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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  November 26, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm GMT

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hello, you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy here in milford haven. today at 2pm: the chief rabbi questions whetherjeremy corbyn is fit to be prime minister, saying he has allowed anti—semitism to poison his party. the labour leader says the party has taken rapid and effective action and says anti—semitism is vile and wrong. there is no place whatsoever for anti—semitism in any shape orform or in any place whatsoever in modern britain. and under a labour government, it will not be tolerated in any form whatsoever. i want to make that clear. i do think it is a very serious business when the chief rabbi speaks as he does. i've never known anything like it.
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the intervention from the chief rabbi has prompted a leading muslim organisation to criticise the conservatives for their handling of claims of islamophobia in the party. in other news.... don't give this man your vote because of his brexit policy — that's the message from former tory cabinet minister lord heseltine. a present senior minister hit back. michael i think advised people to vote liberal democrat in the european election. so in that sense he is consistent. but i do think he is wrong on this. a bleak outlook, says the un on climate change. the world has to act much faster to avoid dangerous levels of global warming. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with ben croucher. ho isato ho is a to lead tottenham hotspur at home for the first time tonight. he
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says he likes the love his fans give their side. and andy murray's thoughts on retirement. thanks, ben. and another ben — ben rich — has all the weather. we have had some cloud and outbreaks of rain. it has been mild. that will change dramatically by the end of the week. i will have all the details. thanks, ben. also coming up, a builder and a shop worker are £105 million richer, after winning the euromillions jackpot. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. britain's most seniorjewish leader has questioned jeremy corbyn‘s
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fitness to be prime minister, saying that a new poison of anti—semitism had taken root in the party, sanctioned, as he put it, from the very top. in an outspoken intervention in the general election campaign, the chief rabbi ephraim mirvis described labour's claim to have dealt with allegations of anti—semitism as a fiction and he urged people to vote with their conscience. launching labour's race and faith manifesto, jeremy corbyn said his party will not tolerate anti—semitism. jess parker reports. not the backdrop the labour party wanted outside the launch of its race and faith manifesto. it comes as this man, the chief rabbi ephraim mirvis, questioned jeremy corbyn‘s fitness to be prime minister. in the times, the chief rabbi writes that, "a new poison, sanctioned from the top, has taken root in the labour party." he adds, "i ask every person to vote with their conscience. be in no doubt, the very soul
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of our nation is at stake." labour have said they want to establish better education regarding race and religion. asjeremy corbyn arrived at the event, it was clear the launch today had become overshadowed. there is no place whatsoever for anti—semitism in any shape orform whatsoever for anti—semitism in any shape or form or whatsoever for anti—semitism in any shape orform or in any place whatsoever in modern britain and under a labour government will not be tolerated in any form whatsoever. and asked directly about the chief rabbi's comments... i invite the chief rabbi, the archbishop of canterbury and all the other faith leaders to come, talk to us about
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what their concerns are, but be absolutely clear of this assurance from me. no community will be at risk because of their identity, their faith, risk because of their identity, theirfaith, their risk because of their identity, their faith, their ethnicity or their faith, their ethnicity or their language. and views may vary on what a labour government could mean for the jewish community. people will feel increasingly uncomfortable and will look for ways of either moving or having a play somewhere else or whatever they can possibly do, to mitigate what feels oppressive, uncomfortable, dangerous. there is a lot of pain in the jewish community. i think there are concerns, the jewish community. i think there are concerns, but i think the concerns are legitimate up to a point, but beyond that i think they are misplaced. ithink point, but beyond that i think they are misplaced. i think the chief rabbi has gone too far. the overall narrative here might feel familiar. labour insists they are taking robust action, critics say that is
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not the case. the manner and tone of this intervention is different. this comes in the middle of a general election campaign. boris johnson comes in the middle of a general election campaign. borisjohnson has faced criticism over his handling over allegations of islamophobia in the conservative party. we want to check there are robust procedures. we are committed to an independent review by the end of this year. meanwhile, the equality and human rights commission continues to investigate labour over anti—semitism allegations. while the chief rabbi has criticised the party before, timing is everything. right now, jeremy corbyn is working to win the trust of voters. let's speak now to jonathan goldstein, chair of thejewish leadership council, the umbrella body of britishjews which represents around 32 different
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jewish organisations. do you think, as some are claiming, that these comments go too far? the first thing you have to understand is anybody who knows the chief rabbi now seem is anybody who knows the chief rabbi now seem to be a temperate and thoughtful person. he is regarded as a real shepherd to his flock. the fa ct a real shepherd to his flock. the fact that he feels the levels of anxiety and thus reflecting the anxiety and thus reflecting the anxiety of the community at this point, you need to understand the strength of feeling which has brought us to this point. this is not a new issue. thejewish community has been looking for a nswe i’s community has been looking for a nswers for community has been looking for answers for this since jeremy community has been looking for answers for this sincejeremy corbyn became leader in september 2015 and we have had none. and as he representing all wings of your religion? the chief rabbi is widely regarded as a representative of the anglojewish regarded as a representative of the anglo jewish community. all regarded as a representative of the anglojewish community. all branches of the community came out today to support the community. across the
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spectrum of religious observance in the united kingdom. so you have to really understand that when you are looking at the anglo jewish community today, over 80% of the community today, over 80% of the community regard jeremy corbyn as having a problem with anti—semitism. this is not a small pocket of view, this is the vast majority of our community who feel in the same way. and what do you say to those who say this is religion getting involved in the political process and the two should not meet just the political process and the two should not meetjust before an election? i think the chief rabbi made it clear that we are currently ina made it clear that we are currently in a battle for the soul of our country. i think it's important the british people understand what the jewish community is feeling at this point in time. it is then for the british people to decide whether it isa british people to decide whether it is a fact of the take into consideration. at no point does the
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chief rabbi suggest who people should vote for. but he is making sure the british people understand the strength of feeling of a community which has been in this country for 500 years. what is the evidence that is used to support the claims he is making? i think you first of all have to say you need to go back in history. look at the anti—semitic mural which he endorsed. the fact that he befriends people who perpetratejewish people. we have looked for a resolution of theseissues we have looked for a resolution of these issues since we met in april 2018. over the last couple of weeks, the leader and the deputy leader have been going around and seeing everything has been sorted. there are over 100 serious cases within the labour party at the moment and there are thousands waiting to be heard. there are nine prospective parliamentary candidates within the labour party have been outed for
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very unpleasant anti—semitic comments over the last couple of weeks. nothing has been done. i could spend a long time taking you through a book of issues the community has and the sad fact is the labour party has done nothing to deal with those issues. the labour party has done nothing to deal with those issueslj the labour party has done nothing to dealwith those issues. i know the labour party has done nothing to deal with those issues. i know you are speaking as a former labour supporter. how much of this is ingrained within the party, do you think? how much of it, as the chief rabbi says, is coming from the top? i think the problem is when you allow s pa ce i think the problem is when you allow space to occur for anti—semites or racists to occur, i am afraid that space gets filled up very quickly. mr corbyn and his leadership team have brought a far left ideology to the table. it is not something they are prepared to address. normally when you have a situation where people have been
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offended, you would expect a person to reach out and say, i have done something wrong, how can i help resolve this? instead, you get the opposite. blank denials and obfuscation. and that is a sad situation to be in. is there anything that jeremy corbyn situation to be in. is there anything thatjeremy corbyn and those around him can do before 12 december? we have had a long road up until here and we only have 16 days until here and we only have 16 days until 12 december. it seems difficult to understand what mr corbyn could do between now and then. it would be wrong for any of us then. it would be wrong for any of us who are fair and decent people to rule out a change in behaviour, a turn. but it is our long road to come back from. thank you very much for your time this afternoon. the former conservative deputy prime minister lord heseltine has urged voters to back either independent candidates or the liberal democrats — saying that borisjohnson's brexit policy would be utterly disastrous.
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borisjohnson is in fife, launching his pa rty‘s scottish conservative manifesto. 0ur political correspondent ben wright is there. it certainly is an extraordinary intervention by lord heseltine. borisjohnson is here, in fife, the new queensferry crossing across the water is behind me, you probably cannot see it through the murk. he is upstairs launching the tory party's manifesto for scotland, where the message is not really focused on brexit, it is on the conservative party's opposition to a second independence referendum. scotland, of course, the majority of voters here voted to remain in the eu referendum, so i don't think it's got the same emphasis by the tory party up here as it does south of the border. but brexit certainly featuring today, after that intervention by lord heseltine, who said that borisjohnson's promise that he can get a whole new trade deal done with the eu by the end of next year was nonsense. this is what lord heseltine said.
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the damage to our economy, to our position in the world, to our ability to have a voice in what is happening in this century on the great issues, is seriously undermined by fracturing our relationship with europe. and so, on a simple question of britain's self interest, it's quite an easy decision to take and i've made it clear from the day after the referendum that i would be part of the fightback to maintain the traditional position of the conservative party towards europe. lord heseltine, who, of course, had big roles in the governments of margaret thatcher and john major, is a tory peer — or was until he had the whip removed earlier this year after saying he would vote for the lib dems in the european elections. there is no love lost at the moment between boris johnson and lord heseltine, they have totally divergent views when it comes to brexit, and i'm sure today borisjohnson will try and swat it away, which is exactly what michael gove, one of his cabinet colleagues, tried to do earlier.
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the one area where i respectfully disagree with michael is on europe. michael has been a long—time advocate of further european integration, he's a believer in the single currency, he wanted us tojoin the euro, very few people take that view now. on this particular question, michael i think advised people to vote liberal democrat in the european elections, so in that sense he is consistent, but i do think that he's wrong on this. taking questions a few minutes ago at this manifesto launch, borisjohnson said there was a tight timetable to get a new trade deal in place by the end of next year, which is something he has pledged. many are very sceptical it can be done, considering how long these complicated trade negotiations take, and i think lord heseltine's intervention really puts the pressure on borisjohnson to now explain in the remainder of this campaign how he plans to achieve that and what he wants to get. let's take a look at some of today's other election news. the liberal democrats leader
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jo swinson has been out on the campaign trail this morning. announcing what she called a war on plastic, the party leader visited a cornish sustainable clothing business, finisterre, in st agnes in cornwall. she was given a tour of the company's workshop which has been working to improve sustainability and the reuse of plastics. liberal democrats are determined to protect our marine environment, to make sure that we break the addiction that we have with plastics and be much more ambitious on how quickly we get rid of single use, unessential plastics, and move to a much more circular economy. throughout the campaign, bbc news will be looking closely at the places where the election could be won and lost. we will be visiting ten parts of the uk where seats will be closely contested. today, we're in milford haven which is in the preseli pembrokeshire constituency in south west wales. this seat has been held
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by the conservatives since 2005 — and is bordered by three other constituencies — one conservative and two plaid cymru. labour held this seat — or versions of it — from 1992 until 2005. the conservatives have held the seat since 2005, but in 2017 they got a majority ofjust 314, with labour in second place. and plaid cymru took neighbouring ceredigion from the liberal democrats in 2017 by just 104 votes. climate change has featured heavily on the election agenda, with the parties promising various targets for net carbon zero. 0ur science editor david shukman has been looking at the uk's ever changing energy supply. the way we get our power is going through an incredible transformation, and many of us probably haven't what's changing. until a few decades ago, most of our electricity and heating came from coal.
