Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  November 27, 2019 6:00am-8:31am GMT

6:00 am
hello, good morning britain looking to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines to you. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn, in a bbc interview, says anti—semitism is vile, wrong but fails to apologise of his party's handling of the issue. would you like to take this opportunity tonight to apologise to the british jewish community for what has happened? what i will say to them is this. i am determined that our society will be safe for people of all faiths. i don't want anyone to be feeling insecure in our society. # let me introduce you to tim. just
6:01 am
11 years old, lives with his mum... director behind lou story gives us his first tv interview after his ban does make film was banned some cinemas —— blue story. lancashire to win in 2025 but what benefits does it bring? ruin your‘s spurs look special. —— jose migno. it bring? ruin your‘s spurs look special. ——jose migno. ——jose mourinho. 0h! how does andy murray relax? being trapped in a dark room, of course. he says tennis is his way to escape. a nursery in chester has become one of the first in britain to introduce an entirely vegan menu for all its children. good morning, the weather today remains unsettled. cloudy with rain at times, windy and
6:02 am
the south and brightest conditions in northern ireland and western scotland. i will have more in 15 minutes. good morning when david 27th of november. it is just gone six o'clock for top the labour leader jeremy corbyn has fails —— fell to apologise for his party's record on anti—semitism. in a bbc interview with andrew neil, his is —— insisted he is taking rapid and —— out action but declined to say sorry. reporter: mr corbyn, are you fit for high office, sir? labour's handling of anti—semitism allegations has been an issue of controversy over recent years, and it burst into the headlines yesterday after the chief rabbi said there had not been an adequate response. jeremy corbyn said he had toughened up procedures, but last night, speaking to andrew neil, he declined to apologise. what i will say to you is this — i am determined our society will be safer for people of all faiths. i don't want anyone to feel insecure in our society and our government will protect every community. against the abuse they
6:03 am
receive on the streets, on the trains or in... so no apology? ..or any other form of life. some labour politicians have called for tougher action and last night a member ofjeremy corbyn‘s front bench said there should be an apology. i would say absolutely that we need to apologise to our colleagues in my own party who have been very upset, but to the whole of thejewish community as well, that we have not been as effective as we should have been in dealing with this problem. it is a shame on us, it really is, and it's something that i am very, very ashamed of. mr corbyn was also quizzed about his plans for power. he said the only people paying more income tax under labour will be those earning over £80,000 a year, but the party also wants to get rid of the marriage tax allowance, a tax break for some couples who earn well under that sum.
6:04 am
mr corbyn argues those affected will benefit from other labour policies, like the real living wage of £10 per hour. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. let's get more right now from our political correspondence to zig parker who joins political correspondence to zig parker whojoins us from westminster. let us pick up on some of the talks. —— jessica parker. westminster. let us pick up on some of the talks. -- jessica parker. so jeremy corbyn repeatedly asked as to whether he wanted to apologise and chose not to do so. i think for some of his critics, that will be a further sign that in their view he perhaps just doesn't get how serious this issue has become for some people. i think for his supporters, they will point to the fact they say thatjeremy corbyn has been a campaign against racism all his life that has nick was saying, this issue burst back onto the scene yesterday during the general election campaign as labour was launching its race and faith manifesto so certainly a difficult day forjeremy corbyn on
6:05 am
that front. also on this issue of tax. 0bviously essential element to the labour pa rty‘s tax. 0bviously essential element to the labour party's pledges that they can deliver better public services, free broadband with the vast majority of people not having to pay more tax so this admission, that some people, including couples, that would have a lower earner in that couple, would lose this tax allowa nce, couple, would lose this tax allowance, the married couple allowa nce, allowance, the married couple allowance, i think that will allow jeremy corbyn‘s critics to pile onto this idea that labour's plans are not physically credible. labour will push back and say that they are fully costed. what you know about the snp manifesto? manifesto caesar is nearly over —— season. we had the snp's launch today. the snp's central message has been throughout this campaign they want to stop brexit, of course, and have another
6:06 am
independence referendum in scotland. i think nicola sturgeon will attack borisjohnson, saying —— saying he is unfit for office and that his brexit plans mean the eu could —— the uk look could leave the eu without a plan. she would demand more money for the nhs in scotland as well if labour were to come into power. nicola sturgeon has made it very clear he worked —— she will never help borisjohnson, she is against the tories, jeremy corbyn wouldn't be her pic as labour leader but she won't form a coalition to stop she has made it pretty clear she would strike a hard bargain in that scenario so it will be interesting today to listen out for more details as to what that hard bug and might entail. the writer and director of the film blue story will speak out for the first time in breakfast this morning after deciding the decision to ban the film in some cinemas. the writer has said the film has been wrongly blamed for the actions of a few
6:07 am
individuals after a brawl broke out. there has been accusations of racism after the film was pulled. the starcity cinema complex in birmingham on saturday night, and a brawl that led to seven police officers being injured, five teenagers being arrested and a spotlight being shown on this film. you're my brother, i'm from the view. i only have one brother, and that ain't you. blue story tells the tale of two friends from south london who become enemies in rival gangs. we always have each other‘s back, man — you know this. following the violence in birmingham, vue was the first cinema chain to withdraw the film. it said that in the 2a hours following its release, there had been more than 25 significant incidents reported in 16 of its cinemas. some have described the ban as racist. vue stressed the decision wasn't taken lightly and not based on biased assumptions. rival chain showcase also
6:08 am
withdrew blue story, but on monday night reinstated it, and said additional security measures would be put in place at the cinemas where it's shown. the blue story director, rapman, says it's a story about love, not violence. he's told the bbc he was hurt by the decision to ban it and said there was no truth of any correlation between the violence in the cinema in birmingham and the film itself. the controversy hasn't done the film too much harm at the box office. at the cinemas where it is being shown, it's already grossed more than £1.3 million and is number three in the uk box office charts. tim muffett, bbc news. and we will be speaking exclusively to the film's writer and director
6:09 am
rapman pulled up his first tv interview with reaction to that banning. we will be talking about the subject as well covered in the film. it is a sort of about gangs in london. it is an absolutely incredible watch and we will be talking about it later. a really powerful film and much to discuss. elsewhere, the widow of a policeman killed at the end of august in berkshire has thanked the public and police for their overwhelming generosity, kindness and support. a memorialfund has generosity, kindness and support. a memorial fund has raised generosity, kindness and support. a memorialfund has raised nearly £330,000 pc andrew harper who was killed after being dragged under a van killed after being dragged under a va n after killed after being dragged under a van after investigating a burglar. —— burglary. three teenagers have been charged charged. there has been a joint been charged charged. there has been ajoint —— groupjoined been charged charged. there has been a joint —— groupjoined at uniting victims of nice and non— crime. the teenager stabbed in the back as she sat ina
6:10 am
teenager stabbed in the back as she sat in a park in london earlier this year. you can be as skilled as you like as a therapist or counsellor but unless you have been through it, i don't think you can really understand and that is why it is really good to talk to other parents that are going through the same thing. a nursery in chester has been the first in britain to introduce an entirely vegan menu for some some pa rents entirely vegan menu for some some parents expressed concern. the owners say they have been working with a nutritionist to create a varied and sustainable menu. i will bejoined by the varied and sustainable menu. i will be joined by the owners of the nursery on the so far here at 730 on brea kfast was breakfast anything nursery on the so far here at 730 on breakfast anything can happen on live tv as has improvement on this show. this is a new one. even for the breakfasting. show. this is a new one. even for the brea kfasting. greek
6:11 am
show. this is a new one. even for the breakfasting. greek reporter was in the middle of a live broadcast for a local news channel when he was accosted. he was in a town reporting on the recent flooding and you can see our rather lug —— large pig started chasing him and nipping at his trousers, much to the amusement of the presenters back in the studio. they are about as sympathetic as we would have been. your ever when steph was surrounded by piglets who ate her roots? they really wanted to eat her gumboots.
6:12 am
and you got a really interesting interview with andy murray coming up. interview with andy murray coming uirky interview with andy murray coming up. quirky is the way to describe it. he really likes escape rooms, he told us months ago. i really didn't like the idea of it. what did we do? well, we went to an escape room. that is coming up in the programme and really, really interesting watch. i am starting today with news from spurs last night was of a really interesting couple of decisions from jose mourinho. they came from behind to win. the victory sealed spurs' space in the knockout stage and gavejose mourinho to wins from his first few games. more on the paper review coming up. there was enough to send manchester city through with a game to spare. city went ahead before there was an equaliser. chris silverwood will travel back to britain after day two of the second test against new zealand. it follows a family
6:13 am
bereavement. the test starts tomorrow and graham thorpe and paul collingwood will take over management of the team. women's golf in europe has been given a boost with a partnership with the american tour and with a partnership with the american tourand a with a partnership with the american tour and a bonus of £215,000 shed between the top three players on the european order of merit. quite a lot of cash, not quite as much as the men. did you get out of the room? i can't tell you, you will have to watch. we eventually got out. what do you think? do you think my logical rain got us out of a locked room? —— logical rain. —— brain. i would like to have andy murray on my side. he was quite good! you have to turn dials and work out. i get
6:14 am
really claustrophobic. you wouldn't have liked the bit where you had to go in have liked the bit where you had to goina have liked the bit where you had to go in a draw. this it is giving me sweaty hands even thinking about it so well done, sally for even doing it. i had to put him in a draw. like a chest of drawers. you had to literally go in and then i had to do it. no! we have finally found something she doesn't like. also a lift involved. you are anti— left as well, aren't you? carol is back, thankfully. she has escaped from the whistling wind of yesterday which was quite something, wasn't it, carol? today there are gusty winds again but this time across the english channel and kent. starting off on english channel and kent. starting offona english channel and kent. starting off on a cloudy note but a mild one and we have got some outbreaks of rain. seem quite heavy rain as we have gone through the night across parts of the south—east but you can we also have it in wales, the southwest and also across northern scotland. some clear skies across
6:15 am
northern ‘s england and southern scotland, for example and here this morning, watch out for some missed. poor visibility around. the rain in the south—east will push north. which will be windy across the english channel, the channel islands, through parts of connell, devon and kent in particular and you can see how it brightens up a touch in the afternoon with showers across southern areas of england and wales heavy rain falling where we have already had issues of flooding and that could lead to some disruption. the cloud builds in the highlands and it will be windy across the north of scotland. this evening and overnight, the rain is coming. the wind changes direction tomorrow so it will turn colder in the north as we go through the course of the night. as we push further south,
6:16 am
clear skies but not quite as cold. sixes and sevens. as we head through the course of thursday, what is happening is the low pressure driving our weather at the moment pushes off into the near continent and is this weather front sink south and is this weather front sink south and behind it with brilliant cold, northerly winds so we will notice the difference in the north of the country to the feel of the weather during the course of thursday. let us during the course of thursday. let us look at that. the rain is still sinking southwards into north wales and afair sinking southwards into north wales and a fair bit of cloud around it. it is fragmenting but behind it, clear skies with sunshine and just a few showers on the tops of the hills. south of that, again, some dry conditions but a fair bit of cloud. you can still we still have —— you can see we still have milder air but the territory comes down as we push further north. the weather
6:17 am
front visit way down south as we go into friday. 0riginal high—pressure moves in so along the north sea coastline, we could see some showers initially. a lot of dry and fine weather and a fair bit of sunshine. a weak weather front but here it will be cloud and spots of rain at times but still quite mild at 10 degrees. as we push across the rest of the uk, we will fill the draft, literally, ghost averages from being above average will now be low average was up a above average will now be low average was up a quick look ahead, on saturday, rain could come in across south wales and southern england. but it will be dry with sunny spells for the most part. lets have a look at some of the front pages this morning, and a look inside as well. one story dominating, the daily mail leading onjeremy dominating, the daily mail leading on jeremy corbyn's dominating, the daily mail leading onjeremy corbyn's interview dominating, the daily mail leading on jeremy corbyn's interview with andrew neill where he was continually asked to apologise to the jewish community. continually asked to apologise to thejewish community. the guardian also leads with what it calls mr
6:18 am
colvin's struggle to rebuff anti—semitism accusations —— mr corbyn. protests were held yesterday. the times are saying labour spent all of yesterday grappling with the consequences of the chief rabbi's article, but also carries a picture of the lucky euro lottery winners who skipped the £1.5 million jackpot. they say they are going to help their village. and the huffington post has described the bbc interview with jeremy corbyn huffington post has described the bbc interview withjeremy corbyn as a bloodbath and features analysis of what it describes as five standout moments. you seem to have all sorts of papers. a real mixed bag. i want to start with this one, it is a firm called de la rue, it is one of the firms you won't know if you don't know, they print banknotes, something you use every day. you will be hard pressed to find anyone who knows who makes them. the prince notes for the bank of england and 100 other central banks around the
6:19 am
world. it also crucially makes passports. it has fallen into a sharp loss, 12.8 pounds loss in the last year, compared to a sharp profit this year —— last year. that is because of a number of things, not least the failure to win a contract not least the failure to win a co ntra ct to not least the failure to win a contract to print britain's post blue passports. it employs quite a lot of people, 2500 people around the world, and there are concerns about whether it can continue as a going concern. we will keep an eye on that one for you. some great pictures of the mirror, looking at some hollywood memorabilia that is up some hollywood memorabilia that is upfor some hollywood memorabilia that is up for sale. i love stories like this, but i can never work out how anyone works out what they are worth. superman's tape, one by christopher reeve, £156,000, but elbow bagans‘s pipe, £93,000. —— bilbo baggins. why is the pipe
6:20 am
£93,000 whereas captain kirk's jacket is £63,000? someone was a keen smoker? dennis hopper's chopper, used, it says, to publicise easy writer, maybe it was not used in the field, but £62,000 —— easy rider. and how much is the ball boy from last night's spares game worth? if you didn't see, what actually happened was this little fella down here was working as a ball boy last night and was hailed as a hero by spurs boss jose night and was hailed as a hero by spurs bossjose mourinho for very quick thinking. he threw the ball back to them very quickly, which helped them on their comeback last night. he got mentioned in the press conference. jose mourinho went looking for him afterwards because they wanted to congratulate him on they wanted to congratulate him on the dressing room. they couldn't find him. imagine that opportunity missed. he had probably gone home foran missed. he had probably gone home for an early night. it was a school night. i think they will find him.
