this would bring some heavier rain. the remnants of a storm in there, storm sebastian. it will continue to bring some wet and windy weather particularly on the
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southern flank of that lower zip drives steadily northwards on tuesday. so more rain, some of it heavy at times, when the as well but at least the wind some southerly direction so at least it stays mild. wednesday and thursday could be a showery story but if you want the dry settled theme to return it does look as though into the weekend high pressure will take over questioning things down but that means some sunshine by day but clear skies and cold again overnight. that's it. back to you. frozen, your favourite. thank you. while it may not be an election headline—grabber, like brexit or the nhs, the issue of childcare remains hugely important to millions of families. breakfast'sjohn maguire has been talking to parents and care providers about their concerns and what they'd like to see done to help. have you had a nice day? that's a nice cuddle! it's home time for libby. as for all parents returning
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for work, forjess, finding the nursery place was the first hurdle. it's quite difficult to get into nursery. so we put her down there on the waiting list when she was about a month old. so just to make sure we got a place. so i looked at a couple of nurseries around the area, so obviously it being convenient was obviously quite critical. but we really liked this one when we looked around. there were a couple of things about it. itjust seemed quite relaxed, the children seemed happy. i like the fact it is in the community centre. downstairs and helen is picking up her son leo. once a place has been secured, the next challenge is paying for it. we're in a fortunate position, we've got two professionals in our household, which between mortgage costs and childcare costs, even we find that there is not a lot of excess at the end of the month. so i think for people with a lower income it is hugely challenging and they know a lot of people in that category who have,
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unfortunately, not had the choice of the luxury of being able to go back to workjust because of the cost of childcare. this is a bristol nursery run as a social enterprise, with profits going back into the community centre where it's housed. it provides up to 63 places, employs almost 30 staff, and was set up to meet strong local demand. we know that it's a growing demographic of working families. people are making a choice to buy into all the social elements that we are able to bring. so notjust a nursery, but they know what they will get high quality staff, they will have well—paid staff, the low turnover of staff, and it's a consistent place that's going to stay open. that's a very important factor for a lot of families as well. availability and affordability are the two key factors. research by the family charity quorum puts the average cost of a nursery place for an under two at £127 per week, more than £6,600 per year. and it's rising above
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the rate of inflation. we want all parents to have choices about how they balance working and caring. parents will always know what is best for them and their family, but what's tragic for us as a society is if parents are really want to work, who have the skills and talents to work, are locked out of the workforce by unaffordable or unavailable childcare. it's also worth saying that we know from huge, many years of research now, that childcare is good for children. children who attend a high—quality nursery go on to do better in their gcses and beyond. so this is a good investment for all of us. the nursery beneath christ church in bristol has been a part of the local community here for 43 years. as the children role play in the garden, if the staff had a magic wish, it would be to simplify childcare payment. i think the funding needs to be increased. i think it's a very low amount. as i said, for us as a charity it's not an issue, but for other places that have got high costs,
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high staff costs, that then is a real thing. so i think if you are going to be giving more hours, you need to be giving more money per hour. and that's a real problem for lots of people. childcare may not be the main headline grabber of this particular general election, but it remains an important issue for parents, for communities, and for the politicians seeking to represent them — now and in the future. john maguire, bbc news, bristol. it's six minutes to nine o'clock. it's been one of the most highly—anticipated films of the year, and frozen 2 has finally opened in uk cinemas. so, was it worth the wait? i'll ask the film critic kat brown injust a moment — first here's a little look at anna and elsa's latest adventure.
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elsa, the past is not what it seems. you must find the truth. go north across the enchanted lands and into the unknown. but be careful. we have always feared elsa's powers were too much for this world. now we must hope... we are enough. —— they are not. was it good? i am so relieved to say yes it is. people have been spending the next six years going if we have to go into the frozen world again it has to be worth are well and i am saying read by how good it is. very glittery but this time a sunday
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morning. what stands out for you? it had such, frozen one had such a lot to live up to. it is interesting because the average reviews, if you look at rotten tomatoes is about 75% which is good but we forget that froze n which is good but we forget that frozen one introduced the completely different way of being which was women saving each other rather than a prince charming turning up and it had one of the best twists in recent films which i won't spoil for anyone who hasn't seen it. this time around i think they are all very much aware of what a juggernaut the frozen franchise has become and they have gone really big on the technology, the art is fantastic. the couple who write the songs have just gone back to their broadway roots and this is a real musical theatre treat. talk more about that in a minute but she made of interesting point about the
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whole frozen brand. they have new dresses. and trousers. parents will be groaning. that means a whole new outlay on new frozen kit. the merchandise is absolutely key and i was speaking to somebody who had taken theiryoung was speaking to somebody who had taken their young daughter to a screening at the weekend and their daughter was the only one they're not wearing a frozen dress. she was wearing the frozen sweatshirt, saying mummy appeal feel really left out. the merchandise is one of those slightly less empowering things to come out of it but it is also what makes all the money. you mention the broadway roots of the people who wrote the music. even i know let it go which was the big blockbuster song. from frozen one. other songs on this that will be similarly popular? initially from the first couple of songs i was like oh, it is just going to be this, they will
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throw song that it sticks. but my goodness there are at least four songs in this that pulse my patented goose bump test really. there is a lovely song, most of the big songs are again with elsa. the beautiful one in the snow cave called and show yourself, a really inspiring powerful one, this film's let it go no cold into the unknown. it has been in my head for two weeks. also a lovely 0ne been in my head for two weeks. also a lovely one that anna gets. voiced by a lovely one that anna gets. voiced by kristen bell. the poor stepsister inaway by kristen bell. the poor stepsister in a way and the traditional fairy tale because herjob is to run after elsa and stop her from leaving her for good but she gets a beautiful song called do the next right thing which is the film's most powerful message. do the next right thing. 0ne message. do the next right thing. one of the reasons this film is so great is we are living in such uncertain times that wearing a
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ridiculous sequin blazer is actually a huge relief and a break from it. this film is also just a relief from everything. i am glad you pronounce the other character. it is elsa and ana. why not spell it with one n. who knows? cat film journalist talking about frozen two, it could be your sunday afternoon treat. dan and louise will be back with breakfast tomorrow from 6am. have a good day. bye— bye.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 9: the conservatives will pledge not to raise income tax, national insurance contributions or vat when they publish their election manifesto this afternoon. labour pledges to compensate nearly four million women who lost out when their state pension age rose from 60 to 66. voters in hong kong turn out in record numbers — to cast their ballots in district council elections. a number of police officers have been assaulted while trying to break up a large brawl at a cinema in birmingham. and our sunday morning edition of the papers is at 9.35 — this mornings reviewers are property and personal finance commentator, anne ashworth — and editorial director of first

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