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coal was the foundation of the industrial revolution and the backbone of the economy. but it's the dirtiest kind of fuel and burning it releases huge amounts of carbon dioxide that warms the atmosphere. so now, it's being phased out. in its place has come gas. gas is used to heat most of our homes and generate electricity for the national grid. gas is cleaner than coal but still produces carbon dioxide. more recently, we've seen the rise of renewable energy, with thousands of wind turbines planted out at sea and on land. and the more that have been installed, the lower their costs have become. so, there are big plans for many more. it's the same with solar power. the panels have tumbled in price and the result is that over the last three months about 40% of the uk's electricity came from
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renewable sources. whoever wins the election, we are on course for an even greater push to go green. the current target is to cut our carbon emissions to what's called "net zero" by 2050. the political parties disagree over whether to do that sooner. whatever is decided, it'll be a massive challenge. we are broadcasting from martha's vineyard, overlooking the bay and milford haven. the technology in these broadcasts is extensive. we have highly trained operatives here. it is not just have highly trained operatives here. it is notjust television that is broadcasting from here. we have online radio. if you ask how we get through the day, there is the answer down there! but anyway, anna foster is here from radio 5 live. i will
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hand over to you. you will tell us more about what is going on here. i can get out of the shot. thank you, simon. we will be here between 4pm and 7pm, looking at the issues which are important to people in pembrokeshire. you just saw david shukman talking about how climate change and energy is a big topic here, but actually you have been seeing these beautiful views behind simon all day, out over the estuary and the harbour. this place has a rich history when it comes to energy creation. keith, you are an industry expert. as a large, you used to work out there, when the skyline looked very different to it does now? yes, there were four oil refineries here. probably nine in the uk. the vista
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was chimney stacks, really. across the harbour, you will see a jetty. when the large crude tankers came m, when the large crude tankers came in, you are talking about vessels that had half a million barrels of crude oil. they were massive. they would come into port, there will be a huge procession of tug boats to push them in. when they first arrived full of crude oil, they were sitting low in the water. as the discharge, you saw the boat rising like a cork out of the water. stood where we are today, you would see this huge crude vessel. if you think there were one of those every day, that gives you an idea of the number of deliveries. everything has changed here? absolutely. everything around us was supplied by the oil companies. protective clothing,
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manufacturing for the engineers, it was all down on the docks. i have memories of going to the customs house to get my duty form stamped. i see that that is now a church. very different to the wall of wine we have going here nowadays! while keith remembers how things used to be, you are very much looking to the future? yes, and it's a future built on that maritime heritage. we have some of the best maritime engineers anywhere in the world, really. we are looking to utilise that knowledge and bring the industry forward into a green future. this waterway is focused around the oil and gas refineries. we are looking at ways to redevelop the docks and look at things like floating wind, wave and tidal resources. we also in the uk are blessed with great
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indigenous resources. there are so manyjobs indigenous resources. there are so many jobs that indigenous resources. there are so manyjobs that used to rely on that heavy industry. it is important to make sure that what comes next also helps people live here. yes, the gba is very important. from marine energy perspective, we know we can deliver about 60% of the jobs and benefits in coastal communities. this is a new area for the uk and it is so important. let's utilise those skills and expertise that we have built and go out to a global market. are you feeling enough about that, when you hear politicians talking about the nhs and education, are you feeling enough about the future of energy? i think the claim of net
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zero has really brought us forward. but it will not solely be achieved on solar and but it will not solely be achieved on solarand wind. but it will not solely be achieved on solar and wind. whatever we do to achieve net zero, we need to ensure we are building peripheral economies and keeping those jobs. we are building peripheral economies and keeping thosejobs. i we are building peripheral economies and keeping those jobs. i don't think there is enough focus and i don't think there is enough on delivery. how can we diversify our energy generation and really build the jobs in the economy? from what you're saying, it is almost about the headlines instead of thinking about how achievable it is? we have been lobbying for an access to the global market. the uk leads the world for wave and tidal. we need to look at how we can produce to market revenue in the uk to secure jobs, it
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uses engineers and builds on the infrastructure we have in our ports and harbours. keith, we are a long way from london here. in terms of what the politicians need to see, do you need to come out here to know where the potential is and see how they can try and harness it?|j where the potential is and see how they can try and harness it? i quite agree. i have no doubt the local constituents are fully au fait with the opportunities we have here, but i sometimes think in london decisions are made. the road to zero isa decisions are made. the road to zero is a classic. 20110, no cars. that's fine, but we need help in the market to get to that. 80% of our fuel stations are owned by independents. they need help and guidance. they don't want to see it as a threat. so ido don't want to see it as a threat. so i do think there needs to be a
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better understanding, i would say, of local communities and the effect it will have. do you think you will get that in the next couple of weeks? i don't think we'll get it in the next two weeks, but hopefully following that we will get a clearer direction. the trade associations in the sector are working hard to get the sector are working hard to get the message across. thank you to you both. simon, hide the wine. it's back to you! thank you, anna. plenty more on bbc radio five throughout the afternoon. let's return to the story regarding the labour party and our assistant political editor norman smith, who's in tottenham in north london. any intervention like this from a religious leader would be damaging, but the timing is a nightmare for labour. two weeks away from polling day, the very day they want to
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launch their race and faith ma nifesto, launch their race and faith manifesto, and the language is used, it is all bad, bad, bad. mr corbyn didn't really take on the chief rabbi's comments. he said anti—semitism was vile and evil. as prime minister, he would want to ensure there was protection for synagogues and mosques. it seemed to me, the nearest he got to directly addressing the intervention from the chief rabbi was to appeal to religious groups to engage with him if they have concerns. i take it from that that the labour team have decided there was not much they can see or do that will make any difference to the way he is seen by many people in thejewish community. tea m many people in thejewish community. team carb and take the view they have introduced disciplinary processes , have introduced disciplinary processes, they are fast tracked time and people are getting turfed
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out of the party. jeremy corbyn has said that he abhors anti—semitism, and yet doesn't really seem to have made any difference at all in terms of his relationship with large sections of the jewish community. of his relationship with large sections of thejewish community. so my senses team corbyn probably took the sense there was nothing they could do or say today that would help them, so we almost had to take the hit, move on and hope this blows overin the hit, move on and hope this blows over in the election moved on to other issues. norman, i will be talking to you later. for now, thank you very much to norman smith, our assistant political editor. time for a look at the weather. here's ben rich. very disappointed you are inside today, simon. but i'm sure you don't mind too much. wet and blustery weather out there. we have had some clout and outbreaks of rain, but with that it has felt pretty mild. let me show you what is going on.
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this is the view from space. you can see the swirl of cloud, an era of low pressure. bringing cloud, wind and rain. the wind rotating in an anticlockwise direction, so it is mild because we are pulling up that warm air. many of us have been cloudy and wet, but we have seen some brightness developing. this was the view in bristol earlier. this afternoon and this evening, some shoppers push up from the south, some heavy and more thundery. this band of rain is settling in across northern scotland. it will be mild. winded to the north and the south as well. low pressure still with us into tomorrow. the slow trudging its feet, moving very slowly eastwards. quite a messy weather picture for tomorrow. some hefty showers. this
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band of rain will linger over northern scotland. a brisk north—westerly wind. some sports, such as the west and south—west of scotla nd such as the west and south—west of scotland and northern ireland, some dry weather. a different story from north—east england. flooding and travel disruption as possible. some brightness further south, but heavy downpours as well. very windy for the english channel. 60 mph gusts for the channel islands could be possible. it looks like the low pressure system is moving away, but this weather front will linger, dangling its way. as the rain slides southwards, the skies will start to brighten up, we will see some sunshine. some shoppers for northern and eastern course. with a strong wind, it will feel cold over the
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north and east of the uk. temperatures for many in single digits. still holding on to something more mild in the south. it won't last. 0n something more mild in the south. it won't last. on friday, we all get into this plunge of cold arctic air. temperatures for friday on the weekend far lower than they have been. five, six or 7 degrees at best. just the chance of a little bit of rain in the south for a time at least over the weekend. mild and u nsettled. at least over the weekend. mild and unsettled. things will turn brighter but colder by the end of the week.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the chief rabbi questions whetherjeremy corbyn is fit to be prime minister, saying he has allowed anti—semitism to "poison" his party. the labour leader says the party has taken "rapid and effective" action and says anti—semitism is vile and wrong. there is no place whatsoever for anti—semitism in any shape or form or in any place whatsoever in modern britain. and under a labour government, it will not be tolerated in any form whatsoever. i want to make that clear. i do think it is a very serious business when the chief rabbi speaks as he does. i've never known anything like it. the intervention from
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the chief rabbi has prompted a leading muslim organisation to criticise the conservatives for their handling of claims of islamophobia in the party. in other news. the un says the world has to act much faster to avoid dangerous levels of global warming. and who's a lucky couple? steve and lenka thompson are £105 millions richer, after winning the euromillions jackpot. my my good friends there who i've admired for many, many years! sport now on afternoon live with ben and a big night in north london for a certain portuguese manager. jose mourinho is the man in question. he is not one to probably
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build a 20 year dynasty at tottenham hotspur. he's probably been hired for short—term success and trophies. and as a proven champions league winner with porto and inter milan, he'll get his first taste of european football with his new club tottenham tonight. they host 0lympiakos at the tottenham hotspur stadium in what will be mourinho's first home game in charge. he says he likes the love of the home fans — having been on the other side of it against tottenham numerous times. he's relishing the special aura of the champions league too with spurs able to qualify for the knockouts later. with these boys, i will never be afraid of any championship match we need to qualify, that is the focus. only when my team is arriving in the quarterfinals that i start having the feeling that we can do it, but in this moment, i think we are really far from it.
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victory tonight is all important for mourinho as their last group game is away to bayern munich — a team they lost 7—2 to earlier in the group stages so they'll not be wanting to go to germany needing a result if they can help it. elsewhere, manchester city host shakhtar donetsk and need just a point to progress. you can follow both matches on radio 5 live. the head of new zealand cricket says the alleged perpetator who racially abused england bowlerjofra archer will be banned from future matches in the country and referred to the police. speaking to one news in new zealand, david white said he'd apologised personally to archer and was hopefully of catching the culprit in the next day or two. archer says the incident happened as he was walking off the field during england's first test defeat in mount maunganui. andy murray says he is more relaxed about retiring from tennis now — as he's experienced so much time away from the sport in the last couple of years recovering from a hip injury. in a new documentary that premiered in london on monday night, audiences are given an insight into the gruelling strain murray's rehab took out of him, his family and those close to him before making a long awaited
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return in september. tennis obviously has been my whole adult life but also a huge part of my childhood as well — this is what i've done since i was a young kid, so when you sort of get to 28, 29 and it looks like you're coming to the end, i think sport doesn't do a very good job preparing athletes for finishing and setting them up for what they're going to do when they finish. but the nice thing about these last six or seven months — when i was at home and my pain was gone, i got a glimpse into what my life would be like without tennis, and i'm so much more relaxed about that now that i know that everything will be all good when i do stop. and you can see that interview in full with andy murray in sportsday here on the bbc news at 6:30. murray can entice plenty to come watch him but he'll have never experienced this many before. a record 42,517 fans turned up to watch an exhibition match between roger federer
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and alexander zverev in mexico city last night — more than any other tennis match. federer described it as a magical evening after winning in three sets. any prospect of ben te'o rejoining the england fold look to be over — for now at least — after the centre agreed to join japanese side sunwolves from february. no england player can be selected for the national team if they play outside the country. te'o was left out of eddiejones' world cup squad shortly after an altercation with mike brown at a training camp and he's been playing for the french side toulon this season. that's all the sport for now. more after 3:00. welcome back to milford haven in pembrokeshire — a county in south west wales that sees overfour million tourists every year — an industry that supports 16,000 jobs. recent years, though, have seen a decline in overseas
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visitors and concern over second home ownership in the area. wales is a nation that voted for brexit — with 57% of people in pembrokeshire voting to leave the eu in the 2016 referendum. beyond that, what are the other issues on voters' minds? 0ur correspondent hywel griffiths has been to a music night in the coastal town of fishguard. folk night in fishguard, a welcome distraction from the sound and fury of the election. this western corner of wales can feel far from westminster. the decisions made there aren't always in tune with life here. issues like health and education are devolved to the welsh government in cardiff and so aren't on the ballot, but there's plenty the mps can do. 0llie wants them to help small rural businesses. i think that'd have a bit of a shock if they came down and, you know, sort of spent an evening in fishguard. it's a lot different to the rat race up there. you know, in the winter,
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some nights we'll sell two or three meals, you know, and that's the dark times, that's the hard times. you've got to work hard in the summer to make enough money to carry you through the winter. at this time of year, the coastline can feel dormant. there's less money flowing around and, as in many parts of the country, there are more deep—rooted concerns. wales has higher levels of poverty than the rest of the uk — and rising child poverty. homeless or struggling to find places that they can afford to live, the number of people sleeping on the street has risen horribly and ijust think it's appalling. inevitably, there is another issue playing on many minds. concerned about brexit, obviously. bamboozled by the brexit thing. brexit, ooh, i don't know. there's no getting away from the "b word "here. brexit could mean the sea off this coast becomes the new european union border.
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like most of wales, this constituency voted to leave the eu. and that would have a direct impact right here on all the cars and lorries that roll on and off of these ferries every day, twice a day, on the customs officials, with all their forms to fill, and on the local businesses, who import and export to the european union. farmers in particular are worried by the uncertainty. brexit could mean facing new tariffs and the end of decades of financial support from the eu. 80% of welsh farmers rely on that subsidy payment at the moment in order to keep food cheap. that's the concept behind it, and we have milk products that go to europe as well, so that would impact on us here as well, as a dairy farm. the brexit debate has changed how some people vote. this election could see more switching sides, making marginal seats like this one even more finely balanced. hywel griffiths,
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bbc news, fishguard. let's go now to st davids — another part of pembrokeshire where steffan powell from newsbeat has his camper van parked up today. rather you than me in this weather! you've come home! i have come home. welcome to pembrokeshire and we have come literally to the edge of a cliff. we had to hide the camper van behind one of the vans to stop it blowing into the sea. a beautiful spot, the sun came out and it was almost as if they knew i was coming home. it's really dramatic out there, you can really see the waves crashing against the deserted beach, beautiful. we aren't here just to stare at the scenery, we are here to talk about the election and joining us talk about the election and joining us is sian, alison sarah. i hope you
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don't blow away in the five minutes. you run this fun, what is it like running a business in this part of the world? it's wonderful, i've been here all my life and i quite enjoyed the contrast that we have. we had the contrast that we have. we had the summer months which are really busy and people come in and it's the same people that have been coming back to 450 commerce nick clegg —— coming back here for 50 years. we get to enjoy running, swimming, riding all the things we do and can do in the winter months because a lot of us are involved in the tourist industry. i saw your son out surfing earlier on. he cannot go surfing earlier on. he cannot go surfing whenever he likes and he e njoys surfing whenever he likes and he enjoys it because he has that freedom this time of year. rather him than me! sarah, you chose to
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come and live somewhere like this, city life wasn't for you. my parents moved here when i was three sol grew up here but i went to university in cardiff and figured i would do the whole grad scheme in london thing afterwards. then my circumstances changed and i found myself back here. i didn't think it would be for ever but now i think it might be. what is it like setting up home, trying to find work?m might be. what is it like setting up home, trying to find work? it can be challenging, definitely the change between summer and winter, while it can be great, money wise it is a challenge. we are really lucky, sian is my mother—in—law so we're really lucky we've got that support but what we do between summer and winter changes. we have to have that flexibility. you run your own business as well, alice, and its broadband, a big issue. you can't
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even barely stream netflix so how are you running your bakery? you don't need wi—fi to bake bread but i don't need wi—fi to bake bread but i do rely on it, on orders coming in through facebook or e—mails. you just hope and pray. what can the party do to help people like you looking to employ more people and delete my claim —— what can they do for you? i looked into funding and i basically got told, don't bother, you are seen as not basically got told, don't bother, you are seen as not giving back anything to the community because it's just you. i think businesses start somewhere, everyone starts somewhere and i'm in a place where i am very lucky that my parents were able to help me start up. 16 months
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down the line, hopefully next year i'll be employing my first employee. is there enough support for small businesses? do you see that support out there notjust businesses? do you see that support out there not just for you businesses? do you see that support out there notjust for you but businesses? do you see that support out there not just for you but the people you employ? listening to what wasjust said people you employ? listening to what was just said then, people you employ? listening to what wasjust said then, that's people you employ? listening to what was just said then, that's what we need, we need youngsters to stay here. if they don't get married, buy houses, set up business, this community is going to die so they need the support. we are established unfortunate that we are in that position but i am very keen to see anybody who can help. if anybody came up with that idea with the housing, and the broadband, you need it because you're missing out. everyone takes it for granted that they can get their orders on facebook and you can be checking it every ten minutes. you probably have set times of the day when you do it so set times of the day when you do it so these things are important, we
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need youngsters to stay here. the idea of nationalising broadband, something labour are promising, conservative say that's never going to happen, is that something you would be interested in? very. it's something we take for granted. everybody should have it. you are talking about seasonal work, zero—hours contracts hasn't been a big issue yet but for some people it's really important. where'd sit on that debate? should they be banned or do they offer flexibility? especially in places like this where your busier in the summer and quieter in the winter. it can be good for some people but for a lot of people, a lot of my friends are working extra hours in the summer and in the winter they literally lose theirjobs. the business might say they are closing for january and february and you aren't going to get paid and then contracts have clauses saying you're not allowed to work
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for anyone else. that leaves families and income short for a month or two which is unacceptable as faras i'm month or two which is unacceptable as far as i'm concerned. is that something you would like to look into when it comes to making your choice on december the 12th? definitely. i know that labour are promising to clamp down on them and banned them, and that appeals to me. a full list of manifesto promises on the bbc news website if you want to go and find out what the parties are promising on any issue. alice, it is interesting around here, it's such a close race between labour and the conservatives, only 300 votes in it. does that empower people when they realise it's going to be so close or does it not make a difference?” don't know, really. i really don't know. it has empowered me because you told me that before and i miss it on the fence type of person and i could be swayed way. —— i'm sitting
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on the fence. 0ver could be swayed way. —— i'm sitting on the fence. over the past few days looking into the manifestos, i've become more interested in labour policies and it sways me. it's quite exciting. i think we should find it exciting. i think we should find it exciting and i hope it inspires people to go out and vote, it has inspired me to vote and i hope it inspires the youngsters who maybe don't show much interest. this could bea don't show much interest. this could be a chance for them, to get out there and make a difference. question hasjust come there and make a difference. question has just come to mind that we have planned. 0bviously because of devolution, do you think people are fully informed about what they are fully informed about what they are voting for? things like education and health are devolved and westminster doesn't have the power over that, do people realise the difference between this vote on the difference between this vote on the one they'll be taking next year in the assembly elections?”