6:21 am
and ijust want to show you this, the fulton manager, keith hill, in his shed at training, is keeping the bolton dream alive and not very much cash —— alton manager. this is where he goes to retreat from the wind and the rain. he says they are basically doing everything they can to keep the club going, training as much as they can, but it is sad in a way to think of the way that club used to be another financial constraints they are under. and we have some good news for coffee drinkers? drinking between one and four coffees a day can significantly reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity according to a study. to watch out, because they say it is after four copies it is not so good for you. i love that coffee is finally... even decaffeinated coffee. —— four coffees. between one and four is good. i have bad news for coffee drinkers, it makes a hangover worse. well, i haven't got a hangover.
6:22 am
according to scientists in india, they have worked out that the best way of dealing with a hangover is a drink that is 65% paired use, 25% sweet lime, and 10% coconut —— pear juice. if you drink that with a side place of —— side plate of cheese, cucumber and tomatoes, that is the magic combo. can you imagine prepping that before a big night out? this is my favourite story of the day. in russia they are trying to convince cows it is summer all year round to help with milk production. so what they have done is put virtual reality headsets on cows. to convince them that it is summer. it is the world's smallest picture, but hold on a second. can you get in there? there is a cow with a virtual reality headset on. so the cows' mood was improved, and they expect the calm conditions to
6:23 am
elevate milk quality and quantity. the only thing i can say is poor cow. unless the cow is convinced this is lovely. you need to have the smells of summer, as well. it is just watching a film. i thought i would share that with you this morning. the scottish national party will launch their election manifesto later today. the party hopes its promises will persuade people in scotla nd promises will persuade people in scotland to vote for them. our reporter, john kay, has been to stirling, and found that although independence and brexit are important, they are not the only issues that people will be voting on. don't be fooled by the peace and quiet. as a battle going on in stirling. —— there is a battle going on in stirling. in the last general election, it was closed here, very close. the conservatives beating the snp byjust148 votes.
6:24 am
close. the conservatives beating the snp byjust 148 votes. this time, snp byjust148 votes. this time, uncertainty over brexit and scottish independence mean, for many, the choice is more complicated. like for and, at her first choice is more complicated. like for and, at herfirst zumba class, probably voting snp, but not because of independence. what sort of issues matter to you? what are you thinking about? i think local issues, environmental issues and local issues, developments in green areas, and things like that, and i think theseissues and things like that, and i think these issues are important to me, like, more important than sort of big issues. and upstairs, christine. after weighing things up, she made a very different choice. i'm going to vote conservative. i'm going to vote conservative, but i hope to remain in europe. but the conservatives wa nt to in europe. but the conservatives want to get brexit done. well, i am
6:25 am
a conservative that wants to not get brexit done. across this constituency, many told us that decision was harder this time, the issue so big and so intertwined, making the results so unpredictable. for every voter, it is a complex political calculation, working out what will happen in very different eventualities. in the former mining village of fallon, we meet gareth. he wants scottish independence, and will examine the snp manifesto, but will examine the snp manifesto, but will he be inspired to get up and vote ? will he be inspired to get up and vote? there's not a politician out who actually makes me think they know what they are doing. not one? not a single one. we are just numbers to them. we are just statistics. turnout will be crucial in stirling. which party can mobilise its supporters on a dark december day? this would be the eighth time keir could have gone to
6:26 am
the polls since 2018? of those eight opportunities, how many times have you voted? i think! have opportunities, how many times have you voted? i think i have an inverted once or twice. it is one of those things, you are going to get fed out hearing about politics all the time. at the auction, one of the busiest days of the season —— fed up.1 busiest days of the season —— fed up. 1 million sheep are sold here every year, up. 1 million sheep are sold here every yea r, to up. 1 million sheep are sold here every year, to businesses right across the uk, and into europe. with that in mind, these married hill farmers hope the election will give them some answers, and stop life feeling like a certain movie. that's what it feels like, groundhog day. so it will be good to really get moving and know where we are going, whether we are leaving or staying. what does that mean for you for business? well, hopefully we will get a clearer future. back at the gym, alison needs to clear her head. confused by brexit and conflicted over independence. there are so many
6:27 am
different possibilities and choices. they seem endless. ifeel quite personally overwhelmed by it all. i just don't know what to vote for, to be honest. two weeks to go. john kay, bbc news, stirling. two weeks indeed. we will keep you up—to—date with everything that happens. you are watching breakfast from bbc. still to come on the programme this morning: hisjourney back to tennis has been an emotional one. andy murray has been speaking to sally about his rehabilitation in a rather strange location. they were locked in an escape room together. right now the news, travel and the weather wherever you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm sonja jessup. talks are being held later aimed at preventing a month of rail strikes by guards on south western railway. members of the rmt union are due to walk out from monday over a long—running dispute about the role of guards. if it goes ahead, commuters
6:28 am
in and out of waterloo have been warned they face 27 days of severe disruption. a food bank charity is predicting this christmas will be its busiest ever, as more londoners rely on its help. the trussell trust says it handed out a record number of emergency food parcels last december, and has seen a jump in the number of people in crisis this year. now, are children becoming brainier? the number of under—11—year—olds joining the high-iq society mensa has risen by more than half in the last five years. more than 300 are now members, which mensa says means their iq is in the top 2% of the population. they includejiya, from pinner, who scored the top mark in her test. i looked around and everyone was so much older than me, and i got a bit worried, like, what are in the right place, was i supposed to do this? but when the test came, i just did
6:29 am
my best, and it turned out that i did pretty good. yes, it is a long 2.5 hour test, but it isjust a 2.5 hour test, and if the results come out fair, it will give a huge boost to your child. thousands of cherry trees gifted from japan are to be planted across london. a ceremony is being held in regents park today. the idea is to teach us more about japanese culture and celebrate the country's relationship with the uk. let's take a look at the travel situation now. the tube is all looking good so far. no reported problems on any of those lines there. a watermain has burst in willesden green. staverton road is closed. and this is how the a13 looks. usual rush hour build—up heading into central london through dagenham. now the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. it is a mild start this morning. temperature is largely
6:30 am
in double figures celsius. there's a lot of cloud, though, and quite a bit of rain as well. it's a damp start to the day, and will remain quite breezy as well. now, the rain, the heaviest of which is clearing away northwards through the morning, turning more showery in its wake. some brighter and drier spells, but those showers potentially could merge together and produce some longer spells of rain. temperatures today getting up to 12 celsius, despite the cloud and the rain. now, overnight, still some showers at first but gradually clearing. we'll get a drier spell ahead of more rain and cloud sinking south as we had through the early hours and into thursday morning. temperatures overnight cooler than last night, between five and seven celsius. now, that cloud and rain continues to move south through the course of thursday. becoming rather wet, the temperature staying mild. that clears. it is a cold front. 0nce temperature staying mild. that clears. it is a cold front. once it does, the sky clears, the temperature drops. so a chilly night into friday morning, but then we have clear skies. plenty of sunshine, finally, friday, but getting much colder. that's all from me for now.
6:31 am
i'm back in around half an hour. back to dan and louise. bye for now. the good morning, bbc breakfast. a reminder of what we have on the programme will dub an exclusive interview this morning with the writer and director of blue story. it isa writer and director of blue story. it is a controversial decision you would have seen over the weekend about pulling that film from all —— from lots of cinemas. but rapman will be with us. teriyaki vegetables are in, chicken nuggets are out. we are in, chicken nuggets are out. we are hearing from owners from one nursery who have introduced a vegan only menu. and the barefoot runner who ran the equivalent of 90 marathons across britain will be here. in no shoes, just as a reminder that we will find out how she is recovering and what it feels like to be wearing shoes again. a
6:32 am
senior member ofjeremy corbyn's tea m senior member ofjeremy corbyn's team has said he should apologise during an interview with the bbc‘s andrew neil on television last night, jeremy corbyn failed to say sorry. the former defence secretary said the issue should be put right. i would say absolutely that we need to apologise to our colleagues in my own party who have been very upset to have the whole of thejewish community as well that we haven't been good at dealing with this programme. “— been good at dealing with this programme. —— problem. it is a shame on us programme. —— problem. it is a shame on us and it is something that i am very, very ashamed of something we absolutely must put right. the scottish national party will launch their manufacture —— ma nifesto will launch their manufacture —— manifesto this morning. the party
6:33 am
pardee leader nicola sturgeon will demand that any future minority government will need to spend billions of extra pounds on the nhs in scotland to secure the support of the snp. the writer and direction of film about gangs blue story will speak out for the first time in this programme this morning after criticising the decision to ban the film at some cinemas. the writer rapman has said the film has been wrongly blamed for the actions of a few individuals. the decision led to some accusations of racism. pc andrew harper who died after being dragged under a van after investigating a burglary has thanked the public and police their own of judgement overwhelming generosity, kindness and support. he died four weeks after his wedding was not three teenagers have been charged with murder. the bodies of 16
6:34 am
vietnamese people who are found dead in their refrigerated lorry in essex have been returned to vietnam. they are among 39 migrants found in the vehicle in october. investigations are continuing in both the uk and vietnam and several people have been arrested or charged. 0ne vietnam and several people have been arrested or charged. one of the first in britain to introduce an entirely vacant menu in this nursery. some parents have expressed concern following the move to switch their children to a plant —based only diet. they have worked with a nutritionist to create a varied and sustainable menu. and we will be speaking to the owners of that nursery at about 7:50. are you in favour? do you think a lifestyle is being thrust upon the children? it involved and we shall discuss. you know how to get in touch. are we seeing a new jose know how to get in touch. are we seeing a newjose mourinho, perhaps? refreshed, revitalised?
6:35 am
seeing a newjose mourinho, perhaps? refreshed, revitalised ? let's seeing a newjose mourinho, perhaps? refreshed, revitalised? let's ask again in six months. 0r refreshed, revitalised? let's ask again in six months. or maybe in three months. tottenham had a 4—to agree over 0lympia cost last night. natalie perks is reporting. it looked like business in —— as usual in north london. life must go on under mourinho but are spurs fans go to open their hearts? he will be fantastic for two years and then go downhill fast. at the end of the day, is our manager now.|j downhill fast. at the end of the day, is our manager now. i don't like jose moreno. —— day, is our manager now. i don't likejose moreno. —— mourinho. everybody is lovely when they come toa everybody is lovely when they come to a new club, aren't they? no fa nfa re, to a new club, aren't they? no fanfare, no big introduction, maybe this will be the rain of humblejose mourinho. 0lympia costs were without
6:36 am
a their name and the greeks had left off. the greeks were in dreamland and the north london is in a nightmare. jose mourinho's job was made easier due to an blue story mistake. —— and 0lympiacos mistakes up mistake. —— and 0lympiacos mistakes up the turnaround was complete with two late strikes. the first thing of beauty. numbers make forth courtesy who else? he promised passion and happiness, far bigger challenges ahead will test that period. harry canas now the fastest player in
6:37 am
history to reach 20 champions league goals and stirs up through to the knockout stages for the third successive season to mourinho's rain is off to a flyer but they had to do it the hard way. a great night for spurs but as we saw in nutley‘s —— natalie's story, it was down to a ballboy. he isa he is a very good ballboy. he is living the game and playing it very, very well. i invited him into the dressing room but he disappeared, i don't know where he is was a very good old boy, very good, really. meanwhile, manchester city have booked their place in the knockout stages despite a disappointing 1—1 draw at home. they will at least
6:38 am
give their travelling fans something to rememberfor the give their travelling fans something to remember for the 2000 give their travelling fans something to rememberfor the 2000 mile journey back to ukraine. manchester united defender max taylor has received his first senior call up 12 months after having chemotherapy treatment for testicular cancer. taylor who was 19 has been named in the young squad for the united's europa league game. he only returned to training in september after getting the all clear. with united already through to the knockout stage, legal and soldier has left most of his players imaginablejob women's golf in europe has been given a boost with a new partnership with the american tour and a bonus prize of £215,000 shed between the top threat —— top three players on the european order of merit. whoever leads the money list at the end of the year will get an extra £107,000. by the year will get an extra £107,000. by contrast, the winner of the equivalent prize in men's prize one a bonus of over £1.5 million last weekend.
6:39 am
we spent the same amount of money no matter where we go, you are paying for your caddie, your expenses, every week costs similar amounts so it is just every week costs similar amounts so it isjust nice every week costs similar amounts so it is just nice to feel like we are working so hard for more of what we deserve financially and it gives us something more to look forward to. the pulling power of roger federer shows no sign of waning. a record crowd showed up for an exhibition match featuring the great man and alex are variable. 42,517 people watched the contest in mexico city stop that is more than any other match in the history of tennis. federer has described it as a magical evening after winning in three sets. for context, wimbledon's a centre court has 15,000 seats and this is more than 42,000. incredible. record—breaking. people pay a lot of
6:40 am
money to get the likes of federer and some of the big names to those sorts of things. it is great they can fill a stadium like that. a spread to the tennis love around the world. totally. fantastic. the scottish national party launches its election manifesto today. that is all coming up a little bit later this afternoon for top we will speak to ian blackford from the snp to talk about what nicola sturgeon will be talking about later on. thank you for talking to us on bbc breakfast. 0ne for talking to us on bbc breakfast. one issue i wanted to explore with you was how the s&p will actually work with labour —— snp. in the insta nce work with labour —— snp. in the instance of potentially hung parliament was up positions have been shifting a little bit in recent days and particular in that leaders debate with fiona bruce, we sought jeremy corbyn and your leader nicola sturgeon not necessarily being on the same page was up in your mind, how would that work? of course we
6:41 am
would like to see hung parliament because we can really bring out incidents —— influence to bear in westminster. for us it is fairly simple. from the election we had in 2016, we had a manifesto commitment on the material change in circumstances like brexit, that we have the offer —— opportunity to have the offer —— opportunity to have a referendum on scottish independence, that we can choose our own future. what we are saying to the people in scotland is that this is about scotland's right to choose. we would say to jeremy is about scotland's right to choose. we would say tojeremy corbyn, boris johnson, or to anyone else, that in light of the people of scotland having voted for that mandate and the snp winning the election for scotla nd the snp winning the election for scotland again in a couple of weeks people ‘s time, whoever is in ten downing st, recognise it is for scotla nd downing st, recognise it is for scotland to choose and we should have that referendum on scottish independence in 2020. tojeremy corbyn if he is listening this morning, my very simple, don't pick up morning, my very simple, don't pick up the phone to the snp unless you are wanting to accept that the people of scotland have that right to choose. jeremy has always
6:42 am
supported a self—determination for countries around the world and he needs to recognise that he needs to make sure that we can have that referendum on scottish independence above and upon —— beyond. referendum on scottish independence above and upon -- beyond. are you concerned that they will be in agreement and they won't follow through? if there is an agreement it absolutely has to be followed through. the technicalities is the power to call that referendum at the moment sits with westminster. we believe that should be transferred to the scottish parliament. it is on behalf of the people from scotland. you have been firm on it being 2020 and jeremy corbyn has been a bit more vague. what is your understanding of the timing specifically? i look forward to sitting down withjeremy specifically? i look forward to sitting down with jeremy and specifically? i look forward to sitting down withjeremy and nicola and wanting to lock borisjohnson out of ten downing st. we don't want
6:43 am
them in there. he has to be realistic that we are prepared to sit down and discuss progressive politics but it has to be on the basis that this referendum takes place. passing legislation, the referendum bill that will allow us toa referendum bill that will allow us to a lack —— an act that referendum, jeremy has to recognise that has to happen as a precondition to anything else taking place. this is really interesting because he was saying not year 1 and interesting because he was saying not year1 and was unclear about but for you, it is 2020, it would have to be in the first year. i would say to be in the first year. i would say to everyone that is watching this thatjeremy might say something today and his position has changed in the part —— because of the past few weeks. 0nce in the part —— because of the past few weeks. once that election is out of the way and you have the harsh reality of, if he is trying to vomit —— the minority administration, he will have to rely on the scottish parliament. you talked about trying to keep boris johnson parliament. you talked about trying to keep borisjohnson out of majority government in westminster. he said that he claimed that
6:44 am
scotla nd he said that he claimed that scotland has been paralysed by nicola sturgeon and the f's mp over the past decade and talked about your leader's in a once—in—a—lifetime decision. is he right to hold you to account on that? of course not. if you find the wording of the referendum, if you look at our white paper 650 pages, nowhere within that did anybody talk about this being a once—in—a—lifetime thing and the simple fact is, we were told in 2014 that if we stayed in the uk, that scotland's voice would be respected. but crucially within all of that, our rises eu citizens would be respect that, that we would be staying in europe and voting to stay in the uk was the way to do that and none of that turned out to be true. based on that an investor commitment because that is really the fundamental point stop we have the power to call that referendum. is that mandate in the scottish for that mandate in the scottish for that referendum. westminster really has to respect that and boris has
6:45 am
got to respected. if i may say so, borisjohnson is someone i don't believe is fit to be prime minister on any account anyway. we again saw yesterday and i have to put it simply, he lied about the snp's position and said we would be joining the euro. none of that history. this is a man you simply cannot believe a word that he says. 0n cannot believe a word that he says. on that issue, i am sure are quite a bit of this will come up in nicola sturgeon cosmic speech later on the launch of the manifesto. i want to ask you about nhs funding because thatis ask you about nhs funding because that is something you will be talking about today tabletop spending in the scotland per head is the highest in the uk and you will be trying to push that out across the uk, but your nhs record is not great. if we look at just amd targets, you haven't hit those since 2017. -- a targets, you haven't hit those since 2017. —— a and e. well, when you look at our a&e record, we have a better record than anyone else. it is still not hitting the target. if you look at the
6:46 am
auditor's report, we have made progress in seven out of the eight targets. health services around the world face challenges, and no—one is denying we do. when you look at patient satisfaction with the national health service in scotland, it is very high, the highest throughout the united kingdom. but we are laying down a challenge to the other parties. we recognise that health spending in scotland is higher, it is £136 higher per person. we have more doctors per head of population, more nurses. what we are saying to the other parties is match the scottish government's spending on the national health service. that would mean that throughout the uk over the lifetime of the next parliament there would be additional spending on health of £35 million. it would mean that spending in scotland would increase by £4 million. we want to be able to tackle the challenges the nhs faces. and this is a bold plan which would see the nhs delivering in scotland, but would have benefits throughout the united kingdom. my message to everyone else's match the ambition of the scottish national party in delivering on health. there is one more thing i want to talk to you about. i am not sure how many of
6:47 am
our viewers are aware of this, but there was a leaflet which was going to be published and sent out in eastern button share, which isjo swinson's constituency, and it has been withdrawn and royal mail are not sending it out because it was challenged byjo not sending it out because it was challenged by jo swinson not sending it out because it was challenged byjo swinson and the liberal democrats and found to be untrue. with that in mind, can voters trust the s&p to tell the truth, when that was going to say that she accepted £14,000 from fracking company, in ruling on that it was said that it was false in substance, materially inaccurate and defamatory? well, that's a legal matter and i understand it may be the subject of an appeal, so let's wait and see. but i would simply say that the snp has been a government in scotland for 12 years. we have a proud record, we are trusted by the people of scotland, and the polls are showing us with a substantial lead against other parties. the question i am asking, though, is that the right thing to do? as i understand it, looking through what your qc was understand it, looking through what yourqc was arguing, understand it, looking through what your qc was arguing, there was no
6:48 am
substantial untruth. i was ok in election time to just main maintained there was no substantial untruth but we will be free around the edges? as i say, at the end of the edges? as i say, at the end of the day this is a matter of appeals. i don't want to get into the semantics of this. but i think it is the case that the snp are widely trusted in scottish politics and we look forward to getting the backing and trust of the scottish people in the election and a couple of weeks' time. thank you for coming on bbc brea kfast. and you can find out more about what each party is promising to do with our general election policy guide. you can find it on the bbc news website or on the bbc news app as well. also, to let you know, we are doing various leaders' interviews, and we are going tojust doing various leaders' interviews, and we are going to just have a look... that is how to do it. but while you are looking at that, let me tell you as well. we are doing lots of interviews with the leaders of the political parties. today it is the turn of plaid cymru. adam price is going to be here at around 7:10 a.m., which is good timing as
6:49 am
we have spent a lot of the programme in pembrokeshire. before the general election we will try and get all the party leaders in. is that your phone beeping away? it probably says it is time to go to the weather, with carol, which it is. good morning, carol. that text was from me, louise, saying hurry up! it is a cloudy, murky start to the day. we also have some rain around. we have clear skies across the north of england overnight, we have also got some patchy fog and visibility is poon some patchy fog and visibility is poor. particularly across parts of northern england. now, with had a lot of rain across northern scotland, a lot of rain across wales, south—west england, the midlands and into the south—east. the south—east seeing some heavy bursts just of late. and this band is going to move steadily northwards through the course of the day. falling on areas that have already had issues with flooding, so it is something we are keeping a very close eye on. as well as the rain, it's going to be windy. windy across cornwall, parts of devon, the
6:50 am
english channel towards kent. gusty winds, up to 60 mph across the channel isles today as well. but as we go through the afternoon, dry conditions across southern england and much of wales, with a few showers. there is that band of rain i was telling you about. by disguising embryo, northern ireland and scotland with variable amounts of cloud. but it is in the far north of cloud. but it is in the far north of scotla nd of cloud. but it is in the far north of scotland we got the rain, and also pretty strong and gusty winds as well. as we head on through the evening and overnight, we still have this rain across scotland. the rain across northern england moves bit further west, in the south, there will still be a few showers running along coastal counties. in temperature—wise, well, it is going to start to cool down. because in the north, we are going to start to pull in more of a northerly flow. and that is a cold direction for us. 0n and that is a cold direction for us. on thursday, a low pressure that has been dominating the weather pushes off towards denmark. the occlusion sinks south with its rain, and you can see we have more of a north or north—westerly flow coming our way. so on thursday, it's going to feel colder initially across scotland,
6:51 am
but it is going to turn colder across the whole of the uk as we head towards friday. they were on thursday, here is our occlusion sinking south, taking cloud and rain with it. still quite mild around this and it will still be mild in the south. clear skies follow—on behind for scotland, eventually northern england and parts of northern ireland. any showers on the hills of scotland are likely to be wintry, but note the temperatures. five to eight or nine, and in the south, we are looking at 11 or 12. by south, we are looking at 11 or 12. by the time we get from thursday into friday, our occlusion clears the south. that opens the doors to more of a northerly, especially down the east coast, and a ridge of high pressure builds across us. so chilly wind coming down this north sea coastline, blowing in some showers. in the afternoon, most of them we expect to be offshore. however front by then a fairly weak affair extending from the channel islands across the southwest. that will have across the southwest. that will have a lot of clout on it, the odd spot here and there, but for most it will be dry, it will be sunny. temperatures, having been above
6:52 am
average, will now be below average exceptin average, will now be below average except in the south—west. we are looking at a range 4— seven. except in the south—west. we are looking at a range 4- seven. it will be properly cold, won't it? be properly cold, won't looking at a range 4- seven. it will be properly cold, won't it? thank you very much. lancashire is entering the race to be named the next uk city of culture. we will discuss whether lancashire is actually a city later with ben, but you are looking at this context for us —— contest for us. we are talking about that idea of a city of culture, different to a european capital of culture, which has taken off recently. what we're talking about is a uk city of culture. they talk about liverpool back into thousand and eight, it became the european capital of culture, really kickstarted reinvigoration and revival on merseyside. it led to 10 million extra visits of people to the city, generating more than £750 million for the local economy. so it was really seen as a driver of that
6:53 am
regeneration. so back into thousand nine, the government decided it would announce a uk version of this, where just would announce a uk version of this, wherejust uk would announce a uk version of this, where just uk cities were eligible. and it means that one uk city gets to hold the title every four years. now, doesn't provide the same level of funding as the european one, but nonetheless it really puts it on the map, puts it in the spotlight for those four years, and gives it a bit ofa those four years, and gives it a bit of a boost. so if you look at some of a boost. so if you look at some of the ones that have held this title in the past, derrey, londonderry, when the first contest backin londonderry, when the first contest back in 2013. whole's turn in 2017, and in 2021 it will be coventry‘s turn. these are the ones we have had so far. so back in 2013, hull in 2017, and in 2021 it will be cove ntry‘s 2017, and in 2021 it will be coventry‘s turn. attention now turning to 2025 and the cities which are bidding to win the next title. soa are bidding to win the next title. so a lot to play for, and quite rightly, it is being seen as a way of giving these cities a bit of a boost. so just to talk you through the difference between the uk one and the european one, as i touched
6:54 am
on, londonderry was the first test case back in 2013, and they found that for every £1 of public money they got £5 back extra visits, and that sort of thing. it got 1 million extra tourists and helped create wealth. whole put on all sorts of events, including actually hosting the final of the prestigious turner prize for art at the end of that year. so this is what some people in hull told us about a year as the city of culture. honestly, you put some money into that, makes london look like nothing. i have lived in hull for73 years. has never been a year like this? no, never. remax people coming from out of town are saying to you know, it is not likely thought it was going to be. it is actually brilliant. a report last year found a report last yearfound it attracted £250 million in investment. so they do think the numbers hold up afterwards. and it is not just about the
6:55 am
numbers hold up afterwards. and it is notjust about the money, it is about anything else as well. have a listen. we have some important positives in the area of the external image of the area of the external image of the city, through an analysis of media coverage, national media coverage. we have noticed that there has been a weakening of the presence of the more negative narratives about the city, and an increase in positive narratives, including narratives about the cultural life, cultural assets, of how. so that's how, who is up next? so coventry 2021 is next, they will use their time coventry 2021 is next, they will use theirtime in coventry 2021 is next, they will use their time in the spotlight to raise their time in the spotlight to raise the profile of the city, cultural events, all that sort of thing, and as we said, lancashire wants the title in 2025. so all to play for. lots of competition, we should say, but it is lancashire day to day, so really bidding for it. happy lancashire day. as much as i enjoy lancashire, it is not a city, is it? so how do you become a city of culture if you are not a city? it is
6:56 am
true, of course it is. just to be really clear, you are allowed to bid for it. this would be the first time a county has bid for it, rather than a county has bid for it, rather than a city, just to be clear on that. what lancashire wants to do is focus on sort of rural culture. but they are allowed to apply because their bid contains one or two or more than one or two big urban centres. so it is about a sort of collective bed of the cities within lancashire rather than a specific city on its own. but we should say tough competition, bradford, luton, cheltenham, chelmsford, medway in kent and northeast all bidding for it. a bit of competition, so lancashire doing a sort of collective bed. of competition, so lancashire doing a sort of collective bedlj of competition, so lancashire doing a sort of collective bed. i remember i was a sort of collective bed. i remember iwas in a sort of collective bed. i remember i was in liverpool when it was given european capital of culture and the excitement it brought to the city was really something palpable. and you can dismiss these things quite easily as a few headlines and it works for the tourist literature and that sort of thing, but it really does make a difference. if you look at the example of londonderry, for every £1 of public money that was
6:57 am
spent got £5 back, so it really does make a difference. so all to play for. good luck, everyone. loads coming up on the programme. still to come on the programme this morning: his journey back to tennis has been an emotional one. you might have heard about this film blue story, about gang culture, it was on at cinema over the weekend, and vue cinemas said they are not going to show this film in any of their cinemas across the uk. we will speak to the writer and director, rapman, of that film. lots of other cinemas are showing it. we will talk to them about that. time now to get the news, travel and weather. good morning from bbc london. talks are being held later aimed at preventing a month of rail strikes by guards on south western railway. members of the rmt union are due to walk out from monday over a long—running dispute about the role of guards. if it goes ahead, commuters in and out of waterloo have been
6:58 am
warned they face 27 days of severe disruption. a food bank charity is predicting this christmas will be its busiest ever, as more londoners rely on its help. the trussell trust says it handed out a record number of emergency food parcels last december. it is asking londoners to make donations, but also put pressure on politicians on all sides to pledge to tackle food poverty. now, are children becoming brainier? the number of under—11—year—olds joining the high-iq society mensa has risen by more than half in the last five years. more than 300 are now members, which mensa says puts them in the top 2% of the population. they includejiya, from pinner, who scored the highest mark in her test. i looked around and everyone was so much older than me, and i got a bit worried, like, was i in the right place? was i supposed to do this?