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the one they'll be taking next year in the assembly elections? i don't think so. i'm relatively politically engaged and i don't fully understand, i have to remind myself of the differences. 0bviously understand, i have to remind myself of the differences. obviously the main budgets come from westminster, whether or not it's devolved and at the moment that is a massive thing, there is a limit to public spending. for me, i'm trying to put that to one side that what is done with the money is devolved but we need more money is devolved but we need more money for the nhs in wales and that comes from westminster. alice, what's going to be the big thing that's going to help you make up your mind in the next couple of weeks? the support that local people have around here. we are out on a limb in wales and i feel like sometimes we get forgotten about. basically, that and ijust want to see a bit more help towards smaller businesses because we are the
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community. hopefully you will get those answers you're looking for. the caravan is being blown away, literally! laughter i'm going to close the window because that might help. that is it from us on the edge of the cliff, there is a full list of the cliff, there is a full list of all the candidates standing here online. studio: what are those green things waving about in the middle of the table? flowers! we thought they would brighten the place up. alice isa would brighten the place up. alice is a baker, bear with me, this is some doughnuts she's made. what's in these? jam, vanilla custard and salted caramel. so, it's really hard work being on the raid in the camper van! —— on the road.
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work being on the raid in the camper van! -- on the road. i saw the biscuits and i know they were the ones you are offering in southampton a week ago so i know how it works! good luck. plenty more from him throughout the election campaign. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. these are your business headlines. don't believe the hype — that's the message from which, when it comes to black friday deals. the consumer group studied last year's sales event — and says 95% of goods were the same price or cheaper at other times of the year. retailers say they're not misleading us. de la rue — the company that prints our banknotes — says there's a chance it could collapse if its rescue plan doesn't work.
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the company prints about a third of the world's currencies — and has sustained big losses overseas. it says the warning is a worst case scenario. companies are being banned from marketing high risk minibonds to ordinary punters. the city watchdog says too many people have been tempted by the higher than average returns on these bonds — and lost money. it's worried non specialist investors don't understand how risky these investments can be. amazon has helped transform the way we shop. the ease — the convenienece — has proved irresistible to many people. but at what cost? there are signs of a growing backlash to the the company. viviennes nunis is in new york for us. so, what is the backlash starting to look like? we are seeing a backlash ona number of look like? we are seeing a backlash on a number of fronts. it was revealed today there is a new
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coalition of around 40 grassroots campaign groups, each of them normally campaigns on a separate issue whether it be employment law, the environment or workers' rights. they come together to form a coalition based in york which they say will hopefully from their point of view help influence the way amazon operates. they say this corporation has two powerful grip on society and it isn't being regulated well by governments. what is the kernel of the concerns? is it working practices, choice? a lot of it is about working conditions and at same time today we've also seen report out in some —— in southern california. they have honed in on the social and environmental impact and is having on that area and they say wages are so low that a number of workers who work in the warehouse
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or as delivery drivers are paid something like $20,000 a year and they say that is less than half the living wage. some they say are even below the poverty line and they say that has effects for the public purse. many of these employees are receiving benefits as well as housing conditions that are really bad. they say a number of these workers are living in crowded, substandard conditions. they have called on amazon to pay $20 an hour as well as invest in affordable housing and provide comprehensive health care for their workers in. how has the company responded to this? so far, anderson hasn't responded to this new coalition of campaign groups. they say they have taken campaign groups. they say they have ta ke n ste ps campaign groups. they say they have ta ken steps to campaign groups. they say they have taken steps to improve the way they operates. last year it announced a minimum wage of $15 an hour which critics say isn't high enough. amazon say they have taken steps on the environment, recently announcing
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it will be carbon neutral by 2030 and change the materials it packages its products and delivery gets in. amazon would say it's taking steps in this direction but many regulators and opposition groups say it isn't doing enough. thank you. the ftse is on the up — that's after renewed hopes of some progress on ending the trade war between america and china. topps tiles have managed earlier losses — that's after it warned of challenging trading conditions. pets at home is really soaring. it had blockbuster financial results. de la rue — the company that prints our bank notes — is under real pressure after warning it could go out of business. that's all the business news. a couple from west sussex have been revealed as the winners of a £105
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million euromillions jackpot. steve and lenka thompson are the uk's ninth biggest winners. mr thompson said he started shaking when he found out they'd won — but that they both just went to work as usual. a warning this report by duncan kennedy has some flash photography. read it and leap, this is what happiness looks like. steve and lenka thomson have won £105 million. good morning, ladies and gentlemen, i would like to introduce you to steve and lenka thomson. the couple with three young children found out when steve checked his numbers... i believe that's mine! ..en route to hisjob as a painter and builder. i had the ticket in one hand, the numbers just jumped, boom, straightaway. from that moment onwards i was a shaking, gibbering wreck. lenka thought they had won £105,000
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— not £105 million — but they both still went back to work. it is life changing, not just for us, our families, the community, definitely. we will do a lot of good with this. it is too much for us. laughter. the couple are now in britain's rich list, ahead of emma watson on 52 million, ronnie wood at 85 million and gareth bale who is on a meer £94 million. steve and lenka said the priority is to move house so there children don't have to share bedrooms. whilst lenka has already given up herjob in the grocery store, steve says he will not let his customers down and will carry on building. cheering. steve and lenka, who have been married for 13 years, say their heads are spinning. a pre—christmas present which they say will gift them, their family and their friends
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a new life. duncan kennedy, bbc news, west sussex. time for a look at the weather. here's ben rich. we haven't been so lucky with the weather today. some rather blustery, cloudy weather but through all of that it has felt pretty mild. we've got this cloud on the satellite, this is an area of low pressure which has brought the wind and the rainfor which has brought the wind and the rain for some of us. with the wind is rotating around low pressure in an anticlockwise direction, that is drawing warm air in from the south. there is cold air lying in wait, that will come into play later in the week. amidst the gloom there is a bit of brightness to be had. the skies are brightening for a time. some hefty sham is pushing up from
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the south. some of those will be heavy and thundery through the evening. some persistent rain developing across east anglia and the south—east tonight. also settling in in northern scotland. there will be some dry interludes in between, windy and the north and south and another mild night for all of us. tomorrow, low pressure is still with us, trudging slowly eastwards. various bands of showers or longer spells of rain circulating around it. quite a messy picture, heavy showers in the south, persistent rain moving in across north—east england and staying damp all day long in the northern isles and north of maine in scotland. windy as well, brisk north—easterly wind, gusts of up to 50 mph. for the south and west of scotland and northern ireland, a decent chance of some dry weather and a bit of sunshine. the rain is piling on across northern and north—eastern england which can cause flooding and
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travel problems. showers in the south and very windy through the english channel. for the channel islands, steady winds of 30 mph, gusts up to 60 mph. noticeable westerly wind. area of low pressure clearing on thursday but this weather front will still trouble us through the day. some outbreaks of rain pushing south. some of that rain pushing south. some of that rain is heavy in england and wales. to the north of the skies brightening, one or two showers. windy and cold air sinking into the picture, temperatures will be stuck in single digits. into friday, this cold air plunges southwards across all parts of the uk, temperatures dropping through friday into the weekend. 0vernight frosts with a bit of rain in the south at times but generally speaking, more in the way of sunshine.
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hello. you're watching afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy here in milford haven. today at 3pm: the chief rabbi questions whetherjeremy corbyn is fit to be prime minister, saying he's allowed anti—semitism to poison his party. the labour leader says the party has taken rapid and effective action. there is no place whatsoever for anti—semitism in any shape or form or in any place whatsoever in modern britain. and under a labour government, it will not be tolerated in any form whatsoever. i want to make that clear. i do think it is a very serious business when the chief rabbi speaks as he does. i've never known anything like it. the intervention from the chief rabbi has prompted
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a leading muslim organisation to criticise the conservatives for their handling of claims of islamophobia in the party. in other news... a bleak outlook, says the un, on climate change. the world has to act much faster to avoid dangerous levels of global warming. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with ben croucher. hello, simon. a big night of champions league football ahead, with tottenham able to qualify. jose mourinho will be leading spurs at home for the first time later. he says he is looking forward to the love of the home fans. more in half an hour. we will talk to you then. thanks, ben. and another ben — ben rich — has all the weather. pretty cloudy, wet and blustery for some today. it is few and mild. a better chance of seeing some sunshine, but it will start to feel colder. details on the way.
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thanks, ben. also coming up, a builder and a shop worker are £105 million richer, after winning the euromillions jackpot. hello, everyone. this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. britain's most seniorjewish leader has questioned jeremy corbyn's fitness to be prime minister, saying that a new poison of anti—semitism had taken root in the party, sanctioned, as he put, it from the very top. in an outspoken intervention in the general election campaign, the chief rabbi ephraim mirvis described labour's claim to have dealt with allegations of anti—semitism as a fiction and he urged people to vote with their conscience. launching labour's race and faith manifesto, jeremy corbyn said his party will not tolerate anti—semitism.
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jessica parker reports. not the backdrop the labour party wanted outside the launch of its race and faith manifesto. it comes as this man, the chief rabbi ephraim mirvis, questioned jeremy corbyn's fitness to be prime minister. in the times, the chief rabbi writes that, "a new poison, sanctioned from the top, has taken root in the labour party." he adds, "i ask every person to vote with their conscience. be in no doubt, the very soul of our nation is at stake." labour today described its race and faith manifesto as ambitious, tra nsformative. it wants to hold an independent review of far right extremism, establish better protections for places of worship. more broadly, tackle pay discrimination based on race and teach children about colonialism and the role of the british empire.
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but as jeremy corbyn arrived at the event a short while ago, it was clear today's launch had become overshadowed. there is no place whatsoever for anti—semitism in any shape or form or in any place whatsoever in modern britain. and under a labour government, it will not be tolerated in any form whatsoever. i want to make that clear. and asked directly about the chief rabbi's comments... i invite the chief rabbi, i invite the archbishop of canterbury, i invite all the other faith leaders to come, talk to us about what their concerns are, but be absolutely clear of this assurance from me. no community will be at risk because of their identity, their faith, their ethnicity or their language. and views may vary on what a labour government could mean for the jewish community. what i think is critical is that people will feel increasingly uncomfortable and will look for ways of either moving or having a place somewhere else or whatever
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they can possibly do, to mitigate what feels oppressive, uncomfortable, dangerous. there is a lot of pain in the jewish community. i think there are concerns, yes, but i think the concerns are legitimate up to a point, but beyond that i think they are misplaced. i think they are misplaced in terms of the chief rabbi has gone too far. the overall narrative here may feel familiar. labour insists it is taking robust action, critics say that is not the case. what is different is the manner and tone of this intervention from the chief rabbi in the middle of a general election campaign. borisjohnson has faced criticism for his handling over allegations of islamophobia. today, the muslim council of great britain accused the conservatives of broaching the issue with denial and deceit. we want to ensure the conservative party has robust procedures.
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we think we do, but we want to check and determine that. which is why wee are committed to this independent review by the end of this year. meanwhile, the equality and human rights commission continues to investigate labour over anti—semitism allegations. and while the chief rabbi has criticised the party before, timing is everything. right now, jeremy corbyn is working to win voters' trust. jessica parker, bbc news. let's speak now to historian simon sebag montefiore who is in central london. there is no hiding the fact because of the time in the nature of the comments from the chief rabbi what his intention is? hello. i couldn't quite hear the question. would you mind asking it again? i'm just wondering, looking at the timing and the nature of his comments, what do you think his intention is?”