6:59 am
but when the test came, ijust did my best, and it turned out that i did pretty good. yes, it's a long 2.5—hour test. but it's just 2.5—hour test, and if the results come out fair, it will give a huge boost to your child. thousands of cherry trees gifted from japan are to be planted across london. a ceremony is being held in regent's park today. the idea is to teach us more about japanese culture and celebrate the country's relationship with the uk. let's take a look at the travel situation now. the tube is all looking good so far. no reported problmes on any of those lines there. —— problems. a watermain has burst in willesden green. staverton road is closed. and this is how the a13 looks. usual rush hour build—up heading into central london through dagenham. now the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a mild start this morning, temperatures largely in double figures celsius. there's a lot of cloud, though, and quite a bit of rain as well.
7:00 am
it's a damp start to the day. it's going to remain quite breezy as well. now, the rain, the heaviest of which is clearing away northwards through the morning, turning more showery in its wake. some brighter and drier spells, but those showers potentially could merge together and produce some longer spells of rain. temperatures today getting up to 12 celsius, despite the cloud and the rain. now, overnight, still some showers at first, but gradually clearing. we'll get a drier spell ahead of more rain and cloud, sinking south as we head through the early hours and into thursday morning. temperatures overnight cooler than last night, between five and seven celsius. now, that cloud and rain continues to move south through the course of thursday, becoming rather wet, the temperatures staying mild. that clears, it's a cold front. once it does, the sky clears, the temperature drops. so a chillier night into friday morning, but then we have clear skies. plenty of sunshine, finally, friday, but getting much colder. i'm back in around half an hour. there is more news, travel and weather on our website at the usual address. bye for now.
7:01 am
good morning. welcome to breakfast. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn in a bbc interview says anti—semitism is vile and wrong but fails to apologise for his party's handling of the issue. wouldn't you like to take this opportunity tonight to apologise
7:02 am
to the britishjewish community for what's happened ? what i will say to them is this — i am determined that our society will be safe for people of all faiths. i don't want anyone to be feeling insecure in our society. # let me introduce you to tim, innocent, just 11 years old, lives with his mum. rapman, the director behind blue story gives us his first tv interview after his film was banned in some cinemas. cashing in asa banned in some cinemas. cashing in as a city of culture. now, it is not as a city of culture. now, it is not a city but lancashire enters the contest to win the title in 2025 stop so is it worth it and what benefits does it bring? jose mourinho's spurs look special in the champions league. tottenham come from behind to beat 0lympiacos and wreak the knockout stage. that's it, thatis wreak the knockout stage. that's it, that is it. how does andy murray relax? being locked in a room, of course. he tells us tennis is his great escape. no more chicken
7:03 am
nuggets. a nursery in chester has become one of the first in britain to introduce an entirely vegan menu for all of its children. good morning, cloudy, wet start to the day for many of us but it is mild. we also have some mist and fog. strong winds through the english channel and brightest guys. northern ireland and south—west scotland. i will have more in south —— minutes. starting with the main story this morning and labour leaderjeremy corbyn has failed to apologise for his party's record on —— tackling anti—semitism. in an interview with the bbc‘s andrew neil, he insisted he is taking rapid and effective action but declined to say sorry as nick adderley reports. reporter: mr corbyn, are you fit for high office, sir? labour's handling of anti—semitism allegations has been an issue of controversy for years, and it burst into the headlines
7:04 am
yesterday after the chief rabbi said there had not been an adequate response. jeremy corbyn said he had toughened up labour's procedures, but last night, speaking to andrew neil, he declined to apologise. what i'll say is this — i am determined our society will be safer for people of all faiths. i don't want anyone to feel insecure in our society and our government will protect every community. so no apology? against the abuse they receive on the streets, on the trains or in... so no apology? ..or any other form of life. some labour politicians have called for tougher action and last night a member of mr corbyn's front bench said there should be an apology. i would say absolutely that we need to apologise to our colleagues in my own party who have been very upset, but to the whole of thejewish community as well, that we have not been as effective as we should have been in dealing with this problem. it is a shame on us, it really is, and it's something that i am very,
7:05 am
very ashamed of. mr corbyn was also quizzed about his plans for power. he said the only people paying more income tax under labour will be those earning over £80,000 a year, but the party also wants to get rid of the marriage tax allowance, a tax break for some couples who earn well under that sum. mr corbyn argues those affected will benefit from other labour policies, like the real living wage of £10 per hour. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. alp political correspondentjessica parker joined alp political correspondentjessica parkerjoined us to discuss this from westminster. we will get to the snp ina from westminster. we will get to the snp in a minute but the reaction to thejeremy snp in a minute but the reaction to the jeremy corbyn snp in a minute but the reaction to thejeremy corbyn interview snp in a minute but the reaction to the jeremy corbyn interview with andrew neil, all sorts of opinions coming out after the half—hour interview last nightjessica? coming out after the half—hour interview last night jessica? yes and a lot of people picking up as nick wasjust and a lot of people picking up as nick was just saying on the fact thatjeremy corbyn did not apologise for this now long money anti—semitism saga for the labour
7:06 am
party. i think for some people, critics ofjeremy corbyn who think that he has failed to deal with allegations of anti—semitism in the party, his failure to apologise would be perhaps another sign to see how good his issue is. perhaps for somejeremy corbyn how good his issue is. perhaps for some jeremy corbyn supporters, how good his issue is. perhaps for somejeremy corbyn supporters, they will point to the fact that they say he has been campaigning, fighting against his entire political life. there has been a critical. launching their fate manifesto. 0n there has been a critical. launching theirfate manifesto. 0n tax, this interesting issue around the marriage tax allowance, and of course, jeremy corbyn and the labour party made a big thing about a saying that most people will not have to pay more tax can still get the benefits of lots of new spending on public services. free broadband. the marriage tax allowance, getting rid of it, that is a tax break, not a tax rise. nevertheless, i think
7:07 am
that concession from him will allow his political opponents to try and pick holes in it labour's tax and spending plans. and we are nearly end of one of fester week, fortnight, whatever you want to talk about it. nearly at the end of ma nifesto about it. nearly at the end of manifesto season. i hope everybody has enjoyed it very much was not the snp are up today and yes, everybody will be looking over their policies they have written down in black and white and see how well they are. the other thing people will be listening out for is what the snp might try to demand in the event of trying to perhaps prop up a minority labour government. you have been speaking to the snp's westminster labour in blackford. to jeremy corbyn, if he is listening, don't pick up the phone to the snp if you —— unless you are wanting to accept that the people of scotland have that right to choose. jeremy has always supported self—determination for other countries but he needs to realise that we have to make sure we
7:08 am
can have that referendum on scottish independence above and beyond anything else in 2020.|j independence above and beyond anything else in 2020. i think the labour party will say when it comes to this election, they are in it to win it. thank you jessica parker. the writer and director of the film about gangs at blue storybook speak out for the first time on breakfast this morning after criticising the decision to ban that film at view make cinemas. he has been wrongly banned because of violence. the starcity cinema complex in birmingham on saturday night, and a brawl that led to seven police officers being injured, five teenagers being arrested and a spotlight being shown on this film. you're my brother, i'm from the view. i only have one brother, and that ain't you. blue story tells the tale of two friends from south london who become enemies in rival gangs. we always have each other‘s back,
7:09 am
man — you know this. following the violence in birmingham, vue was the first cinema chain to withdraw the film. it said that in the 24 hours following its release, there had been more than 25 significant incidents reported in 16 of its cinemas. some have described the ban as racist. vue stressed the decision wasn't taken lightly and not based on biased assumptions. rival chain showcase also withdrew blue story, but on monday night reinstated it, and said additional security measures would be put in place at the cinemas where it's shown. the blue story director, rapman, says it's a story about love, not violence. he's told the bbc he was hurt by the decision to ban it and said there was no truth of any correlation between the violence in the cinema in birmingham and the film itself. let me introduce me to tim, 11 years
7:10 am
old, lives with his mum. the controversy hasn't done the film too much harm at the box office. at the cinemas where it is being shown, its already grossed more than £1.3 million and is number three in the uk box office charts. tim muffett, bbc news. # welcome to the blue story. and will be talking to rapman later on breakfast. it is his first tv interview and we're looking forward to speaking to him. the is really powerful. beautifully acted as well. we will be talking to and let us know what you think of that. the young actors are fantastic. the widow of pc andrew harper who died after being dragged under a van after being dragged under a van after —— while investigating a burglary has thanked the public and police for their overwhelming kindness, generosity and support. a memorialfund has kindness, generosity and support. a memorial fund has raised kindness, generosity and support. a memorialfund has raised nearly £330,000 was up he died just four
7:11 am
weeks after his wedding. three teenagers have been charged with murder. a nursery in chester has become one of the first in britain to introduce an entirely vegan menu. some parents have expressed concern following the move and the switch to a plant —based diet only pulled up the owners say they have been working with a nutritionist to create a varied and sustainable menu. another one we will be discussing this morning, the shepherd list pie stop we will be joined to the owners of that nursery just after 730 this morning. —— my critical subplots of you are in touch about this already. thank you for your messages this morning. —— sheppardless pie. how is it going to be today, carol?
7:12 am
good morning, everyone, we will be starting off with cloud and rain but a relatively mild start of the day. we also have some patchy fog extending through central and southern scotland into northern england. 0vernight we have seen rain across scotland and wales. the rain in scotland remains ensconced and windy conditions through the english channel. 50 miles an hour off the coast of cornwall and around 55 of the coast of kent but moved north of that, something drier through the afternoon with still a few showers. heavy rain and issues with flooding but for cumbria, northern ireland, parts of scotland, something drier until we hit the north of scotland.