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the nature of his comments, what do you think his intention is? i can't speakfor the you think his intention is? i can't speak for the chief rabbi himself, but i have to say that the decision to write this article right now is of course an incredibly sensitive one. i also think it's a very brave one. i also think it's a very brave one. and he is not a character who is known as a showboat, he is a very calm and temperate man. and the fact he has done it now in the middle of a general election should tell everybody, and i believe this is his intention, that this is a very serious subject. and we are now at a moment in british cultural and political history when literally the soul of the nation is at stake. 0n theissue soul of the nation is at stake. 0n the issue is, tragically, anti—semitism in britain. and that isa anti—semitism in britain. and that is a phenomenon that most of us members of the jewish is a phenomenon that most of us members of thejewish community never thought we would see in the
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21st—century. never thought we would see in the 21st-century. simon, does it tally with what you hear from other parts of the jewish community? it still does. this is a very, very powerful and poignant and heartfelt message from the chief rabbi. it's totally unprecedented. in british history, this has never happened before. that's how serious it is. the feeling in thejewish community, no matter what you hear from feeling in thejewish community, no matter what you hearfrom labour sources, the feeling is very much that overwhelming majority of the jewish community feels that a labour party is not a safe space, feels that anti—semitism is rife and unchecked in the labour party. and this comes from the leadership faction at the very top of the
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labour party. the figures are overwhelming. it's something like 93% of britishjewish people who used to vote labour now will not vote labour. 87% think that the leadership is anti—semitic. 83% think the labour party is now anti—semitic. i think people should respect the views of the overwhelming majority of british jews. they feel angry that despite the claims ofjeremy corbyn and john mcdonnell that they are dealing with this, infouryears, mcdonnell that they are dealing with this, in four years, that has shown
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to bea this, in four years, that has shown to be a total lie. very little has been done. thousands of cases are coming to light all the time and now have been reported to the labour party and have not been sorted out. so, this is a very, very uncomfortable and scary time for british jews. simon, when the issue of languages under spotlight during this campaign, politicians are being urged to be aware of their language, is it helpful for words like mendacious to be used about a party leader by such an influential group? language is important. i couldn't hear the complete question as we have a value add line, but i think the point about the article from the
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chief rabbi is that it is very carefully written. it is a bit very powerfully written. and i'm afraid, and this is a tragedy for british politics, it really does reflect the views of a tragedy for british politics, it really does reflect the views of the majority of british jews and also many many decent non—— jews. ijust jews and also many many decent non—— jews. i just want to say that the labour party is full of decent, moderate and progressive people. we need those people to stand up and be heard. this is a terrible situation for the labour party to find itself in. it is a tragedy which wejewish people in britain deeply regret. simon, very good of you tojoin us. i apologise for the quality of the
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line. let's take a look at some of today's other election news... the liberal democrats leaderjo swinson has been out on the campaign trail. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake is in cheltenham we are in cheltenham, a seat that the liberal democrats are looking to win back from the conservatives. it isa win back from the conservatives. it is a slim majority. jo swinson is here to talk about ambitious plans to eliminate single use non—recyclable plastic within three yea rs. non—recyclable plastic within three years. would you legislate for this? would companies face fines if they did not comply? well, i think we have all seen quite what the plastic pollution is doing to our oceans. many people have watched
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documentaries by david attenborough and others. we need to change the way in which we use plastic. many companies are leading the way on this. they are showing where we can have alternatives to plastic. different packaging is being used here. this morning, i was at a place which was using recycled plastic to make jackets. the innovation as they are. we need to change the regulations, to ensure that business recognises it has responsibility for the produce they make and what happens to it afterwards, so that plastic does not end up in a receive. you are talking about plans to protect more of the coastline. what about the fishing industry who might be concerned tighter legislation might put a limit on the
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business they can do? the fishing industry understands the need for marine protection. if we did not look after our marine species, their industry would disappear. so they understand the need for us to make sure we are looking after the marine environment and all the creatures, the fish and others which live within the sea. and making sure that we can do that. we have the money set aside in our manifesto. we have the blue belt and we can expand that protection to at least half of the uk territorial waters. and that will make a big difference to these vital environments and habitats. we are in one of the constituencies your party will have to win a few to our —— if you are to increase your seats as you are to increase your seats as you want. there is some suggestion that voters are not responding positively to you as a leader. are
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you sure you are the right person at this time? i was elected by majority. i think there are other polls which show something different from what you're saying. we have fantastic candidates right across the country, in seats across the southwest and elsewhere. liberal democrats can win seats from the conservatives. for anyone who is concerned about a boris johnson majority government, the hard brexit deal that he has cooked up and nigel farage is supporting, which could end up with a no—deal brexit, the way to stop borisjohnson is to vote liberal democrat because it is the liberal democrat because it is the lib dems who want to stop brexit. what about voters in the middle? do you regret taking that stance?” think it is the right policy to be honest about what we would do with a majority government. the lib dems
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have led the campaign for a people's vote. if others who now say they support it had walk the walk in parliament, i'm thinking of the labour party, we might be having a people's vote referendum campaign right now instead of a general election. a few weeks ago, we tabled the 17th attempt for this and labour refused to back it. we know we cannot trust labour for remain and thatis cannot trust labour for remain and that is why remainers are flocking to the liberal democrats. the liberal democrats whether i in certain constituencies during this campaign. the former conservative deputy prime minister lord heseltine has urged voters to back either independent candidates or the liberal democrats — saying that borisjohnson's brexit policy would be utterly disastrous. borisjohnson is in fife, launching his pa rty‘s
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scottish conservative manifesto. 0ur political correspondent ben wright is there. it certainly is an extraordinary intervention by lord heseltine. borisjohnson is here, in fife, the new queensferry crossing across the water is behind me, you probably cannot see it through the murk. he is upstairs launching the tory party's manifesto for scotland, where the message is not really focused on brexit, it is on the conservative party's opposition to a second independence referendum. scotland of course, the majority of voters here voted to remain in the eu referendum, so i don't think it's got the same emphasis by the tory party up here as it does south of the border. but brexit certainly featuring today, after that intervention by lord heseltine, who said that borisjohnson's promise that he can get a whole new trade deal done with the eu by the end of next year was nonsense. this is what lord heseltine said. the damage to our economy, our position in the world, to our ability to have a voice in what is happening in this century
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on the great issues, is seriously undermined by fracturing our relationship with europe. and so, on a simple question of britain's self interest, it's quite an easy decision to take and i've made it clear from the day after the referendum that i would be part of the fightback to maintain the traditional position of the conservative party towards europe. lord heseltine, who, of course, had big roles in the governments of margaret thatcher and john major, is a tory peer — or was until he had the whip removed earlier this year after saying he would vote for the lib dems and the european elections. there is no love lost at the moment between boris johnson and lord heseltine, they have totally divergent views when it comes to brexit, and i'm sure today borisjohnson will try and swat it away, which is exactly what michael gove, one of his cabinet colleagues, tried to do earlier.
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the one area where i respectfully disagree with michael is on europe. michael has been a long—time advocate of further european integration, he's a believer in the single currency, he wanted us tojoin the euro, very few people take that view now. on this particular question, michael i think advised people to vote liberal democrat the european elections, so in that sense he is consistent, but i do think that he's wrong on this. taking questions a few minutes ago at this manifesto launch, borisjohnson said there was a tight timetable to get a new trade deal in place by the end of next year, which is something he has pledged. many are very sceptical it can be done, considering how long these complicated trade negotiations take, and i think lord heseltine's intervention really puts the pressure on borisjohnson to now explain in the remainder of this campaign how he plans to achieve that and what he wants to get. throughout the campaign, bbc news will be looking closely at the places where the election could be won and lost. we will be visiting ten parts
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of the uk where seats will be closely contested. today, we're in milford haven which is in the preseli pembrokeshire constituency in south west wales. this seat has been held by the conservatives since 2005 — and is bordered by three other constituencies: one conservative, and two plaid cymru. labour held this seat — or versions of it — from 1992 until 2005. the conservatives have held the seat since 2005, but in 2017 they got a majority ofjust 314, with labour in second place. and plaid cymru took neighbouring ceredigion from the liberal democrats in 2017 by just 104 votes. i'm joined now by nerys edwards — a shellfish farmer from syren shellfish in camrose. and by gerint evans — a dairy farmerfrom haycastle.
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thank you to you both for coming on. i know for a fight you both voted differently in the 2016 referendum. you voted to leave. have you changed your mind since 2016? what are you planning for this election? it depends what is available here. planning for this election? it depends what is available harem is looking like i will vote for the conservatives. you are dealing with live things all the time. you have worries about things like tariffs and getting stuff to market? tariffs, ferry ports, delays, strikes. all that sort of thing. you
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voted to remain. i would imagine that you would say, why are we leaving? is that what the argument would be? i was and i remain a strong remainer. if you stand back and look at the larger picture, the uk is not a large country. europe is not large. walls have been brought down, borders have been brought down in my lifetime. it concerns me that we are in the situation at the moment. one of your biggest markets is spain. they eat more shellfish than we do. a lot of people would say, why back something which will make life more difficult? it will make life more difficult? it will make life more difficult? it will make life a little more difficult, but i feel we should have control of what is happening in our country. every country in the eu is slightly different. it would be very difficult to treat them all as one.
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it will not do the best for all countries involved. i want to work closely with france, spain and eve ryo ne closely with france, spain and everyone in the eu. we used to do that before. i can't see a problem with that again. i love their food and they love our food. there is going to be a reciprocal agreement. ijust pray to god, really, that if we do come out, that we do come out with a good deal. and that the uk and eu 27 can have a free and frictionless trading for the future. when we are faced with tariffs, in my industry, cheddar would be exported with a 57% tariff. but, 48 and coming in at 15. it's concerning and coming in at 15. it's concerning and alarming. are you regarding this
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election is a moment to reverse the referendum result? 0r election is a moment to reverse the referendum result? or are there other issues? there are a lot of local issues, but most of them are devolved to cardiff. how many people are aware what cardiff is responsible for and what london is responsible for and what london is responsible for? that's interesting because the nhs is a huge issue, but it doesn't matter what doctors and nurses in london are saying. it doesn't matter what doctors and nurses in london are sayingm doesn't at all. a lot of people might be taken in by the announcement of new hospitals. welsh labour is of a different opinion from labour in london as well. i could tell you who i would vote for, but i could also tell you i certainly will not vote for. what is very important is that we respect
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democracy. we had a referendum and i acce pt democracy. we had a referendum and i accept that. but we had a referendum to leave or to stay. we didn't have the three years of information which has now been given to us, and what it could implicate to us. as a dairy farmerand it could implicate to us. as a dairy farmer and for many other industries in this area. no access to hospital is something you are concerned about? absolutely. our local hospital is decreasing. we are in a rural area. farmers live so far away and the need to be able to get to a hospital very quickly. the industry has the highest percentage of accidents and fatalities. we are facing an extra travel of an hour to get to our proposed hospital. as an industry, we depend so much on a charity, the wales air ambulance, which is not supported other than as a charity. again, that is another
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concerning matter. can you still change your mind before the election? do you know who you will vote for? nothing will change your mind? nothing will change my mind. nothing will change my mind either. thank you to you both. people who want to take part in the general election on 12 december have until midnight to register. almost three million people have joined the electoral register since the election was announced at the end of october, and over a third of those are under 25. let's talk further about voter registration, and more, withjoe twyman — founder and director of polling company delta poll uk. just talk us through, joe, what people need to be doing and concentrating on now. time is beginning to run out. if people believe they are not registered to vote, there are government websites you can go on to and you can do that online up until midnight tonight. if
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you are not registered at the correct address, you will not be able to vote. it is very important that if you want to vote you have to register. 0r that if you want to vote you have to register. or even if you don't know whether you want to vote or not, you need to register so you have the option. just talk us through the other forms of voting. postal votes. anyone watching now, perhaps a student, they might be wanting to know what the deadlines are. the deadline for registration as midnight tonight. as part of that registration, you will have the opportunity to register for a registration, you will have the opportunity to registerfor a postal vote, which will then be subsequently sent to your address. some people have already received a postal vote and may have already voted. then the final election itself is of course on 12 december. all those who are registered at their address will be able to go to their address will be able to go to their local polling station and take
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part. i'm just their local polling station and take part. i'mjust wondering their local polling station and take part. i'm just wondering what issues... 0ur part. i'm just wondering what issues... our main story is about the chief rabbi and jeremy corbyn. what is the impact of moments like this, rather unexpected interventions for an important source. interventions for an important source. whether there is evidence that changes things? well, it's really too early to say whether this particular instance will have an effect. it's always important during a campaign to separate the talking points from the turning points. that may well be the publicity the labour party has had today and that affects their ratings in the polls. at the same time, it might be that this is simply not seen as an important issue, rightly or wrongly, simply not seen as an important issue, rightly orwrongly, not simply not seen as an important issue, rightly or wrongly, not seen as an important issue for deciding how people will vote across the country. my sense is that in a lot of cases people are already aware of theissues of cases people are already aware of the issues with anti—semitism. and it is unlikely to be, if you like,
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new information to a lot of voters. and so we will make their decision based on that. at the primary driver for that decision is unlikely to be anti—semitism, but more widely it raises questions about, for instance, jeremy corbyn's leadership of the party. and that in turn can have an effect on their appalling. certainly it is something labour would have wanted to avoid during this campaign and i think we will be disappointed this intervention was made at such a crucial point.l crucial point also because there are two television moments. a sky news debate and also the leadership debate and also the leadership debate on friday from cardiff. there is no doubt that that will be raised and that will be uncomfortable for some. yes, jeremy corbyn has repeatedly said the party are dealing with it and he has no support for anti—semitism and wishes for it not to occur at any point if
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he becomes leader. but nonetheless it isa he becomes leader. but nonetheless it is a stick with which he can be beaten by his opponents. and with these set piece events lined up, particularly the leadership debate on six december, that could be a crucial point. having said that, in that debate he is only up against borisjohnson that debate he is only up against boris johnson and the that debate he is only up against borisjohnson and the conservatives themselves have had similar issues with islamophobia in the past. and so neither one of the two main party leaders is in a particularly strong position when it comes to specific minorities within the electorate. and so it may be that as we get closer to polling day neither one wa nts to closer to polling day neither one wants to draw too much attention to their party's track record in that respect. joe, always good to see you. thank you very much. time for a look at the weather.
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it is the end of a storm we are seeing the tail end of year. a remarkable skyline over the marina in milford haven. looking out to sea, it is very choppy. i don't know if the ferry service is still running. trawlers heading out to sea in the distance. rather them than me! here's ben rich. we have the remnants of what was tropical storm sebastien, not any more a tropical storm but it has brought some blustery weather across southern and western parts of the uk and of rain as well. looking at the satellite picture, you can see the area of low pressure as it has moved its way and something a little brighter developing across the south and west at the moment but with this area of low pressure in place it has been dragging the air from the south—west so it has been cloudy and blustery and wet for some but also mild. as simon showed us, some hints
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of brightness in milford haven and hints of brightness from one of our weather watchers in bristol and as weather watchers in bristol and as we go into tonight we will see some clear spells, but also some showers pushing up from the south, some of which will be heavy and possibly thundery and all the while persistent rain will linger across northern parts of scotland. windy in the north and the south, lighter winds in between and what will be another pretty mild night but the area of low pressure is still with us into tomorrow, moving very slowly east and you can see a few weather fronts around it in various bands of showers and longer spells of rain circulating around the centre of the low, which means a messy weather picture in terms of the detail tomorrow, showers in the south, heavy and persistent rain in north—east england and also northern scotla nd north—east england and also northern scotland staying damp all day long. windy here as well, through the northern isles, caithness and sutherland, strong north—easterly winds perhaps —— as —— as high as 50 mph. not too much rain in northern
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ireland and some sunshine, 10 degrees in belfast. plenty of rain in north—east england which could cause localised flooding and travel disruption. further south, patchy rain, the odd glimmer of brightness and for the far south of england, especially through the channel islands and through the english channel some gusty winds, and gales are likely. as we move from wednesday to thursday looks on first glance as this the low is leaving away but it leaves a weather front dangling in place which means rain to come across england and wales and this moves south through the day. to the north of that, skies will brighten and we see more sunshine with the odd shower but a brisk northerly wind starting to develop and that is going to make it feel really chilly, especially across the northern half of the uk on thursday but holding onto double—digit highs in london, cardiff and plymouth but even here you can see the cold air is surging south until the end of the weekend as we looked at the weekend it will be much, much colder with night—time frosts and chilly days but a better chance of seeing
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some sunshine. this is bbc news. our latest headlines. the chief rabbi questions whetherjeremy corbyn is fit to be prime minister, saying he has allowed anti—semitism to "poison" his party. the labour leader says the party has taken "rapid and effective" action. there is no place whatsoever for anti—semitism in any shape orform or in any place whatsoever in modern britain. and under a labour government, it will not be tolerated in any form whatsoever. i want to make that clear. i do think it is a very serious business when the chief rabbi speaks as he does. i've never known anything like it. meanwhile, a leading muslim organisation, the muslim council of britain, criticises the conservatives for their handling of claims of islamophobia in the party.
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the un says the world has to act much faster to avoid dangerous levels of global warming. and a very lucky couple from west sussex are £105 millions richer, after winning the euromillions jackpot. sport now on afternoon live with ben croucher, and we're looking ahead to a pivotal night in the champions league for two english clubs. still two rounds of champions league group games to go but both manchester city and tottenham hotspur can qualify for the knockout stages tonight. and that wouldn't be a bad way forjose mourinho to announce himself to the spurs fans would it. it'll be his first home game in charge since taking over as manager last week. mourinho an experienced campaigner in europe, winning this competition with porto and inter milan. can he take tottenham one better than they managed last year and win the competition? if they beat 0lympiakos tonight,
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they'll definitely be a step closer. with these boys, i will never be afraid of any championship match that comes to our faces. we need to qualify, that is the focus. only when my team is arriving and quarter—finals will a start having the feeling that we can do it, but in this moment, i think we are really far from it. victory will see spurs into the last 16. manchester city meanwhile only need a draw at home to shaktar donetsk to progress. the head of new zealand cricket says the alleged perpetator who racially abused england bowler jofra archer will be banned from future matches in the country and referred to the police. speaking to1 news in new zealand, david white said he'd apologised personally to archer and was hopeful of catching the culprit in the next day or two. archer says the incident happened as he was walking off the field
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during england's first test defeat in mount maunganui. as andy murray releases a new documentary about his battle with a hip injury, he says he's more relaxed about retirement now, having spent so much of the last two years not playing tennis. he greeted fans in london last night at the premiere, with audiences set to find outjust how hard it was for murray to comeback from hip resurfacing surgery. he told us he doesn't fear life after tennis the way he used to. tennis obviously has been my whole adult life but also a huge part of my childhood as well — this is what i've done since i was a young kid, so when you sort of get to 28, 29 and it looks like you're coming to the end, i think sport doesn't do a very good job preparing athletes for finishing and setting them up for what they're going to do when they finish. but the nice thing about these last six or seven months — when i was at home and my pain was gone, i got a glimpse into what my life would be like without tennis, and i'm so much more relaxed about that now that i know
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that everything will be all good when i do stop. and we'll have the full interview with andy murray on bbc news in sportsday at 6:30.. murray wanted to come back and play in front of big crowds. he'll do well to match what roger federer achieved last night. this is the plaza de toros in mexico city where federer and alex zverev played an exchibition match last night. an exhibition match last night. a new tennis record of 42,517 turned up to see federer win in straight sets. loving the sombreros. any prospect of ben te'o rejoining the england fold look to be over for now at least, after the centre agreed to join japanese side sunwolves in 2020. no england player can be selected for the national team if they play outside the country. te'o was left out of eddiejones' world cup squad shortly after an altercation with mike brown at a training camp and he's been on loan at french
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side toulon this season. you're up to date. more after 4. i don't know how up—to—date i am, but thank you for that. welcome back to milford haven in pembrokeshire. before we find out more about what people think about the election lets get back to the main story of the day. britain's chief rabbi has questioned jeremy corbyn's fitness to be prime minister, saying that "a new poison" of antisemitism had taken root in the party, "sanctioned" as he put it "from the very top." jeremy corbyn said his party will not tolerate anti—semitism. let's speak now to our digital election reporter joe tidy, who is seeing how the campaign is playing out
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on social media. what has the reaction being to what the chief rabbi had to say? the social media is only a snapshot of the public thinking in our analysis of the public post and groups on twitter and facebook is a snapshot of the snapshot but we've seen interesting things we can bring out as part of the analysis and the main thing we see is that this story around the rabbi is being seen on party political lines. if you support a party or a having a political leaning you look at it in a different way to the other side andi a different way to the other side and i will bring you to tweets that have been popular which highlight this partisan way it is working. firstly, matthew butcher tweeted this morning on this tweet has been very popular, 6 million impressions according to the software we use, and it's important to mention he is and it's important to mention he is a green party and labour supporter according to his twitter activity and he says, as a due and someone whose grandparents fled the holocaust to find safety in britain, i would like to say that the chief rabbi does not speak to me. labour was slow in anti—semitism and has some way to go but the idea that
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jeremy corbyn is unfit for office is not right. that's one way we see people going and another way is the way that the group leave. eu people going and another way is the way that the group leave.eu have tweeted this morning, huge reaction to this as well, and they have said in an unprecedented move the chief rabbi hits out atjeremy corbyn and his racist uk labour party and he blasts the mendacious picture that labour has investigated every case of anti—semitism in the party and insist the soul of our nation is on the line on the 12th of december. i hope this shows you the different ways the story is being treated on social media. there's also a lot of discussion about the chief rabbi's potential political leanings. 0n every thread i've seen on facebook people have dug out a post he put himself out back injuly of him saying and congratulating boris johnson on becoming pm and leader of the conservative party. it appears to be an old picture accompanying that particular post and you can see
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david cameron in the background, for example and i've done a reverse image search are not found the source image search are not found the source of the picture but i believe it would be an old picture, and possibly his own picture from the rabbi himself in that post has been shed very widely and people on one side of the debate are saying here is the chief rabbi who is clearly friends, is the term they are using, with boris johnson bit friends, is the term they are using, with borisjohnson bit in the post it says that boris johnson with borisjohnson bit in the post it says that borisjohnson is a friend to thejewish community. it says that borisjohnson is a friend to the jewish community. and it's all very well, we illustrated it's all very well, we illustrated it well, to use social media to gauge how the public are reacting to this but social media can often be pa rt this but social media can often be part of the problem as much as anything else and can be, frankly, a cesspit. absolutely right. and when we have these discussions around anti—semitism or a slammer phobia it does bring out the worst in social media, frankly and we have seen some of that today. we have seen anti—semitic comments and xenophobic comments and racist comments but
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overall my impression is that this is about the politics and which way you are leaning and how you are viewing this particular story but it's effectively showing that at this stage in the election even something that has the ability to move the dial doesn't seem to make much impact because people are so entrenched in their views, especially on social media. thank you very much. joe tidyjoining us through the newsroom. throughout the general election campaign we have been asking you to contact us with questions that you would like us to answer. quite a number of you want to know why it's not compulsory to vote in elections here in the uk when it is in more than a dozen other countries around the world. with nearly a million more people registering to vote in the past four days alone, our correspondent ben hunte spent some time here in pembrokeshire trying to find some answers. pembrokeshire in november. this is a key marginal. last time around, the mp here won byjust over 300 votes, but more than a quarter of people
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who were eligible to have their say didn't. so the question is, "why isn't it compulsory to vote like in australia?" in order to answer this question, the best place to start is for me to call our correspondent on a sunny beach in australia, shaimaa khalil. hi, shaimaa. hey, ben. it's coming up to the beginning of the summer here in queensland, and just look how gorgeous it is out here. queensland is where compulsory voting was introduced more than 100 years ago, and that's why australia has one of the highest levels of voter participation in the world. more than 90% of eligible voters cast their ballots in this year's election. notjust because they love politics, it's because, if they don't, they get hit with a fine of about £12. this brings up a debate here all the time, because people say, in a democracy, you shouldn't force
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people to do anything, including vote. here in haverfordwest, mothers and their babies have come together for their weekly singing class. so, would they want to be forced to vote? yeah, i think everybody should have to vote. a lot of people have sacrificed so that we have the right to vote, so i think if somebody doesn't use their vote, that's a real shame. if it was compulsory, i think that would be a really good idea. you'd get a much better idea of what everybody wanted, and then you wouldn't get people whinging about the outcome when they haven't been to vote in the first place. actually, all of the mums we spoke to liked the idea of compulsory voting. however... you could say it's exciting in the sense that there's a lot at stake, right? this expert doesn't think the system will change anytime soon. we don't have compulsory voting here, but primarily because the big parties have never gotten behind it, right? i think there's a reason for that, which is that it would be quite costly in some ways to introduce, right? you'd have to set up this whole
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system of monitoring, you'd have to be able to fine people. it's likely that you'd just be forcing people who are disengaged to turn up and mark a piece of paper, and would that really represent an improvement to british democracy? nobody knows what this year's turnout will be, but since this december election was called, more than 3 million applications have been made to register to vote. ben hunte, bbc news, pembrokeshire. i'm joined by felicity evans, wales political editor. 0ne one of the reasons we are here is just how tight this was at the last election. and yet, labour, looking from the outside look to have a stronghold in wales. it's a real test of the labour resilience, you are right. labour has dominated the political landscape for more than 100 years in wales and always topped the poll in the last 26 general elections and they did it in 2017,
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taking 70% of seats, so they have a high water mark. 40 seats and 28 of them are labour held? yes, in the last parliament. where do plaid sit here? it's tricky for plaid and arguably they all are and it's the battle for number ten and the nationalist party can never win that because they only stand in welsh seats, but in this particular insta nce seats, but in this particular instance they will probably be only a few hundred votes between a brilliant result and a disastrous one for clyde comrie, because they wa nt to one for clyde comrie, because they want to have their best ever result which would be five seats, perhaps taking on the anglesey seat which is their target seat and two of the seats they are defending our ultra marginals, sojust a seats they are defending our ultra marginals, so just a few hundred votes either way could make all the difference? is brexit the main issue in how that might go one way or another? where do they stand on
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that? plaid are a remain party and pa rt that? plaid are a remain party and part of the remain pact with the liberal democrats and the greens, so this time around they are not standing on all of the seats in wales because they are standing on 11 out of the 40 seats and plied our not standing in four of the 11, so they are a pro—independence party and it's a country where the majority of voters have supported neither stance so it is a bold offer that plaid is making. one of the complicated aspects is dissolved government and you have boris johnson saying new hospitals, more doctors and nurses, that's a devolved issue and agriculture is devolved, so how does that play with voters ? devolved, so how does that play with voters? it's really difficult because it adds a layer of complexity and when people are listening to the london—based media and hearing about manifesto promises promising x numbers of doctors and nurses, people in wales have to remember it does not apply because
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it's the remit of the welsh government scrutinised by the welsh assembly and those elections are in 2021 so we have that to look forward to once we get this over and done with. 0h to once we get this over and done with. oh good, another election. that is an extra layer of complexity. and what it does mean for wales is when people make these promises of extra spending it means extra money does flow through to wales as a result but it's only up to the welsh government to decide how they spend that money. felicity, as ever, great to see you. that is the picture in west wales, more from here later let's catch up with the business news. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. don't believe the hype! thats the message from which, when it comes to black friday deals. the consumer group studied last yea r‘s sales event, and says 95% of goods were the same
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price or cheaper at other times of the year. retailers say they're not misleading us. de la rue — the company that prints our banknotes — says there's a chance it could collapse if its rescue plan doesn't work. the company prints about a third of the world's currencies and has sustained big losses overseas. it says the warning is a worst—case scenario. companies are being banned from marketing high risk minibonds to ordinary punters. the city watchdog says too many people have been tempted by the higher than average returns on these bonds, and lost money. it's worried non specialist investors don't understand how risky these investments can be. the festive season is fast approaching and that means lots of spending. but there's a stark warning today from small businesses. almost a quarter of them say they could close within a year if the christmas trading season is below average. the report is by the online retailer
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not on the high street. holly tucker, co—founder of not on the highstreet is here now. 0ne one of the standout facts from the report was that a third of people who were questioned had not bought anything from an independent retailer in the last six months? how does it happen? i think it happens quite easily. unless we really think about where our money is going, where our pounds are being spent and encouragingly one in three of us actually know someone who runs a small business, so it should be topical and on our minds about shopping small but as you said, a third of us have not shopped small in the last six months and what is the most worrying part of this situation that we have commissioned is that a quarter of small businesses will go under unless we really support them this festive
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season. i've got to ask you this, isn't part of the problem when it comes to the high street that online retailers are comes to the high street that online retailers a re really comes to the high street that online retailers are really cutting into their market share? well, you could look at it that way but when we started the company back in 2006 there was no one supporting small businesses and we are that. it is a home for small businesses and we support 5000 businesses, 200,000 products and we have been going 13 yea rs products and we have been going 13 years and all we do every day is champion the small, so some larger retailers out there who are undercutting prices of the independence on the high street, thatis independence on the high street, that is not great and not what we do. i believe the two things can coexist, the high street, full of independent shops and online marketplaces who support the small. isn't there more that businesses themselves can do to make themselves more appealing to the consumer? i
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think there is more that small businesses can do. we have the wonderful internet and social media. but actually, after the last 15 yea rs but actually, after the last 15 years working with small businesses, tirelessly, i know that this is a bunch of people who could not work harder and it's more for the viewers watching this programme right now to consider that 26p of every pound that christmas goes to a small business and that means that 74p goes to a larger organisation so i think it is the voters with our money, it's the power of us to support small with that 74 p. what would happen this christmas in 50p of every pound went to small businesses? holly, thanks for joining us. you're more than welcome. thanks for having me. that's all the business news now. thank you very much. let's stay with
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money and lots of it. a couple from west sussex have been revealed as the winners of a 105 million pounds euromillions jackpot. steve and lenka thompson are the uk's ninth biggest winners. people i've always admired for many yea rs, people i've always admired for many years, my best friends. mr thompson said he started shaking when he found out they'd won, but that they both just went to work as usual. a warning this report by duncan kennedy has some flash photography. read it and leap, this is what happiness looks like. steve and lenka thompson have won £105 million. good morning, ladies and gentlemen, i would like to introduce you to steve and lenka thompson. the couple with three young children found out when steve checked his numbers... i believe that's mine! ..en route to hisjob as a painter and builder. i had the ticket in one hand, the numbers just jumped, boom, straight away. from that moment onwards, i was a shaking, gibbering wreck.