7:13 am
here we have the rain and also quite strong winds as well. to this evening and overnight, we will hang onto this band of rain pushing a bit further west and hang onto the. we will bring in colder conditions and that will lead us into the next rest of the week. it is turning colder. louise is saying earlier we were talking about interviewing the major party leaders right across the uk. plaid cymru has made it clear they wa nt to plaid cymru has made it clear they want to stay in the eu. that is despite wales as a whole voting to leave in 20 the party's formed a so—called remain alliance with the lib dems and greens for next month's general election. while still fighting for welsh independence. we have been talking to the main pa rty‘s leaders have been talking to the main party's leaders and plaid cymru's leader adam pricejoins party's leaders and plaid cymru's leader adam price joins us party's leaders and plaid cymru's leader adam pricejoins us now. this is so people can hear about your policies and hear about you as well. let us start with that question. you said that a vote for plaid cymru will be a vote for wales to stay
7:14 am
inside the eu but that is despite wales, voting as a whole to leave in the referendum. i understand that. i think we have to say honestly what we believe and if people ask me is brexit going to help wales or hurt wales, have to say it is going to hurt wales. some of the concerns you heard about, reports 20,000 people waiting —— working out of ports across wales, what is going to happen to our agricultural sector? the decimation that could happen if we have a no—deal cliff edge at the end of next year. manufacturing base, absolutely essential for our economy. have to be honest. i didn't into politics to say what i thought people wanted to hear but what i genuinely believe and it is for the people to decide where they stand as well. we have to be clear and answer the question. well, where they stand, is it not indicated by the fa ct stand, is it not indicated by the fact that the brexit party top poles
7:15 am
in the european elections? the brexit party who are very different from you. —— polls. brexit party who are very different from you. -- polls. we did very well too. but they beat you, didn't they? if you look across, they were higher than the pro leave votes. now is the opportunity for people to decide in the next election. a lot of people, looking at the reality, not the kind of myths and all the promises that we hear from of myths and all the promises that we hearfrom 2016, but of myths and all the promises that we hear from 2016, but the of myths and all the promises that we hearfrom 2016, but the precise specifics, things that are on the table. people can decide. should we continue to leave on the terms that have been offered or is there a better option which is to stay within the european union and building up the welsh economy, not undermining it. and your view is to stay in the european union, but you are also for welsh independence. what is the sequencing of that? ultimately wales has been bumping along generation by
7:16 am
generation at the bottom of the uk economic league table. and we believe, and i think a lot more people, young people, the majority of them now believe in independence for wales. why? because there has to bea for wales. why? because there has to be a better way. there is nothing about the welsh people which means that we are somehow predetermined to poverty. so independent but part of the european union. you know, it is a complicated thing to do, isn't it, for starters, even if you have the votes to have it done. ultimately, the status quo is clearly not working for wales. what we need now is the power to actually improve our economy as we stand, so that means more investment. at the moment wales gets very little investment from the uk government. we need that infrastructure investment so we can build a platform for our economy going forward. we need to invest in the skills of our people. so at this election, we are presenting a plan to transform the economy of wales over the next ten years. ultimately, though, louise, absolutely. the solution to wales's problems have never come from westminster. they
7:17 am
can only come from wales. so we have to empower our own people, our own nation to actually change them. how are you empowering them, then, by not standing in all the seats? because you have done this sort of deal, haven't you? well, the brexit question, of course, we can't get away from it. it is at the heart of this election. it has caused this election. and we feel absolutely, if there is any opportunity of trying to avoid the disaster that we think brexit would represent for the welsh economy, by working with other pro remain parties, to maximise the chance of getting the highest number of pro remain mps elected, that is the right thing to do. let's look at the right thing to do. let's look at the sort of facts on that. the welsh labour leader has said in another referendum, and there are so many ifs and buts, that he will support remain. so they are in fact in wales, and according to that, in some ways, i remain party. so why stand against them? you talk about adding up votes. why stand against
7:18 am
them? well, because the labour party itself, the british labour party, is the party which is setting out its ma nifesto. the party which is setting out its manifesto. they have actually explicitly said we are not remain party. jeremy corbyn has himself been asked this question. in wales ata been asked this question. in wales at a slightly different. it is nuanced, isn't it? i don't think it is. you are either standing on the ma nifesto is. you are either standing on the manifesto of the labour party or you are not. you canjoin plaid cymru if you want to be a pro remain candidate at this election. so the labour party had a chance to actually say where it stood. u nfortu nately actually say where it stood. unfortunately they sat on the fence. jeremy corbyn, one of his great virtues is that he always said what he believed. he is a conviction politician. that is what attracted people to him. unfortunately he seems to have lost his conviction on the central question at the heart of this election, and i think that is a tragedy. one more question about independence. the polls show, and i know you probably have different poles to get back to me, but there is not a huge appetite in wales for independence. 0ver is not a huge appetite in wales for independence. over the last few
7:19 am
yea rs independence. over the last few years it fluctuates between 9% and 1596. years it fluctuates between 9% and 15%. there is not a massive appetite, is there? well, it is changing. the self—confidence in wales is rising. the football helps, the euros. but if you look at the young people, 54% now support independence. it is their future that we are talking about. and i think there is a realisation, you look at the chaos of westminster the last 3.5 years, many, many people are coming to the conclusion there has to be a better way. a welsh way of solving our problems. it starts in the next few weeks, though. because look no westminster government is going to solve wales's problems, whether it is labour or conservative. the only way we're going to solve wales's problem is if find our own way. a lot of it is devolved, isn't it? yes, and the welsh labour government haven't done it good job over the last 20 years. the problems in the nhs and wales mirror the problems in england. look at the fact that labour is promising
7:20 am
to band zero hours contracts. it voted against that seven times in the senate. so there has been a lack of leadership from the welsh labour government as well. we are looking to change that when we get an election in 2021. we looked a lot at the policies of various different things. 0ther the policies of various different things. other things, as well, because we really want to know a little bit about the leaders of the parties. many will know you are the first openly gay politician in wales to political party. when you came out, how difficult was it in those times? it is some time ago now, isn't it? yes, i came out to my mother on christmas day, when i was 25. i had set myself a target. but it was difficult. growing up in the 19805, it was difficult. growing up in the 1980s, particularly, section 28, and a very, very challenging time growing up as a gay man in a working class community. you have seen the film pride, you have seen a little bit of my life story. gay and
7:21 am
lesbian miners came to my home town. that was the first time i met out 93v that was the first time i met out gay men and women, and it gave me a sense of hope. because even in these dark times of negativity, there is progress. it does get better. i am here sat on the sofa with you as an out, gay leader of the party of wales. you know, we can make progress. politics is about changing things for the better, so don't lose hope. we can get there, and i am here hopefully as a symbol of that. and if there is a 15—year—old kind of adam price like teenager looking, you can get there. you can live a happy, fulfilling life and we can change the whole of society so it becomes welcoming and inclusive for us becomes welcoming and inclusive for us all. do you still receive any homophobic abuse? little that i have experienced directly myself. face—to—face? experienced directly myself. face-to-face? very little, but i can see that homophobic hate crime is rising in wales, like everywhere
7:22 am
else. and though we have made progress, dan, we have got to be vigilant. because we have seen hate of all kinds rising in the last few yea rs, of all kinds rising in the last few years, haven't we? so we can make progress, but the clock can turn backwards as well. i am interested because you do talk of optimism. you say that in the last 30 years things have changed in good ways. absolutely. i think we have made progress, certainly in terms of gay rights. but look what has been happening, and obviously the discussion recently in terms of racism, et cetera. so the rise of hate crime in terms of racial and religious minorities, and obviously the discussion of anti—semitism and islamophobia. so we have got to be mindful of the risk that we could actually move backwards, as well.|j love this quote from an election leaflet back in 2016. it describes you as an x factor politician, saying that you are once in a
7:23 am
generation, a politician emerges who stands alone in ability. did you have a say in that quote that went on that election leaflet? always get someone to proof read the leaflet. was it embarrassing? well, goodness gracious me. it wasn't my mother. she is very proud. they were trying to be helpful. but any publicity is good publicity, but that was a little bit top, wasn't it? it is quite something to live up to that. when you see that on a leaflet you think if this guy can deliver this... i am about to burst into song. and just before became an hour, you are a family man, as well, aren't you? yes, i recently became a father and it is as amazing as eve ryo ne father and it is as amazing as everyone said it would be. it fantastic. every morning, if i have had a rough time in the rough—and—tumble of politics, ijust look at his smiling face. he has
7:24 am
begun to say nana for bananas, and a leaflet ca m e begun to say nana for bananas, and a leaflet came through the door with my face on it, and the best moments in this election was when he looked at the face and said dada, and one word i am keen he doesn't learn is brexit. all the best with that. you will have to stop talking about it! adam price, from plaid cymru, thank you for coming and joining us. you can find out what each party is promising to do with our general election policy guide via the bbc news website or on the bbc news app. it sort of walks you through the various things you can do, choose your parties and pick the various issues you are concerned about and it will tell you all the information from the various parties. and there are various debates ahead, interviews with leaders as well, and we are trying to get through all of them on bbc breakfast. we have invited them all to come and talk to us on
7:25 am
invited them all to come and talk to us on the bbc breakfast red so far. —— sofa. families who have lost children to gun and knife crime are using music to help cope with their loss. they have been asked to come together as part of a new group called project ceasefire. breakfast‘s graham satchell has been finding out more. it seems to be happening all the time. this doesn't have an age, this doesn't have a gender, and this doesn't have a gender, and this doesn't have a location. it's happening to anyone and everyone. we need a ceasefire. singer songwriter cecil‘s track ceasefire has been written with the help of families who have lost loved ones to knife crime. the families have come together to form a group called project ceasefire. their aim is to speak with one voice and to help each other. and what i am trying to do is bring everybody together. it's so much better to be around people
7:26 am
who have gone through the same thing. a recording studio in east london. cecil is meeting two of the group. ricky webb, whose brother was just 15 when he was killed in manchester, and pete chesney, whose daughter, jody, was stabbed in the backin daughter, jody, was stabbed in the back in march this year. the impact of my daughter's has been catastrophic. i will never be the same. my family will never be the same. my family will never be the same. it is impossible to understand the pain that something like that causes, unless the pain that something like that causes, unless you the pain that something like that causes, unless you have experienced it. and that's why it's really good to talk to other parents that are going through the same thing. for me, it hit me very hard. i felt like ididn't me, it hit me very hard. i felt like i didn't know what to do with myself anymore. it was just i didn't know what to do with myself anymore. it wasjust hard. my family, my mum, everyone wasjust broken. it was just... family, my mum, everyone wasjust
7:27 am
broken. it wasjust... it was hard, it was really hard. # i am throwing down from the sky like a lightning ball. office for national statistics figures shows knife crime in england and wales is an eight year high. last week, a 19—year—old man was sentenced to 26 years in jail for the murder of peter's daughter. like the murder of peter's daughter. like the rest of the group, pete has been forced to think about the causes of knife crime, and the potential solutions. it's probable that the cuts police officers on the street is not exactly helping, is it? if there are more police officers on there are more police officers on the streets, then obviously this would be less... it would happen less, wouldn't it? i mean, that's an
7:28 am
obvious thing. i think nowadays, for the young people, it's all about building yourself a name. like, you wa nt building yourself a name. like, you want to be the biggest person and the baddest person, but i don't care. “— the baddest person, but i don't care. —— i don't get it. it doesn't really make sense. just... life is a gift. that's howl really make sense. just... life is a gift. that's how i see it. life is a gift. that's how i see it. life is a gift. you should just use it wisely. that's how i see things. it is really interesting, that, isn't it? and on a similar issue, we are looking at the film which was banned in 90 odd cinemas across the uk because of violence in birmingham. and the writer and director of that film, blue story, which is third in the uk in terms of the cinema charts, will be here on the cinema charts, will be here on the sofa to discuss the reaction, to discuss why he made the film. we both watched it last night, and to
7:29 am
try and talk about the message he was trying to get across in the course of that film. he will be back just after 8am this morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm sonja jessup. talks are being held later aimed at preventing a month of strikes by guards on south western railway. members of the rmt union are due to walk out from monday over a long—running dispute about the role of guards. if it goes ahead, commuters in and out of waterloo have been warned they face 27 days of severe disruption. a food bank charity is predicting this christmas will be its busiest ever, as more londoners rely on its help. the trussell trust says it handed out a record number of emergency food parcels last december. it is asking londoners to make donations, but also put pressure on politicians on all sides to pledge to tackle food poverty. now, are children becoming brainier? the number of under—11—year—olds
7:30 am
joining the high-iq society mensa has risen by more than half in the last five years. more than 300 are now members, which mensa says puts them in the top 2% of the population. they includejiya, from pinner, who scored the highest mark in her test. i looked around and everyone was so much older than me, and i got a bit worried, like, was i in the right place? was i supposed to do this? but when the test came, ijust did my best, and it turned out that i did pretty good. yes, it's a long 2.5—hour test. but it's just 2.5—hour test, and if the results come out fair, it will give a huge boost to your child. thousands of cherry trees gifted from japan are to be planted across london. a ceremony is being held in regent's park today. the idea is to teach us more about japanese culture and celebrate the country's relationship with the uk. let's take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube, thejubilee
7:31 am
line has minor delays. it's those faulty trains again. other lines reportedly running well. a watermain has burst in willesden green. staverton road is closed. and this is how the a13 looks. usual rush hour build—up heading intocentral london through dagenham now the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a mild start this morning, temperatures largely in double figures celsius. there's a lot of cloud, though, and quite a bit of rain as well. it's a damp start to the day. it's going to remain quite breezy as well. now, the rain, the heaviest of which is clearing away northwards through the morning, turning more showery in its wake. some brighter and drier spells, but those showers potentially could merge together and produce some longer spells of rain. temperatures today getting up to 12 celsius, despite the cloud and the rain. now, overnight, still some showers at first, but gradually clearing. we'll get a drier spell ahead of more rain and cloud, sinking south as we head through the early hours and into thursday morning. temperatures overnight
7:32 am
cooler than last night, between five and seven celsius. now, that cloud and rain continues to move south through the course of thursday, becoming rather wet, the temperatures staying mild. that clears, it's a cold front. once it does, the sky clears, the temperature drops. so a chillier night into friday morning, but then we have clear skies. plenty of sunshine, finally, for friday, but temperatures getting much colder. i'm back in around half an hour. now it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. some of the main stories around. a senior member ofjeremy corbyn's team has said he should apologise to the jewish community after the chief rabbi criticised how the labour party has dealt with anti semitism claims. during an interview with the bbc‘s andrew neil mr corbyn failed to say sorry. but the former shadow defence secretary, nia griffith, said the issue should be put right.