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lenka thought they had won £105,000 — not £105 million — but they both still went back to work. it is life—changing, notjust for us, our families, the community, definitely. we will do a lot of good with this. it is too much for us. laughter the couple are now on britain's rich list, ahead of emma watson on £52 million, ronnie wood at £85 million and gareth bale who is on a mere £94 million. steve and lenka said the priority is to move house so their children don't have to share bedrooms. whilst lenka has already given up herjob in the grocery store, steve says he will not let his customers down and will carry on building. cheering steve and lenka, who have been married for 13 years, say their heads are spinning.
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a pre—christmas present which they say will gift them, their family and their friends a new life. duncan kennedy, bbc news, west sussex. and we are all very, very, very pleased for them. time for a look at the weather. here's ben rich. today has brought us some rain, windy weather in places, but it has been mild. that is something that is set to change. this is the earlier satellite picture, you can see the swell of cloud, an area of low pressure, the winds around it move in an anticlockwise direction and that has brought up air from the south—west. that is why it has been feeling so mild. while many of us have been cloudy and damp there has been some brightness around. still some showers they are feeding and from the south, and those showers will continue to drift north through the night. more persistent rain possible, and this band of rain really gets
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stuck across northern scotland. temperature—wise, no lower than six to ten degrees. another relatively mild night. tomorrow, the low pressure still in charge, frontal systems spiralling around it, various areas of showers or longer spells of rain. quite a messy weather picture through tomorrow. we will see some showers down towards the south, some rain in northern scotland, and some heavy rain pushing on across parts of north—east england, that could cause flooding and disruption. it will be windy across the far north of scotland, could be gusts of 50 mph for the northern isles. some dry weather and sunshine, the best of that perhaps across the south west of scotland and northern ireland. but the heavy rain pushes and across north—east england, it could cause some disruption. further south some brightness but also hefty showers, and the english channel coasts in particular the channel islands it is windy. gusts could reach 60 mph.
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but our area of low pressure slides away as we get into thursday. still close enough to provide some outbreaks of rain, drifting south across england and wales. there could be the odd heavy burst. further north some sunshine develops, some sunshine for northern and eastern coasts where it will also be cold and also, given the fact we have some colder air pushing in. single digits across most of the uk. 11—12 for london, cardiff and plymouth. but as we head into friday, that cold air is brought southwards on a northerly wind across all parts of the uk, thrust to start friday morning, it stays chilly into the weekend. chance of some rain in the south but for most there should be some brightness.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live —
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i'm simon mccoy here in milford haven. today at 4:00pm... the chief rabbi questions whetherjeremy corbyn is fit to be prime minister, saying he's allowed anti—semitism to "poison" his party. the labour leader says the party has taken "rapid and effective" action. there is no place whatsoever for anti—semitism in any shape or form or in any place whatsoever in modern britain. and under a labour government, it will not be tolerated in any form whatsoever. i want to make that clear. i do think it is a very serious business when the chief rabbi speaks as he does. i've never known anything like it. meanwhile, a leading muslim organisation, the muslim council of britain, criticises the conservatives
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for their handling of claims of islamophobia in the party. a bleak outlook, says the un on climate change. the world has to act much faster to avoid dangerous levels of global warming. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with ben croucher. tottenham and manchester city can both qualify for the last 16 of the champions league tonight. spurs need to beat 0lympiakos. cityjust need a draw against shakhtar donetsk. we'll be live at the tottenham hotspurs stadium ahead ofjose mourinho's first home game in charge just after 4:30. thanks ben, and another ben — ben rich — has all the weather. thank you, simon. pretty cloudy, wet and blustery for some today but with that it will feel mild as we head to the end of this week, a better chance of seeing some sunshine but it will feel colder. details on the way. thanks ben.
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also coming up, a builder and a shop worker are £105 million richer, after winning the euromillions jackpot. hello, everyone — this is afternoon live. i'm simon mccoy. live in milford haven in pembrokeshire in west wales. britain's most seniorjewish leader has questioned jeremy corbyn's fitness to be prime minister, saying that "a new poison" of anti—semitism had taken root in the party, "sanctioned" as he put it "from the very top." in an outspoken intervention in the general election campaign, the chief rabbi ephraim mirvis described labour's claim to have dealt with allegations of anti—semitism as a "fiction" and he urged people to vote with their conscience. launching labour's race and faith manifesto, jeremy corbyn said his party will not tolerate anti—semitism. jessica parker reports.
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not the backdrop labour wanted outside the launch of its race and faith manifesto. it comes as this man, the chief rabbi ephraim mirvis, questioned jeremy corbyn's fitness to be prime minister. in the times, the chief rabbi writes that... "a new poison, sanctioned from the top, has taken root in the labour party." he adds, "i ask every person to vote with their conscience. be in no doubt, the very soul of our nation is at stake." labour today described its race and faith manifesto as ambitious, tra nsformative. it wants to hold an independent review of far right extremism, establish better protections for places of worship. more broadly, tackle pay discrimination based on race and teach children about colonialism and the role of the british empire. but as jeremy corbyn arrived at the event, it was clear today's launch had become overshadowed. there is no place whatsoever
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for anti—semitism in any shape or form or in any place whatsoever in modern britain. and under a labour government, it will not be tolerated in any form whatsoever. and asked directly about the chief rabbi's comments... i invite the chief rabbi, i invite the archbishop of canterbury, i invite all the other faith leaders to come, talk to us about what their concerns are, but be absolutely clear of this assurance from me. no community will be at risk because of their identity, their faith, their ethnicity or their language. and views may vary on what a labour government could mean for the jewish community. what i think is critical is that people will feel increasingly uncomfortable and will look for ways of either moving or having a place somewhere else or whatever they can possibly do, to mitigate what feels oppressive,
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uncomfortable, dangerous. there is a lot of pain in the jewish community. i think there are concerns, yes, but i think the concerns are legitimate up to a point, but beyond that i think they are misplaced. i think they are misplaced in so far as the chief rabbi has gone too far. the overall narrative here may feel familiar. labour insists it is taking robust action, critics say that is not the case. what is different is the manner and tone of this intervention from the chief rabbi in the middle of a general election campaign. borisjohnson has faced criticism for his handling over allegations of islamophobia. today, the muslim council of great britain accused the conservatives of broaching the issue with denial and deceit. we want to ensure the conservative party has robust procedures. we think we do, but we want to check and determine that. which is why we are committed to this independent review by the end of this year.
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meanwhile, an equality and human rights commission continues to investigate labour over anti—semitism allegations. and while the chief rabbi has criticised the party before, timing matters. right now, jeremy corbyn is working to win voters' trust. jessica parker, bbc news. earlier i spoke to the historian simon sebag montefiore about what he thinks the chief rabbi wanted to achieve through writing this article. i can't speak for the chief rabbi himself, but i have to say that the decision to write this article right now is of course an incredibly sensitive one. i also think it's a very brave one. and he is not a character who is known as a showboat, he is a very calm and temperate man. and the fact he has done it now in the middle of a general election should tell everybody, and i believe this is his intention, that this is a very serious subject.
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and we are now at a moment in british cultural and political history when literally the soul of the nation is at stake. and the issue is, tragically, anti—semitism in britain. and that is a phenomenon that most of us members of thejewish community never thought we would see in the 21st—century. simon, does it tally with what you hear from other parts of the jewish community? it so does. this is a very, very powerful and poignant and heartfelt message from the chief rabbi. it's totally unprecedented. in british history, this has never happened before. that's how serious it is. the feeling in thejewish community, no matter what you hear from labour sources, the feeling is very much that
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the overwhelming majority of the jewish community feels that the labour party is not a safe space, feels that anti—semitism is rife and unchecked in the labour party. and this comes from the leadership faction at the very top of the labour party. the figures are overwhelming. it's something like 93% of britishjewish people who used to vote labour now will not vote labour. 87% think that the leadership is anti—semitic. 83% think the labour party is now anti—semitic. with any minority we have been taught to listen to the views of the minority themselves. i think people should respect the views of the overwhelming majority of britishjews.
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they feel anxious, fearful and angry that despite the claims ofjeremy corbyn and john mcdonnell that they are dealing with this, in four years, that has proved to be a total lie. very little has been done. thousands of cases are coming to light all the time and now have been reported to the labour party and have not been sorted out. so, this is a very, very uncomfortable and scary time for british jews. the former conservative deputy prime minister lord heseltine has urged voters to back either independent candidates or the liberal democrats — saying that borisjohnson's brexit policy would be "utterly disastrous." borisjohnson is in fife, launching his pa rty‘s scottish conservative manifesto. 0ur political correspondent
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ben wright is there. it certainly is an extraordinary intervention by lord heseltine. borisjohnson is here, in fife, the new queensferry crossing across the water is behind me, you probably cannot see it through the murk. he is upstairs launching the tory party's manifesto for scotland, where the message is not really focused on brexit, it is on the conservative party's opposition to a second independence referendum. scotland of course, the majority of voters here voted to remain in the eu referendum, so i don't think it's got the same emphasis by the tory party up here as it does south of the border. but brexit certainly featuring today, after that intervention by lord heseltine, who said that borisjohnson's promise that he can get a whole new trade deal done with the eu by the end of next year was nonsense. this is what lord heseltine said. the damage to our economy, our position in the world, to our ability to have a voice in what is happening in this century
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on the great issues, is seriously undermined by fracturing our relationship with europe. and so, on a simple question of britain's self interest, it's quite an easy decision to take and i've made it clear from the day after the referendum that i would be part of the fightback to maintain the traditional position of the conservative party towards europe. lord heseltine, who, of course, had big roles in the governments of margaret thatcher and john major, is a tory peer — or was until he had the whip removed earlier this year after saying he would vote for the lib dems in the european elections. there is no love lost at the moment between boris johnson and lord heseltine, they have totally divergent views when it comes to brexit, and i'm sure today borisjohnson will try and swat it away, which is exactly what michael gove, one of his cabinet colleagues, tried to do earlier. the one area where i respectfully disagree with michael is on europe. michael has been a long—time
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advocate of further european integration, he's a believer in the single currency, he wanted us tojoin the euro, very few people take that view now. on this particular question, michael i think advised people to vote liberal democrat in the european elections, so in that sense he is consistent, but i do think that he's wrong on this. taking questions a few minutes ago at this manifesto launch, borisjohnson said there was a tight timetable to get a new trade deal in place by the end of next year, which is something he has pledged. many are very sceptical it can be done, considering how long these complicated trade negotiations take, and i think lord heseltine's intervention really puts the pressure on borisjohnson to now explain in the remainder of this campaign how he plans to achieve that and what he wants to get. well today the liberal democrat leaderjo swinson is in cornwall, and our political reporter jonathan blake hasjonathan blake has been speaking to her.
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this isjo swinson's second stop on the campaign trail today. we are in the campaign trail today. we are in the constituency of cheltenham, a seat the party are looking to win back from the conservatives, it's a very slim 2000 majority vote or so. jo swinson is here talking about what is described as a radical plan to combat the uk's addiction to plastic. tell us about those plans will stop you say you want to eliminate single use, nonessential and non—plastic within three years. would you legislate for that, would companies face fines, and how do you define nonessential?” companies face fines, and how do you define nonessential? i think we have all seen quite what the plastic pollution is doing to our oceans. many people have watched documentaries, david attenborough and others, that have powerfully hit the message home that we need to change the way we use plastic. many companies are already leading the way on this, we have alternatives like some of the packaging used
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here, but also how we can make sure companies are thinking about the ingredients they use in making their product in the first place. this morning i was at a place using recycled plastic to make jackets as a substitute for down. the innovation is there if we set ambitious targets for business and change regulations to make sure business recognises it has responsibility for the products they produce and what happens to them afterwards so they don't end up plastics in our oceans, which has all the negative consequences for marine life. another policy you speak about today is the plan to protect the uk's coastline, the so—called blue belt, with greater regulation for the protection of marine life. what about the fishing industry who might be concerned about tighter regulation that could limit the business they can do? the fishing industry of all industries understands the need for marine protection, because literally, if we do not look after our marine spaces then their industry would disappear.
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they understand the need for us to make sure we look after the marine environment and all the creatures and fish that live within the sea. and making sure we can do that. we have the money we have set out in our manifesto, we have the blue belt, and we can expand blue belt protection to at least half the uk territorial waters, and that will make a big difference to these vital environments and habitats. on your campaign so far, we are in one of the constituency or parties will have so when if you want to increase your share have so when if you want to increase yourshare in have so when if you want to increase your share in parliament. you are being squeezed in the polls at the moment and some polling suggests voters are moment and some polling suggests voters a re not moment and some polling suggests voters are not responding to you particularly well as a leader. what is your response to that and are you confident you are the leader for your party at this time?” confident you are the leader for your party at this time? i am, i was elected by an overwhelming majority of party leaders just elected by an overwhelming majority of party leadersjust a elected by an overwhelming majority of party leaders just a few months ago and there is other polling that says something different to what you have just says something different to what you havejust said. we have says something different to what you have just said. we have great
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candidates right across the country, seats across the southwest and elsewhere. liberal democrats are in a position to win seats from the conservatives. for anyone concerned about boris johnson conservatives. for anyone concerned about borisjohnson majority government, about a hard brexit deal that he has cooked up, that nigel farage is supporting that could end up farage is supporting that could end up in farage is supporting that could end upina farage is supporting that could end up in a no—deal brexit, the way to stop boris is to vote lib dems, because the lib dems can win seats from the conservatives stop right there is some disquiet in your party about the decision to revoke article 50 if you were to win a majority. doesn't that alienate some voters in the middle and do you regret taking that stance? no, it's right to be honest about what we would do with a liberal democrat majority government and in every other circumstance we would continue to campaign for a people's vote. the lib dems have led that campaign over the last three and a half years. 0thers that campaign over the last three and a half years. others who now say they support it, if they had walked they support it, if they had walked the walk in parliament, and i'm thinking of the labour party, we
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might have had a people's vote referendum campaign right now instead of a general election. but just a few weeks ago we tabled yet again another amendment for a people's vote, the 17th time we have done that in parliament and labour refused to back it so we know we can't trust labour on remain which is why voters are flocking to the liberal democrats. jo swinson, thank you forjoining us. a challenge for conservative voters in constituencies across the country, from the liberal democrats with their eyes on those constituencies in this election campaign. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines... the chief rabbi questions whetherjeremy corbyn is fit to be prime minister, saying he has allowed anti—semitism to "poison" his party. the labour leader says the party has taken "rapid and effective" action. leading muslim organisation, the muslim council of britain, criticises the conservatives for their handling of claims of islamophobia in the party. the un says the world has to act much faster to avoid dangerous levels of global warming.