7:33 am
i would say absolutely that we need to apologise to our colleagues in my own party who have been very upset but to have the whole of thejewish community as well, that we have not been as effective as we should have been in dealing with this problem. it is a shame on us, it really is, and it's something that i am very, very ashamed of and it's something we absoulutely must put right. the scottish national party will launch their manifesto this morning with a warning that borisjohnson's pledged to get rex down is an illusion. the party's leader, nicola sturgeon, will also demand that any future minority labour government would need to spend billions of extra pounds on the nhs in scotland to secure the support of the snp. to jeremy corbyn if he is listening this morning, my messages very simple, don't pick up the phone to snp unless you are wanting to accept that the people of scotland have that the people of scotland have that right to choose. jeremy has
7:34 am
a lwa ys that right to choose. jeremy has always supported self—determination for countries around the world and needs to recognise he needs to make sure that we can have that referendum about scottish referendum —— independence above and beyond anything in 2020. the deadline to vote in next month's general election has passed. applications peaked yesterday with 660,000 people registering to vote. more than two—thirds of them are under the age of 35. the writer and director of the film about gangs, ‘blue story‘ will speak out for the first time here on breakfast this morning, after criticising the decision to ban the film at some cinemas. the writer rapman claims the film has been wrongly blamed for the actions of a few individuals. it was withdrawn from vue cinemas after a mass brawl broke out in birmingham over the weekend. the decision led to some accusations of racism. you are up—to—date with all the latest news and sally is here and i'm very excited because it is about now that we will see your thing with
7:35 am
andy murray. locked in a room which is my least favourite link to do ever! you remember last summer how we spoke to him about how he relaxed. he likes to do escape rooms with his family and has done quite a few. i was a bit like, that sounds like my idea of a complete nightmare. it was, actually. it was like a dungeon. were you working together? we were. we had to do lots of threading of ropes and things like that and finding keys. you will see it all in a moment, i can't wait for you to see it. and a bit of drama. he would have ever thought thatjose mourinho drama. he would have ever thought that jose mourinho could drama. he would have ever thought thatjose mourinho could bring drama. last night was his first time in charge. they really had to work for it. they were 2—0 down to 0lympiacos before two from england
7:36 am
captain harry kane gave them a 4—to victory and secured them to the knockout stages of the champions league. a great night for spurs in the end although moreno's side were helped for a quick thinking ballboy who got the place —— got the ball backin who got the place —— got the ball back in place. the kid is a very good ballboy. he understands the game, reads the game. he is not there just to look to the stands all there just to look to the stands all the lights or the scarves, he is there leading the game and very, very well. we asked him to the room to celebrate but we don't know where he is but a very good ballboy. very good, really. meanwhile, manchester city booked their place in the knockout stage with a seventh consecutive season despite a disappointing 1—1 draw. they hit back to get themselves a point.
7:37 am
but shakthar hit back to earn themselves a point and at least give their 300 travelling fans a momento for their two thousand milejourney back to ukraine. manchester united defender max taylor has received his first senior call up, 12 months after having chemotherapy treatment for testicular cancer. taylor, who's 19, has been named in a young squad for united's europa league game against astana in kazakhstan tomorrow. he only returned to training in september after getting the all clear. with united already through to the knockout phase, manager 0le gunnar solskjaer has left most of his senior players in manchester. take a look at this crowd who turned out to see roger federer. an amazing 42,517 fans in mexico. more people than any other match in history. better described as magical and one
7:38 am
in three sets. for context, wimbledon's centre court's capacity is about 15,000 so itjust shows you how small that is. tennis goes epic there, doesn't it? tennis goes epic. talking of epic, who needs game of phones? —— thrones. rememberandy murray's tearful press conference? well, he is back. i met him in a rather unusual location. done this sort of thing before. maybe that is for my fingers up nothing's happening.
7:39 am
dammit, we have to get out of here. here we are, locked in an escape route. this is not my idea of fun. you... i love it, i love it. what is this? i think there is a key somewhere. 0h, sugar. ithink in this? i think there is a key somewhere. 0h, sugar. i think in the last couple of years they became a huge grades and i heard about them and never tried them and then i went with my wife and a couple of friends and loved it. it wasjust... a good way to spend an hour. in the film, you talk about tennis as your escape. did you already know that i wasn't filming the documentary and talking that made you realise that? when i moved over to barcelona for two years which i think the fifth of
7:40 am
that, i was 15 at the time. 0bviously quite a difficult age to move away. i know now being a parent how difficult that must have been for my mum and dad to let me go and my brother was also abroad at the time. i know how difficult it would have been for them to let me go away and do that. what made you feel co mforta ble and do that. what made you feel comfortable enough to open up?|j didn't expect it to turn out how it did. when we turned up to film it, it was just as i had did. when we turned up to film it, it wasjust as i had had my first operation on my hip and i was expecting to have this operation, i would be back in 3— four months. 0bviously would be back in 3— four months. obviously the story completely changed because that operation didn't work and everything that went on afterwards. so it was not, it certainly wasn't planned like this. i really want to keep going but my bodyis i really want to keep going but my body is telling me know. how far have you come? you want to do well in all of the competitions but i
7:41 am
think that is maybe one of the things for me that i took out of these last few years, actually realise ultimately what are the really important things. tennis is very important to me but it is not ahead of my health and it is not ahead of my health and it is not ahead of my family. tennis is great and winning matches is fantastic but you have to realise when you have gone through the tough period and you get through it, what the really important things are. when i was watching the documentary, you reminded me a little bit of a boxer. do you get to a point in your career when you think 0k, can i do this ain? when you think 0k, can i do this again? probably after had the latest operation, the conversation i had with the doctor who operated on me because i was like, i don't need to tennis. i know now i don't need it because at the beginning when i spoke to her, she was telling me they were risks attached if i tried to play and there was no guarantees i would get back to competing. at the highest level. this was obviously difficult to hear but i
7:42 am
needed to hear that but then after three months when i was in no pain, i was like, wow, i am doing normal things and much happier. ifeel good andi things and much happier. ifeel good and i know that when i do finish playing, ultimately, iwill and i know that when i do finish playing, ultimately, i will be fine which is probably something i had worried about in the past, that if i stopped, what will i do with myself and what would i do without tennis so actually i got to see what my life would be like after tennis in these last six or seven months and it was great. ijust these last six or seven months and it was great. i just feel like there is such a long way to go. your team and your family, just the most incredible support. they are with me every day trying to help me, get me back on the course, competing again, trying to get me out of pain. and yeah, wejust trying to get me out of pain. and yeah, we just didn't get anywhere, really. we didn't get there and i am sure it must have been really difficult for them as well which at the time, i didn't appreciate enough. you are obviously at home
7:43 am
quite a lot, working on your rehab, working, working, working all the time on your fitness. did you ever peak you might have got under kim's feet at the time? a little bit? that has been the nicest thing about the last few years that actually i got to spend lots of time at home with the youngest boy and i got to be there for a few weeks whereas usually, we are always off travelling and training and all over the world but actually got to spend a lot of time with my second daughter when she was young growing up daughter when she was young growing up and got to build a great relationship with her which otherwise is i've —— if i was off playing, you don't get that same amount of time with them. i don't know what my wife would say, if she would rather have me out of the house. ok, i think would rather have me out of the house. ok, ithink that would rather have me out of the house. ok, i think that moves. would rather have me out of the house. ok, ithink that moves. how does it move? are you happy to do this? just watch the hit, 0k? are you ready? trust me. don't touch anything, knee down. 0h! wow, you're
7:44 am
ina anything, knee down. 0h! wow, you're in a different room. how are you going to get through here? hang on. yes. look at that. there we go. what's in here? 0h, yes. look at that. there we go. what's in here? oh, there is a dragon! it appears we are locked in. sorry. i feel like i've dragon! it appears we are locked in. sorry. ifeel like i've let dragon! it appears we are locked in. sorry. i feel like i've let you down. thank you anyway. we did our best. no, we didn't get out. you have let the entire breakfast team down. he did say, "i'm a bit disappointed in you". he was quite relaxed. he not only enjoys your company but he really enjoyed that atmosphere. he loves the escape room full of it is rare to see him speaking so openly, just about all aspects of tennis and life and
7:45 am
everything. and the key to all of thatis everything. and the key to all of that is actually he has realised with the break from tennis life is going to be ok when he stops. that is what he is saying. he seems genuinely... he is happy to keep going to stop the documentary is great. hiller went to america to learn brea kdancing which great. hiller went to america to learn breakdancing which apparently strengthens your hips and pelvis was not video itself launches on prime video on friday. i like him saying it might be better if he stayed in there. i was quite scared about that. carol is going to look at the morning's weather. it was a great watch, that. it certainly was, i bet andy loved being in there with sally. watch out for some patchy fog, especially across central and southern scotland and northern england. visibility is still quite poor. and to start the day, anyway, it is quite cloudy and
7:46 am
we got some outbreaks of rain. now, on the radar picture you can see a fair bit of rain across south—east england, and some of that has been heavy. we've also got ran across northern scotland, and we've also got some showery outbreaks of rain across wales southern england. through the course of the day, the rain in the south—east is going to drift further northwards, following the areas where we have already had issues with flooding. as we come further south, it is going to be a windy day through the english channel, gusting about 50, 55 mph in cornwall and kent, up to 60 mph across the channel islands. they will also be a few showers, but not as wet for some as it was this morning. and then you can see a fair bit of rain moving across northern england. cumbria saying largely dry, the same for northern ireland and much of scotland although there will beafair much of scotland although there will be a fair bit of cloud at times, and across the western and northern isles and the northern highlands we're looking at further outbreaks of rain, and also strong winds, gusting 40, 45 mph. through this evening and overnight we hang onto this rain. if anything it drifts a
7:47 am
little bit further west. we also hang onto the rain across scotland, but the wind subtly changes direction to more of a north—westerly. it is a colder direction, but it hangs on in the southis direction, but it hangs on in the south is more of a westerly, so that is not as cold direction. tomorrow we have low pressure which was driving our weather today pushing off into the near continent. this occlusion sinking southwards. behind it, that is where we are pulling in the cold air. so initially it will be across scotland, and we still do have that rain, don't forget, coming south. so here it is, we start the day with rain moving out of scotland and northern ireland and across england and also wales. a straight northerly, it will be cold. a few showers, they will be wintry in the tops of the hills, but equally dry weather and a fair bit of sunshine for scotland, northern england and parts of northern ireland. come south, where we got the weather front, we are in the milder air. we've also got thicker cloud and some splashes of rain. now, thursday into friday you see that weather front moving across all areas,
7:48 am
including the uk. down the east coast, it will still be cold, with a brisk wind, but ridge of high pressure still building in from the west. so this cold wind will bring in some showers inland in the morning. we think most of them will be offshore in the afternoon, but just look at this chart. hardly a speck of blue on it. a lot of dry weather, a lot of sunshine. in the south, we've got a week with a friend still producing cloud with some spots of rain. milder here, but cold everywhere else. cold, cold, cold. thank you. lancashire is entering the race to be named as the next uk city of culture, hoping to become the first county to win the title. here to explain all, including the geography for us, is ben. we're talking about the uk city of culture here. that is very different to the european capital of culture prize. but, in a way, that is where this all started. this idea that the city can really
7:49 am
use the profile or the headlines or everything to kickstart regeneration. so let's talk about the european capital of culture. remember liverpool in 2008? a lot of experts reckon that as the european capital of culture prize winner that helped drive lots of investment into the merseyside revival. they looked at the numbers and found 10 million extra visits to the city, generating more than £750 million for the local economy. in 2009 the government announced a uk version. 0ne city every four years would get to hold the city of culture title. it brings loads of investment, loads of people, and while it doesn't provide the same level of financial investment that the european one does, it gives them the headlines and it gives them that focus that they can really capitalise on for four years. so is their money on the benefits of the uk one as opposed to
7:50 am
european? yes, if you look at the numbers, it really does seem to pay off. derry, londonderry, won the first contest in 2013, it was hull's turn in 2017 and in 2021 all eyes will be on coventry. for every £1 invested they got £5 back. it got! million extra tourist visits and created 40 new businesses. in 2017, hull had the title and put on a whole year of events. kickstarted with a huge fireworks display over the humber. it hosted the final of the turner prize for art, and this is what some residents of hull told us about their year being the city of culture. honestly, you put some money into that, makes london look like nothing. i have lived in hull for 73 years. has there never been a year like this? no, never. people coming from out of town are saying, you know, it's not like they thought it was going to be. it's actually brilliant.
7:51 am
again, if you look at the numbers, really successful. £220 million worth of investment, and they think the numbers hold up even after you have lost that title. people are still really interested. it is not just about the cash investment you get. we have some important positives in the area of the external image of the city, through an analysis of media coverage, national media coverage. we have noticed that there has been a weakening of the presence of the more negative narratives about the city, and an increase in positive narratives, including narratives about the cultural life, cultural assets, of hull. so who is up next? next up is coventry in 2021. and then we get to 2025, which is the one that everyone is vying for. lancashire have thrown their hat in the ring, alongside a lot of others. there is some pretty tough competition. bradford, luton, southampton, cheltenham, medway, and
7:52 am
the north—east. the shortlist will be announced in the summer and then we will get the winner at the end of 2020. we will find out who is in 2025. you are right to point out there is a bit of a difference between a county and the city. but you don't have to be a city to apply for it, you are saying earlier it is about having a series of towns. large urban centres, basically. they have sort of said the benefit it will bring and what lancashire wants to do is focus on rural investment and rural benefits. so that is their unique thing, they say, but a lot of others vying for this title.|j remember extremely well, back in the day, when liverpool won european capital of culture, the excitement was just palpable in that city. capital of culture, the excitement was just palpable in that citylj think it isjust was just palpable in that citylj think it is just about capitalising on all those extra people being there. a lot of people here about things, we are not very good at doing those staycations in this country, so you go there, you are surprised how much it has changed,
7:53 am
and the numbers do hold up, so it is worth it. the first trailer for a special christmas day episode of gavin and stacey has been revealed tucked away on the bbc iplayer. the series, created by and starring james corden and ruthjones i last aired in 2010, with a new year's day special which drew 10.2 million viewers. here's a little teaser. jason, anyone? the table should have been set 37 minutes ago, and the plates are still at stacey's. 0h, been set 37 minutes ago, and the plates are still at stacey's. oh, my god. stacey! would you kindly inform eve ryo ne god. stacey! would you kindly inform everyone that dinner will be ever so slightly delayed ? we've been to meet the cast on the set of the new gavin and stacey, which we will bring to you on christmas eve. the show itself airs
7:54 am
on christmas day. how exciting. now how does this sound for a slap—up meal? hungarian goulash with chickpeas, butterbea ns and potatoes. teriyaki vegetables and sesame noodles with toasted sesame seeds. and aloo matar curry, that's potato and pea curry, in a spiced tomato sauce. this isn't the menu for a gatro pub but a children's nursery which is putting on a vegan—only diet despite some criticism from parents. let's talk to the founders, claire and stuart taylor, now. good morning to you. so why?” good morning to you. so why? i am passionate about childcare. i have runa passionate about childcare. i have run a nursery for 20 years and i have always strived to provide the best environment and the education that children need to be the best people when they leave us. and it became apparent over the last few yea rs, really, became apparent over the last few years, really, that the environment has been not taken care of, and i would like to be able to help that
7:55 am
for our children. they don't need to worry in the future about the planet. i want to be able to help that. so we decided to take the menus plant —based purely because of our footprint. we menus plant —based purely because of ourfootprint. we provide meat and dairy at the moment and knew that moving forward with a plant —based menu would obviously reduce that carbon footprint and would allow the children to be able to go into the world feeling happy and confident that there is a future for them. so a few questions. stuart, first of all, lots of people heading in touch with us saying first of all, what about nutrition. what about the fact that children need to have certain things in order to grow bubbly?” think it is absolutelyjustified, the concerns we have had from the pa rents. the concerns we have had from the parents. when you look at the plant based diet, there's early years guidelines to follow here for what we can and can't feed children. if you look at the first steps nutrition ‘s early years trust, the guidelines around that, you have the british dietetic association, they would all unanimously agree that a
7:56 am
well—planned vegan diet is more than capable of meeting the nutritional value. you can guarantee to parents that that is what they are getting, can you? in this particular instance, we can. we have followed the guidelines rigorously but we have also brought in highly experienced, qualified dietitians, so for each of the meals which will be on the menu we have done a microanalysis of the values within each meal and it has helped to shape the menu accordingly. there are quite a few people who will agree with you and say this is a great day to follow at home, but there is a difference between saying this is something that we do and saying this is something all the kids in our nursery are going to do. we are imposing our lifestyle and the children. we don't see it as imposing a lifestyle. we only provide a certain amount of food for the children in a day, so it is a case of you still have choice. if you choose to eat meat and dairy at home, go ahead. we're not to convince people to change their views. we're just
7:57 am
convince people to change their views. we'rejust hoping convince people to change their views. we're just hoping that what we can do will make a change. so many people getting in touch this morning, as you can imagine. 0ne says it is not the duty of school force a diet on children. what is your response? i think if you look at our response, it is difficult to speak to the entire country. if you look at the recommended guidelines, around 75% of their overall food inta ke around 75% of their overall food intake is the responsibility of the parents at home, so the challenge that we are seeing is you have removed choice. the responses choice remains fully within the grasp of parents. this driver is purely from an environmental perspective, and choice can be fully part of everybody's food world if they choose to do so. lots of people talking about the point louise was making about supplements and making sure all the nutrients are there. it has made some people quite angry, as well, as i'm sure you anticipated. 0ne says you should be prosecuted, you are deliberately avoiding many of the trace elements and nutrients that you need but plans to give you. it would be interesting to work out whether your carbon footprint really makes a difference, and is the food
7:58 am
not just incredibly bland, makes a difference, and is the food notjust incredibly bland, so this woman. absolutely not. we had a pa rents‘ woman. absolutely not. we had a parents‘ tasting session last night. you know, we would have done things differently, maybe, because our pa rents differently, maybe, because our parents didn't feel quite informed enough about what we were doing, which they do now. and i do understand people would feel a little bit perplexed about what we have done, if they felt it was an enforcement. but we're just to provide healthy, nutritious food in a balanced way. we haven't rushed into this, and we do believe that our carbon footprint... well, we know it is going to be reduced. it is quite incredible, as we have looked at the steps towards how we... how much it will impact. thank you very much for coming to see us, and thank you to everyone who has beenin and thank you to everyone who has been in touch. thank you very much. plenty more to come, and rapman, who has written and directed a film which has caused a lot of headlines, blue story, is going to be with
7:59 am
time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. talks are being held later aimed at preventing a month of strikes by guards on south western railway. members of the rmt union are due to walk out from monday over a long—running dispute about the role of guards. if it goes ahead, commuters in and out of waterloo have been warned they face 27 days of severe disruption. detectives have released a cctv image of a man suspected of sexually assaulting a young boy in his bedroom in west london. officers said there was no sign of forced entry at the home in ickenham on saturday, but that a man had made his way into the boy's room and attacked him. he ran off when the child said he would phone the police. now, are children becoming brainier? the number of under—11—year—olds joining the high-iq society mensa has risen by more than half in the last five years. more than 300 are now members, which mensa says puts them
8:00 am
in the top 2% of the population. they includejiya, from pinner. i looked around and everyone was so much older than me, and i got a bit worried, like, was i in the right place? was i supposed to do this? but when the test came, ijust did my best, and it turned out that i did pretty good. yes, it's a long 2.5—hour test. but it's just 2.5—hour test, and if the results come out fair, it will give a huge boost to your child. thousands of cherry trees gifted from japan are to be planted across london. a ceremony is being held in regent's park today. the idea is to teach us more about japanese culture and celebrate the country's relationship with the uk. travel now. 0n the tube, thejubilee line has minor delays, and severe delays on the metropolitan line southbound, between uxbridge and harrow on the hill, after a signalfailure.
8:01 am
a watermain's burst in willesden green. staverton road is closed. other than that, the usual rush hour problems on the a13. as you can see, its slow heading into central london through dagenham. now the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a mild start this morning, temperatures largely in double figures celsius. there's a lot of cloud, though, and quite a bit of rain as well. it's a damp start to the day. it's going to remain quite breezy as well. now, the rain, the heaviest of which is clearing away northwards through the morning, turning more showery in its wake. some brighter and drier spells, but those showers potentially could merge together and produce some longer spells of rain. temperatures today getting up to 12 celsius, despite the cloud and the rain. now, overnight, still some showers at first, but gradually clearing. we'll get a drier spell ahead of more rain and cloud, sinking south as we head through the early hours and into thursday morning. temperatures overnight cooler than last night, between five and seven celsius. now, that cloud and rain continues to move south through the course of thursday, becoming rather wet, the temperatures staying mild. that clears, it's a cold front. once it does, the sky clears, the temperature drops. so a chillier night into friday morning,
8:02 am
but then we have clear skies. plenty of sunshine, finally, for friday, but temperatures getting much colder. i'm back in around half an hour. there is more news, travel and weather on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning. 0ur headlinesjust gone 8am. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, in an interview with the bbc says anti—semitism is vile and wrong but fails to apologise for his pa rty‘s but fails to apologise for his party's handling but fails to apologise for his pa rty‘s handling of but fails to apologise for his party's handling of the issue. wouldn't you like to take this opportunity tonight to apologise to the british jewish community for what's happened? what i will say to them is this — i am determined that our society will be safe for people of all faiths. i don't want anyone to be feeling
8:03 am
insecure in our society. the director behind blue story gives us the director behind blue story gives us his first tv interview after his film was banned in some cinemas. cashing in as a city of culture. lancashire enters the contest to win the title in 2025. is it worth it and what benefits does it actually bring? jose mourinho's spurs look to special in the champions league. they reach the knockout stages by beating on npr costs and coming from behind. sugar! that's it! how does andy murray relax? being trapped in a locked room. the former british number one tells us tennis is his great escape. a cloudy and wet start to the day with many of us with patchy fog around and winding through the english channel but brighter skies today, south—west scotla nd brighter skies today, south—west scotland and northern ireland. more
8:04 am
in ten minutes. it's wednesday the 27th of november, good morning. the labour leader, jeremy corbyn, has failed to apologise for his party's record on tackling anti—semitism. in an interview with the bbc‘s andrew neil, he insisted he was taking rapid and effective action, but declined to say sorry as nick ea rdley declined to say sorry as nick eardley reports. reporter: mr corbyn, are you fit for high office, sir? labour's handling of anti—semitism allegations has been an issue of controversy for years, and it burst into the headlines and it burst into the headlines yesterday after the chief rabbi said the party's response had been utterly inadequate. jeremy corbyn said he had toughened up labour's procedures, but last night, speaking to andrew neil, he declined to apologise. what i'll say is this — i am determined our society will be safer for people of all faiths. i don't want anyone to feel insecure in our society and our government will protect every community.
8:05 am
so, no apology? against the abuse they receive on the streets, on the trains or in... so no apology? ..or any other form of life. some labour politicians have called for tougher action and last night a member of mr corbyn's front bench said there should be an apology. i would say absolutely that we need to apologise to our colleagues in my own party, who have been very upset, but to the whole of the jewish community as well, that we have not been as effective as we should have been in dealing with this problem. it is a shame on us, it really is, and it's something that i am very, very ashamed of. mr corbyn was also quizzed about his plans for power. he said the only people paying more income tax under labour will be those earning over £80,000 a year, but the party also wants to get rid of the marriage tax allowance, a tax break for some couples who earn well under that sum. mr corbyn argues those affected will benefit from other labour policies, like the real living
8:06 am
wage of £10 per hour. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. 0ur political correspondentjessica parker joins 0ur political correspondentjessica parkerjoins us from westminster. let's pick up on those comments last night and this failure to apologise. what do you think the impact of that is? well, look, for some critics of jeremy corbyn orfor is? well, look, for some critics of jeremy corbyn or for those who are deeply concerned about allegations that have now been around for some yea rs of that have now been around for some years of anti—semitism in the labour party, his failure to apologise and will be, to them, perhaps further proof thatjeremy corbyn has failed to ta ke proof thatjeremy corbyn has failed to take this issue seriously enough. i thinkjeremy corbyn's supporters would point to the fact that they say he has been fighting racism all of his life and perhaps point as well to the fact that he has apologised back in 2018 for the hurt caused to thejewish community. no doubt, it was a difficult day for jeremy corbyn after that intervention from the chief rabbi on
8:07 am
the very day the party was launching its race and faith manifesto. 0n tax and spending, which nick was referring to, this idea that we knew about already that labour would scrap the marriage tax allowance and how that would impact couples who are not necessarily or are not high earners, some would say scrapping a tax allowance isn't the same as having a tax rise. nevertheless, it will allow some ofjeremy corbyn by political opponents to try and pick holes in his tax and spending plans. andrew neil doing a whole series of interviews as we are here on brea kfast. interviews as we are here on breakfast. the snp, it has been ma nifesto breakfast. the snp, it has been manifesto and they have launched it today. manifesto coming to an end and they have launched their ma nifesto and they have launched their manifesto today at nicola sturgeon will launch an attack on boris johnson, saying he is not fit for office. saying if there was a hung parliament she wouldn't help the conservatives. the snp perhaps would help the labour party but there
8:08 am
would be conditions attached, something that the snp's westminster leader ian blackford has been outlining to you this morning. don't pick up the phone to the snp unless you are willing to accept that the people of scotland have that right to choose. jeremy has always supported self—determination for countries around the world that he needs to recognise that he needs to make sure that we can have that referendum on scottish independence above and beyond anything else in 2020. the labour party would say they would be hoping to form a majority government and wouldn't be looking to do any deals. jessica, thank you. more than 660,000 people registeried to vote yesterday according to government figures. it was the last day. more than two thirds are from those under the age of 35. applications peaked as the deadline to register passed last night.