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throughout the campaign, bbc news will be looking closely at the places where the election could be won and lost. we will be visiting 10 parts of the uk where seats will be closely contested. we are we a re halfway we are halfway through those visits. today, we're in milford haven which is in the preseli pembrokeshire constituency in south west wales. this seat has been held by the conservatives since 2005 — and is bordered by three other constituencies: one conservative, and two plaid cymru. labour held this seat — or versions of it — from 1992 until 2005. the conservatives have held the seat since 2005, but in 2017 they got a majority ofjust 314, with labour in second place. and plaid cymru took neighbouring ceredigion from the liberal democrats in 2017 by just 104 votes.
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it is all very tightly run here. joining me now is dennis 0'connor, tourism liaison manager at pembrokeshire tourism. thank you forjoining us. difficult to sell a place in weather like this... its gorgeous! you are the tourism manager, iwould this... its gorgeous! you are the tourism manager, i would expect nothing else. it is windy and blustery right now, but the seasonal nature of tourism, does that pose any particular problems in an area like this? it does, yes. we want to extend the season for tourism, not just in pembrokeshire but right throughout the uk. it's really important that we have in place mechanisms to do that. we need to keep people moving around. it is a challenge, but it's a challenge that i think anybody who goes into the tourism industry undertakes with relish to a certain degree. it's not a secret, i'm not breaking trust here, you voted remain in the referendum. yet you have seen some
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positives from that decision here. absolutely. i think the brexit vote itself, obviously the pound dropped so we saw an increase in overseas visitors initially. we also saw an increase in people taking a staycation. the mentality that people employ has changed somewhat in that they are battening down the hatches, drawing the belt buckle a little bit and saying, 0k, hatches, drawing the belt buckle a little bit and saying, ok, let's start at home and work it out from there. it has given them a different perspective of the uk as a place to holiday. and those with a slightly larger belt are buying second homes here as well. yes, and obviously with it being such a popular destination, you can understand that we are surrounded by coasts and it will always be a draw for people who wa nt to will always be a draw for people who want to purchase a second home. the conservatives, let's get brexit done, that's their message. is that
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a message that appeals to people who perhaps wouldn't naturally be wanting to get brexit done? editor very good question. —— it's a very good question. i would have to say that yes, to a certain degree. people i have spoken to, friends and family, and! people i have spoken to, friends and family, and i know people who have voted both ways, and i think now it has gone on so long that i think the country has had enough and something has to happen to break this deadlock. there is potentially light at the end of the tunnel. if we are to believe what is being said by central government, but whether or not it will actually come to pass, i don't know. but they are certainly trying their best. you use the phrase a central government. for people who don't know wales terribly well, the issue of devolution and the rules that come from the welsh government over health, agriculture,
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over so much, does that complicate an election campaign like this? over so much, does that complicate an election campaign like thi57m does without a shadow of a doubt. u nfortu nately. does without a shadow of a doubt. unfortunately. there will always be some crossover and some people who nail their colours to a master because they have a particular concern, which is a legitimate concern, which is a legitimate concern, for instance over health. they get confused, or they forget that it they get confused, or they forget thatitis they get confused, or they forget that it is a devolved issue, devolved to the assembly in cardiff. so i'm sure any politician standing here in front of you will say, it's not my problem, it is the problem of cardiff bay. so it does complicate it. and of course we have a labour administration in cardiff, and a conservative government essentially. that potentially has its own problems as well. how important do things like television debates and the personalities of national leaders when it comes to areas like
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this where westminster is a long way away. i can only speak personally but up until this year they have been important but not hugely important perhaps. things have been more about the local candidates. i did see the debates last week and my personal opinion was i don't think any of the leaders came out with any credibility at all. which should be worrying for their parties. i would be very disappointed with it, to be honest. but that's my personal opinion. but i'm not going to nail my colours to a mast of any one particular party. because they want to revoke the brexit deal or anything like that, it doesn't work like that. i want a little bit more substance than mere words. and who at the moment promises that? you don't have to breech too many
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secrets! to be honest, if we went to the polls today, i would not know, until i stood in the ballat area, who i would vote for. i simply could not say. what's going to change that? a performance on television, a policy? i think we need to see more honesty from politicians to be honest? not an easy task to ask for. but a lot has to change, otherwise i think we willjust be voting for the status quo, perhaps with a different administration, but the status quo, and we won't move the country forward. my personal view is that politics needs to change from the top down, starting with central government and all the way through every single mp, it has to be said, they have a massive responsibility. they have let this country down. we
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have to come back from that. in the meantime, pembrokeshire first? pembrokeshire first, always! anybody yet to register to vote in next month's general election, has until midnight tonight. government figures show nearly 3 million people have applied to register in the past month, with more than a third of them under the age of 25. applications can be made online at gov.uk/registertovote. joining me now is ailsa irvine from the electoral commission. just to talk us through the deadlines. tonight is the first significant one. absolutely. if you have recently moved house or not registered before, you have until midnight tonight to get on the website, it's an easy process, it only takes five minutes, you just need your address, date of birth and national insurance number and you can fill national insurance number and you canfill in national insurance number and you can fill in your details there and then and have your say on december 12. that's the deadline tonight, so
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what is the next one? after that, the first deadline today is the one to apply to vote by post, which is 5pm today, people are running out of time. they need to have their signed form back to the local council. but if they miss that deadline and can't go to their polling station on polling day then they can apply to vote by proxy, appointing someone they trust to vote on their behalf, and they have until 5pm on the 4th of december to do that. how busy is it at the electoral commission at times like this? there's certainly plenty going on. we have been working hard to try to make sure voters have the information they need so they know what to do and we are working to support local authorities with running elections in setting up polling stations and making the arrangements on the ground and doing our work to regulate political parties' spending so voters have transparency on who is spending money to influence their votes. looking at some of the questions you get asked regularly,
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things like, can i bring my dog? it has set off a whole social media thing of its own, dogs at polling stations will stop can i bring my kids, my own pencil. what bizarre questions do you get asked? we do get a lot of those questions. it's good to see dogs at polling stations becoming a feature on polling day. we have all sorts of questions, can i get we have all sorts of questions, can iget drunk we have all sorts of questions, can i get drunk when i cast my vote. it's not the most advisable thing but as long as you behave yourself and don't behave inappropriately at the polling station, then i guess it's your choice. that's a good one. we better ended there. great to talk to you. thank you very much. for many i think it will be a prerequisite. today has brought rain and windy weather in places but it has been mild, and that's something that is set to change. the earlier satellite picture, you can see this swirl of
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cloud, an area of low pressure and the wind around low pressure areas moves in this anticlockwise direction bringing it up from the south—west, which is why it has felt mild. many of us have been cloudy and damp but there has been some brightness around. this was cornwall earlier. still some showers feeding in from the south, and those showers continuing to drift north tonight. more impossible across east anglia and the south—east and this band of rain getting stuck across northern scotland. temperatures no lower than 6-10 scotland. temperatures no lower than 6—10 so another relatively mild night in prospect. tomorrow, the area of low pressure in charge, frontal systems spiralling around with various areas of showers and longer spells of rain. a messy picture through tomorrow but we will see some showers to the south and rain in northern scotland and heavy rain in northern scotland and heavy rain pushing in across north—east england that could cause flooding and disruption. a closer look, windy across the far north of scotland, a
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brisk north—easterly wind, could be gusts of 50 mph for the northern isles. the best of the sunshine across south—west scotland and northern ireland but this heavy rain pushing across north—east england. that could cause some disruption. further south, a bit of brightness but hefty showers and on the english channel coasts and the channel islands it will be windy. a steady wind speed in the white arrows, but gusts up to 60 mph. the area of low pressure will slide away as we move into thursday. still close enough to provide outbreaks of rain, drifting south across england and wales. the odd heavy burst but sunshine developing further north. it will be cold on the north—east coast given the strength of the wind and also given the fact we have colder air pushing on with single digits across the northern part of the uk. as we head into friday, that cold air is brought south on a northerly wind across all parts of the uk. a frost
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to start friday morning and it will stay chilly into the weekend. a chance of rain in the south but most of us should see some brightness. this is bbc news. our latest headlines. the chief rabbi questions whetherjeremy corbyn is fit to be prime minister, saying he has allowed anti—semitism
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to "poison" his party. the labour leader says the party has taken "rapid and effective" action. there is no place whatsoever for anti—semitism in any shape orform or in any place whatsoever in modern britain. and under a labour government, it will not be tolerated in any form whatsoever. i want to make that clear. i do think it is a very serious business when the chief rabbi speaks as he does. i've never known anything like it. meanwhile, a leading muslim organisation, the muslim council of britain, criticises the conservatives for their handling of claims of islamophobia in the party. the un says the world has to act much faster to avoid dangerous levels of global warming. and a lucky couple from west sussex are £105 million after winning the euromillions
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jackpot. sport now, on afternoon live with ben and a big night awaits jose mourinho and tottenham hotspur in europe. yes, who'd have seen this coming a week ago? jose mourinho in charge of tottenham hotspur for his first home game. it comes in the champions league tonight against greek side 0lympiakos. mourinho has been quick to talk up the passionate home support in his press conferences since taking over. so will he be feeling the love tonight? 0ur correspondent natalie pirks is at the tottenham hotspur stadium and natalie, is this a good fixture to be kicking off with? yes, ina yes, in a word. you are right, what a difference a week makes. this time last week pochettino was captain of the ship and fast forward 24 hours, the ship and fast forward 24 hours, the next morning, he was out and moreno was in and it's all been izar. —— jose mourinho.
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moreno was in and it's all been izar. ——jose mourinho. it's moreno was in and it's all been izar. —— jose mourinho. it's a moreno was in and it's all been izar. ——jose mourinho. it's a good game to kick off with with 0lympiakos bottom of group b having managed only two shots on target in their last away games, not a single one in the last game against bayern munich and have only won once in 14 away games against english opposition in europe, against arsenal when they won 3—2 but it was the greeks who put spurs on a sticky wicket with the first game in the champions league this season when spurs were 2—0 up and 0lympiakos came back to draw 2—2, their only point in the group so far this season but i fully expect spurs to get the victory tonight. if they do win they will be through to the group stages for the third successive season that is something thatjose mourinho successive season that is something that jose mourinho needs successive season that is something thatjose mourinho needs to get the fa ns thatjose mourinho needs to get the fans onside because there has not an outpouring of love for him. he got them off to a great start at the weekend, 3— to their first away win in the league, since january, and that was a great start but getting
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solid results in the champions league is what they want after reaching the final last season, so we will have a chat to some of the fa ns we will have a chat to some of the fans later and gauge the mood and see if they are starting to get on board with thejose mourinho era, but don't forget he did one say he would never manage the club because his love for chelsea was too strong. let's see if they are starting to forgive him. i'm sure he can win them over with a winter night. —— a victory tonight. also in action tonight are manchester city. they can also book their place in the last 16 tonight at home to sha ktar donetsk. just a point will be enough for pep guardiola's side. win and they're guaranteed to top the group too. you can follow both game tonight on bbc radio 5 live. the chief of new zealand cricket says the alleged perpetator who racially abused england bowler jofra archer will be banned from future matches and referred to the police. speaking to1 news, david white said he'd apologised personally to archer and was optimistic of catching the man in the coming days. archer says the incident happened
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as he was walking off the field during england's first test defeat in mount maunganui. andy murray says he is more relaxed about retiring from tennis now, as he's experienced so much time away from the sport in the last couple of years recovering from a hip injury. in a new documentary that premiered in london on monday night, audiences are given an insight into the gruelling strain murray's rehab took out of him, his family and those close to him before making a long awaited return in september. tennis obviously has been my whole adult life but also a huge part of my childhood as well — this is what i've done since i was a young kid, so when you sort of get to 28, 29 and it looks like you're coming to the end, i think sport doesn't do a very good job preparing athletes for finishing and setting them up for what they're going to do when they finish. but the nice thing about these last six or seven months — when i was at home and my pain
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was gone, i got a glimpse into what my life would be like without tennis, and i'm so much more relaxed about that now that i know that everything will be all good when i do stop. and we'll have the full interview with andy murray on bbc news in sportsday at 6:30. that's all the sport for now. now on afternoon live, let's go nationwide and see what's happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. tonic, i will be back in a minute. i am in milford haven in west wales. let's see what else is happening in the country.
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david rhodes is in berwick this afternoon where the look north team have been speaking to voters ahead of the general election. and carolyn sim is making her news nationwide debut and what a night to be doing it. you'll be today talking about how the local council and a shopping centre are getting into the christmas spirit this year. we all need a bit of that. lots more tonic. first though, david, i love live television,. tell us what is happening with the constituents there tonight? afternoon, simon, we're here to cover the election and we are doing this broadcast outside here in berwick—upon—tweed, a town that has changed hands between england and scotla nd changed hands between england and scotland 13 times down the years, but in terms of the political map in the north—east and cumbria, you can divide it into two games, and offensive game and a defensive game.