8:09 am
the widow of pc harbour has thanked for police and people for their overwhelming generosity and kindness and support. a memorialfund has raised nearly £330,000. mr harper died just four weeks after his wedding. three teenagers have been charged with murder. project ceasefire has been launched by the father of the teenager who was stabbed in the back as she sat ina park was stabbed in the back as she sat in a park in london earlier this year. you could be as skilled as you like as a therapist or a counsellor but unless you have lived through it, i don't think you can barely understand. that is why it is really good to talk to other parents. in the next few minutes we will be speaking to the director of blue story, that film has been banned in some cinemas. we will be with him
8:10 am
after the weather on bbc breakfast. i have some fog to start the day. fog across central and southern scotla nd fog across central and southern scotland and northern england and the visibility is pretty poor. it is a cloudy start to the day and we have some rain around. at least it is mild. we have had rain across the north of scotland overnight and much of england and wales and some of it in the south east in particular has been heavy. this band of rain will continue to move north, depositing rain on areas where we have previously had issues with flooding. it is windy through the english channel with gusts of wind for example across channel with gusts of wind for exa m ple across parts channel with gusts of wind for example across parts of cornwall and kent, 50 file miles an hour but in the channel islands, up to 60 miles an hour. it will be drier this afternoon and some brightness this afternoon. we have rain in the north and cumbria and northern ireland and
8:11 am
much of scotland seeing something drier and brighter. a fair bit of cloud around. rain across the northern and western isles. it is going to be pretty windy. this evening and overnight this rain extends west in other parts of northern england and we hang on to rein in northern scotland and the wind goes towards the north and that is the first sign of things cooling down. temperatures for most, it won't be cold. as we head through the course of tomorrow, the low pressure that has been driving our weather pushes away and this weather front sinks south and we see northerly winds. it will turn colder but drier towards the end of this week. thank you. the decision to pull the movie has suffered from accusations of racism. the director
8:12 am
of blue story, rapman is with us. lovely to see you. thank you for coming. thank you for having me. we both saw the film last night. did you enjoy it? it was the first thing we talked about when we came in this morning. it is a powerfulfilm. we will talk more about the film later on but we wanted to talk to you about the controversy around it. when you first heard that vue cinema would pull the movie because of what happened in birmingham at the weekend, what was your reaction?” first found out about the incident byafan first found out about the incident by a fan sending me a video saying there is a fight in birmingham and they said it is about you. i thought it mightjust they said it is about you. i thought it might just be they said it is about you. i thought it mightjust be a fan. i got a couple of messages from a friend of mine who tried to book tickets for vue and he said i have been trying to book all day and it's not letting me do it. i tried to book tickets. i called up the head of paramount and said what is going on, we are trying to buy tickets and he said they pulled it. isaid, what
8:13 am
to buy tickets and he said they pulled it. i said, what do you mean? isaid pulled it. i said, what do you mean? i said over a fight? and he broke down the situation of what happened. isaid down the situation of what happened. i said because of that, they pulled it down from every single vue? what happened isn't even connected to the film. i couldn't believe it because opening weekend is so important and we we re opening weekend is so important and we were trying to make a statement not only with the message but the fa ct not only with the message but the fact that there is an audience for those type of stories, the bigger impact of the weekend. when we found out we lost so many screens and we didn't have many to begin with, i thought my legs were swiped from underneath me. we were doing really well. selling out screen after screen and all of a sudden, we have lost all of the vues. so much to talk about. let's talk about what happened in birmingham. we have seen the pictures. what do you think of what happened rather than the connection that it may or may not be... ? bringing a machete to a cinema is barbaric. ijust don't even understand that at all. i'm not
8:14 am
sure if anybody got hurt, i haven't been given details and i've heard so i'v been given details and i've heard so —— i've heard so many different stories. if somebody got hurt, that isa stories. if somebody got hurt, that is a tragedy. i don't understand why kids would bring a machete to a cinema. it is wild. vue had said there are a number of incidents at all of them are linked to screenings of blue story. they say there have been a number of incidents but where are the receipts for that? where is the proof, the evidence? where? the one that they are talking about, 0k, that was caught on camera. we live ina camera that was caught on camera. we live in a camera generation, anything happens and we will film it, the youth film that and you will see it. how come we haven't seen any footage of the best of these incidents? i feel that was just something to say to cover their decision, which already wasn't justified to cover their decision, which already wasn'tjustified because the incident had no connection to blue story. it wasn't in a blue story screen. people apparently was in line watch frozen, will we pull that
8:15 am
as well? so many questions. some of your people have been in touch with vue and they said the decision to withdraw blue story in its entirety was made on saturday evening on the grounds of safety alone. the decision is not, they say, alleged unbiased assumptions all the content of the film itself. they go on to say that we hope blue story achieves the success it deserves and importantly its message doesn't get lost. but do they really hope that it goes on to do what it deserves? that was the case, they would have reinstated the film. they say it was a matter of security. not that blue story has caused any risk anywhere else but why not hire more security? have you offered security as well? paramount have offered plenty of security. was this before the incident. paramount made it clear before the incident, they call them hot sites where certain areas are a bit boisterous anyway. in any of those areas, if there is any extra... because there is a lot of youth coming to watch this film, we
8:16 am
can help you with security. they could easily have taken us up on that offer. i wouldn't even mind if they would have said, do you know what, the offer is still a bit... not enough, maybe we will take it out from that screen. tim richards, the vue founder had said the company had gone to great lengths to talk to you directly and they say to no avail, is that true? after they got so much backlash on social media for their decision, they felt like their reputation was in trouble, so they figured if they do a reach out to me after the backlash on twitter, for me to say i spoke with them, it would take the heat off of them but isaid to would take the heat off of them but i said to them, if we speak, will we talk about reinstating the film back into the screens and we said we won't talk about that but we want to explain why we pulled it. i've read your statement of why we pulled it, as far as your statement of why we pulled it, as faras i'm your statement of why we pulled it, as far as i'm concerned, there is nothing else to talk about. as far as i'm concerned, there is nothing else to talk aboutm as far as i'm concerned, there is nothing else to talk about. it is really important to you that people go and see this film. we have seen it. explain to people who have not seen it yet why you think it has got an important message. if you are in
8:17 am
an important message. if you are in a gang, and you are living that life and you are rolling with a group of friends who are doing bad things, this film shows you the end result of that. if you want to keep a career as a gang member. it will really wa ke career as a gang member. it will really wake you up. you will leave that a cinema thinking twice about your situation, carrying on in this life that you are living. if you are not in that gang life, but you see the articles in the paper, you've never kind of understood what's going on, you can see how a kid who comes from a great time can end up on that side of the tracks. we watched it last night that it was the first thing we talked about this morning, we found it was powerful, the cast were fantastic but i am sure people have said this to you, they say you are glorifying gang culture. this is a film about violence, how do you respond to that? anyone who has ever said that has never watched the film, that is the facts. i've had not anybody say... i listened to the radio debate and it glamorises the film. have you seen the film? no. that opinion shouldn't be valid any more.
8:18 am
what do you think it is about? opinion shouldn't be valid any more. what do you think it is abounm opinion shouldn't be valid any more. what do you think it is about? it is about love. it is about what do for the people they love and how love can make people make the wrong and right decision sometimes. it is the choices they are making. there's lots of things that have come out of this, particularly for me, it was about how things can escalate and why they escalate. exactly that. it's all about the choices you make. if you don't have someone guiding you as a role model to give you their positive advice, the decision you make will literally alter your whole life. there is no one you look up whole life. there is no one you look up to say and do it like this, do it like that, so the choice could be fatal. what i wanted to understand from you is what is your... you know, there are no easy solutions. we talk about this kind of thing on brea kfast we talk about this kind of thing on breakfast the whole time. it is like that tit—for—tat, an eye for an eye and you can see how it gets out of control. how do we stop that do you think? i ain't got the personal
8:19 am
answer. it all starts in the school playground. and it does, you can see that from the film. if it was me, every time a kid is acting up in school, repeatedly being suspended, repeatedly in detention, they should mark up on a list and with that list, they should get counselling, they should get someone to sit down and speak with them about why they are they doing this. if you can nip it in the blood from the school playground, more than likely, you will stop them from ever having to pick upa will stop them from ever having to pick up a knife or any weapon. escalation is such a crucial word. when i was watching the film, so many times i was saying, don't do that, don't do that, don't make that decision. it's almost like i was trying to work out ways out of their situation for those various kits throughout the film. what it showed me was that for people in that situation, they see their only way out is to either violence or to eventually take someone else's life —— for those various kids throughout. i wouldn't say that is
8:20 am
the case for those in the film. are you talking about from the movie? for some of those, the mindset. you are trying to show that is not the right way... a lot of the mindset is, if they have an enemy they feel they are in danger of, get them before they get me. a lot of times these things can be resolved with a conversation. if there was a mutual party that knew both sides, it could bring them together and it could be results but if there is no one in the middle, if there is no one to make that phone call to say, speak to him, you speak to him, let's try and sort this out, it can just escalate. it can escalate. can we talk about you, as well? it is very clear from this film, we know so much about it and this is very much pa rt much about it and this is very much part of your life, you made different decisions along the way?” was fortunate, because the role models in my household, like, my father was a really strict, like, he's still strict! even though i dabbled in it quite a lot, he kept me one foot in an one foot out. i
8:21 am
would dip in it and get involved, but i knew i had to be back at a certain time or else i'm getting into another drama. certain times, when i was meant to be out there, getting into trouble, i had to be back at a certain time, so i would miss a lot of the stuff. that plays a major part in your upbringing, how strict... how hard is it at home when you have rules. if you can do what you want, i would have probably stayed out with my friends all night, getting into a lot more trouble than i did. you have poured so much of yourself into this film. when it has been pulled from various cinemas, does that make you angry, is that something you thought might happen in any way? are you frustrated? i never thought it would happen. literally, it was breaking my heart. i'm getting those calls every day, we are doing less well, that well, i did was doing so well, so well received, then to get pulled from every cinema every vue cinema, i couldn't believe it. those were the ones we were selling out the
8:22 am
most. i just the ones we were selling out the most. ijust figured, the ones we were selling out the most. i just figured, why? the ones we were selling out the most. ijust figured, why? why my film? not frozen, the other ones but pull out blue story. can ijust ask you one thing? you said you made the film not to jeopardise lives but to save lives, is that what you think it can do? you can definitely save a life. whether it is somewhat involved or someone that has the power to get involved and make the decision to stop the kids getting there but it can 100% save lives because the message will make you think, whether you are 12, 13, 14, 15. anyone who can watch this type of film, it will hit you. the cast are brilliant, where did you find them? i have to big up my cast and my director, isabella duffin. she brought in new faces. the biggest requirement was we get new faces and they are all amazing. you have some real stars of the future. they will be massive. thank you very much. certificate 15, isn't it? yeah. writer and director of the film, blue story, rapman. thank you for
8:23 am
having me. it is 8:22am. the scottish national party will launch their manifesto later today and the party hopes its promises will persuade people to vote for them. 0ur reporter has been to stirling, a seat the snp want to win back from the conservatives and found that although independent anti—brexit are important, it is not the only thing people will be voting on in a couple of weeks' time. don't be fooled by the peace and quiet. there's a battle going on in stirling. in the last general election, it was close here, very close, the conservatives beating the snp by just 148 votes. this time, uncertainty over brexit and scottish independence mean, for many, the choice is more complicated. like for anne, at her first zumba class — probably voting snp, but not because of independence.
8:24 am
what sort of issues matter to you? what are you thinking about? i think local issues, environmental issues and local issues. developments in green areas, and things like that. and i think these issues are important to me, like, more important than sort of big issues. and upstairs, christine. after weighing things up, she made a very different choice. i'm going to vote conservative. i'm going to vote conservative, but i hope to goodness we remain with europe. but the conservatives want to get brexit done. well, i'm a conservative that wants to not get brexit done. across this large, mixed constituency, many told us that decision was harder this time, the issues so big and so intertwined, making the results so unpredictable. for every voter, it is a complex political calculation working out what will happen in very different eventualities.
8:25 am
in the former mining village of fallin, we meet gareth. he wants scottish independence, and will examine the snp manifesto. but will he be inspired to get out and vote? there's not a politician out there who actually makes me think they know what they're doing. not one? not a single one. we're just numbers to them. we're just statistics. turnout will be crucial in stirling. which party can mobilise its supporters on a dark december day? this would be the eighth time keir could have gone to the polls since 2016. of those eight opportunities, how many times have you voted? i think i've only voted once or twice. it's one of those things, you're going to get fed up hearing about politics all the time. at the auction, one of the busiest days of the season. 1 million sheep are sold
8:26 am
here every year to businesses right across the uk, and into europe. with that in mind, these married hill farmers hope the election will give them some answers, and stop life feeling like a certain movie. that's what it feels like — groundhog day. so it will be good to really get moving and know where we're going, whether we're leaving or staying. what does that mean for you for business? well, hopefully we'll get a clearer future. back at the gym, alison needs to clear her head, confused by brexit and conflicted over independence. there are so many different possibilities and choices. they seem endless. i feel quite personally overwhelmed by it all. ijust don't know what to vote for, to be honest. two weeks to go. john kay, bbc news, stirling.
8:27 am
something else to think about. it is time to get the news, travel and weather wherever you are watching. see you in a moment. we've got more rain in the forecast today and tomorrow but things will improve with drier and brighter weather by the time we get to the end of the week. we still got this area of low pressure across the uk at the moment and around it we've got these weather fronts bringing outbreaks of rain. quite wet for many of us, particularly towards eastern areas of england. the rain is going to last into the afternoon, turning heavy in parts of lincolnshire and yorkshire later on. elsewhere, the shower is easing off slightly and becoming a bit drier, dry for much of northern ireland, central and southern scotland but
8:28 am
still rain in the far north. temperature is not as high as yesterday. we've still got the rain tonight affecting much of northern england into the south east of scotland. the low pressure is still there, only gradually moving further eastwards as we get into thursday. this weather front moving southwards. there will be some rain on thursday again, that is going to spread toward southern parts after a dry and bright start in the south, the cloud increasing. eventually some sunny weather coming across scotla nd some sunny weather coming across scotland and the far north of england but temperatures dropping away. that cold air in the north will gradually move to most parts on friday, just accept the far south—west of england where they will still be a bit more cloud and one or two spots of rain on friday. elsewhere frost in the morning across northern areas, lots of sunshine throughout the day and a much drier day. those temperatures
8:29 am
will take quite a big dip, 5—7, a chilly day on friday. keeping that chilly day on friday. keeping that chilly weather this weekend, sunshine on saturday but rain spreading into the south—west, dry for many during sunday but temperatures about 4—7.
8:30 am
this is worklife from bbc news with sally bundock and karin giannone. the ugly side of the beauty industry, as a leading body in the uk claims bullying is rife within the industry. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday the 27th of november. in an exclusive interview with the bbc, the british beauty council says workers are suffering from a wide range of issues, from name calling to psychological abuse. also in the programme. trouble at softbank, as the japanese giant fails to woo investors for its new fund.

71 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on