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the offensive game is by the conservatives, trying to win seats like bishop auckland seat with a majority of just 502 votes like bishop auckland seat with a majority ofjust 502 votes in the general election and they are trying to win in places like stockton south and if the polls are to be believed at the minute they could, theoretically maybe even take seats where they've never had a conservative mp in places like the blyth valley, one of the poorest places in the north—east and cumbria and in terms of the defensive game, that's been led by labour who are trying to hold onto places like darlington and hartlepool, places that were once labour strongholds but now the party is very fearful they could lose. as for the other parties, the liberal democrats used to hold berwick—upon—tweed for nearly 30 years and they are trying to win places like this back for them in the election and for the brexit party, their number one target in this election is in the north—east and cumbria. it is hartlepool, a town that voted by 70% to leave the european union in 2016
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and the brexit party chairman is standing there for his party and they believe they have a real chance of taking that seat from labour. david, what are the issues that voters have with politicians when they knock on the doors, especially along the english and scottish border? here in berwick there are things like bus services which have fallen in the last five or six yea rs. fallen in the last five or six years. they fallen in the last five or six yea rs. they really fallen in the last five or six years. they really matter in rural constituencies like this one and when we talk about connectivity we talk about broadband, so the labour proposal to effectively nationalise broadband provision across the uk has been received warmly by some constituents in this part of the world, but one of the big issues in this constituency is what will happen in terms of a second scottish referendum. the snp across the border, in their manifesto, they could say they want to see another referendum held and that is concerning some business leaders here in berwick—upon—tweed. concerning some business leaders here in berwick-upon-tweed. the effect on business would be
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significant. the extra cost of the ha rd significant. the extra cost of the hard border which frankly would be a complete waste of money, when people come to berwick to visit the region, not one side of the border or the other and anything that makes that more difficult would have a major impact. the only possible advantage i could see is people like me in their late 505 having retirement job5 their late 505 having retirement jobs and checking pa55port5 at the bridge. the snp would say if there is going to be a second referendum thenif is going to be a second referendum then if scotland votes to leave the uk there would be no problems on this border but there are lots of english voters on this side who are looking with some interest and what is happening across the border in scotland. david there on dry land. if i'm sounding a bit queasy, i am,
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because it is moving and we are seeing the tail end of a storm in west wales and somebody thought it would be a really good idea to stand on the jetty and if you wonder why there is nobody on a boat, it's because there is a huge storm going on. you have been helping people with their christmas shopping, is that right? it is christmas shopping with a difference and this is feel—good christmas shopping, a toy christmas gift appeal that they run all over the country but here in southampton they are looking to help around 10,000 children who are either in their care or from disadvantaged backgrounds to get a christmas present this year. the way it works is, you go to the shopping centre, pick up a gift tag which has the name, age and gender of a child on itand the name, age and gender of a child on it and the names have been changed but the age and gender represent a real child and you go out and buy that child a gift and it is given to their parents so they can make them smile at christmas. what is the reason behind this? it's actually quite sad, and in this day and age!
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actually quite sad, and in this day and age i was really shocked by the figures that in southampton alone there are 2800 children who are either living in the care of the city council or who are supported by social services. that's a really big figure and these children do come from very difficult backgrounds and as southampton city council told me today, christmas is a really hard time of yearfor them. today, christmas is a really hard time of year for them. it might be that they have a parent with mental health difficulties, they might be experiencing domestic abuse and it might be that financially it is troubling time5 might be that financially it is troubling times and there are many thou5and5 troubling times and there are many thousands of children in those circum5tance5, thousands of children in those circumstances, some thousands of children in those circum5tance5, some of us who work in this business might have been in that situation our5elve5 so it doesn't mean our ambition for children is less because of their circumstance but this year, a chri5tma5 we just want to make sure they get at least one gift. have the shopper is taken to this ideas —— idea quest might yes they have, and by the power of social media in the short time we are at the shopping centre all of those gift tags were taken away by shoppers. it's not
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difficult, is it? buy a gift that will make a child smile, so the people we spoke to did not take much persuading. it just people we spoke to did not take much persuading. itjust makes me feel 5ad there are so many kids who will not have any pre5ent5 5ad there are so many kids who will not have any presents this chri5tma5. not have any presents this christmas. i went through a hard time 5truggling sol christmas. i went through a hard time 5truggling so i know what it's like to not have anything and a chri5tma5 everybody 5hould like to not have anything and a chri5tma5 everybody should have something. i've got two children of my own but they are grown up now and i think it's good for the community to be able to help out as best you can. i said to my little girl that it would be nice to buy something for a trial that doesn't have anything to teach her that it's good to give back. -- a child. it does reflect the generosity of the people of southampton and anyone who's interested in going along and buying a gift can do so until the 20th of december and social services will pass it to those children to really make them smile christmas. nice to have a good story to end on. thank you and congratulations on nationwide. you can have a full
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time, by all means, and david in berwick, thank you very much. there are too rusty old anchors, one here and one over there, look. that is nationwide tonight. if you want to see more on any of those stories, access them via the bbc iplayer and a reminder that we go nationwide at 4:30pm every weekday afternoon. 0ne one of the issues surrounding this election is the issue of climate change. we were talking to our science editor this morning who said that the first time in his career he is likely been required more than one day during an election campaign. it is something that has caught the public imagination, particularly those of younger people. our environment correspondent matt mcgrath reports. fires rage in the amazon in brazil.
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this year has seen a major surge in burning and forest clearing. as a result of all the carbon being released, the un says it will be difficult for brazil to meet its climate pledges. it's a similar story in many countries, with deforestation in africa and asia helping c02 concentrations in the atmosphere rise to a new record high in 2019. scientists agree that all this carbon is changing our climate, and the impacts are being seen across the world as ice melts, storms surge and flood waters rise, threatening cities like venice. but if global temperatures rise by more than 1.5 celsius this century, the effect on the planet could be devastating. to have any chance of keeping under this limit, the un says the carbon cutting promises made by countries must increase massively over the next ten years. what we are trying to do is amplify the challenge we have in front of us, that if we still want to start talking or continue talking
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about one—and—a—half degree as the highest temperature increase we will accept, then basically countries in the next ten years have to reduce their emissions by 55%. so a little over half of current emissions, which is an immense challenge. to put the challenge in context, over the last decade, global emissions have gone up by1.5%a year. to keep the world from dangerous warming, these emissions will have to fall by over 7% every year until 2030. so, what's gone wrong? almost every country in the world signed up to the paris climate agreement in 2015, but today's report says seven of the richest 20 nations — including the us, canada and japan — are not meeting the commitments they set themselves. the un says that all countries must put new and hugely improved carbon cutting plans on the table by the end of next year to have any real chance of meeting the 2030 target. there is one note of hope in today's assessment — the costs of renewable energy have
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fallen massively in price over the last decade. if the world can move away from coal and rapidly embrace wind and solar, we might have a fighting chance of limiting the damage that climate change will inevitably do. matt mcgrath, bbc news. the prime minister boris johnson was in fife this morning launching the scottish conservative manifesto. he's since moved on to norfolk. 0ur political correspondent ben wright is travelling with him. borisjohnson has already been on two flights today and the campaign is gathering some pace. he was up in scotla nd is gathering some pace. he was up in scotland this morning and he has just arrived in norwich and he is expecting an aeroplane that doesn't look like it is fit to fly, he somewhere underneath the wing. this is an aviation training academy. borisjohnson, as is an aviation training academy. boris johnson, as i is an aviation training academy. borisjohnson, as i said, was up in scotla nd borisjohnson, as i said, was up in scotland today launching the ma nifesto for scotla nd scotland today launching the manifesto for scotland and the
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emphasis up there was interesting. it was all about the tories opposition to another independence referendum in scotland. there wasn't so much of a focus on brexit where in scotland, of course, the majority of voters did vote to remain in the eu. up in fife, the attack was all on the snp and scottish independence. now i think the campaign message will switch back to brexit, but it's been a tricky day in some ways for borisjohnson after lord heseltine, a tory grandee, launched a pretty strong attack on his brexit policy. lord heseltine lost the tory whip earlier this year when he said he voted lib dems in the european elections, he hates brexit and wants another referendum and said that borisjohnson's brexit policy was nonsense and there was a good chance britain might leave the eu with no trade deal at all if mr johnson gets the working tory majority that he wants. there is another uncomfortable question that borisjohnson another uncomfortable question that boris johnson might be another uncomfortable question that borisjohnson might be asked today
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around islamophobia and labour have their issues around anti—semitism but the muslim council of britain said the approach to tackling islamophobia from the tories had been one of denial, dismissal and deceit. an independent enquiry into islamophobia was promised back in the summer by borisjohnson and still has not happened and i'm sure the prime minister will face questions about that later on. then right reporting from norfolk. —— ben wright. somebody just said right reporting from norfolk. —— ben wright. somebodyjust said drop the anchor but i'm not sure they're talking about the ships. egon cossu is here now with the business news. don't believe the hype! thats the message from which, when it comes to black friday deals. the consumer group studied last year's sales event — and says 95% of goods were the same price or cheaper at other times of the year. retailers say they're not misleading us. de la rue — the company that prints our banknotes — says there's a chance it
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could collapse if its rescue plan doesn't work. the company prints about a third of the world's currencies, but has suffered big losses overseas. it says the warning is a worst case scenario. companies are being banned from marketing high risk minibonds to ordinary punters. the city watchdog says too many people have been tempted by the higher than average returns on these bonds — and lost money. it's worried ordinary investors don't really get how risky these minbonds can be. let's go back to that story about de la rue — the firm that prints our bank notes. its warning that it could go out of business if its rescue plan doesn't work out. all sounds very dramatic. tom stevenson is from fidelity international. let's start off with a fairly strange question, if it does go out of business, what happens to our cash? if it does go out of business then someone else will have to print
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then someone else will have to print the cash. interestingly, de la rue has already lost the contract to print british passports which was pa rt print british passports which was part of a whole string of bad news that de la rue has faced over the last year, a time in which it has lost its chairman, chief executive and its finance director and announced a big, £12 million half yearly loss today and said debts had risen by 58%. it is in quite a bad way and that's been reflected in the share price which fell by 25% today and it is 70% down and where it was as recently as may this year. is it really a victim of the cashless society we are evolving? well, you might have thought so. you know, we go around and we pay for everything on cards and we have a lot less cash in our pockets and you might think that would hit de la rue but the
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reality is that there is still plenty of cash in the world and experts who watched de la rue are saying the problems it faces are more about its management than its market backdrop that it faces. let's turn to pets at home, a company reporting a big leap in profits up to £45 million. what we think it is doing right? that is precisely the question because it is bucking the retail trend at the moment. many retailers are suffering from this assault on their market by online rivals, and i think that is the key to pets at home's success, that it is creating stores where its customers have to go because you can't, for example have your dog groomed on the internet. you can't
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ta ke groomed on the internet. you can't take your dog to see a vet on the internet, and those are two of the features of de la rue's new stores. it's rolled out a pilot of three new stores that has been very successful and it will roll out 30 more of these new format stores over the next few years so what it is doing, it's operating in an area when it cannot be competed with on the internet. i'm sure somebody is working on online dog grooming. toops tiles has made a warning about bad trading conditions. this is not a good story. we often get retailers complaining about the weather and this is the first one i've heard of where a retailer complains about the election. topps tiles has a point here, because they are blaming the timing of the election, the winter election, the first since 1923, and the reason is that the run—up to
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christmas is typically, traditionally, a good time for topps tiles because people renew their bathrooms or kitchens in time for christmas. they're not doing that this year. since the election was announced people have put the plans on hold and they are waiting to see what is happening and leaving it till next year so sales in the eight weeks since the beginning of october are down 7% and they also announced are down 7% and they also announced a smaller drop in profits to 1.6% in the year to the end of september. we have to leave it there, tom, but thanks forjoining us. the ftse made gains after renewed hopes of some progress on ending the trade war between america and china. shares in pets at home bounded away. investors pleased with the firm's impressive financial results. de la rue saw losses after warning it could go out of business. topps tiles managed to reverse earlier losses,
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that's after it warned of challenging trading conditions. that's it from me. back to simon, who is facing challenging weather conditions. you are not wrong. ijust had to put the heated blanket on in my room tonight. but that is nothing, because there a couple in west sussex who have just £105 million on the euro millions lottery. steve and lenka thompson are the uk's ninth biggest winners. a warning this report by duncan kennedy has some flash photography. read it and leap, this is what happiness looks like. steve and lenka thompson have won £105 million. good morning, ladies and gentlemen, i would like to introduce you to steve and lenka thompson. the couple with three young children found out when steve checked his numbers... i believe that's mine! ..en route to hisjob
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as a painter and builder. i had the ticket in one hand, the numbers ju5t jumped, boom, straight away. from that moment onwards, i was a shaking, gibbering wreck. lenka thought they had won £105,000 — not £105 million — but they both still went back to work. it is life—changing, notjust for us, our families, the community, definitely. we will do a lot of good with this. it is too much for us. laughter the couple are now on britain's rich list, ahead of emma watson on £52 million, ronnie wood at £85 million and gareth bale who is on a mere £94 million. steve and lenka said the priority is to move house so their children don't have to share bedrooms. whilst lenka has already given up herjob in the grocery
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store, steve says he will not let his customers down and will carry on building. cheering steve and lenka, who have been married for 13 years, say their heads are spinning. a pre—christmas present which they say will gift them, their family and their friends a new life. duncan kennedy, bbc news, west sussex. lucky them. you want to hear what a cold, bitter wind sounds like? it is miserable. it is cold, it's the end ofa miserable. it is cold, it's the end of a storm which ben is about to tell us about. coming up next, hugh edwards. we are on a jetty here that is shaking like mad. coming up next for five o'clock news. now look at the weather. i am going to my room. where are my keys?
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most of us have spent today under a cloud with some outbreaks of rain and some brisk winds but it has been mild and it stays mild through the evening and tonight. further hefty downpours pushing up from the south, more persistent rain possible in eastern england and this band of rain really settles across northern scotland. staying windy in the north and the south, lighter winds elsewhere on what will generally be a mild night. quite a messy weather picture into tomorrow, various lumps of rain circulating around an area of rain circulating around an area of low pressure and some heavy and persistent rain feeding into north—east england and it stays wet across northern scotland, brisk, north—easterly winds down the south and the channel islands there are westerly gales and we will see lighter winds elsewhere but there is a fighting chance of some dry weather and spells of sunshine. by thursday and friday it starts to turn colder and there is an increasing chance of seeing some sunshine.
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today at 5pm, labour responds to the chief rabbi's severe criticism of the party's record on anti—semitism. ephraim mirvis questioned whetherjeremy corbyn was fit to be prime minister, accusing him of allowing anti—semitism to ‘poison' the labour party. the labour leader says all forms of racism are unacceptable. there is no place whatsoever for anti—semitism in any shape or form or in any place whatsoever in modern britain. and under a labour government it will not be tolerated in any form whatsoever. i want to make that clear. applause. but the conservatives have also been accused, by the muslim council of great britain, of failing to deal with islamophobia in the party.

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